Chronicle: Some tasting rooms moving toward adults-only

Of course, this topic has been discussed/debated here plenty. The article talks about reasons for such policies, pro and con sides, etc.
My two cents: I seldom want to bring my kids to wineries because usually it’s just not fun for them. Square peg scenario. On the other hand, I have seen far more examples of adults than kids behaving poorly in tasting rooms.

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We’ve taken our kids to tasting rooms many times, and it’s never been a problem for the kids, us, or anyone else.

Especially these days, when kids can be on a iPad and headphones and essentially not affect anyone.

It was never that we sought to bring them to tasting rooms per se, it just allowed us to make a few visits while traveling with the kids.

If a winery doesn’t want to allow it, that’s their decision and I of course would abide with no complaints (other than if they told us it was okay then wouldn’t let us in or something like that).

I also don’t to the $100 a person Napa fancy places, either. Hardly any of the kinds of places I would go mind at all, and many are quite enthusiastic that you made the effort to visit even while traveling with your kids.

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Been tasting with the kids (ages 3-8) many times across CA (including Napa), OR and Washington. These days I’m making reservations, usually with less mainstream producers that I have a relationship with. Always ask beforehand, and offer to pay for the “seats” for my kids. Almost never a problem- even places that state “no kids” usually say it’s fine when asked. Of course it’s important not to ruin the experience of others, and screens go a long way, but I wouldn’t do more than 1-2 tastings in a day with the kids. I’ve even braved some fancier settings…the only one I wimped out on was the component tasting Phelps.