It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

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Jayson Cohen
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#601 Post by Jayson Cohen » May 14th, 2019, 3:55 pm

S. Rash wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 3:45 pm
John Morris wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 10:11 am
If someone can tell me what "built on texture, power and resonance" or "vertical in feel" mean, I'll ... tell them they're full of BS.
Moccagatta Barbaresco Bric Balin 2016
"The 2016 Barbaresco Bric Balin is a prototypical Moccagatta wine built on texture, power and resonance. Black cherry and plum fruit show the interplay of ripeness and bright acids that is such a signature of the vintage. Vertical in feel and yet also incredibly persistent, the Bric Balin is a wonderfully complete wine. This rich, super-concentrated Barbaresco is going to need time to shed some of its baby fat, but it is super impressive, even in the early going." 95 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
And why the "yet"? How is "vertical in feel" in contrast or opposition to "persistence"?
A little Top Gun reference, “We’re going vertical Maceric!”
Maybe he’s floating? Maybe there’s something else in that wine....

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#602 Post by Brandon R » May 14th, 2019, 4:09 pm

S. Rash wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 3:45 pm
John Morris wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 10:11 am
If someone can tell me what "built on texture, power and resonance" or "vertical in feel" mean, I'll ... tell them they're full of BS.
Moccagatta Barbaresco Bric Balin 2016
"The 2016 Barbaresco Bric Balin is a prototypical Moccagatta wine built on texture, power and resonance. Black cherry and plum fruit show the interplay of ripeness and bright acids that is such a signature of the vintage. Vertical in feel and yet also incredibly persistent, the Bric Balin is a wonderfully complete wine. This rich, super-concentrated Barbaresco is going to need time to shed some of its baby fat, but it is super impressive, even in the early going." 95 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
And why the "yet"? How is "vertical in feel" in contrast or opposition to "persistence"?
A little Top Gun reference, “We’re going vertical Maceric!”
Ahem, being a Top Gun fan, I need to quibble with your quote a little. I believe it's Maverick saying, "He's going vertical. So am I..." to which Goose replied, "We're going ballistic, Mav', go get him!" neener
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#603 Post by crickey » May 14th, 2019, 6:05 pm

GregT wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 3:10 pm
crickey wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 12:02 pm

I'm guessing "resonance" is meant to be a synonym for length or persistence (it can mean a powerful, lasting effect).

As for the other, persistence is a time-related word, and I think of time horizontally (i.e., stretching out). So the "yet" of time horizon opposed to vertical is a reasonable connector.

What "vertical in feel" means, I have no idea, but then I've never understood Parker's metaphor of a skyscraper either. Curiously, I think I understand depth in wine, which is the same spatial dimension, but height doesn't make sense to me. Whatever.
But then the "yet" makes less sense. It would mean (leaving out a few of the other descriptors) - "Built on persistence yet incredibly persistent."

[wow.gif] !!

Only in wine writing can you say less with more words than you can with no words.

The day is quite hot, yet extremely warm.

The synapses worked intermittently, yet fired sporadically.
No, the juxtaposition is vertical (feel) and horizontal (persistence), so vertical, yet horizontal. Maybe it's extending in all dimensions. Or two anyway.

I think the real problem with the syntax of the original is not the descriptors but the "built on." His descriptors all reference his experience (particularly "resonance," which if I have intuited the meaning correctly, refers to an effect on an external party), but "built on" suggests the elements that make up the wine. So he writes about a wine constructed on its effects on tasters. That's awkward.

I think, though, that it is an awkwardness inherent to the style of tasting note Galloni -- and many other critics -- want to write. They both want to describe the wine and describe the experience it evokes in a short tasting note, so both a Parker-style tasting note and a more "writerly" note on the tasting experience and the writer's response to it. Interestingly, the second part is most likely a response to criticisms of points and thus an attempt to express the points in verbal form. Which makes me appreciate the point of points in support of tasting notes.

Parker was actually very good at expressing relative quality, and thus his reaction to, and emotional experience of, a wine through tasting descriptors. Not many others can do it as well. David Schildknecht, Neal Martin, William Kelley, maybe Stephen Tanzer, can do it. Galloni tends to write about his feelings about a wine; sometimes, his entire note consists of nothing but his feelings, which, as people occasionally point out here, makes it sound vacuous or like a mere instance of puffery. On the other hand, Lisa Perrotti-Brown has such a dry set of descriptors that she absolutely needs points to convey relative quality (or else toss in a "Wow!").
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#604 Post by GregT » May 15th, 2019, 1:51 am

I think, though, that it is an awkwardness inherent to the style of tasting note Galloni -- and many other critics -- want to write.
This.

As to the other - stretching, length, horizontal, it's so nuanced, (in fact it is LOADED with nuance) that it makes little sense anyway we stretch it!

I think you're on to something regarding Parker though. He wasn't a brilliant writer, but he let you know what he thought about a wine while doing his best to describe it. In his later years he seemed to become a parody of himself and he started throwing in technical opinions regarding viticulture, etc., that destroyed his usefulness. But early on, while his writing was pretty dry, it conveyed something. "Gobs of fruit" may be the expression of a simpleton, but it actually carries more information than stating that something has nuances of white and yellow flowers and cast iron pan.

But back to the game!
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#605 Post by David Glasser » May 15th, 2019, 4:35 am

GregT wrote:
May 15th, 2019, 1:51 am
I think, though, that it is an awkwardness inherent to the style of tasting note Galloni -- and many other critics -- want to write.
This.

As to the other - stretching, length, horizontal, it's so nuanced, (in fact it is LOADED with nuance) that it makes little sense anyway we stretch it!
One might say "nuanced to the core."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#606 Post by Yao C » May 15th, 2019, 2:14 pm

One can't help palate differences, but writing is a craft. If you write thousands of TNs a year, you should in theory improve if you work at it. I may not agree with Jancis Robinson's palate but man she can write.

