It's critic bingo! ("Lifted by metallic minerality")

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
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Alan Rath
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1201 Post by Alan Rath » September 16th, 2020, 6:13 pm

Keith Levenberg wrote:
September 13th, 2020, 3:37 pm
By the way, for those playing along at home, "closing shades of nuance" gets its own square on the bingo card, separate from the unmodified nuance.
99 Points, Antonio Galloni, Vinous: “Like Tignanello, the 2016 Solaia is a wine of extraordinary nuance and finesse. Super-ripe blackberry, plum jam, espresso, menthol, licorice and sweet spice build as the sublime 2016 shows off its personality and breeding. The 2016 somehow manages to be incredibly deep and also light on its feet. Sweet floral and spice notes add the closing shades of nuance to an exotic, beguilingly beautiful Solaia endowed with an eternal finish and mind-blowing beauty. The 2016 is an epic Solaia. That's all there is to it.” 08/19
Antonio Galloni 96 points! "The 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon is elegant, plush and silky, like the 2012, but with a little more of everything. Dark cherry, plum, licorice, leather and espresso are all nicely lifted by the natural freshness of the year. At present, the 2016 is a bit shy, but it undoubtedly has a very bright future. Floral, perfumed notes add the closing shades of nuance. Spottswoode's Cabernet is quite gracious in 2016, not to mention incredibly delicious."
Antonio Galloni, Vinous Media: "The 2013 Barbaresco Pajè will leave readers weak at the knees with its stunning aromatics. Spicebox, cedar, tobacco, licorice and menthol speak to the essence of Pajè. A wine of depth and pedigree, the 2013 has a lot to offer. Orange peel, cinnamon, rose petal and mint add the closing shades of nuance in a deceptively medium-bodied Barbaresco that has plenty of backing structure and tannic clout to age well for many years to come."
Tasted from magnum, the 1996 Barolo is absolutely stunning. Vibrant and wonderfully alive, the 1996 exudes class. Time has gently softened the 1996 tannins, rendering the 1996 super-expressive today. Balsamic, mentholated notes, along with scents of tobacco and dried stone fruit continue to open up with time in the glass. The 1996 is still firm and quite powerful, but not as austere as many wines are in this vintage. Tar, licorice and scorched earth add the closing shades of nuance in an impeccably balanced, vivid Barolo that captures the personality of the vintage at its best.
A classic Stags Leap Cabernet, the 2014 exudes richness, power and depth. Graphite, crème de cassis, lavender, violets, chocolate and sweet spices infuse this beautifully expressive, sculpted Cabernet Sauvignon. Chocolate, inky black fruits and a dollop of new oak add the closing shades of nuance. The tannins need time to siften, but there is plenty to look forward to. The 2014 is gorgeous. It’s as simple as that. – Antonio Galloni, Oct. 2016
Ridge's 2013 Zinfandel Paso Robles, from the Benito Dusi Ranch, exudes Paso warmth and richness. Unquestionably racy and overt, the 2013 offers striking depth and intensity, with a slightly roasted, sweet quality to the fruit. Sweet tobacco, cedar and dried herbs add closing shades of nuance, but the 2013 remains quite opulent in style. Still, all the elements are in the right place. The 2013 could use a few years to soften. It will be appreciated most by readers who enjoy intense, super-ripe Zinfandels. - Antonio Galloni, Vinous Media
This has me worried “shades of nuance” is some kind of code to wake up a dormant sleeper cell.
I'm just one lost soul, swimming in a fish bowl, year after year

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1202 Post by John Morris » September 16th, 2020, 6:22 pm

Judging by the repetition, it looks like they’ve slept the alarm.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1203 Post by Leonard Maran » September 16th, 2020, 9:57 pm

In another thread a negotiant throws around phrases like "uber pure", "just a bit of air it turns cologne-like", "sexy red and black fruit", "a resplendent finish", "kiss of brett, leather upholstery", "mysterious deep and savory tones", "nutmeg and brown sugar, blackberry syrup". Of course, this is mailing list only (a hallmark of this site), so it matters not that you do not know what you are buying.
Last edited by Leonard Maran on September 16th, 2020, 10:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1204 Post by Leonard Maran » September 16th, 2020, 10:02 pm

My palate aligns with Galloni and I don't care about his prose. Actually, aside from Charlie Olken (California), he's the only critic I do trust for wines from California and Italy.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1205 Post by John Morris » September 20th, 2020, 10:27 am

We've discussed "vertical" as a descriptor before. In most cases, I don't have a clue what the critic means when he/she uses it. As William Kelley said many pages back, it seemed once to be in contrast to a wine that is broad or expansive, and the French use the equivalent to refer to a wine with a good spine of acid. But what on earth does it mean here, both "dense and vertical"?
2015 Bruno Giacosa - Barolo - Falletto
"Superb aromas of ripe fruit, such as plums and berries with peaches and tar. Very intense. Full body, great depth and density. Incredible richness and power with superb length and persistence. One of the most dense and vertical Falletos I have tasted."-James Suckling, 95 points
(Peach scents in a Barolo?!?)
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1206 Post by K.C0LBURN » September 20th, 2020, 11:56 am

