First Impression - Germany 2015

First Impression - Germany 2015

The word “century vintage” is forbidden to use these days, BUT I have to say the vintage 2015 in Germany looks thrilling so far. It seems everything is on the right place respectively everything fits perfectly together. Normally I am a fan of cool-climate vintages and not such a fan of fruity vintages like 2009&2011. But it seems that 2015 is the best of both worlds, which means we have a dense&juicy fruit and at the same time clarity, refinement, chill and acidity. Also quite accessible already which is good for restaurants and also showing a big cellar potential. Conclusion, believe the hype.

Thanks Martin. What types of wines did best in 2015. Dry, off-dry, sweet, Kabinetts and Spatlesen or higher pradikats? Any prior vintages you would compare it to?

Well that’s really exciting!

Howard,

Mr. Weil from Rheingau compared it with 1975 and a winemaker from Rheinhessen with 1971. I haven´t tasted the GGs so far, but the Spätlese and Auslese are spectacular and also the dry Rieslings looks promising.

Cheers,
Martin

1975 means quite a lot to live up to.

Martin,
So, moderate alcohol levels in the trockens despite the potential for high sugar levels? Or,is the acidity high enough to keep the wines energetic despite more alcohol than has been usual? Thanks for your post [cheers.gif] .

A 1971 or 1975 would be nice.

Joseph,

yes, the acidity is quite high in 2015 and keeps it in balance. For example, I had a 2015 Robert Weil “Gräfenberg” Auslese on Monday, normally I need some time to drink a bottle of Auslese, but this 2015 Auslese I could drink in 10minutes. In addition I had a 2015 TbA from Pfalz region 2 weeks ago, normally I have problems to drink a glass TbA, but in this case no problem the whole bottle. The high acidity keeps the alcohol in bay, provides freshness and drinking pleasure.

We are talking about 9-10g acidity.

Just for the record, a few days I received a freshly bottled 2015 Kabinett “Wehlener Sonnenuhr” from the estate Max Ferd. Richter. Here is the data:

Wehlener Sonnenuhr Kabinett 2015 - 82 Grad Oechsle, 45.9 g/l RZ, 9.9 g/l Säure and 7.5 % Alk.

Reminds me of the joke/justification I say to myself when I realize I have basically “chugged” a bottle of Riesling… They must have not filled the bottle all the way.

That reads like 2001 with slightly (a gram or so) higher acidity.

Seems like 1990.

Ive found the wines change a huge amount between the London tastings just after bottling and my annual trip in Septmeber. Some good tech numbers and early indication but too soon to judge IMHO.

Good producers will make great wines though no doubt.

David, thanks for providing context.

YES Russell, it´s a bit too early for a judgement. But I wanted to give a first impression. Of course, final judgement in autumn and/or in a couple of years.

Appreciated. :wink:

Since Martin’s Breuer Schlossberg post, I did see 2004 and 2008 vintages of this available in small quantities at Chambers St. last week, FWIW.

Thanks for your impressions Martin. Certainly, we will know more in 20 years, but in a few months the wines will be available for purchase. It will be a lot harder to find them in 20 years.

Luckily in the UK most of the top wines are available in bond (so reasonable assurance of provenance) for many years after release. I’ve been buying quite a few 96s of late for very fair prices.

I still buy most of my wines on release though, generally ordering the same few things and then tweaking a little after taking in September, much more reliable than the April samples flown in to London.