One of the best ever from Galloni (lol): "The 2008 Dom Pérignon is fabulous... <snip> what I admire most about the 2008 is the way it shows all the focus, translucence and energy that is such a signature of the year, and yet it is also remarkably deep and vertical. In other words, the 2008 is a Champagne that plays in three dimensions."

Which dimensions? Are those the only important dimensions or are there other dimensions that matter? [head-bang.gif]

Contrast this with JR's note, which is a paragon of brevity and restraint: "Very fresh and lively and creamy, lovely undertow. Long and tense. Really refreshing"
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#607 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » May 15th, 2019, 3:44 pm

Yao C wrote:
May 15th, 2019, 2:14 pm
One can't help palate differences, but writing is a craft. If you write thousands of TNs a year, you should in theory improve if you work at it. I may not agree with Jancis Robinson's palate but man she can write.

One of the best ever from Galloni (lol): "The 2008 Dom Pérignon is fabulous... <snip> what I admire most about the 2008 is the way it shows all the focus, translucence and energy that is such a signature of the year, and yet it is also remarkably deep and vertical. In other words, the 2008 is a Champagne that plays in three dimensions."

Which dimensions? Are those the only important dimensions or are there other dimensions that matter? [head-bang.gif]

Contrast this with JR's note, which is a paragon of brevity and restraint: "Very fresh and lively and creamy, lovely undertow. Long and tense. Really refreshing"
Agreed, Jancis is a clear, snappy, direct writer who communicates the point with a minimum of fuss.

Galloni communicates less in many more words.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#608 Post by John Morris » May 17th, 2019, 8:45 pm

crickey wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 6:05 pm
Parker was actually very good at expressing relative quality, and thus his reaction to, and emotional experience of, a wine through tasting descriptors.
+1
crickey wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 6:05 pm
Galloni tends to write about his feelings about a wine; sometimes, his entire note consists of nothing but his feelings, which, as people occasionally point out here, makes it sound vacuous or like a mere instance of puffery.
If you really look at his language, it's not about his feelings -- it's extremely abstract qualities attributed to the wines (dimensions, beams, nuance) that are subjective yet don't manage to convey anything about his sensory experience. Often they're just surplusage. For instance, how is "beams of tannin" different from "tannic"? Another writer would say "round tannins" or "green tannins" to convey the texture in the mouth.

It's not helpful to readers/buyers when everything is scored 93-96 and every note ends "Don't miss it!" and everything else is piffle.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#609 Post by David Glasser » May 18th, 2019, 7:18 am

John Morris wrote:
May 17th, 2019, 8:45 pm
surplusage
Great lawyer word, I’m stealing this. Not for tasting notes.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#610 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 18th, 2019, 7:43 am

Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
May 15th, 2019, 3:44 pm
Yao C wrote:
May 15th, 2019, 2:14 pm
One can't help palate differences, but writing is a craft. If you write thousands of TNs a year, you should in theory improve if you work at it. I may not agree with Jancis Robinson's palate but man she can write.

One of the best ever from Galloni (lol): "The 2008 Dom Pérignon is fabulous... <snip> what I admire most about the 2008 is the way it shows all the focus, translucence and energy that is such a signature of the year, and yet it is also remarkably deep and vertical. In other words, the 2008 is a Champagne that plays in three dimensions."

Which dimensions? Are those the only important dimensions or are there other dimensions that matter? [head-bang.gif]

Contrast this with JR's note, which is a paragon of brevity and restraint: "Very fresh and lively and creamy, lovely undertow. Long and tense. Really refreshing"
Agreed, Jancis is a clear, snappy, direct writer who communicates the point with a minimum of fuss.

Galloni communicates less in many more words.
But even that Jancis note, does it really tell you what the wine tastes like? Any fruit, earth, spice, etc.? Other than knowing it is a note on DP, would you know if it is a red or white wine?

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#611 Post by crickey » May 18th, 2019, 5:35 pm

Normally, I don't weigh in, because tasting notes are hard, but John will love this from AG (latest article on Sonoma):

"Here, it is the wine's resonance and textural resonance that make the strongest impression. This is a flat-out gorgeous wine. Don't miss it."

Both resonance and textural resonance.

Dehlinger wines appear to be quite resonant; four feature the term (counting the above note as one).
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#612 Post by crickey » May 18th, 2019, 6:21 pm

John Morris wrote:
May 17th, 2019, 8:45 pm
crickey wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 6:05 pm
Parker was actually very good at expressing relative quality, and thus his reaction to, and emotional experience of, a wine through tasting descriptors.
+1
crickey wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 6:05 pm
Galloni tends to write about his feelings about a wine; sometimes, his entire note consists of nothing but his feelings, which, as people occasionally point out here, makes it sound vacuous or like a mere instance of puffery.
If you really look at his language, it's not about his feelings -- it's extremely abstract qualities attributed to the wines (dimensions, beams, nuance) that are subjective yet don't manage to convey anything about his sensory experience. Often they're just surplusage. For instance, how is "beams of tannin" different from "tannic"? Another writer would say "round tannins" or "green tannins" to convey the texture in the mouth.

It's not helpful to readers/buyers when everything is scored 93-96 and every note ends "Don't miss it!" and everything else is piffle.
I picked one note from AG's recent article to demonstrate what I mean.

"The gorgeous 2016 Cuvée Moriah is all class. Bright, vibrant and delineated, it beautifully blends 67% Grenache from Dry Stack (in Bennett Valley), 20% Mourvèdre (from Sonoma Valley) and 10% Syrah (from Sonoma Mountain). On the palate, it exudes balance and sophistication; the interplay of bright red-toned fruit and mouthwatering acids is compelling. The 2016 is one of the finest (maybe the finest) Cuvée Moriahs I can remember tasting. Don't miss it."

