Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

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JordanL
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Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#1 Post by JordanL » January 13th, 2019, 10:03 am

On my 21st birthday, my parents took me to a tasting menu with a wine pairing in the Napa area and it completed changed the way I thought about food and wine. Finished up my undergrad (at UC Davis of all schools... one of my biggest regrets now is not caring about their V&E department in my time there).

Fast forward two years, I move to NYC, started going to some amazing small wine stores (shoutout Nolita Wine Merchants and Wine Therapy) where I got to learn more and more about wine, and now I have completely fallen in love with it. I love going to wine bars, I love checking out different wine stores and trying to learn as much as I can from the people there.

Unfortunately, not a lot of my friends are that into wine and sometimes I feel like I'm talking to a wall when I talk to them about wine, but I do anyway. I did go to a meetup once where most of the people were in their 30s and older and I really enjoyed their company.

A question I want to end on...

I assume a lot of you guys are older than me... When did you guys start getting into wine, and if you were in my position (25-year-old, would be financially irresponsible if he was spending even over $50 on a bottle of wine regularly, what would you be doing to maximize your enjoyment of wine?)
Last edited by JordanL on January 13th, 2019, 10:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#2 Post by ericleehall » January 13th, 2019, 10:05 am

As far as I can tell most members here don't even open bottles until they are older that you! :-)
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#3 Post by Merrill Lindquist » January 13th, 2019, 10:25 am

Jordan... there are some of us who are not guys! There are not many of us women here, but yes, I am old enough to be your mother. But there is a wide range of age, not much range of gender, and certainly a wide range of what people here pay for wine.

I would advise you to experiment, try to attend an offline or two, and don't go heavy into any one type or style of wine if you are building a cellar.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#4 Post by Chad Richardson » January 13th, 2019, 10:33 am

First...welcome! I probably started down the rabbit hole at about your age...though I'm 2X that now :(
Sounds like you're already doing this, but visit all the tastings you can to get exposed to as many different wines/regions/experiences as possible. And meet all the other wine-geeks you can. There are a lot of small "private" tasting groups out there...if you meet the right folks and get into some groups, you can get a much more focused experience with a group of like-minded people. Cheers!
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#5 Post by Brian Gilp » January 13th, 2019, 2:37 pm

My introduction was via my girlfriend’s parents when I was about 18. My parents didn’t drink so wine wasnt something I had any experience with, just cheap beer. My girlfriend’s parents took us out to dinner a few times and always ordered a bottle of wine and I was smitten. It was all I could do to not drain my glass before the food arrived. After that, it took a few years before I really started my journey. We had a wine appreciation course at the University where I went to school/ worked. I took the course once but would visit specific classes when the prof told me it was worth showing up.

After that, it was a weakend job in the tasting room of a local winery. But it wasn’t long before I was taking off from my day job to bottle, rack, or whatever was happening. Blending trials was probably my favorite and quite eye opening. The winery job lead to a number of tastings and other educational meetings.

This lead to making my own wine. By now I wanted to really understand the process and felt that I had to actually make my own to fully grasp the process. Which with a large delay led to my own vineyard.

Along the way, I read and drank a lot. I really enjoy learning about grapes and regions more than I do about the top wines out there but still felt I needed to taste them on occasion to understand why many consider them great. So the occasional splurge was in order but more often it was a tasting where I could try things I couldn’t afford. At the time, pre-auction tastings were a thing and a specific Chicago wine company tasting proved to be a critical point in my journey.

I don’t regret the occasional splurge. Those were vital to my journey and my understanding. They helped focus my interest both to specific regions but also away from some. It’s also very nice to have cellared some things from my early years to try decades later. Due to a local wine shop that never raised prices and didn’t have a customer base that loved the same wines as the owner, I got to purchase a number of 91 & 92 Étude and Insignia for a song and drank the last just a few years ago with the next generation of enthusiasts.

The hobby can take many forms and you really only need to follow the one you find interesting. My brother found wine much later than me and took a completely different path yet finds as much interest in it as I do.

Enjoy the journey.

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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#6 Post by Randy Bowman » January 13th, 2019, 7:11 pm

Different people are sucked in at different ages, depending on a large variety of elements like location, people, weather and money. My first wife's family was part owner in a winery with other family members. The family was Italian so wine was served with everything, probably even with cereal at breakfast. I liked the high but not the wine. Rarely drank wine after that until I was 29 and had my first Silver Oak Cab. I now have 40 years in the rabbit hole, the last 17 owning a wine store. I have also learned why Italian wine goes with Italian food.

Jordan, you still have 12 states and 26 countries worth of wine to explore. You will really be in trouble if you become a foodie too. Think exponential spending on wine/food.

Enjoy!
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#7 Post by JordanL » January 14th, 2019, 1:39 am

Thank you everyone who responded! I feel very welcome and look forward to spending a lot of time here.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#8 Post by Jason T » January 14th, 2019, 5:13 am

Hey Jordan, welcome. You're definitely one of the youngest; I'm 40 and even I feel like a kid around here (and since I just cracked 40, feeling like a kid isn't a bad thing!).

My intro to wine was similar to Brian's in that it came via my (then girlfriend) wife and her parents. They were big into wine, went to lots of wine dinners and tastings, and she poured at tastings for some extra coin. My parents and extended family were not into wine at all. 'Wine' was white zin at Easter, Christmas and Thanksgiving. So this was all a bit of a revelation.

I found out I liked it, but was intimidated by what seemed like an insurmountable learning curve. Then I found out there was a great deal I could learn not just by tasting but also by reading (and that there's a lot of great stuff to read), and got the bug from there.

What I now realize is that while there's infinitely more to know about wine than I'll ever get my head around, I don't need to know it all to enjoy wine. That said, to me, putting in the time isn't like 'work' because I enjoy it so much. Continuing to taste and learn has given me a framework for learning more, which helped with the intimidation factor quite a bit.

Then I came across this forum and became obsessed - read almost every post from the beginning of the forum to present, starting in May 2014. My knowledge and appreciation of wine grew exponentially as a result.

I'm jealous that you've found wine at such a young age. I was in my early 30's, and I wonder where I'd be now, both in terms of the progression of my knowledge, appreciation and palate, as well as the progression of my cellar.

Jordan, like you, not too many of my friends are into wine. Though I've become a bit of evangelist; I've increased a couple family member's enjoyment and gotten a couple friends hooked. Maybe that happens to you, maybe it doesn't, or maybe you make friends via the wine bars or tastings. It will happen, but it takes time, and with that a bit of patience.

