Calling all Pepe haters …

2019 Emidio Pepe Pecorino

Well this wine is not oxidized. It has oxidative notes. It looks scary as hell with that honeyed bronzed quality.

But it has lift and zip and such a weird melange of flavors that keep you engaged: underripe apricot, lanolin, dried tarragon, iodine and almonds.

(I’m not a laundry list of descriptors kind of taster but in this case it’s necessary.)

It’s broad shouldered but narrows on long finish. There’s this tension between the fruit and a pleasing medicinal note on end.

I can’t say it’s refreshing but you just need to keep tasting it to figure it out. Such a singular wine.

Do I want to drink this every week? No. But I totally dig a vintner following their muse like this.

A heady pairing with a Roman pasta alla Gricia (with my heretical add of a few strands of baby kale!). Would be killer with breaded swordfish steaks IMO.

This is strictly for wine nerds only. Not the book club!




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Have you tasted ‘19 Pepe Trebbiano? I love the stuff.

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It was the first Pepe I tasted and I loved it. 18 was a disappointment in comparison. Now I’m interested: Are the Pepe Trebbianos often like 19 or was that an exception?

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Drank an 1983 and an 1984 Pepe Montepulciano last week. Both had been recorked and were fabulous. Been diligently stashing both Pepe and Valentini Trebbiano for future consumption as need a stock given flawed bottle hit rate

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You are willing to stock-pile Trebbianos which cost over 100 Euros because the hit rate is so low? Geez… That is certainly a solution. :smile:

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When they are on they are on. Effective price for a clean bottle higher given duds

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I know what you mean. And I loved the 2019 Trebbiano. But thinking about this wine as a 200 or 300 Euro wine (depending on hit rate) is hard to swallow. What is your experience? How many bottles do you open to find a good/perfect one.

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Pepe Trebbiano more problematic from my experience than Valentini. Love drinking them both but accept will be sitting on some flawed bottles. 1 in 4 for Pepe. Others may have wildly different experiences so maybe just bad luck on my part. Almost feel it would be more economical to pay restaurant mark up

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Recent vintages are priced around 50€ for the Trebbiano
I have drunk a case of 2016 and all were fine
( Count me as a lover of Pepes wines)
He is also a good looking man
Logo_til_hjemmeside_1-4

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Thanks Matt! I lugged a few bottles from Italy two summers ago. Thoughts on aging curves? I’ve enjoyed the older Pepe montepulcianos but have less experience with aged pecorinos.

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i have been seeing the current release ~60-65 euro in restaurants lately around various parts of italy. frankly i would rather drink a francesco cirelli anfora pecorino or trebbiano for half the price. perhaps valentini is worth some premium as they age very well but not much over 100 euro imo.

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For whatever reason, I’ve had much better luck with Pecorino bottles than Trebbiano, where I’ve been burned several times.

As you can tell from English-language label, this bottle was aimed for US market. Not sure if the Pecorino follows the same VV export model …

@Faryan_Amir-Ghassemi … I’m no expert but if you have a few bottles, I’d actually wait 5 years to see what happens. There’s so much stuffing and ballast … you don’t have to worry about them crumbling apart … but given all the variability you might want to drink one now to hedge your bets.

These wines feel like quality N Rhone whites … love em or hate em … and they will transform over decades into something markedly different … that’s my guess.

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Waiting for @Dennis_Atick
spanky waiting

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2017 Pecorino is also very very fine


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Thanks, Matt, for the thread!

Last Thursday, I shook his hand, said bueno sera, and told him he was a rock star in my world. He smiled. He didn’t understand most of what I said, and it was awesome nonetheless. Full report soon of a dream visit.

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