"All class": I think we can agree that wines do not exhibit class nor are they classy. "Class" here is an expression of AG's summary judgment about the wine. It purports to attribute to the wine an idiosyncratic allusion that exists in his mind.

"Bright, vibrant and delineated." I have no issues with any of those terms. I use "bright" myself, although I am vaguely troubled by the use of a visual term to describe a taste experience, but describing the various experiences of fruit is hard. I think the recent advent of "sparks" and "pixelated" to describe fruit is part of this attempt.

"Exudes balance and sophistication": "Exudes" is an awkward verb for two descriptors which do not exude, i.e., externalize a (previously) internal element. "Sophistication" is another one of those summary judgment terms like "classy" that doesn't really seem to fit wine. It would have helped to know what made this particular wine sophisticated. It seems related to the following clause, but while I can see "the interplay of bright red-toned fruit and mouthwatering acids" as what makes up the balance, I don't see how that is sophisticated.

"...the interplay of bright red-toned fruit and mouthwatering acids is compelling." I have no issue with that description.

"The 2016 is one of the finest (maybe the finest) Cuvée Moriahs I can remember tasting. Don't miss it." Judgments, but okay. Putting this vintage in the context of other vintages is useful information.

Of this note, only "the interplay of bright red-toned fruit and mouthwatering acids" and the isolated phrase "bright, vibrant and delineate" really describes the taste; and the latter terms are somewhat vague metaphors, although we (I anyway) can relate meaning to them and the first clause is married to a judgment (compelling). The rest -- gorgeous, beautifully, all class, sophisticated, compelling, finest, etc. are all what I would call AG's feelings about the wine.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#613 Post by John Morris » May 19th, 2019, 12:29 pm

I completely concur in your exegesis, Chris. I would just add that this note had an uncharacteristic amount of useful, meaningful information. It sounds like this is a wine with fruits in the red fruit direction ("bright" and "vibrant" suggest that even before he says red-fruited explicitly), and the comment about acid is helpful. The descriptors are in contrast to a lot of grenache, so this is helpful. It just doesn't seem typical of his notes, having read hundreds of them for this thread.
Last edited by John Morris on May 19th, 2019, 1:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#614 Post by crickey » May 19th, 2019, 1:10 pm

Eh, many of his notes have fairly normal descriptors. See, for example, this note on an Arnot-Roberts wine, which is more or less selected at random:

"Arguably the highlight in this range, the 2017 Syrah Que Syrah Vineyard is outrageously beautiful. A wine of exotic beauty, the 2017 has so much to offer. Super-ripe black cherry, plum, lavender, spice and black pepper are front and center. The Que Syrah stands out for a compelling interplay of exotic ripeness and cool climate savoriness. It is one of the most exciting young wines I tasted in Sonoma this year. Don't miss it."

Other than the doubling of beauty and exotic, most of the note is useful and reads fine, including the obvious implication that he really, really liked it.

Incidentally, two of the Arnot-Roberts wines are described as "outrageously beautiful."
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#615 Post by crickey » May 19th, 2019, 1:12 pm

In one note, he threw in a new descriptor that includes two of your bugaboos: "beams of salinity." The crossbars to pillars of salt?
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#616 Post by John Morris » May 19th, 2019, 1:26 pm

crickey wrote:
May 19th, 2019, 1:10 pm
Eh, many of his notes have fairly normal descriptors. See, for example, this note on an Arnot-Roberts wine, which is more or less selected at random:

"Arguably the highlight in this range, the 2017 Syrah Que Syrah Vineyard is outrageously beautiful. A wine of exotic beauty, the 2017 has so much to offer. Super-ripe black cherry, plum, lavender, spice and black pepper are front and center. The Que Syrah stands out for a compelling interplay of exotic ripeness and cool climate savoriness. It is one of the most exciting young wines I tasted in Sonoma this year. Don't miss it."

Other than the doubling of beauty and exotic, most of the note is useful and reads fine, including the obvious implication that he really, really liked it.
I do get a sense of the dark fruit profile here, but most of the rest is just piling on unhelpful superlatives (bolded). After the first one, they add nothing. The biggest problem, though, is that I don't understand how "super ripe" and "exotic ripeness" can coexist with "cool climate savoriness" (underscored).

And then there are the reflexive "so much to offer" and "don't miss it."

What was the score? I'm curious. 95± 2, I would guess.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#617 Post by crickey » May 19th, 2019, 1:57 pm

I guess you will have to try it to find out. The use of "interplay" suggests he is aware that ripe fruit and savory elements are two things generally in opposition, except in southern Rhone wines, where I find it quite common.

I think the score was a 97.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#618 Post by John Morris » May 19th, 2019, 2:08 pm

Speaking of crimes against our native tongue, did anyone catch the first sentence of Lisa Perroti-Brown's announcement of Parker's retirement yesterday:
Lisa Perrotti-Brown
16 May 2019 | News & Views
The father of modern wine criticism, our publication’s founder and namesake, my greatest mentor and a dear friend, it is with mixed feelings that I announce that Robert M. Parker Jr. will, as of today, be formally hanging up his wine criticism boots and retiring from Robert Parker Wine Advocate. I say “mixed,” because if anyone deserves a rest from our frenetic world of wine reviews, it is Bob. And yet, his contribution to significantly raising the bar of critical, unbiased wine writing and wine quality cannot be overestimated. His unrivaled tasting experience and expert, straight-talking opinions will be sorely missed by consumers and trade alike.
What is the bolded phrase? On first read, it seemed like a salutation addressed to Parker. But then it seems like a parenthetical description that should have come immediately before or after his name but was pasted into the wrong spot.

Does anyone read this stuff before it goes out? [scratch.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#619 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 19th, 2019, 2:48 pm

And she split an infinitive!

Sigh . . . .