If I were you, a couple things I'd do to maximize my appreciation - one is, I'd look for tastings in my area, whether put on my wine shops/liqour stores or otherwise. Some of these are free, many are not. It's a great way to explore wines you'd otherwise have to purchase a bottle of to try. I'd also look for tasting groups in your area that fit your budget.

And from there I'd just think about what is it that I want out of this thing and ensure my buying patterns match that. For example, would I rather drink well, but less often, or just 'pretty-well' and more frequently? Do I expect to have a greater income potential in the future such that I don't have any need to focus on squirreling wines away now?

Regardless, remember that no matter what it's just a hobby, and you shouldn't take it too seriously, or stress too much if you bought a bum bottle or came across a prized bottle that's out of our reach. There's always more wine!
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#9 Post by Jeff P » January 14th, 2019, 6:31 am

JordanL wrote:
January 13th, 2019, 10:03 am
On my 21st birthday, my parents took me to a tasting menu with a wine pairing in the Napa area and it completed changed the way I thought about food and wine. Finished up my undergrad (at UC Davis of all schools... one of my biggest regrets now is not caring about their V&E department in my time there).

Fast forward two years, I move to NYC, started going to some amazing small wine stores (shoutout Nolita Wine Merchants and Wine Therapy) where I got to learn more and more about wine, and now I have completely fallen in love with it. I love going to wine bars, I love checking out different wine stores and trying to learn as much as I can from the people there.

Unfortunately, not a lot of my friends are that into wine and sometimes I feel like I'm talking to a wall when I talk to them about wine, but I do anyway. I did go to a meetup once where most of the people were in their 30s and older and I really enjoyed their company.

A question I want to end on...

I assume a lot of you guys are older than me... When did you guys start getting into wine, and if you were in my position (25-year-old, would be financially irresponsible if he was spending even over $50 on a bottle of wine regularly, what would you be doing to maximize your enjoyment of wine?)
I'm slightly older than you and started around same time.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#10 Post by Dan Hammer » January 14th, 2019, 6:50 am

Jordan,

There's an Offline forum on Berserkers. That's where a group of us meet for wine dinners. Some have a theme, others don't. I can recall my first offline. My cellar held under a dozen bottles then. I brought something I thought was good. It was a 1999 Anderson Conn Valley Reserve Cabernet. Cost was $35, and it was the most expensive bottle I owned. It was a good bottle; but was surrounded by much better bottles. When you attend one of these events, bring something good. Don't cheap out.

Here's a link to my Di Fara's offline that I do annually. You can sign up for the waitlist, but you'll probably have to wait for the thread next year. We're a friendly bunch here. Some bark, but we don't bite. viewtopic.php?f=8&t=156785

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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#11 Post by JordanL » January 14th, 2019, 6:32 pm

Dan Hammer wrote:
January 14th, 2019, 6:50 am
Jordan,

There's an Offline forum on Berserkers. That's where a group of us meet for wine dinners. Some have a theme, others don't. I can recall my first offline. My cellar held under a dozen bottles then. I brought something I thought was good. It was a 1999 Anderson Conn Valley Reserve Cabernet. Cost was $35, and it was the most expensive bottle I owned. It was a good bottle; but was surrounded by much better bottles. When you attend one of these events, bring something good. Don't cheap out.

Here's a link to my Di Fara's offline that I do annually. You can sign up for the waitlist, but you'll probably have to wait for the thread next year. We're a friendly bunch here. Some bark, but we don't bite. viewtopic.php?f=8&t=156785

Welcome to Wine Berserkers.

Dan
Oh wow!! Would have loved to come but that waitlist is looking a little deep. Are there other WineBerserker offline meetups?
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#12 Post by Christian H » January 14th, 2019, 8:05 pm

I just joined...im 45...its not about age...its about passion...enjoy the ride my friend..

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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#13 Post by Dan Hammer » January 15th, 2019, 8:10 am

JordanL wrote:
January 14th, 2019, 6:32 pm
Dan Hammer wrote:
January 14th, 2019, 6:50 am
Jordan,

There's an Offline forum on Berserkers. That's where a group of us meet for wine dinners. Some have a theme, others don't. I can recall my first offline. My cellar held under a dozen bottles then. I brought something I thought was good. It was a 1999 Anderson Conn Valley Reserve Cabernet. Cost was $35, and it was the most expensive bottle I owned. It was a good bottle; but was surrounded by much better bottles. When you attend one of these events, bring something good. Don't cheap out.

Here's a link to my Di Fara's offline that I do annually. You can sign up for the waitlist, but you'll probably have to wait for the thread next year. We're a friendly bunch here. Some bark, but we don't bite. viewtopic.php?f=8&t=156785

Welcome to Wine Berserkers.

Dan
Oh wow!! Would have loved to come but that waitlist is looking a little deep. Are there other WineBerserker offline meetups?
Once in a while. A few are posted, and a few are not posted. Keep an eye on the forum.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#14 Post by Frank Z » January 15th, 2019, 2:39 pm

I'm also 25, so you're not alone! Just be sure to taste as much as you can (I use a coravin to go back and forth between bottles), attend events and tastings, visit wine regions often to get to know the people and winemakers behind the labels you're interested in, get on allocation lists (if applicable), and learn and read about wine whenever you have free time! :D

I started getting interested into wine after I finished my masters degree when I went to Napa for vacation, and I fell in love with it (both wine and Napa). Since then, I've reached out to people and built connections (even though I'm not in the wine industry). I strongly recommend to have an open mind, as you may find yourself enjoying something you otherwise might not have thought about. And most importantly, don't forget to have fun! :)
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#15 Post by Brent C l a y t o n » January 15th, 2019, 5:08 pm

If you weren't old enough to drink when WB was established, that would certainly put you in the young category. newhere [berserker.gif]

A brief history:

There are people here who just met in person and formed wine tasting/dinner groups that predate the internet, and early adopters go back to Prodigy boards or other things that popped up in the early days of the internet. Most of the OG members transitioned over from the Mark Squires/Robert Parker board and/or were already part of other smaller chat boards. I do miss the participation of the UK crowd from the Squires days, who have their own thing going.

That being said, there are plenty of enthusiastic and knowledgeable younger members and everyone's participation is valued. Until otherwise determined by a jury of your peers.

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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#16 Post by Tariq K » January 16th, 2019, 4:24 pm

Welcome!