John Morris wrote:
September 20th, 2020, 10:27 am
We've discussed "vertical" as a descriptor before. In most cases, I don't have a clue what the critic means when he/she uses it. As William Kelley said many pages back, it seemed once to be in contrast to a wine that is broad or expansive, and the French use the equivalent to refer to a wine with a good spine of acid. But what on earth does it mean here, both "dense and vertical"?
2015 Bruno Giacosa - Barolo - Falletto
"Superb aromas of ripe fruit, such as plums and berries with peaches and tar. Very intense. Full body, great depth and density. Incredible richness and power with superb length and persistence. One of the most dense and vertical Falletos I have tasted."-James Suckling, 95 points
(Peach scents in a Barolo?!?)
(You do have to wonder, don't you?)
K A T H E R I N E

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1207 Post by RichardFlack » September 20th, 2020, 12:52 pm

Alan Rath wrote:
September 16th, 2020, 6:13 pm
Keith Levenberg wrote:
September 13th, 2020, 3:37 pm
By the way, for those playing along at home, "closing shades of nuance" gets its own square on the bingo card, separate from the unmodified nuance.
99 Points, Antonio Galloni, Vinous: “Like Tignanello, the 2016 Solaia is a wine of extraordinary nuance and finesse. Super-ripe blackberry, plum jam, espresso, menthol, licorice and sweet spice build as the sublime 2016 shows off its personality and breeding. The 2016 somehow manages to be incredibly deep and also light on its feet. Sweet floral and spice notes add the closing shades of nuance to an exotic, beguilingly beautiful Solaia endowed with an eternal finish and mind-blowing beauty. The 2016 is an epic Solaia. That's all there is to it.” 08/19
Antonio Galloni 96 points! "The 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon is elegant, plush and silky, like the 2012, but with a little more of everything. Dark cherry, plum, licorice, leather and espresso are all nicely lifted by the natural freshness of the year. At present, the 2016 is a bit shy, but it undoubtedly has a very bright future. Floral, perfumed notes add the closing shades of nuance. Spottswoode's Cabernet is quite gracious in 2016, not to mention incredibly delicious."
Antonio Galloni, Vinous Media: "The 2013 Barbaresco Pajè will leave readers weak at the knees with its stunning aromatics. Spicebox, cedar, tobacco, licorice and menthol speak to the essence of Pajè. A wine of depth and pedigree, the 2013 has a lot to offer. Orange peel, cinnamon, rose petal and mint add the closing shades of nuance in a deceptively medium-bodied Barbaresco that has plenty of backing structure and tannic clout to age well for many years to come."
Tasted from magnum, the 1996 Barolo is absolutely stunning. Vibrant and wonderfully alive, the 1996 exudes class. Time has gently softened the 1996 tannins, rendering the 1996 super-expressive today. Balsamic, mentholated notes, along with scents of tobacco and dried stone fruit continue to open up with time in the glass. The 1996 is still firm and quite powerful, but not as austere as many wines are in this vintage. Tar, licorice and scorched earth add the closing shades of nuance in an impeccably balanced, vivid Barolo that captures the personality of the vintage at its best.
A classic Stags Leap Cabernet, the 2014 exudes richness, power and depth. Graphite, crème de cassis, lavender, violets, chocolate and sweet spices infuse this beautifully expressive, sculpted Cabernet Sauvignon. Chocolate, inky black fruits and a dollop of new oak add the closing shades of nuance. The tannins need time to siften, but there is plenty to look forward to. The 2014 is gorgeous. It’s as simple as that. – Antonio Galloni, Oct. 2016
Ridge's 2013 Zinfandel Paso Robles, from the Benito Dusi Ranch, exudes Paso warmth and richness. Unquestionably racy and overt, the 2013 offers striking depth and intensity, with a slightly roasted, sweet quality to the fruit. Sweet tobacco, cedar and dried herbs add closing shades of nuance, but the 2013 remains quite opulent in style. Still, all the elements are in the right place. The 2013 could use a few years to soften. It will be appreciated most by readers who enjoy intense, super-ripe Zinfandels. - Antonio Galloni, Vinous Media
This has me worried “shades of nuance” is some kind of code to wake up a dormant sleeper cell.
I think he just means “finishing touch”. But this is a great game.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1208 Post by RichardFlack » September 20th, 2020, 12:53 pm