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#620 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 24th, 2019, 1:06 pm

In the wake of Parker’s retirement, and clearly wanting to out-do Leve and his liquid sex, Lisa Parody Brown now brings us sex on a rug:

97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Pontet-Canet is made up of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot. Picking began on September 24 and finished on October 5; aging is in 55% oak barriques and 45% amphorae. Very deep purple-black in color, it comes rolling sensuously out of the glass with all the opulence and seduction of Cleopatra on a carpet. It emerges with flamboyant scents of crème de cassis, preserved plums and blueberry compote, and after a few moments, it bursts with nuances of molten licorice, sandalwood, Chinese five spice, candied violets, dark chocolate and dried roses, followed by underlying earthy suggestions of fallen leaves, black truffles, underbrush and wild sage. Full-bodied, wonderfully dense, rich, impossibly layered and very, very decadent, the palate delivers all it promises on the nose, with a firm, wonderfully velvety frame and finishing with epic length, a scintillating wave of freshness and a beguiling perfume. This is one for true hedonists. (LPB) (4/2019)

How this doesn’t get a barrel range score of 100-100, XXX or three bunnies defies imagination. [gen_fro.gif]

Pardon me while I go take a cold shower . . . .

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#621 Post by Yao C » May 24th, 2019, 1:50 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 24th, 2019, 1:06 pm
In the wake of Parker’s retirement, and clearly wanting to out-do Leve and his liquid sex, Lisa Parody Brown now brings us sex on a rug:

97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Pontet-Canet is made up of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot. Picking began on September 24 and finished on October 5; aging is in 55% oak barriques and 45% amphorae. Very deep purple-black in color, it comes rolling sensuously out of the glass with all the opulence and seduction of Cleopatra on a carpet. It emerges with flamboyant scents of crème de cassis, preserved plums and blueberry compote, and after a few moments, it bursts with nuances of molten licorice, sandalwood, Chinese five spice, candied violets, dark chocolate and dried roses, followed by underlying earthy suggestions of fallen leaves, black truffles, underbrush and wild sage. Full-bodied, wonderfully dense, rich, impossibly layered and very, very decadent, the palate delivers all it promises on the nose, with a firm, wonderfully velvety frame and finishing with epic length, a scintillating wave of freshness and a beguiling perfume. This is one for true hedonists. (LPB) (4/2019)

How this doesn’t get a barrel range score of 100-100, XXX or three bunnies defies imagination. [gen_fro.gif]

Pardon me while I go take a cold shower . . . .
Wow, nice find. Such a lascivious note. I feel dirty now

Maybe LPB can invent a new set of ratings that scale from one to five eggplants
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#622 Post by John Morris » May 24th, 2019, 6:31 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 24th, 2019, 1:06 pm
In the wake of Parker’s retirement, and clearly wanting to out-do Leve and his liquid sex, Lisa Parody Brown now brings us sex on a rug:

97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Pontet-Canet is made up of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot. Picking began on September 24 and finished on October 5; aging is in 55% oak barriques and 45% amphorae. Very deep purple-black in color, it comes rolling sensuously out of the glass with all the opulence and seduction of Cleopatra on a carpet. It emerges with flamboyant scents of crème de cassis, preserved plums and blueberry compote, and after a few moments, it bursts with nuances of molten licorice, sandalwood, Chinese five spice, candied violets, dark chocolate and dried roses, followed by underlying earthy suggestions of fallen leaves, black truffles, underbrush and wild sage. Full-bodied, wonderfully dense, rich, impossibly layered and very, very decadent, the palate delivers all it promises on the nose, with a firm, wonderfully velvety frame and finishing with epic length, a scintillating wave of freshness and a beguiling perfume. This is one for true hedonists. (LPB) (4/2019)

How this doesn’t get a barrel range score of 100-100, XXX or three bunnies defies imagination. [gen_fro.gif]

Pardon me while I go take a cold shower . . . .


I was at a tasting many years ago where someone described a very lush Chardonnay as "a real Lana Turner of a wine." I guess this is a real Elizabeth Taylor of a wine.

If a male critic had written that note, it would have been highly sexist. From LPB, it's just over the top.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#623 Post by crickey » May 24th, 2019, 7:38 pm

She's not exactly the first person to suggest the connection between pleasure and sex. Maybe you guys just need to get some. I'm surprised you didn't underline "full-bodied" too. You come off sounding like horny teenagers.

I'm actually impressed she managed to keep the metaphor consistent and suggest that the imagery of Cleopatra came from the tasting impression itself; "rolling," "emerges" and "after a few moments...bursts" all relate to the Cleopatra in a carpet story dating back to Plutarch.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#624 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 24th, 2019, 7:58 pm

Damnit, and I also missed the creme note! I was too excited early on.

Personally, I think she ought to have used the golden barge metaphor, since the carpet has also been referred to as a simple linen sack. So pedestrian.

[wow.gif]

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#625 Post by John Morris » May 24th, 2019, 8:43 pm

Sheesh. Now you guys are going all literary on us.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#626 Post by Tim Heaton » May 24th, 2019, 9:01 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 24th, 2019, 1:06 pm
In the wake of Parker’s retirement, and clearly wanting to out-do Leve and his liquid sex, Lisa Parody Brown now brings us sex on a rug:

97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Pontet-Canet is made up of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot. Picking began on September 24 and finished on October 5; aging is in 55% oak barriques and 45% amphorae. Very deep purple-black in color, it comes rolling sensuously out of the glass with all the opulence and seduction of Cleopatra on a carpet. It emerges with flamboyant scents of crème de cassis, preserved plums and blueberry compote, and after a few moments, it bursts with nuances of molten licorice, sandalwood, Chinese five spice, candied violets, dark chocolate and dried roses, followed by underlying earthy suggestions of fallen leaves, black truffles, underbrush and wild sage. Full-bodied, wonderfully dense, rich, impossibly layered and very, very decadent, the palate delivers all it promises on the nose, with a firm, wonderfully velvety frame and finishing with epic length, a scintillating wave of freshness and a beguiling perfume. This is one for true hedonists. (LPB) (4/2019)