So I'm almost 20 years older than you. I first got bit by the wine bug when I was about your age, but then became a more casual wine drinker in the ensuing years, only to really pick it up again this past year.

Here's a thought: tasting and enjoying wines in different styles is a great thing to do. However, I would encourage you to also consider the time dimension in wine appreciation. Building a cellar and enjoying wines of different ages takes the hobby to an entirely different level, in my opinion.

Therefore, I would suggest the following, especially since you seem to live in NYC: consider renting offsite wine storage as a way of building a longer-term collection. I wish I had known about the existence of such facilities earlier. I myself moved around a lot for work and have always lived in apartments, so home storage was never really an option. But if I had been buying half-cases of things I liked back when I lived in NYC (back in the LCD Soundsystem era) I would have a killer collection today.

Something to think about.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#17 Post by JordanL » January 16th, 2019, 6:34 pm

Tariq K wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 4:24 pm
Welcome!

So I'm almost 20 years older than you. I first got bit by the wine bug when I was about your age, but then became a more casual wine drinker in the ensuing years, only to really pick it up again this past year.

Here's a thought: tasting and enjoying wines in different styles is a great thing to do. However, I would encourage you to also consider the time dimension in wine appreciation. Building a cellar and enjoying wines of different ages takes the hobby to an entirely different level, in my opinion.

Therefore, I would suggest the following, especially since you seem to live in NYC: consider renting offsite wine storage as a way of building a longer-term collection. I wish I had known about the existence of such facilities earlier. I myself moved around a lot for work and have always lived in apartments, so home storage was never really an option. But if I had been buying half-cases of things I liked back when I lived in NYC (back in the LCD Soundsystem era) I would have a killer collection today.

Something to think about.
Interesting! I know about wine storage but I guess I'm not thinking that far ahead... although it would be a good idea. I heard 2015 is supposed to be a big Bordeaux year so it might be worth starting to hoard a few bottles. I might be able to rely on my parents or siblings because their housing situation is a bit more stable, but I guess if I start building a cellar now I could really come to enjoy it in the future...
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#18 Post by Albert_H » January 17th, 2019, 3:36 am

the 2014's are where to look if you're looking for the best bang for the buck imo. 2015 was an awesome year on the right bank, on the left bank id say Pauillac and lower did the best. 2016's favored the left bank slightly but the right banks turned out awesome as well. Depending on your budget, id say start looking for storage now. I'm 5 years older than you are and I started on my wine journey 3 years ago, I constantly find myself running out of storage space nearing 800 bottles now.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#19 Post by Tariq K » January 17th, 2019, 8:56 am

JordanL wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 6:34 pm


Interesting! I know about wine storage but I guess I'm not thinking that far ahead... although it would be a good idea. I heard 2015 is supposed to be a big Bordeaux year so it might be worth starting to hoard a few bottles. I might be able to rely on my parents or siblings because their housing situation is a bit more stable, but I guess if I start building a cellar now I could really come to enjoy it in the future...
I think friends and family is a pretty good alternative to having your own cellar space. And can I also make another suggestion? I know this is heresy on this message board, but don't stress too much about vintage, especially when starting out. You can drive yourself, er, berserk optimizing for this stuff, especially if you are analytical like me. Just buy quality stuff and good things will happen.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#20 Post by Brent C l a y t o n » January 17th, 2019, 9:38 am

Most people's basements in the northeast are perfectly fine for passive cellaring.

When I lived in Boston my grandparents' basement in Newton Centre was my de-facto cellar.

Until they relocated last year, when I moved to NYC it was my parents' house in Jersey.

Now I'm paying a bunch of money to Morrell for storage. [pwn.gif] It's only about a 10min drive from my apt though so it's convenient, and the facility is top notch.

I'd invest in some type of wine unit for your apartment if you have fewer than 60 bottles. You're gonna need one of those anyway eventually, and it will take a year or two off the storage fees you'll eventually be paying.
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#21 Post by TR Barry » January 18th, 2019, 9:20 am

Welcome to the forum Jordan. My intro to wine started through my folks when my dad was traveling to France he would often bring bottles home and started sharing those with me in my late teens. After college I worked at a country club and our restaurant manager had no desire in running the beverage program so I took over the buying of all wine, beer and spirits at the age of 23. It was about this time that I joined eBob and when that became a pay to play forum I made the jump over here to Berserkers and happily have never looked back.

As for your question about splurging on bottles $50+ I would say it truly comes down to how you want to budget your play money. The focus of my 'collecting' has been WA wines because they have been more affordable than CA. Looking back 12 years you could get a solid bottle for $50 from Cadence, Andrew Will, Betz, etc. so that was where I was putting my money. Somehow I made the Cayuse list 10 years ago and that has been my annual spending splurge. Is there a certain region you are focused on?
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#22 Post by Ben M a n d l e r » January 20th, 2019, 5:44 pm

Hi Jordan! I'm 30 - a little older sure but I'd wager still very much on the younger end of the forum. We have so many years of wonderful wines to look forward to! Some of the things you mentioned really resonated so I thought I'd give you a bit of my history here and a bit of what I've learned along the way. This also doubles up as my first post on Wine Berserkers, so hi everyone!

I first got into wine when I was around 20. I was at university in England (where I'm originally from) and caught the bug thanks to an incredible wine store in Bristol (Avery's). Every day they'd have 10-15 wines sitting out on a table for you to taste, totally free (that part was important). I started going in a few times a week and got talking with the staff there. Eventually they'd let me just go up to the tasting table and help myself, and one guy there gave me his staff discount.

None of my friends were into wine, and I didn't know anyone who was into wine, so I just started holding my own blind tastings at home and inviting my friends - most of them weren't as interested in geeking out as I was, but they liked to drink and if the wine came along with a bit of information, why not! 8 wines on a theme. I asked everyone to bring some money to help cover the cost and people kept showing up. I still do that today with my partner in our apartment outside Washington DC.

After college I moved to the U.S. and landed first in Boston. A wine store out in Waltham (Gordon's) would do free tastings every Saturday in the fall - most would have one or two tables of wines, and they'd have one big grand tasting each year. And I got to know my local wine merchant (Ball Square Fine Wines) really well - so they gave me discounts. Since I moved to the DC area a few years ago I've found it much harder to develop the kinds of wine relationships I had in Bristol and Boston. I don't know if it's the local culture or if I just haven't found the right place. I've also found it difficult to find groups of people to do more focused tastings with - something I've never really had but always been interested in. Joining this forum is one of the ways I'm trying to change that. I haven't had much luck with MeetUp either so far.