Leonard Maran wrote:
September 16th, 2020, 9:57 pm
In another thread a negotiant throws around phrases like "uber pure", "just a bit of air it turns cologne-like", "sexy red and black fruit", "a resplendent finish", "kiss of brett, leather upholstery", "mysterious deep and savory tones", "nutmeg and brown sugar, blackberry syrup". Of course, this is mailing list only (a hallmark of this site), so it matters not that you do not know what you are buying.
“Kiss of Brett , leather upholstery “ sounds like quite the fetish.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1209 Post by John Morris » September 23rd, 2020, 11:32 am

So which is it? First it's "ample, creamy and expansive," then it's not as "rich and powerful" as normal and instead is fresh, finessed and tranluscent -- all implying that it's not so ample and expansive.
2016 Sandrone Barolo Aleste

"The 2016 Barolo Aleste is ample, creamy and expansive in feel. But more than that, the 2016 stands out for its freshness, persistence and brilliance. In so many vintages, the Aleste (formerly known as Cannubi Boschis) has been rich and powerful in feel, but in 2016, the wine is all about finesse. The red-fruited, floral purity of Nebbiolo comes through beautifully here; I especially admire the wine’s translucence. Wow." --Antonio Galloni, Vinous 98
"But they told me there would be a hand basket."

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1210 Post by John Morris » September 28th, 2020, 3:03 pm

Huh?
“The 2016 [Ulysses Napa] Cabernet Sauvignon is fabulous. Bright, powerful and pulsing with energy, the 2016 possesses stunning textural depth allied to a real sense of drive. Black cherry, tobacco, menthol, sage and licorice give this Cabernet from southern Oakville much of its distinctive personality. In this tasting, the 2016 Ulysses simply towers with pedigree and character. I loved it. Although the track record is short, the 2016 is the finest wine Christian Moueix and Tod Mostero have made at Ulysses. 98+ Points.”
(Keep those cards and letters coming in folks!)
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1211 Post by John Morris » September 28th, 2020, 3:49 pm

Time for a quick survey of wines with pedigree (bolded), which evidently is now an attribute of the wine in the bottle, like a flavor or aroma. It is often conjoined with class. (Other intriguing descriptors in red.)
2008 Louis Roederer Brut Cristal Rose
"The 2008 Cristal Rosé is all tension, nuance and class. Fresh and utterly brilliant, the 2008 bristles on the palate with pure pedigree. In the glass, the 2008 is at once translucent, weightless and powerful. Readers should be in no hurry to drink the 2008, a wine that will age effortlessly for many, many decades to come."-Antonio Galloni
2017 Raen Pinot Noir Royal St. Robert Cuvee
"The 2017 Pinot Noir Royal St. Robert is absolutely gorgeous. A wild array of floral and savory notes make a strong opening statement. Expressive and multi-faceted, the Royal St. Robert is positively dazzling from the very first taste. The interplay of fruit, whole cluster savoriness and structure results in a captivating Pinot that has more than enough pedigree to reward a number of years of cellaring. This is a brilliant showing. Wow!" -Antonio Galloni, Vinous 94
2018 Tensley Syrah Colson Canyon
"A wine of immense pedigree and stature, the 2018 Syrah Colson Canyon Vineyard captures the essence of Joey Tensley's style. Soaring aromatics, dense fruit and beams of tannin shape a Syrah of intense richness and savory depth. The Colson Canyon Syrah is a wine of tremendous dimension that gets better and better with time in the glass. Cedar, sweet pipe tobacco, iron and bright red fruit build into the palate-staining finish. All I can say is: Wow!!" -Antonio Galloni, Vinous 97
2009 Bond Cabernet Sauvignon St. Eden
"The 2009 Proprietary Blend St. Eden is simply stunning. A rich, resonant bouquet melds seamlessly into layers of fruit as the 2009 shows off its breathtaking pedigree and sheer class. There is virtually no perception of tannin in this voluptuous, beautifully balanced Cabernet Sauvignon. Freshly cut roses and a hint of cinnamon add complexity on the finish, but ultimately the St. Eden is first and foremost a wine of textural brilliance and spherical palate presence." -- WA 97, Antonio Galloni
2014 Fontodi Chianti Classico
"Fontodi's 2014 Chianti Classico is one of the most finessed vintages of this wine in recent memory. The combination of the cool growing conditions and a move toward larger oak casks has resulted in a deep yet translucent wine of notable pedigree and class. There is plenty of the typical Panzano richness, but less of the overt weight that has characterized some recent vintages."-Antonio Galloni, Vinous 92
2017 Ridge Lytton Springs
"Ridge's 2017 Lytton Springs opens up beautifully, with bright acids that drive a whole range of red/purplish fruit intermingled with floral notes. Creamy and ample in feel, the 2017 boasts superb balance and pedigree. Readers lucky enough to owe it should plan on cellaring it for at least a few years."-Antonio Galloni, Vinous 94
2016 Ch Margaux Margaux
"A gorgeous, captivating bouquet gives the 2016 Margaux an irresistible allure. Weightless and yet wonderfully persistent, in the way only the château's wines can be, the 2016 Grand Vin is a wine of exceptional breeding and pedigree. So many wines in this vintage are obvious, but Margaux is a wine that takes time to discover, like a great book or piece of music. Shades of tobacco, cedar, mint, licorice and bright, red-toned fruit reveal themselves over time. And yet it is a sense of total harmony and seductiveness that elevates Margaux into the stratosphere in 2016."-Antonio Galloni. Vinous 99
(Note breeding = pedigree)
"But they told me there would be a hand basket."