How this doesn’t get a barrel range score of 100-100, XXX or three bunnies defies imagination. [gen_fro.gif]

Pardon me while I go take a cold shower . . . .
there are plenty that lap up this dramatic hogwash; she's not the only one to tell people what they want to hear. Sad commentary.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#627 Post by crickey » May 25th, 2019, 3:47 am

After having read a few other tasting notes on the 2018 Pontet Canet, I was struck that LPB, Galloni and Leve all used the same image to convey the sense impression of the flavors: "bursts" (LPB), "explodes" (Leve) and "explosive" (Galloni).
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#628 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 25th, 2019, 3:58 am

Johnny will love love Galloni’s notes . . . .
The 2018 Pontet-Canet is a freak of nature.
The 2018 soars out of the glass
Quite simply, I have never tasted anything like it
I wonder what Uncle Rollo is putting in that amphora.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#629 Post by Charlie Carnes » May 25th, 2019, 7:38 am

The exact same thing as he always uses...
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#630 Post by GregT » May 25th, 2019, 11:59 am

Bursts with nuance. Explodes with subtlety.

Reminds me of an old NY congressman who, outraged by a proposed bill, exclaimed "This will derail the ship of state!"

Should have been a wine critic.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#631 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » May 25th, 2019, 1:41 pm

Those explosion metaphors started to get really common about a decade ago as "critics" pushed the boundaries of hyperbole. Makes me think of a hand grenade in the glass, loaded with shards of dark chocolate and cherry, ready to go off in your mouth. A room full of pasty middle aged critics dodging wine shrapnel as glasses of the latest vintage of the century detonate around them.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#632 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 25th, 2019, 6:52 pm

These two notes on the same wine crack me up, like polar opposites:
Wine Advocate Notes
92-94 Points, Neal Martin, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate: ""The 2015 Petit-Gravet-Aine is located west of Canon-la-Gaffelière, a blend of 80% Cabernet Franc and 20% Merlot, one of the highest proportions of Cabernet on the Right Bank. This has a very attractive bouquet, the Cabernet Franc exuding freshness and complexity with mineral-rich black and red fruit, cold rock just tucked in nicely. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, great depth, just a touch of bell pepper infusing the red fruit, superb precision and real gusto on the structured finish. What a fabulous Saint Emilion wine from proprietor Catherine Papon-Nouvels."" 4/16"
Antonio Galloni
90-93 Points, Antonio Galloni, Vinous: ""Catherine Papon-Nouvel's 2015 Petit Gravet Ainé boasts serious richness and intensity from start to finish. Mocha, espresso, raspberry jam, white pepper and mint are some of the many notes that are pushed forward in this unctuous, super-ripe St.-Émilion. The summer heat appears to have baked out the Cabernet Franc aromatics that are such a signature here. Today, the 2015 is incredibly tightly wound. It will be interesting to see where things ultimately shake out. For now, the 2015 is an embryonic wine built on intensity and ripeness. I would like to see a little more of the finesse this site is capable of. Petit Gravet Ainé is 80% Cabernet Franc and 20% Merlot done in 100% new oak. Tasted two times."" 4/16"
Like night and day.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#633 Post by David Glasser » May 25th, 2019, 7:11 pm

crickey wrote:
May 24th, 2019, 7:38 pm
She's not exactly the first person to suggest the connection between pleasure and sex. Maybe you guys just need to get some. I'm surprised you didn't underline "full-bodied" too. You come off sounding like horny teenagers.

I'm actually impressed she managed to keep the metaphor consistent and suggest that the imagery of Cleopatra came from the tasting impression itself; "rolling," "emerges" and "after a few moments...bursts" all relate to the Cleopatra in a carpet story dating back to Plutarch.
Well, he did say Lisa Parody Brown.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#634 Post by John Morris » May 25th, 2019, 7:34 pm

GregT wrote:
May 25th, 2019, 11:59 am
Bursts with nuance. Explodes with subtlety.

Reminds me of an old NY congressman who, outraged by a proposed bill, exclaimed "This will derail the ship of state!"

Should have been a wine critic.
champagne.gif
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#635 Post by John Morris » May 25th, 2019, 7:35 pm

Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
May 25th, 2019, 1:41 pm
Those explosion metaphors started to get really common about a decade ago as "critics" pushed the boundaries of hyperbole. Makes me think of a hand grenade in the glass, loaded with shards of dark chocolate and cherry, ready to go off in your mouth. A room full of pasty middle aged critics dodging wine shrapnel as glasses of the latest vintage of the century detonate around them.
While Cleopatra slithers around on a carpet at their feet.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#636 Post by John Morris » May 25th, 2019, 7:41 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 25th, 2019, 6:52 pm
These two notes on the same wine crack me up, like polar opposites:
Wine Advocate Notes
92-94 Points, Neal Martin, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate: ""The 2015 Petit-Gravet-Aine is located west of Canon-la-Gaffelière, a blend of 80% Cabernet Franc and 20% Merlot, one of the highest proportions of Cabernet on the Right Bank. This has a very attractive bouquet, the Cabernet Franc exuding freshness and complexity with mineral-rich black and red fruit, cold rock just tucked in nicely. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, great depth, just a touch of bell pepper infusing the red fruit, superb precision and real gusto on the structured finish. What a fabulous Saint Emilion wine from proprietor Catherine Papon-Nouvels."" 4/16"
Antonio Galloni
90-93 Points, Antonio Galloni, Vinous: ""Catherine Papon-Nouvel's 2015 Petit Gravet Ainé boasts serious richness and intensity from start to finish. Mocha, espresso, raspberry jam, white pepper and mint are some of the many notes that are pushed forward in this unctuous, super-ripe St.-Émilion. The summer heat appears to have baked out the Cabernet Franc aromatics that are such a signature here. Today, the 2015 is incredibly tightly wound. It will be interesting to see where things ultimately shake out. For now, the 2015 is an embryonic wine built on intensity and ripeness. I would like to see a little more of the finesse this site is capable of. Petit Gravet Ainé is 80% Cabernet Franc and 20% Merlot done in 100% new oak. Tasted two times."" 4/16"
Like night and day.
Wow. Perhaps they were offered different barrels.