Some of the advice I'd give for people diving deep down the wine rabbit hole at a young age and of limited means, based partly on what I've done so far and partly on what I haven't done but wish I had:

1. Befriend your local wine merchant. They will love your passion and want to feed it - that may extend to helping you to do that more affordably.
2. Go to free tastings at stores. Since you're a little way down the rabbit hole already, I'd say the tastings that are like 3 or 4 different wines from a distributor's portfolio might not be so useful, but some stores will do themed tastings for free (or for a fee, if you can justify it). Those are great. Four white burgundies > four random wines.
3. Don't worry too much about building a cellar right now. Sure, in 10 years' time you'll wish you'd bought and laid down some wines, but if you have limited space/conditions for storage and don't have a ton of money, don't worry about it - the world of wine is enormous and you will always be able to find good things to drink, young and older, at a price you can stomach. I recently found a small cache of 1988 Sauternes (my birthyear) and bought 375s of Rieussec, Guiraud, and Lafaurie-Peyraguey for $130 total. Another reason to not buy a bunch of stuff now to lay down is that your tastes will change. Ten years ago I saw a bottle of Amon-Ra for $40. Now a current vintage would be $100, but if I'd bought it then and waited til now to drink it I would be much less interested than 20-year-old me expected. I'm only just now starting to buy wines to hold on to for a while - and even so I'm only looking at a case or two per year. No regrets.
4. If a tasting group doesn't exist that suits your needs, start one. If I was in New York I'd join you! And I'm sure you'll find plenty of people on here and elsewhere to fill out a good tasting group.
5. If you travel, use it as an opportunity to learn about wine. Recent trips to Prague, Vancouver, and Croatia exposed me to wonderful wines that I wouldn't be able to find here in DC.
6. Find local winemakers and winery workers and talk them into spending time with you. And spend time in the vineyards. You've got some great wineries on Long Island and upstate. Take advantage of that to learn about how vineyards and wineries work.
7. Get to know older, more experienced, wealthier wine fanatics. As you mentioned in your post, there is nothing we love more than talking about wine with people, and people who've been doing this a long time have a huge amount of knowledge - and wine - to share. I hosted one of my wine tastings a few years ago and on a whim invited an older couple I'd met through a friend the month before. They show up at my place with a Gundlach-Bundschu Cab and a Rafanelli Zin. "Not for the tasting, just for you." Incredible generosity.
8. Sniff and taste everything. Not just wine. Your palate will thank you.
9 & 10. Decide on a budget you can justify and stick to it, then become familiar with inexpensive wines, and try not to buy anything twice unless you LOVE it. For example, if my wine budget is $100 a month (it was for most of my 20s) - I can buy 3 $10 bottles, 1 $15 bottle, 1 $20 bottle, and 1 $35 bottle. I'm only spending an average of $17 per bottle but I get to drink a full bottle of $35 wine every month. There is so much wine for $10 and some of it is shockingly good. Plus if you know all the best $10 wines your non-wine friends will love you. Deciding on your target price-point for "desirable" wines is important too. For most of my 20s mine was ~$35 (for Ridge, La Rioja Alta, some JJ Prum Rieslings, Royal Tokaji, Merry Edwards SB, etc.). These days it's around $50 but I doubt it'll go up too much from there (famous last words...)

Sorry, that was a lot. I'm sure a lot of it is super familiar to you already but I wanted to cover my bases.

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Brian Tuite
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#23 Post by Brian Tuite » January 21st, 2019, 6:09 am

Ben M a n d l e r wrote:
January 20th, 2019, 5:44 pm
Hi Jordan! I'm 30 - a little older sure but I'd wager still very much on the younger end of the forum. We have so many years of wonderful wines to look forward to! Some of the things you mentioned really resonated so I thought I'd give you a bit of my history here and a bit of what I've learned along the way. This also doubles up as my first post on Wine Berserkers, so hi everyone!

I first got into wine when I was around 20. I was at university in England (where I'm originally from) and caught the bug thanks to an incredible wine store in Bristol (Avery's). Every day they'd have 10-15 wines sitting out on a table for you to taste, totally free (that part was important). I started going in a few times a week and got talking with the staff there. Eventually they'd let me just go up to the tasting table and help myself, and one guy there gave me his staff discount.

None of my friends were into wine, and I didn't know anyone who was into wine, so I just started holding my own blind tastings at home and inviting my friends - most of them weren't as interested in geeking out as I was, but they liked to drink and if the wine came along with a bit of information, why not! 8 wines on a theme. I asked everyone to bring some money to help cover the cost and people kept showing up. I still do that today with my partner in our apartment outside Washington DC.

After college I moved to the U.S. and landed first in Boston. A wine store out in Waltham (Gordon's) would do free tastings every Saturday in the fall - most would have one or two tables of wines, and they'd have one big grand tasting each year. And I got to know my local wine merchant (Ball Square Fine Wines) really well - so they gave me discounts. Since I moved to the DC area a few years ago I've found it much harder to develop the kinds of wine relationships I had in Bristol and Boston. I don't know if it's the local culture or if I just haven't found the right place. I've also found it difficult to find groups of people to do more focused tastings with - something I've never really had but always been interested in. Joining this forum is one of the ways I'm trying to change that. I haven't had much luck with MeetUp either so far.

Some of the advice I'd give for people diving deep down the wine rabbit hole at a young age and of limited means, based partly on what I've done so far and partly on what I haven't done but wish I had:

1. Befriend your local wine merchant. They will love your passion and want to feed it - that may extend to helping you to do that more affordably.
2. Go to free tastings at stores. Since you're a little way down the rabbit hole already, I'd say the tastings that are like 3 or 4 different wines from a distributor's portfolio might not be so useful, but some stores will do themed tastings for free (or for a fee, if you can justify it). Those are great. Four white burgundies > four random wines.
3. Don't worry too much about building a cellar right now. Sure, in 10 years' time you'll wish you'd bought and laid down some wines, but if you have limited space/conditions for storage and don't have a ton of money, don't worry about it - the world of wine is enormous and you will always be able to find good things to drink, young and older, at a price you can stomach. I recently found a small cache of 1988 Sauternes (my birthyear) and bought 375s of Rieussec, Guiraud, and Lafaurie-Peyraguey for $130 total. Another reason to not buy a bunch of stuff now to lay down is that your tastes will change. Ten years ago I saw a bottle of Amon-Ra for $40. Now a current vintage would be $100, but if I'd bought it then and waited til now to drink it I would be much less interested than 20-year-old me expected. I'm only just now starting to buy wines to hold on to for a while - and even so I'm only looking at a case or two per year. No regrets.
4. If a tasting group doesn't exist that suits your needs, start one. If I was in New York I'd join you! And I'm sure you'll find plenty of people on here and elsewhere to fill out a good tasting group.
5. If you travel, use it as an opportunity to learn about wine. Recent trips to Prague, Vancouver, and Croatia exposed me to wonderful wines that I wouldn't be able to find here in DC.
6. Find local winemakers and winery workers and talk them into spending time with you. And spend time in the vineyards. You've got some great wineries on Long Island and upstate. Take advantage of that to learn about how vineyards and wineries work.
7. Get to know older, more experienced, wealthier wine fanatics. As you mentioned in your post, there is nothing we love more than talking about wine with people, and people who've been doing this a long time have a huge amount of knowledge - and wine - to share. I hosted one of my wine tastings a few years ago and on a whim invited an older couple I'd met through a friend the month before. They show up at my place with a Gundlach-Bundschu Cab and a Rafanelli Zin. "Not for the tasting, just for you." Incredible generosity.
8. Sniff and taste everything. Not just wine. Your palate will thank you.
9 & 10. Decide on a budget you can justify and stick to it, then become familiar with inexpensive wines, and try not to buy anything twice unless you LOVE it. For example, if my wine budget is $100 a month (it was for most of my 20s) - I can buy 3 $10 bottles, 1 $15 bottle, 1 $20 bottle, and 1 $35 bottle. I'm only spending an average of $17 per bottle but I get to drink a full bottle of $35 wine every month. There is so much wine for $10 and some of it is shockingly good. Plus if you know all the best $10 wines your non-wine friends will love you. Deciding on your target price-point for "desirable" wines is important too. For most of my 20s mine was ~$35 (for Ridge, La Rioja Alta, some JJ Prum Rieslings, Royal Tokaji, Merry Edwards SB, etc.). These days it's around $50 but I doubt it'll go up too much from there (famous last words...)

Sorry, that was a lot. I'm sure a lot of it is super familiar to you already but I wanted to cover my bases.
Budgets are overrated. [snort.gif]
Bob Wood - 1949-2013 Berserker for eternity! RIP

"On self-reflection, I think a big part of it was me just being a PITA customer..." ~ Anonymous Berserker

"Something so subtle only I can detect it." ~ Randy Bowman

2019 WOTY...

David Cohen
Posts: 228
Joined: April 27th, 2010, 5:43 am

Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#24 Post by David Cohen » January 25th, 2019, 8:49 am

Welcome Jordan L. I am about 20 years or so your senior. Lots of good advice here already. I live on Long Island. We (long island) have lots of wine shops that do great tastings on the weekends if not everyday. I used to taste dozens of wines for free every single weekend in the matter of an 90 minutes on a Saturday or a Sunday. I have since forged relationships with some of those wine shops where they will open any bottle i remotely show interest in. Conversely I have been known to bring some wines into those same shops for the staff to taste. Yin and Yang.
If you start to build a collection please keep in mind there is a VERY strong chance your tastes will change over the years so do not but to much of one varietal or one winery as you may find yourself with a lot of wine done the road you may no longer enjoy as much when you purchased it. If you dont have a place to store wines you want to age I can store a handful of cases for you in my cellar on the island. Have done it before for other beserkers.
Try to attend offlines to expose yourself to wines that are well aged and perhaps out of your budget. Head to wine bars in manhattan and you will find lots of people your own age drinking good stuff. A lot of restaurants and wine shops offer paid tastings usually at a nice Restaurant. Try attend those where wine maker is present as the insight given is sometimes worth the price of admission by itself.
Lastly have fun, drink small amounts often and stay young my amigo!

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Michael O'Brien
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#25 Post by Michael O'Brien » January 25th, 2019, 2:14 pm

My youngest daughter does not dwell on this board but when she was 16, I made the mistake of introducing her to my Le Nez du Vin master kit. It was clear early on that she has a "nose" for wine. Then I introduced her to blind tasting and my budget has been under pressure ever since. She is 26 now and has a small collection of wines that she is aging for a decade or two; a mix of old and new world wines. Whenever I buy wines that can age, I set aside one bottle for her to keep the collection growing. Wine, food, and travel are passions my daughter and I share.
PlanoWino

Dan Sch
Posts: 95
Joined: August 30th, 2018, 11:50 am

Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#26 Post by Dan Sch » January 30th, 2019, 11:29 am

Ben M a n d l e r wrote:
January 20th, 2019, 5:44 pm
Hi Jordan! I'm 30 - a little older sure but I'd wager still very much on the younger end of the forum. We have so many years of wonderful wines to look forward to! Some of the things you mentioned really resonated so I thought I'd give you a bit of my history here and a bit of what I've learned along the way. This also doubles up as my first post on Wine Berserkers, so hi everyone!

I first got into wine when I was around 20. I was at university in England (where I'm originally from) and caught the bug thanks to an incredible wine store in Bristol (Avery's). Every day they'd have 10-15 wines sitting out on a table for you to taste, totally free (that part was important). I started going in a few times a week and got talking with the staff there. Eventually they'd let me just go up to the tasting table and help myself, and one guy there gave me his staff discount.

None of my friends were into wine, and I didn't know anyone who was into wine, so I just started holding my own blind tastings at home and inviting my friends - most of them weren't as interested in geeking out as I was, but they liked to drink and if the wine came along with a bit of information, why not! 8 wines on a theme. I asked everyone to bring some money to help cover the cost and people kept showing up. I still do that today with my partner in our apartment outside Washington DC.

After college I moved to the U.S. and landed first in Boston. A wine store out in Waltham (Gordon's) would do free tastings every Saturday in the fall - most would have one or two tables of wines, and they'd have one big grand tasting each year. And I got to know my local wine merchant (Ball Square Fine Wines) really well - so they gave me discounts. Since I moved to the DC area a few years ago I've found it much harder to develop the kinds of wine relationships I had in Bristol and Boston. I don't know if it's the local culture or if I just haven't found the right place. I've also found it difficult to find groups of people to do more focused tastings with - something I've never really had but always been interested in. Joining this forum is one of the ways I'm trying to change that. I haven't had much luck with MeetUp either so far.