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1212 Post by RichardFlack » September 28th, 2020, 3:58 pm

the 2008 bristles on the palate with pure pedigree.
That sounds quite unappetising.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1213 Post by Jayson Cohen » September 28th, 2020, 4:50 pm

Maybe Vinous should implement new features for each regional review: Best in Breed; Best in Show.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1214 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » September 29th, 2020, 12:33 pm

"bristling with pedigree" would actually be a great literary description of a particularly snobbish and arrogant aristocrat

I think one reason these guys like the "pedigree" descriptor is because it fits well with the branding game of giving sky-high scores year after year to the same small group of wines with sky-high prices. "This wine traces its bloodline to the ancient and honorable house of 98 points!"

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1215 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » September 29th, 2020, 1:27 pm

John, assuming the critics you quote actually read this and are ashamed enough into amending their ways, you will be doing a public service. Assuming, as I expect is the case, that they either do not read this or, if they do, react with standard defensiveness and go on their merry way, you might consider whether you are needlessly inflicting pain on yourself. I do admit that I am regularly amused, though.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1216 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » September 29th, 2020, 2:55 pm

Jonathan Loesberg wrote:
September 29th, 2020, 1:27 pm
John, assuming the critics you quote actually read this and are ashamed enough into amending their ways, you will be doing a public service. Assuming, as I expect is the case, that they either do not read this or, if they do, react with standard defensiveness and go on their merry way, you might consider whether you are needlessly inflicting pain on yourself. I do admit that I am regularly amused, though.
Ha, worth it at every level.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1217 Post by John Morris » September 29th, 2020, 5:57 pm

Jonathan Loesberg wrote:
September 29th, 2020, 1:27 pm
John, assuming the critics you quote actually read this and are ashamed enough into amending their ways, you will be doing a public service. Assuming, as I expect is the case, that they either do not read this or, if they do, react with standard defensiveness and go on their merry way, you might consider whether you are needlessly inflicting pain on yourself. I do admit that I am regularly amused, though.
It serves two purposes, one selfish, one generous: (a) to vent at offenses against the language and (b) to amuse others. It seems I may have succeeded at both. [cheers.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1218 Post by PeterH » September 29th, 2020, 8:33 pm

"creamed plum, braised fig and melted black licorice notes that are long and deep, gliding through effortlessly and ending with a swath of espresso, loam and smoldering tobacco details"

Would you want to buy this wine? It is not a dessert wine BTW, nor a 2020 late harvest Napa.
P Hickner

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1219 Post by Paul @bbott » September 29th, 2020, 10:36 pm

“So full of texture, sifting, shifting, like licking clay off a potter’s wheel.” Not quiet sure what Tamlyn Currin was experiencing in tasting this Hungarian wine, but I don’t think that I want to try it.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1220 Post by crickey » October 1st, 2020, 10:40 am

I sometimes think certain critics are aware of this thread and are deliberating trolling it. See below for the latest from AG:

"The 2016 Chinon La Rougerie is all class. Bright and sculpted, with tremendous depth as well as unreal precision, the 2016 screams with character. An exotic mélange of black cherry, sage, lavender, licorice and menthol races out of the glass as this explosive, structured Chinon shows off its immense pedigree and statuesque beauty. The Rougerie emerges from a 1.2 hectare parcel on clay first planted in 1952. It spent 25-30 days on the skins and was aged for 18 months in French oak, about a third new. The 2016 is an utterly breathtaking wine. That's all there is to it."
Chri$ Ri¢k€y

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1221 Post by John Morris » October 1st, 2020, 10:44 am

PeterH wrote:
September 29th, 2020, 8:33 pm
"creamed plum, braised fig and melted black licorice notes that are long and deep, gliding through effortlessly and ending with a swath of espresso, loam and smoldering tobacco details"

Would you want to buy this wine? It is not a dessert wine BTW, nor a 2020 late harvest Napa.
Given that a guy in Massachusetts just died from eating too much black licorice, probably not.

