Ten 2021 Falkensteins

Glad the notes matched, good luck keeping your hands off the corks for the others. If you do pop them share your thoughts please!

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Great notes and very excited about the 2021s; if only they were easy to find. Vinopolis posted a bunch today and they were mostly gone within an hour of their weekend mailing list email.

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Two days ago, Flor Wines posted on Instagram a lineup of nine different 2021s from Hofgut Falkenstein.

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On October 23, in Chicago, RieslingKenner has its third annual Hofgut Falkenstein vintage tasting. The event includes all 24 selections imported to the States. Click here for more details.

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Great thread as I cut my teeth with this producer on the 19’s.

I have purchased but not picked up the 21 ‘Egon’ - Any recent thoughts or tastes on it? Approachable early or forget about it for a spell? Thanks!

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Over the last 3 days I had the 2021 Hofgut Falkenstein Niedermenniger Herrenberg Riesling Kabinett trocken “Egon” #19

My impression:
Ripe (this impression grew with time) lime/lemon, touch of stone fruit and a hint of petrol-ish notes that blew off with time. Herbal notes, even more so on the palate. Ripe acidity and full throttle with focus and tension. Quite structured and gripping, yet delicate and elegant; long finish.

Would have loved the chance to taste the rest of the whole bunch side by side, but also a pleasure to focus on one bottle over time. Maybe the best would be to taste all side by side over several days :slight_smile:

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Thanks for your impression. Egon is tops.

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Tops it is, a pleasure to drink!

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On Instagram, Patrick Rauber announced that David Schildknecht will also be attending the 3rd annual Falkenstein tasting in Chicago on October 23.

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Just had the '21 Meyer Nepal tonight from 750. A bit shocked this perennial favorite isn’t mentioned on any post in this thread. My first thought is, wow, this is a Spätlese - and Feinherb at that? This screams racy Kabinett all day long. It’s like biting into a grapefruit or Meyer lemon. Loads of flavor, ripping acidity. Finish lingers nicely. I wouldn’t say it’s necessarily not ready depending on what style of wine you like. I did finish most of the bottle. But for me right now it’s a bit punishing on the palate, like eating Shock Tarts.

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Thanks for sharing your note, Andrew. Love the description, and it sounds delicious.

Given the vagaries, nuances, and leeway within German riesling designations, I sometimes think of “Spätlese feinherb” as short-hand for saying “this may trend toward Kabinett expectations, but with more must weight than a Kabinett and less RS than a typical Spätlese”. Your mileage may vary, but given the 2021 Meyer Nepal only has 26g/l of RS, your description seems to be in line with that.

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Maybe it’s because none of us can find it. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

So many Falkenstein cuvees that I’ve never seen or tasted… I have actually had a few vintages of Meyer Nepal (2019, 2020) and they were both phenomenal.

Anyone have any input on the new cuvee in 2021, Ockfener Bockstein Kabinett? It was markedly more expensive than the other cuvees offered to me, and I’m not quite sure why. I bought it anyway, in case it was really good.

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The minimum must weight for Mosel Riesling Spätlese is 80 degrees Oechsle, which is very low. The 2021 Meyer Nepal had around 83 degrees Oechsle. We could have labeled it as a Kabinett feinherb, but most recent vintages of this wine, including the highly rated 2019, were in the low to mid-80s.

That’s a good summary. In 2021, we picked some Spätlesen earlier and at lower must weights than certain Kabinetts. It depends on the wine. That’s why I disagree with critics who declare it a Spätlese vintage.

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Note: There are two different casks of 2021 Ockfener Bockstein Kabinett—namely, Schorsch and Mia.

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Oh cool, looks like I have Mia.

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Mia is the parcel with the old vines in Bockstein. Schorsch could technically be labeled as “old vines” in a year or two. In the 2022 vintage, I think that we will put “Alte Reben” on the label for Mia to differentiate between these two parcels in Bockstein. Besides, Mia has shown to be very good from the get-go.

In Euchariusberg, we only put “Alte Reben” on the label of Gisela, because the old vines are ungrafted. But we have other contiguous old-vine parcels on the prime slope, also known as Großschock, such as Kugel Peter, Förster, Ternes, Mammen, and Klaus.

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That’s very interesting information! I haven’t had the '19 since last year, and my note did say “zippy acidity,” but I remember it being quite a bit less puckering. I guess I’ll have to pop another one soon and check in.

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I left the last half a glass on the counter all night and sipped it today. It’s turned into liquid nectar. So much depth of flavor and nuance with floral notes, honey, apricot - nectar is the perfect word. Acid is still prominent on the finish, but it’s much less punishing on the palate. I think this is a wine to hold, hold, hold.

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Most of these wines are better on the second or third day open within the first year or two of release. So no surprise that that trend continues.

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