Some of the advice I'd give for people diving deep down the wine rabbit hole at a young age and of limited means, based partly on what I've done so far and partly on what I haven't done but wish I had:

1. Befriend your local wine merchant. They will love your passion and want to feed it - that may extend to helping you to do that more affordably.
2. Go to free tastings at stores. Since you're a little way down the rabbit hole already, I'd say the tastings that are like 3 or 4 different wines from a distributor's portfolio might not be so useful, but some stores will do themed tastings for free (or for a fee, if you can justify it). Those are great. Four white burgundies > four random wines.
3. Don't worry too much about building a cellar right now. Sure, in 10 years' time you'll wish you'd bought and laid down some wines, but if you have limited space/conditions for storage and don't have a ton of money, don't worry about it - the world of wine is enormous and you will always be able to find good things to drink, young and older, at a price you can stomach. I recently found a small cache of 1988 Sauternes (my birthyear) and bought 375s of Rieussec, Guiraud, and Lafaurie-Peyraguey for $130 total. Another reason to not buy a bunch of stuff now to lay down is that your tastes will change. Ten years ago I saw a bottle of Amon-Ra for $40. Now a current vintage would be $100, but if I'd bought it then and waited til now to drink it I would be much less interested than 20-year-old me expected. I'm only just now starting to buy wines to hold on to for a while - and even so I'm only looking at a case or two per year. No regrets.
4. If a tasting group doesn't exist that suits your needs, start one. If I was in New York I'd join you! And I'm sure you'll find plenty of people on here and elsewhere to fill out a good tasting group.
5. If you travel, use it as an opportunity to learn about wine. Recent trips to Prague, Vancouver, and Croatia exposed me to wonderful wines that I wouldn't be able to find here in DC.
6. Find local winemakers and winery workers and talk them into spending time with you. And spend time in the vineyards. You've got some great wineries on Long Island and upstate. Take advantage of that to learn about how vineyards and wineries work.
7. Get to know older, more experienced, wealthier wine fanatics. As you mentioned in your post, there is nothing we love more than talking about wine with people, and people who've been doing this a long time have a huge amount of knowledge - and wine - to share. I hosted one of my wine tastings a few years ago and on a whim invited an older couple I'd met through a friend the month before. They show up at my place with a Gundlach-Bundschu Cab and a Rafanelli Zin. "Not for the tasting, just for you." Incredible generosity.
8. Sniff and taste everything. Not just wine. Your palate will thank you.
9 & 10. Decide on a budget you can justify and stick to it, then become familiar with inexpensive wines, and try not to buy anything twice unless you LOVE it. For example, if my wine budget is $100 a month (it was for most of my 20s) - I can buy 3 $10 bottles, 1 $15 bottle, 1 $20 bottle, and 1 $35 bottle. I'm only spending an average of $17 per bottle but I get to drink a full bottle of $35 wine every month. There is so much wine for $10 and some of it is shockingly good. Plus if you know all the best $10 wines your non-wine friends will love you. Deciding on your target price-point for "desirable" wines is important too. For most of my 20s mine was ~$35 (for Ridge, La Rioja Alta, some JJ Prum Rieslings, Royal Tokaji, Merry Edwards SB, etc.). These days it's around $50 but I doubt it'll go up too much from there (famous last words...)

Sorry, that was a lot. I'm sure a lot of it is super familiar to you already but I wanted to cover my bases.
Not to diverge from the OP here, but I'm in DC and the only thing you're missing from the local wine shop vibe is your location. For whatever reason, the small independent shop with great merchants/buyers/importers is much more prevalent in DC than in VA or MD. We have two in our immediate neighborhood (Weygandt and Cleveland Park Wine) in addition to several more in close proximity. Sounds like you have pretty diverse interests in wine -- we should compare notes and drink something!

Cheers,

Dan
Dan Schoeff

Ben M a n d l e r
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Joined: January 20th, 2019, 9:42 am
Location: Santa Rosa, CA

Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#27 Post by Ben M a n d l e r » February 4th, 2019, 3:51 pm

Dan Sch wrote:
January 30th, 2019, 11:29 am
Ben M a n d l e r wrote:
January 20th, 2019, 5:44 pm
Hi Jordan! I'm 30 - a little older sure but I'd wager still very much on the younger end of the forum. We have so many years of wonderful wines to look forward to! Some of the things you mentioned really resonated so I thought I'd give you a bit of my history here and a bit of what I've learned along the way. This also doubles up as my first post on Wine Berserkers, so hi everyone!

I first got into wine when I was around 20. I was at university in England (where I'm originally from) and caught the bug thanks to an incredible wine store in Bristol (Avery's). Every day they'd have 10-15 wines sitting out on a table for you to taste, totally free (that part was important). I started going in a few times a week and got talking with the staff there. Eventually they'd let me just go up to the tasting table and help myself, and one guy there gave me his staff discount.

None of my friends were into wine, and I didn't know anyone who was into wine, so I just started holding my own blind tastings at home and inviting my friends - most of them weren't as interested in geeking out as I was, but they liked to drink and if the wine came along with a bit of information, why not! 8 wines on a theme. I asked everyone to bring some money to help cover the cost and people kept showing up. I still do that today with my partner in our apartment outside Washington DC.

After college I moved to the U.S. and landed first in Boston. A wine store out in Waltham (Gordon's) would do free tastings every Saturday in the fall - most would have one or two tables of wines, and they'd have one big grand tasting each year. And I got to know my local wine merchant (Ball Square Fine Wines) really well - so they gave me discounts. Since I moved to the DC area a few years ago I've found it much harder to develop the kinds of wine relationships I had in Bristol and Boston. I don't know if it's the local culture or if I just haven't found the right place. I've also found it difficult to find groups of people to do more focused tastings with - something I've never really had but always been interested in. Joining this forum is one of the ways I'm trying to change that. I haven't had much luck with MeetUp either so far.