Where's that description from? Who creams plum, and what does that entail? Does anyone melt their licorice?
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1222 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » October 1st, 2020, 11:36 am

crickey wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 10:40 am
I sometimes think certain critics are aware of this thread and are deliberating trolling it. See below for the latest from AG:

"The 2016 Chinon La Rougerie is all class. Bright and sculpted, with tremendous depth as well as unreal precision, the 2016 screams with character. An exotic mélange of black cherry, sage, lavender, licorice and menthol races out of the glass as this explosive, structured Chinon shows off its immense pedigree and statuesque beauty. The Rougerie emerges from a 1.2 hectare parcel on clay first planted in 1952. It spent 25-30 days on the skins and was aged for 18 months in French oak, about a third new. The 2016 is an utterly breathtaking wine. That's all there is to it."
This is also an interesting example of the routine overuse of superlatives in wine criticism. This wine can't just be a wine of depth, precision, and character. It has to have TREMENDOUS depth, UNREAL precision, and SCREAM with character. It can't just be breathtaking (already very superlative!), it needs to be UTTERLY breathtaking.

This actually leaves the reader in a bit of an interpretive quandry. If the critic just says the wine is precise, is this the B-, sort of ordinary and possibly fuzzy level of precision, as opposed to the A+ "unreal" level? If the wine has depth does this just mean a little bit of depth as opposed to the far deeper TREMENDOUS depth? And if these superlatives are scattered everywhere does this mean that your wines of just generic depth and precision are supposed to be viewed as poor cousins, like the sad orphaned 89 pointer is in today's land of 93-95 pointers?

This also contibutes to the rise of what I earlier called "hyper-superlatives" (viewtopic.php?f=1&t=139826&start=1150#p3065535), where the critic gropes for words to indicate entirely unprecedented qualities beyond the capacity of the English language to capture. I assume this "Rougerie" wine is some kind of super-cuvee or at least the most expensive wine from the producer this year in order to get the superlative treatment, but assuming it's just say a 95 pointer, having resorted to endless strings of superlatives for your 95 point wines means you need another descriptive register for your 98-pointers.

Bottom line to me is that when I read critical tasting notes I often don't get the feeling the critic is sitting at his keyboard focused on "how do I describe this wine" (a very difficult challenge BTW!), but instead "how do I praise and market this wine".

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1223 Post by Phil T r o t t e r » October 1st, 2020, 12:16 pm

John Morris wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 10:44 am
Where's that description from? Who creams plum, and what does that entail? Does anyone melt their licorice?
You sir, just had me mute my conference call because of excessive chuckling. Well done and cheers.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1224 Post by crickey » October 1st, 2020, 1:11 pm

If you search google, you will find a number of recipes (basically all ice cream and desserts) calling for melted licorice. The question is whether melted licorice smells/tastes any different than unmelted licorice.
Chri$ Ri¢k€y

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1225 Post by Charlie Carnes » October 1st, 2020, 1:58 pm

Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 11:36 am

Bottom line to me is that when I read critical tasting notes I often don't get the feeling the critic is sitting at his keyboard focused on "how do I describe this wine" (a very difficult challenge BTW!), but instead "how do I praise and market this wine".
Thats it! Why I have very little use for critics.
So shines a good deed in a weary world!

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1226 Post by John Ammons » October 1st, 2020, 3:11 pm

Is there a minimum point score conferred upon a wine if it displays pedigree?

I submit that common pedigree should require at least 90 points, screaming pedigree should require 95, and if by some divine intervention the wine oozes pedigree then 98+. That's all there is to it.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1227 Post by K.C0LBURN » October 2nd, 2020, 9:48 am

What disappoints me most is that I can’t taste points - but I can absolutely taste the difference between Stag’s Leap, Oakville, Howell Mountain, and Rutherford.

I’ve been blessed to try 100% SVD Cabernet from the same winemaker for 3/4 of the above AVAs, and to notice some distinct terroir characteristics later confirmed in other tastings with other wineries and winemakers.

I’d have to say Stag’s Leap fruit is the easiest for me to distinguish, though Rutherford is a close second. Howell MTN. has its distinctive pepper.

I’ll admit I’m less well-versed in Oakville, but I’m gradually getting to know Atlas Peak, Coombsville, Yountville, etc.

And that’s just Cabernet!

What I expect from a Green Valley Chardonnay is totally different from what I expect from a Sonoma Coast Chardonnay. All of my favorite wines are demonstrably “from” somewhere. I love to try different expressions of place created by different winemakers.

“Rutherford dust” is absolutely a thing. Rutherford and Howell Mountain are also the two nested AVAs in Napa that I’ve ‘known’ the longest and tasted the most over multiple vintages.
K A T H E R I N E

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1228 Post by John Morris » October 11th, 2020, 8:09 am

Phil T r o t t e r wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 12:16 pm
John Morris wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 10:44 am
Where's that description from? Who creams plum, and what does that entail? Does anyone melt their licorice?
You sir, just had me mute my conference call because of excessive chuckling. Well done and cheers.
You were reading Wine Berserkers while on a conference call? I'm shocked -- shocked!
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1229 Post by John Morris » October 11th, 2020, 8:10 am

John Ammons wrote:
October 1st, 2020, 3:11 pm
Is there a minimum point score conferred upon a wine if it displays pedigree?