Martin's comment that "The 2015 Petit-Gravet-Aine is located west of Canon-la-Gaffiliere" made me wonder if the 14 and 16 are located to the east.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#637 Post by David Glasser » May 26th, 2019, 7:28 am

GregT wrote:
May 25th, 2019, 11:59 am
Bursts with nuance. Explodes with subtlety.

Reminds me of an old NY congressman who, outraged by a proposed bill, exclaimed "This will derail the ship of state!"

Should have been a wine critic.
Blasting past oxymoronic to moronic.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#638 Post by John Morris » June 3rd, 2019, 2:32 pm

My scouts in other cities remain vigilant!

We need to add "built like a brick house" to the Perotti-Brown bingo card:
96-98 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Lynch Bages is made up of 72% Cabernet Sauvignon, 19% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot aging in 75% new barriques. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is quite coy and restrained to begin, fanning out to offer pure, ripe blackcurrants, black cherries and preserved plums with wafts of red roses, cigar box, incense, cardamom and fenugreek with savory touches of black olives, Marmite toast and smoked meats. Full-bodied, the palate is built like a brick house, with a solid foundation of very firm, very ripe, grainy tannins and superb freshness supporting the generous black fruit layers, finishing long with provocative ferrous suggestions. (LPB) (4/2019)

94-96 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2018 Léoville Poyferré begins sporting a veil of cedar, opening out to reveal profound notions of crème de cassis, warm kirsch, Black Forest cake and Indian spices plus hints of chargrilled meats and Sichuan pepper. Full-bodied and built like a brick house, the taut, muscular black fruit has a solid frame of firm, ripe tannins and seamless freshness, finishing long with loads of savory nuances. Aging is anticipated to be for 18 months in barriques, 80% new. The current blend is 64% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 3% Petit Verdot and 3% Cabernet Franc. (LPB) (4/2019)
I wonder if she's familiar with the form of that phrase that includes a second adjective?

What does it mean to say a wine shows a "pure" eleven ingredients (blackcurrants, black cherries, preserved plums, red roses, cigar box, incense, cardamom, fenugreek, black olives, Marmite toast [ed's note: is that distinct from Marmite pain grillé?] and smoked meats).

And, as a bonus:
97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Palmer is composed of 53% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot and 7% Petit Verdot. Grapes were harvested September 13 to October 15, and the wine has a 3.83 pH and 14.3% alcohol. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is a little reticent to begin, but with coaxing, it slowly emerges to show fragrant violets, underbrush, mossy bark and iron ore with exponentially growing notions of crème de cassis, Black Forest cake, plum preserves, hoisin, Christmas cake and red roses with wafts of dusty earth, Indian spices and cracked black pepper. Full-bodied, concentrated and downright powerful in the mouth, it has a solid structure of firm, wonderfully plush tannins and masses of fragrant accents, finishing very long and very spicy. By the time I finished tasting this, the nose had exploded in this fragrant bomb of fruit, earth and floral notions. This is one of those 2018 wines that has a beguiling brightness that comes from the many floral, spice and mineral accents among all that rich fruit. WOW! (LPB) (4/2019)
I have to say that the combination of Black Forest and Christmas Cake with charbroiled meat, Indian spices and Sichuan pepper sounds revolting.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#639 Post by John Morris » June 3rd, 2019, 2:41 pm

While I was away from my desk, one of my overseas scouts forwarded this.

As we all know, some wines speak to you. This one seems like a downright chatterbox:
The 2014 Barbera d'Alba is an intriguing wine in that it speaks more to the personality of the estate than to the year, or even to Barbera. The 2014 is a Cappellano wine, and that's pretty much all there is to it. Succulent, pliant and expressive, the 2014 has a lot to say. On the palate, the 2014 expresses the mid-weight style of the year. Dark chocolate, plum and spice meld into the super-expressive finish.
-- Antonio Galloni
This barbera doesn't taste like barbera. Check! "That's pretty much all there is to it!"

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#640 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 3rd, 2019, 2:47 pm

“Pliant” seems at odds to the entire note, no? Sorry to express myself so expressly but I felt expressive.

His persistent use of closing phrases like “it’s as simple as that” or that’s “all there is to it” is becoming, or has become, rather Forrest Gumpish.

Back to the forest, lest I lose sight, I noticed that I used the reference to “forest floor” in three out of five wines in one night recently, close to hitting my bingo card, except that I left “apogee” to MarcF. Now in my defense, I’m a hack and admit it, and they were mature Chinons and Bordeaux.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#641 Post by K John Joseph » June 3rd, 2019, 3:22 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 2:32 pm

