Barolo - Rising Stars

Clearly, Barolo is going through a “Burgundization” period amongst the top producers from its allure and collectability to, in some cases, eye-popping prices. Having purchased a few bottles of B. Mascarello, Giacomo Conterno, Rinaldi, and Burlotto Monvig. before prices hit the fan, are there any rising stars in Barolo who may one day hold a match to these greats? I’ve got my eye on Giulia Negri and Trediberri, but would appreciate your thoughts.

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Trediberri for sure!

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Since the production of wines in the Barolo zone has nearly doubled over the past couple of decades, there are many new producers to consider as well as more established, but unheralded, producers. Some that I have enjoyed are: Paolo Manzone, Raineri, Livia Fontana, Giovanni Manzone, Palladino, Tiziano Grasso, Burzi, Renato Corino, Fogliati, Elio Sandri, Schiavenza, Cesare Bussolo, Virna, and Marengo,

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The one I’m most excited about is a friend of mine, Tom Myers, who is married to Carlotta Rinaldi and started his own bootstraps wine project with the 2020 vintage, named Cantina D’Arcy. He’s worked in Burgundy and moonlights as a viticultural consultant, so the farming he’s doing is really exciting for the region. We talk a lot about vinification. As I said to him the other day, if his vinification and élevage are on the same level as his viticulture, the results will be special.

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William, thanks for that tidbit re Cantina D’Arcy. You reminded me that Alan Manley (of Cantina Mascarello) is now making wine under the Margherita Otto label.

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A new producer I made my 2020 “Discovery of the Year” merits consideration IMO: keep an eye for any Bricco Ernesto di Vezza Renato Roero Vino Rosso you can find.

Jonathan

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subscribed.

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Poderi Colla deserves much more attention. Sandri, Oddero and Giovanni Rosso are a few more that come to mind.

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A few that I like, but not sure whether they are characterised as rising stars or not are:-
Massolino
Marengo
Poderi Colla
Marcarini
Sordo
Fratelli Revello
Veglio
Ceretto
Luigi Einaudi

All reasonably priced (for Barolo).

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Galloni addressed this just a few days ago during one of his ‘Festa’ zoom’s. I wasn’t totally paying attention, but he said something along the lines of it being very different from other places where new operations start-up (think he mentioned Sonoma & Burgundy, specifically) as you can’t just lease vineyards or buy a barrel to do the elevage yourself and put your name on it, so anyone “new” is very rare in Barolo.

So, while not Barolo, I’d assume that Nervi Gattinara will follow that path with Roberto Conterno taking over.

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William, do you happen to know anything about viticulture in the region and evolutions there? I asked the same question on a facebook group but to no avail.

When visiting the region a few years ago, I was under the impression that the Barolo (on average) never went that far as burgundy wrt to chemical farming, automated harvesting, etc but I could be wrong.

These are not rising stars but believe they are excellent wines at fair pricing for what’s in the bottle. Their 16’s are also terrific.


Vajra BDV and Ravera- i’ve been back buying 14 and 15 and going long on 16
Elio Grasso- Case Mate and Chiniera. Recent 08 CM on par with the Rinaldi 08
Massolino
Azelia- new producer for me. I’ve only had the 16 normale but agree with AG this is a screaming value. Excited to try the cru’s
Cogno- the 16 Ravera should be on everyone’s list
F. Rinaldi- a recent 08 Cannubio was outstanding and the 10 normale is a terrific classic wine showing beautifully right now. btw, still available for $36 in NY. Just bought some more.
F. Allessandria- probably my #1 suggestion. The 16 normale is beautiful. I have high hope for the Cru’s but won’t open for a while.
Oddero- another terrific 16 normale.
Cordero di Montezemolo- a long time producer now made in a more modern style. The 16 Monfalletto and 13 Gattera are beautiful wines and the oak does not get in the way.
Schiavenza- another producer moving in the right direction.

Not part of the original OP question but I just can’t recommend enough loading up on the 16 normale’s for many producers. There are so many terrific wines under $50 that should only get better. We’ll be opening them in 2026 and wishing we had bought more.

cheers

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Bookmark. Thanks!

You should ask Tom! This is his IG for his project: https://www.instagram.com/cantina_darcy/

As far as prices are concerned, I’d expect Accomasso, Alessandria, Brovia, Cappellano, Vietti and Nervi to go up pretty much every vintage. For established producers whose quality I feel is on an upswing, Massolino, Oddero, Ceretto, E. Pira (Chiara Boschis). I would also argue that Sandrone is a value in my book and I could see his wines entering that upper echelon of pricing one day.

Sandrone should have entered that upper echelon after the 2010 vintage!

Jason L—. I am curious to know what your definition of value is. The average price for Sandrone’s 2016 Le Vigne on Wine Searcher is $229. From my perspective, cru Barolo under $100 is a value. And in that category, I would say Brovia (borderline value as prices are going up), GD Vajra, F. Alessandria, Cogno, Oddero (excepting their Vigna Rionda), and Massolino (excepting their Vigna Rionda). Not a drinker of Ceretto or E. Pira so cannot comment on their wines.

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Hi,

Good question. I was placing it in the context of the other producers in the OP that have all pushed into the 200-300 range. In absolute terms, no it’s not a value, but among its qualitative peers, I’d say it is. For me, I’d say I enjoy Sandrone Le Vigne often more than I do the wines of Brovia, Vajra et al. I’d bracket it (and its cost) differently. Also, I see listings of the 16 in the mid 100’s on W-S and previous vintages are available in the low 100’s. So while the average on the most recent vintage may be creeping up, it seems to still be possible to land it at a value relative to the Giacosas, Mascarellos, Burlottos and Conternos of the world. It’s probably also helpful to note that Barolo and Northern Rhone Syrah are pretty much the only categories of wine where I have no self-installed price ceiling. I allocate a disproportionate amount of my budget to those two areas. [berserker.gif]

Agree. I really liked the 2013 BDV and Ravera. Also, for value, the Albe can be really good esp. with age.

Is that simply because you like them a lot or is there another reason?