I submit that common pedigree should require at least 90 points, screaming pedigree should require 95, and if by some divine intervention the wine oozes pedigree then 98+. That's all there is to it.
It's all in the black-box tasting notes-generating algorithm.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1230 Post by John Morris » October 11th, 2020, 8:16 am

A brief digression to cover cliche-ridden writing by management consultants. This e-mail just landed in my inbox from McKinsey.
McKinsey emerging resilients - highlighted.JPG
[barf1.gif]

From the body of the note:
By sector, we discovered that the emerging resilients are more likely to demonstrate consistent, balanced performance across a number of metrics, as opposed to having a leadership spike in one and lagging performance in the others. This brings us to our final insight: tomorrow’s resilients are more likely to be the companies that are driving value-added growth while balancing optionality, rather than those that focus most of their attention on maintaining operating margins, at the expense of other proportionate measures.
Translation:
The companies that are doing well during the Covid shutdown are the companies that have always done well. In the future, companies that that grow will do better.
"But they told me there would be a hand basket."

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1231 Post by John Morris » October 14th, 2020, 7:18 am

Will PPR (Pedigree/Price Ratio) replace QPR?
Castell 'in Villa - 2016 Chianti Classico
"..Powerful, classically austere and so incredibly beautiful, the 2016 is a total stunner. Sweet red cherry, tobacco, cedar, mint and dried flowers all open up with a bit of coaxing. All of the translucent beauty of Sangiovese comes through in a Chianti Classico that will leave readers weak at the knees. Readers who open the 2016 young will want to give it a good bit of aeration. If I could only have one wine reviewed in this entire article, it might very well be the Castell'in Villa 2016. The price? Ridiculous for the level of pedigree. What a wine. -Antonio Galloni
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1232 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » October 14th, 2020, 7:49 am

John Morris wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 8:16 am
A brief digression to cover cliche-ridden writing by management consultants. This e-mail just landed in my inbox from McKinsey.

McKinsey emerging resilients - highlighted.JPG

[barf1.gif]

From the body of the note:
By sector, we discovered that the emerging resilients are more likely to demonstrate consistent, balanced performance across a number of metrics, as opposed to having a leadership spike in one and lagging performance in the others. This brings us to our final insight: tomorrow’s resilients are more likely to be the companies that are driving value-added growth while balancing optionality, rather than those that focus most of their attention on maintaining operating margins, at the expense of other proportionate measures.
Translation:
The companies that are doing well during the Covid shutdown are the companies that have always done well. In the future, companies that that grow will do better.
I don't think the translation is quite accurate. What the passage seems to be saying is that companies that seek to do well in all aspects of what they do will be more able to deal with various kinds of crises and thus will more likely succeded than companies that concentrate on one aspect of their business rather than others. This statement is still only slightly less vacuous than your version, however.

Escape velocity, though, is precisely the wrong metaphor for this. Escape velocity is the specific speed you need to achieve to escape a planet's gravitational hold on you, the planet usually being Earth because that's the only one we try to escape from. It is thus one very specific feature and not a balance of features. They should have considered the metaphor of genetic diversity. The problem in this passage is not cliché but self-enclosed obscurity.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1233 Post by GregT » October 14th, 2020, 10:45 am

John that whole paragraph is horrible. "Emerging resilients" is exactly the kind of BS consultant-speak that makes them so irritating. And what is "balancing optionality"??

Is optionality a noun? Or an adjective? Does it mean something like the quality of having options? Would you say "Hey pardner. That there scenario sure has a lot of optionality, don't it?"

But you hit on something here. Consultant-speak is really a gold mine for wine writers. Turn adjectives into verbs unnecessarily, use nouns as verbs, make everything a verb if possible and always write like everything is taking place against the backdrop of an exploding building in slow motion.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1234 Post by John Morris » October 14th, 2020, 11:10 am

GregT wrote:
October 14th, 2020, 10:45 am
Is optionality a noun? Or an adjective? Does it mean something like the quality of having options? Would you say "Hey pardner. That there scenario sure has a lot of optionality, don't it?"
Yes, optionality is a noun in investing. There's a technical definition that's relevant to traders, but in practice it's often used to mean the potential upside -- by analogy to owning a call option that allows you to cash in if a value goes up.
optionality (countable and uncountable, plural optionalities)

(finance, business) The value of additional optional investment opportunities available only after having made an initial investment.

The short-term payoff for this is modest, but the optionality value is enormous.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1235 Post by Jason T » October 14th, 2020, 11:53 am

John Morris wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 8:16 am
A brief digression to cover cliche-ridden writing by management consultants. This e-mail just landed in my inbox from McKinsey.