And, as a bonus:
97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Palmer is composed of 53% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot and 7% Petit Verdot. Grapes were harvested September 13 to October 15, and the wine has a 3.83 pH and 14.3% alcohol. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is a little reticent to begin, but with coaxing, it slowly emerges to show fragrant violets, underbrush, mossy bark and iron ore with exponentially growing notions of crème de cassis, Black Forest cake, plum preserves, hoisin, Christmas cake and red roses with wafts of dusty earth, Indian spices and cracked black pepper. Full-bodied, concentrated and downright powerful in the mouth, it has a solid structure of firm, wonderfully plush tannins and masses of fragrant accents, finishing very long and very spicy. By the time I finished tasting this, the nose had exploded in this fragrant bomb of fruit, earth and floral notions. This is one of those 2018 wines that has a beguiling brightness that comes from the many floral, spice and mineral accents among all that rich fruit. WOW! (LPB) (4/2019)
I have to say that the combination of Black Forest and Christmas Cake with charbroiled meat, Indian spices and Sichuan pepper sounds revolting.
I keep laughing at the idea of those things growing, exponentially, in intensity. Like, oh, there's a little tiny note of cassis; that's a nice black forest cake note too; wow, some serious plum preserves; jesus did someone order moo shu pork I mean whoa with the hoisin; holy shit, wow, that's so much f*ck fruitcake. Just too much fruitcake with the little candied cherries and stuff in it and the spice, oh man, that's a lot to handle; okay, I'm f*ck out of here, are there like 300 red roses in this room? What is happening to this wine. OMFG it smells like Utah, NO GOOD LORD ITS A DEHLI FOOD BIZARRE AND IT'S OUT OF CONTROL...OH DEAR LORD --*UNCONTROLLABLE SNEEZING* THE PEPPER!!! WHERE'S MY INHALER!!!
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#642 Post by John Morris » June 3rd, 2019, 5:01 pm

With that post, you are now qualified to write for HoseMaster of Wine™. [cheers.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#643 Post by GregT » June 3rd, 2019, 6:41 pm

Yep. That was a great post.

But this is a description of pretty much all the tasting notes in this thread, courtesy of David:
Blasting past oxymoronic to moronic.
[cheers.gif]

Reading that announcement about Parker's retirement again, that first sentence really gets to me. It should have been a short, or even a long, tribute to the man. A little bit of grace, a thank-you, and a fond farewell would have been entirely appropriate. Instead, there's a clumsy, poorly-written piece that seems like an afterthought. They should have been working on that piece for the past couple of years, rather than hastily drafting something after a long day of wine tasting. As someone said upthread, writing is a craft. Half the people on this thread would have been able to put together a few moving few paragraphs that would have been far better than what was actually published.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#644 Post by Jayson Cohen » June 3rd, 2019, 10:30 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 2:32 pm
My scouts in other cities remain vigilant!

We need to add "built like a brick house" to the Perotti-Brown bingo card:
96-98 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Lynch Bages is made up of 72% Cabernet Sauvignon, 19% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot aging in 75% new barriques. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is quite coy and restrained to begin, fanning out to offer pure, ripe blackcurrants, black cherries and preserved plums with wafts of red roses, cigar box, incense, cardamom and fenugreek with savory touches of black olives, Marmite toast and smoked meats. Full-bodied, the palate is built like a brick house, with a solid foundation of very firm, very ripe, grainy tannins and superb freshness supporting the generous black fruit layers, finishing long with provocative ferrous suggestions. (LPB) (4/2019)

94-96 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2018 Léoville Poyferré begins sporting a veil of cedar, opening out to reveal profound notions of crème de cassis, warm kirsch, Black Forest cake and Indian spices plus hints of chargrilled meats and Sichuan pepper. Full-bodied and built like a brick house, the taut, muscular black fruit has a solid frame of firm, ripe tannins and seamless freshness, finishing long with loads of savory nuances. Aging is anticipated to be for 18 months in barriques, 80% new. The current blend is 64% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 3% Petit Verdot and 3% Cabernet Franc. (LPB) (4/2019)
I wonder if she's familiar with the form of that phrase that includes a second adjective?

What does it mean to say a wine shows a "pure" eleven ingredients (blackcurrants, black cherries, preserved plums, red roses, cigar box, incense, cardamom, fenugreek, black olives, Marmite toast [ed's note: is that distinct from Marmite pain grillé?] and smoked meats).

And, as a bonus:
97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Palmer is composed of 53% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot and 7% Petit Verdot. Grapes were harvested September 13 to October 15, and the wine has a 3.83 pH and 14.3% alcohol. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is a little reticent to begin, but with coaxing, it slowly emerges to show fragrant violets, underbrush, mossy bark and iron ore with exponentially growing notions of crème de cassis, Black Forest cake, plum preserves, hoisin, Christmas cake and red roses with wafts of dusty earth, Indian spices and cracked black pepper. Full-bodied, concentrated and downright powerful in the mouth, it has a solid structure of firm, wonderfully plush tannins and masses of fragrant accents, finishing very long and very spicy. By the time I finished tasting this, the nose had exploded in this fragrant bomb of fruit, earth and floral notions. This is one of those 2018 wines that has a beguiling brightness that comes from the many floral, spice and mineral accents among all that rich fruit. WOW! (LPB) (4/2019)
I have to say that the combination of Black Forest and Christmas Cake with charbroiled meat, Indian spices and Sichuan pepper sounds revolting.
Does you think she really know what exponential means? Or do you think it’s hyperbole?

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#645 Post by David Glasser » June 4th, 2019, 4:48 am

Jayson Cohen wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 10:30 pm
John Morris wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 2:32 pm
My scouts in other cities remain vigilant!

We need to add "built like a brick house" to the Perotti-Brown bingo card:
96-98 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Lynch Bages is made up of 72% Cabernet Sauvignon, 19% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot aging in 75% new barriques. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is quite coy and restrained to begin, fanning out to offer pure, ripe blackcurrants, black cherries and preserved plums with wafts of red roses, cigar box, incense, cardamom and fenugreek with savory touches of black olives, Marmite toast and smoked meats. Full-bodied, the palate is built like a brick house, with a solid foundation of very firm, very ripe, grainy tannins and superb freshness supporting the generous black fruit layers, finishing long with provocative ferrous suggestions. (LPB) (4/2019)

94-96 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2018 Léoville Poyferré begins sporting a veil of cedar, opening out to reveal profound notions of crème de cassis, warm kirsch, Black Forest cake and Indian spices plus hints of chargrilled meats and Sichuan pepper. Full-bodied and built like a brick house, the taut, muscular black fruit has a solid frame of firm, ripe tannins and seamless freshness, finishing long with loads of savory nuances. Aging is anticipated to be for 18 months in barriques, 80% new. The current blend is 64% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 3% Petit Verdot and 3% Cabernet Franc. (LPB) (4/2019)
I wonder if she's familiar with the form of that phrase that includes a second adjective?