Some of the advice I'd give for people diving deep down the wine rabbit hole at a young age and of limited means, based partly on what I've done so far and partly on what I haven't done but wish I had:

1. Befriend your local wine merchant. They will love your passion and want to feed it - that may extend to helping you to do that more affordably.
2. Go to free tastings at stores. Since you're a little way down the rabbit hole already, I'd say the tastings that are like 3 or 4 different wines from a distributor's portfolio might not be so useful, but some stores will do themed tastings for free (or for a fee, if you can justify it). Those are great. Four white burgundies > four random wines.
3. Don't worry too much about building a cellar right now. Sure, in 10 years' time you'll wish you'd bought and laid down some wines, but if you have limited space/conditions for storage and don't have a ton of money, don't worry about it - the world of wine is enormous and you will always be able to find good things to drink, young and older, at a price you can stomach. I recently found a small cache of 1988 Sauternes (my birthyear) and bought 375s of Rieussec, Guiraud, and Lafaurie-Peyraguey for $130 total. Another reason to not buy a bunch of stuff now to lay down is that your tastes will change. Ten years ago I saw a bottle of Amon-Ra for $40. Now a current vintage would be $100, but if I'd bought it then and waited til now to drink it I would be much less interested than 20-year-old me expected. I'm only just now starting to buy wines to hold on to for a while - and even so I'm only looking at a case or two per year. No regrets.
4. If a tasting group doesn't exist that suits your needs, start one. If I was in New York I'd join you! And I'm sure you'll find plenty of people on here and elsewhere to fill out a good tasting group.
5. If you travel, use it as an opportunity to learn about wine. Recent trips to Prague, Vancouver, and Croatia exposed me to wonderful wines that I wouldn't be able to find here in DC.
6. Find local winemakers and winery workers and talk them into spending time with you. And spend time in the vineyards. You've got some great wineries on Long Island and upstate. Take advantage of that to learn about how vineyards and wineries work.
7. Get to know older, more experienced, wealthier wine fanatics. As you mentioned in your post, there is nothing we love more than talking about wine with people, and people who've been doing this a long time have a huge amount of knowledge - and wine - to share. I hosted one of my wine tastings a few years ago and on a whim invited an older couple I'd met through a friend the month before. They show up at my place with a Gundlach-Bundschu Cab and a Rafanelli Zin. "Not for the tasting, just for you." Incredible generosity.
8. Sniff and taste everything. Not just wine. Your palate will thank you.
9 & 10. Decide on a budget you can justify and stick to it, then become familiar with inexpensive wines, and try not to buy anything twice unless you LOVE it. For example, if my wine budget is $100 a month (it was for most of my 20s) - I can buy 3 $10 bottles, 1 $15 bottle, 1 $20 bottle, and 1 $35 bottle. I'm only spending an average of $17 per bottle but I get to drink a full bottle of $35 wine every month. There is so much wine for $10 and some of it is shockingly good. Plus if you know all the best $10 wines your non-wine friends will love you. Deciding on your target price-point for "desirable" wines is important too. For most of my 20s mine was ~$35 (for Ridge, La Rioja Alta, some JJ Prum Rieslings, Royal Tokaji, Merry Edwards SB, etc.). These days it's around $50 but I doubt it'll go up too much from there (famous last words...)

Sorry, that was a lot. I'm sure a lot of it is super familiar to you already but I wanted to cover my bases.
Not to diverge from the OP here, but I'm in DC and the only thing you're missing from the local wine shop vibe is your location. For whatever reason, the small independent shop with great merchants/buyers/importers is much more prevalent in DC than in VA or MD. We have two in our immediate neighborhood (Weygandt and Cleveland Park Wine) in addition to several more in close proximity. Sounds like you have pretty diverse interests in wine -- we should compare notes and drink something!

Cheers,

Dan
Thanks Dan. I just discovered Weygandt recently but haven't been to Cleveland Park Wine yet - something to check out. I'd for sure be up for sharing a bottle some time.

Mike C.
Posts: 46
Joined: January 27th, 2019, 12:19 pm

Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#28 Post by Mike C. » February 24th, 2019, 2:52 pm

New to this forum (but not my wine obsession) and just a few years older than you. One actionable tip--if you're on a limited budget, check out the weekly tasting at Union Square Wines. While many wines are in the $15-30 range, you do see a few wines over that amount. Another option is to learn more about "natural" wines as you can find plenty of interesting things under $30-40 (Discovery Wines and Henry's are good for those). Also, ask wine bars if they pour half glasses if they don't have flights (most will not but a few will, which will allow you to try more).

Anton Nikiforov
Posts: 11
Joined: December 18th, 2017, 1:04 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#29 Post by Anton Nikiforov » March 1st, 2019, 8:06 am

Jordan,

Another 25 year old wine enthusiast here, but living a little further south from you. I got into wine in college when I started working at a tasting room in Connecticut. It was just in the fall of 2017 that I decided to buy a Eurocave to keep up with my interest (mine came from the recent EMP remodeling that happened). My girlfriend and partner is my primary outlet for having and discussing wine now, although there are definitely some older wine drinkers who have taken me under their wing. Aside from tasting a lot and without preconceptions, I found reading and researching to be really joyful. Let me know if you'd like to have some wine in the future!

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EHeffner
Posts: 307
Joined: March 13th, 2018, 8:23 am

Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#30 Post by EHeffner » March 1st, 2019, 1:06 pm

I’m 31. This place makes me feel young and poor!
E v a n

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Kirk.Grant
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#31 Post by Kirk.Grant » March 1st, 2019, 6:40 pm

JordanL wrote:
January 13th, 2019, 10:03 am
On my 21st birthday, my parents took me to a tasting menu with a wine pairing in the Napa area and it completed changed the way I thought about food and wine. Finished up my undergrad (at UC Davis of all schools... one of my biggest regrets now is not caring about their V&E department in my time there).

Fast forward two years, I move to NYC, started going to some amazing small wine stores (shoutout Nolita Wine Merchants and Wine Therapy) where I got to learn more and more about wine, and now I have completely fallen in love with it. I love going to wine bars, I love checking out different wine stores and trying to learn as much as I can from the people there.

Unfortunately, not a lot of my friends are that into wine and sometimes I feel like I'm talking to a wall when I talk to them about wine, but I do anyway. I did go to a meetup once where most of the people were in their 30s and older and I really enjoyed their company.

A question I want to end on...

I assume a lot of you guys are older than me... When did you guys start getting into wine, and if you were in my position (25-year-old, would be financially irresponsible if he was spending even over $50 on a bottle of wine regularly, what would you be doing to maximize your enjoyment of wine?)

Jordan,

The fact that you're asking this question is a good indication that you're making smart financial choices. I know how I did it...and that doesn't mean it's the right way, but I'm happy to share with you.

I got a small part-time job in a wine shop. That job got me the perk of buying wines at cost; this cut down my cost considerably. When I was in college I drank about 2-3 bottles/week while I was trying to learn and taste as much as I could. They averaged about $15-$20 each. There reached a point where I realized for me...there was a BIG jump from $20 - $35 (at cost). So I cut the wines I was buying from 3 bottle/week to two. About a year later I realized I would rather drink one $55-$65 bottle/week than two at $35 and it allowed me to cut down on my spending. Fast forward to today...I probably average opening one bottle every other week...and once again the price has jumped up. Everyone has to do what works for them...if you find the right wine friends it won't matter what you can afford, just that you're passionate about wine.