McKinsey emerging resilients - highlighted.JPG

[barf1.gif]

From the body of the note:
By sector, we discovered that the emerging resilients are more likely to demonstrate consistent, balanced performance across a number of metrics, as opposed to having a leadership spike in one and lagging performance in the others. This brings us to our final insight: tomorrow’s resilients are more likely to be the companies that are driving value-added growth while balancing optionality, rather than those that focus most of their attention on maintaining operating margins, at the expense of other proportionate measures.
Translation:
The companies that are doing well during the Covid shutdown are the companies that have always done well. In the future, companies that that grow will do better.
As a management consultant I’d just like to acknowledge that many management consultants try too hard to sound clever, without actually being clever.
J@son Tr@ughber

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1236 Post by John Morris » October 17th, 2020, 1:46 pm

John Morris wrote:
October 14th, 2020, 7:18 am
Will PPR (Pedigree/Price Ratio) replace QPR?
Castell 'in Villa - 2016 Chianti Classico
"..Powerful, classically austere and so incredibly beautiful, the 2016 is a total stunner. Sweet red cherry, tobacco, cedar, mint and dried flowers all open up with a bit of coaxing. All of the translucent beauty of Sangiovese comes through in a Chianti Classico that will leave readers weak at the knees. Readers who open the 2016 young will want to give it a good bit of aeration. If I could only have one wine reviewed in this entire article, it might very well be the Castell'in Villa 2016. The price? Ridiculous for the level of pedigree. What a wine. -Antonio Galloni
Which leads to another question: How many dimensions (and how many words?) does it take to reach 100 points, and how many points are assigned to each dimension?
2016 Gaja Barolo Sperss, 100 points, Wine Advocate
"The golden touch, that proverbial Gaja magic, is taken to a whole new level in the 2016 Barolo Sperss. Angelo Gaja has taught his children to follow their own path, and now that the generational switch is well underway at the family estate, we can see that Gaia, Rossana and Giovanni have done him proud. Very proud. This stunning expression from the 2016 vintage (with 16,000 bottles released) represents quite a few celebratory milestones. We are now in the fifth generation to protect the Gaja legacy in an unbroken family chain that has endured since 1859. This wine is 100% Nebbiolo, and since the 2013 vintage, it is part of the Barolo DOCG appellation. Winemaking has been tweaked to embrace a more elegant, ethereal and streamlined personality, instead of the bigger extraction we saw in the past. This upgraded identity is distinctly evident in this newest release of Sperss. Starting with appearance, the wine is luminous and bright with shiny ruby and garnet gemstone. Its aromatic reach is three-dimensional with width, height and depth. Delicate berry tones cede to pressed lilac, anise, sandalwood and cardamom spice. I double decanted and left the bottle open for a few hours before my tasting. The results are tight and gentle, and the wine shows beautiful vertical lift and intensity. To achieve this much power without the excess fruit weight is really quite an accomplishment. This is the magic of Nebbiolo, and the magic of Gaja." --Monica Larner
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1237 Post by Otto Forsberg » October 17th, 2020, 2:00 pm

John Morris wrote:
October 17th, 2020, 1:46 pm
Which leads to another question: How many dimensions (and how many words?) does it take to reach 100 points, and how many points are assigned to each dimension?
Seeing how much more information can be stored by adding a new dimension, I think that it wouldn't take much more than a mediocre 4-dimensional wine to be noticeably better than a 3-dimensional 100-pointer.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1238 Post by John Morris » October 17th, 2020, 2:05 pm

Yes, it's really a matter of simple math, isn't it?
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1239 Post by Keith Levenberg » October 17th, 2020, 5:48 pm

I can understand "three dimensional" as a metaphor for a wine after you put it in your mouth. I'm having a real hard time figuring out what a three-dimensional aroma would be. How do you get an aroma without "width, height[,] and depth"? By definition, an aroma would have to be three-dimensional or it would remain on the surface rim accessible only to Flatland creatures.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1240 Post by RichardFlack » October 17th, 2020, 6:24 pm

Otto Forsberg wrote:
October 17th, 2020, 2:00 pm
John Morris wrote:
October 17th, 2020, 1:46 pm
Which leads to another question: How many dimensions (and how many words?) does it take to reach 100 points, and how many points are assigned to each dimension?
Seeing how much more information can be stored by adding a new dimension, I think that it wouldn't take much more than a mediocre 4-dimensional wine to be noticeably better than a 3-dimensional 100-pointer.
Château TARDIS?
Assuming that the fourth dimension is time, that could solve all the possible issues with correctly ageing the wine.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1241 Post by John Morris » October 23rd, 2020, 12:50 pm

Another good one for all you bingo players:
"The [NOAH] 2013 Bramaterra is fabulous. Deceptive in its mid-weight structure, the 2013 is a wine of resonance, vertical reach and, most importantly, real pedigree. Dried flowers, herbs, mint, dried cherry and tobacco all meld together effortlessly. Time in the glass brings out a whole range of floral and savory overtones that add aromatic dimension. Vivid and enticing, the 2013 Bramaterra will delight readers for many years to come." -- 93 points Antonio Galloni, Vinous Media
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1242 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » October 23rd, 2020, 1:12 pm

