How do you remove your wine capsules?

How do you like removing capsules from your wine bottles?

  • Traditional: Cutting around the top of the capsule and removing only a small piece (wine key blade or capsule cutter - the way it’s done in a restaurant).
  • Up the neck: Using the wine key blade or knife, slice up the entire side and remove the capsule.
  • Pull it off: Grab the capsule and pull it straight off.
  • Barbarian: Twist the corkscrew straight through the capsule and pull the cork through the capsule :flushed:
  • I only use port tongs
  • I only drink screw caps
  • Shoe method
  • Other

Personally, I am not one for the traditional way unless I am drinking really old wine. For everyday bottles, I usually just pull the entire capsule off unless it’s Italian, then I usually cut up the neck due to the DOCG tape holding the capsule down.

What about you?

at work: traditional
at home: pull it off

3 Likes

At home, I first try to pull it off. Otherwise, I use a capsule cutter I got at a winery 25 years ago.

1 Like

Unless there’s sturdy tape or wax: Pull it off.
If tape: “Up the neck” or traditional, depending on setting and mood.
If wax: Use wine key blade to try cutting off portion of wax at the neck opening; if that’s difficult, twist corkscrew through wax & pull through.

2 Likes

Traditional.

If I have a capsule cutter at least. Then it’s so easy, why even think about trying anything else.

2 Likes

I first try to pull it off but if it’s being stubborn it’s up the neck she goes.

1 Like

+1
About 40% are loose enough to yank off with a little twist
Otherwise cut it up the neck.

I have a capsule cutter but rarely use it.

Of course, more and more bottles are coming out sand capsules anyway

4 Likes

Tear it off usually

2 Likes

I try to pull it off and use a capsule cutter if that doesn’t work

1 Like

All Barbarian, all the time.

It even works with wax; just run warm water over the top of the wax to soften it.

3 Likes

Typically just try to pull it off, unless I care about how the bottle looks, in which case I’ll usually use a foil cutter.

2 Likes

I prefer to use a foil cutter but my cheapo one broke and I haven’t replaced it, so now I use the pointy end of the corkscrew to cut and pet the foil off.

Up the neck and pull the foil all the way off. Started doing this when I was opening bottles for a blind tasting and some bottles have rather distinctive foils (Far Niente for instance with their bright gold foils can be detected across the room) So all the foils cam off to prevent cheating.

Ha! true I did not include wax caps. Normally I hate wax, such a pain to remove.

2 Likes

Up the neck most of the time. I used to have/use a foil cutter, but it has been lost for a few years.

Wax is another animal all together and wide range of hardness and coverage, from a dot on top to a full half bottle dipped. Anyway, it is a pain in the ass. Warming with palm of hand then barbarian is always my first attempt with wax.

I used to pull it off but sort of prefer the look of traditional - I don’t use a foil cutter since that cuts above the lip. Knife on corkscrew, cut below the lip - pry top off. Rough/cut edge of foil hidden by lip.

Up the Neck method with a minor variation- I slip the tip of the corkscrew worm under the foil down on the bottle’s neck and cut/tear the foil. Then grab one of those foil ends and peel it off.

1 Like

I try to pull it off first. If that doesn’t work, I slice up the neck. I used to go traditional, but was having trouble finding a good foil cutter and don’t like the metal shavings I get when I use the serrated blade on my waiter’s corkscrew.

1 Like

Same here for any wine I want to decant, which is almost every red I open. If I’m not decanting, it’s pull it off first try, traditional second try.

Like Julian, I prefer the look of traditional, so if I’m going to save the empty or think someone else might save it I go traditional and just try to decant well without the advantage of being able to see into the neck.

1 Like

I just bite off the neck of the bottle, Berserker-style

3 Likes