SO once you know your budget...I'd suggest that you splurge from time to time, and cut back on your purchases to justify buying above your comfort level. Finally...buy 2008 Champagnes. I don't know what your preference is. Yet, you will not regret having bought a few high quality 2008 Champagnes later in life when you find you're passionate about it. I bought only one bottle of 1996 Dom Perignon & one bottle of 1996 Sir Winston Churchill in the summers of 2006/2007. By 2012 I regretted only buying one of each.

Buy a few affordable bottles of the following wines if/when you can: 2016 Bordeaux, 2013 Barolo, 2015 Burgundy, 2008 Champagne, 2015 German Riesling, 2015 N. Rhone, 2016 Chateauneuf du Pape, and 2015 Tuscan wines. Get good storage, and be patient as much as you can.
Cellartracker:Kirk Grant

JordanL
Posts: 36
Joined: January 13th, 2019, 2:09 am

Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#32 Post by JordanL » March 2nd, 2019, 8:49 pm

Kirk.Grant wrote:
March 1st, 2019, 6:40 pm
JordanL wrote:
January 13th, 2019, 10:03 am
On my 21st birthday, my parents took me to a tasting menu with a wine pairing in the Napa area and it completed changed the way I thought about food and wine. Finished up my undergrad (at UC Davis of all schools... one of my biggest regrets now is not caring about their V&E department in my time there).

Fast forward two years, I move to NYC, started going to some amazing small wine stores (shoutout Nolita Wine Merchants and Wine Therapy) where I got to learn more and more about wine, and now I have completely fallen in love with it. I love going to wine bars, I love checking out different wine stores and trying to learn as much as I can from the people there.

Unfortunately, not a lot of my friends are that into wine and sometimes I feel like I'm talking to a wall when I talk to them about wine, but I do anyway. I did go to a meetup once where most of the people were in their 30s and older and I really enjoyed their company.

A question I want to end on...

I assume a lot of you guys are older than me... When did you guys start getting into wine, and if you were in my position (25-year-old, would be financially irresponsible if he was spending even over $50 on a bottle of wine regularly, what would you be doing to maximize your enjoyment of wine?)

Jordan,

The fact that you're asking this question is a good indication that you're making smart financial choices. I know how I did it...and that doesn't mean it's the right way, but I'm happy to share with you.

I got a small part-time job in a wine shop. That job got me the perk of buying wines at cost; this cut down my cost considerably. When I was in college I drank about 2-3 bottles/week while I was trying to learn and taste as much as I could. They averaged about $15-$20 each. There reached a point where I realized for me...there was a BIG jump from $20 - $35 (at cost). So I cut the wines I was buying from 3 bottle/week to two. About a year later I realized I would rather drink one $55-$65 bottle/week than two at $35 and it allowed me to cut down on my spending. Fast forward to today...I probably average opening one bottle every other week...and once again the price has jumped up. Everyone has to do what works for them...if you find the right wine friends it won't matter what you can afford, just that you're passionate about wine.

SO once you know your budget...I'd suggest that you splurge from time to time, and cut back on your purchases to justify buying above your comfort level. Finally...buy 2008 Champagnes. I don't know what your preference is. Yet, you will not regret having bought a few high quality 2008 Champagnes later in life when you find you're passionate about it. I bought only one bottle of 1996 Dom Perignon & one bottle of 1996 Sir Winston Churchill in the summers of 2006/2007. By 2012 I regretted only buying one of each.

Buy a few affordable bottles of the following wines if/when you can: 2016 Bordeaux, 2013 Barolo, 2015 Burgundy, 2008 Champagne, 2015 German Riesling, 2015 N. Rhone, 2016 Chateauneuf du Pape, and 2015 Tuscan wines. Get good storage, and be patient as much as you can.
Thank you so much! Are these all 'vintage of the century' type wines? I have a few 2015 Burgundy just by accident and I might try and lay those down for a little while. I think once I get my next job/raise I will look into getting a proper wine fridge and thinking about a couple of bottles to keep for a while.
jordan lee

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Kirk.Grant
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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#33 Post by Kirk.Grant » March 3rd, 2019, 1:35 pm

JordanL wrote:
March 2nd, 2019, 8:49 pm
Thank you so much! Are these all 'vintage of the century' type wines? I have a few 2015 Burgundy just by accident and I might try and lay those down for a little while. I think once I get my next job/raise I will look into getting a proper wine fridge and thinking about a couple of bottles to keep for a while.
They are all great representations & vintages for the regions. What I was really suggesting is that you not go "all in" for one style or region as you build your cellar. You will find as you taste wines over time that the more you explore the more having a balance in the cellar will serve you. For instance, Nebbiolo & Pinot Noir favorite reds of mine which require a lot of age. So I have more of those in my cellar than say, Grenache; which I only tend to want to drink about once/year. Building a cellar that you can grow with is a real challenge. You'll learn and make mistakes along the way. If you can, understand that many, many people I know have cellars full of $25-$30 bottles that will age for decades. So it's not always about price.

Enjoy the journey.
Cellartracker:Kirk Grant

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Re: Does being 25 make me one of the younger members here?

#34 Post by mattccheung » April 2nd, 2019, 12:03 pm

About to turn 30 here but when I was 25 I was primarily buying $20 wines as they were mainly daily drinkers. I couldn't quite yet justify paying more than that. I would look for sales and case discounts. That all changed pretty quickly as I got more into wine and did a lot of side research and reading. I had a new interest of buying wines that could age for the long term. 09/10 Bordeauxs, 10 Brunellos, 13/14 Napa Cabs. I started to spend $50/ $60 and my collection really started to build. Maybe 100/150 bottles by 27. Started to go to more tasting events and took a wine certification course and that is where things really started to change. I'm now willing to spend $100- $150 for a bottle. Smaller productions wines, Beckstoffer grapes, Grand Cru Classes. I also blame those who I taste with as they are older and have quite the collection and I try to be like them. haha. About 400 bottles now and it's time to slow down. My suggestion is to gradually build your collection, subscribe to couple wine magazines/ sites. As I started to read more about specific regions, grapes, vineyards, vintages, I had a greater appreciation for a specific bottle and was willing to splurge a little more. Of course spend within your means too.

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