What does it mean to say a wine shows a "pure" eleven ingredients (blackcurrants, black cherries, preserved plums, red roses, cigar box, incense, cardamom, fenugreek, black olives, Marmite toast [ed's note: is that distinct from Marmite pain grillé?] and smoked meats).

And, as a bonus:
97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Palmer is composed of 53% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot and 7% Petit Verdot. Grapes were harvested September 13 to October 15, and the wine has a 3.83 pH and 14.3% alcohol. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is a little reticent to begin, but with coaxing, it slowly emerges to show fragrant violets, underbrush, mossy bark and iron ore with exponentially growing notions of crème de cassis, Black Forest cake, plum preserves, hoisin, Christmas cake and red roses with wafts of dusty earth, Indian spices and cracked black pepper. Full-bodied, concentrated and downright powerful in the mouth, it has a solid structure of firm, wonderfully plush tannins and masses of fragrant accents, finishing very long and very spicy. By the time I finished tasting this, the nose had exploded in this fragrant bomb of fruit, earth and floral notions. This is one of those 2018 wines that has a beguiling brightness that comes from the many floral, spice and mineral accents among all that rich fruit. WOW! (LPB) (4/2019)
I have to say that the combination of Black Forest and Christmas Cake with charbroiled meat, Indian spices and Sichuan pepper sounds revolting.
Does you think she really know what exponential means? Or do you think it’s hyperbole?
I fear another circular argument. Some may say her writing skills are irrational or even imaginary, but they are real. They are asymptotic, and they have reached their limit.

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D@vid Bu3ker
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#646 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » June 4th, 2019, 5:27 am

David,

Given her fascination with brick houses, some might conclude her skills are "mighty, mighty." Her tasting notes are stacked and that's a fact.
David Bueker - Rieslingfan

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Jim Brennan
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#647 Post by Jim Brennan » June 4th, 2019, 5:34 am

John Morris wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 2:32 pm
My scouts in other cities remain vigilant!

We need to add "built like a brick house" to the Perotti-Brown bingo card:
John, now you're just being persnickety. It's completely obvious that the wine is "mighty, mighty, just lettin' it all hang out" meaning bold, with robust tannins, and gobs of fruit.

:-)

Hah looks like David and I totally understand this wine thanks to LPB's inciteful note!

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John Morris
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#648 Post by John Morris » June 4th, 2019, 6:06 am

David Glasser wrote:
June 4th, 2019, 4:48 am
I fear another circular argument. Some may say her writing skills are irrational or even imaginary, but they are real. They are asymptotic, and they have reached their limit.
I'm told she emphatically rejects your "provocative ferrous suggestions."
"I'm a Frisbeetarian. We worship frisbees. We believe when you die your soul goes up on the roof and you can't get it down." – Jim Stafford

"The Internet has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of instances in which humor must be explained." - me, 2019

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John Morris
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#649 Post by John Morris » June 4th, 2019, 6:10 am

Jayson Cohen wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 10:30 pm
Do you think she really knows what exponential means? Or do you think it’s hyperbole?
A simple mistake. I'm sure she meant logarithmic.
"I'm a Frisbeetarian. We worship frisbees. We believe when you die your soul goes up on the roof and you can't get it down." – Jim Stafford

"The Internet has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of instances in which humor must be explained." - me, 2019

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RichardFlack
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#650 Post by RichardFlack » June 4th, 2019, 6:40 am

K John Joseph wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 3:22 pm
John Morris wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 2:32 pm

And, as a bonus:
97-99 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2018 Palmer is composed of 53% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot and 7% Petit Verdot. Grapes were harvested September 13 to October 15, and the wine has a 3.83 pH and 14.3% alcohol. Very deep purple-black in color, the nose is a little reticent to begin, but with coaxing, it slowly emerges to show fragrant violets, underbrush, mossy bark and iron ore with exponentially growing notions of crème de cassis, Black Forest cake, plum preserves, hoisin, Christmas cake and red roses with wafts of dusty earth, Indian spices and cracked black pepper. Full-bodied, concentrated and downright powerful in the mouth, it has a solid structure of firm, wonderfully plush tannins and masses of fragrant accents, finishing very long and very spicy. By the time I finished tasting this, the nose had exploded in this fragrant bomb of fruit, earth and floral notions. This is one of those 2018 wines that has a beguiling brightness that comes from the many floral, spice and mineral accents among all that rich fruit. WOW! (LPB) (4/2019)
I have to say that the combination of Black Forest and Christmas Cake with charbroiled meat, Indian spices and Sichuan pepper sounds revolting.
I keep laughing at the idea of those things growing, exponentially, in intensity. Like, oh, there's a little tiny note of cassis; that's a nice black forest cake note too; wow, some serious plum preserves; jesus did someone order moo shu pork I mean whoa with the hoisin; holy shit, wow, that's so much f*ck fruitcake. Just too much fruitcake with the little candied cherries and stuff in it and the spice, oh man, that's a lot to handle; okay, I'm f*ck out of here, are there like 300 red roses in this room? What is happening to this wine. OMFG it smells like Utah, NO GOOD LORD ITS A DEHLI FOOD BIZARRE AND IT'S OUT OF CONTROL...OH DEAR LORN --*UNCONTROLLABLE SNEEZING* THE PEPPER!!! WHERE'S MY INHALER!!!
Ummm... my mind is racing with possible interpretations. That’s very good.

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