John Morris wrote:
October 23rd, 2020, 12:50 pm
Another good one for all you bingo players:
"The [NOAH] 2013 Bramaterra is fabulous. Deceptive in its mid-weight structure, the 2013 is a wine of resonance, vertical reach and, most importantly, real pedigree. Dried flowers, herbs, mint, dried cherry and tobacco all meld together effortlessly. Time in the glass brings out a whole range of floral and savory overtones that add aromatic dimension. Vivid and enticing, the 2013 Bramaterra will delight readers for many years to come." -- 93 points Antonio Galloni, Vinous Media
All that, and only 93, which is like a B- score for him.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1243 Post by Jayson Cohen » October 23rd, 2020, 2:05 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
October 23rd, 2020, 1:12 pm
John Morris wrote:
October 23rd, 2020, 12:50 pm
Another good one for all you bingo players:
"The [NOAH] 2013 Bramaterra is fabulous. Deceptive in its mid-weight structure, the 2013 is a wine of resonance, vertical reach and, most importantly, real pedigree. Dried flowers, herbs, mint, dried cherry and tobacco all meld together effortlessly. Time in the glass brings out a whole range of floral and savory overtones that add aromatic dimension. Vivid and enticing, the 2013 Bramaterra will delight readers for many years to come." -- 93 points Antonio Galloni, Vinous Media
All that, and only 93, which is like a B- score for him.
I guess if a wine only reaches the vertical and aromatic dimensions but not the infinity of other wine dimensions, the cap is 93.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1244 Post by John Morris » November 1st, 2020, 9:52 am

Some days, I suspect that some critics are trolling us.

Never David Schildknecht, whose creative vocabulary defies bingo cards. Indeed, rather than trolling us, I think he's teasing us -- daring us to find any common or repeated term. But he slipped up with "evocation":
Von Winning, Riesling Grosses Gewachs Kieselberg, 2017
"This displays one of the most purely mineral noses I can recall from any Pfalz Riesling, specifically an evocation of quarry dust, wet stone, oil and sea breeze. In Chablis-like fashion, these are accompanied by penetrating evocations of crushed lemon seed. The feel is firm and the sense of crushed-stone suffusion is striking. At the same time, a sense of vibrancy sets the palate tingling, while salinity tugs at the salivary glands. Mint and white pepper add to the incisively gripping, intense finish. 94pts" -- David Schildknecht, Vinous
Crushed-stone suffusion?
Spreitzer, Hattenheimer Engelmannsberg Riesling Feinherb, 2017
"Ceylon tea, sea breeze and corn tassel in the nose find subtle subsequent expression on the wine’s polished, buoyant palate. The mouthwateringly-persistent finish is infectiously juicy as well as wonderfully transparent to myriad herbal and mineral nuances. What a model of Rheingau restraint, complexity, balance and “hidden sweetness! 91pts" -- David Schildknecht, Vinous
Corn tassel in the nose sounds, well, ticklish.

Transparent to myriad nuances??
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1245 Post by John Morris » November 1st, 2020, 9:52 am

FYI, here's part of the intro from Flatiron, which quoted those reviews:
Rheinhessen
This is frontier land with France and has spent centuries caught in the middle of other people’s wars. It is also where Charlemagne started planting vines in the late 700’s and has been doing so continuously ever since. Its current, enthusiastic, and highly talented winemakers are moving mountains to change that.
I thought that guy was dead.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1246 Post by Jayson Cohen » November 1st, 2020, 10:04 am

John Morris wrote:
November 1st, 2020, 9:52 am
FYI, Flatiron, which quoted those reviews, has brought Charlemagne back from the dead!
Rheinhessen
This is frontier land with France and has spent centuries caught in the middle of other people’s wars. It is also where Charlemagne started planting vines in the late 700’s and has been doing so continuously ever since. Its current, enthusiastic, and highly talented winemakers are moving mountains to change that.
I bet you if you pointed out this sentence to Clara, who is great, she would be a bit embarrassed.

As we have discussed many times, both professional wine writers and retailers really need copy editors or at least good proof readers.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1247 Post by John Morris » November 1st, 2020, 10:24 am

As you say, a copy editor would be useful.

I could also point out that the Rheinhessen isn't on the French frontier.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1248 Post by John Morris » November 11th, 2020, 12:09 pm

On the one hand, on the other hand, and on the third hand....
"The 2016 Clos de l’Oratoire is dense, resonant, but also quite closed in on itself. Black cherry, plum, chocolate, licorice and smoke all meld together in this super-expressive, layered Saint-Émilion. In 2016, Clos de l’Oratoire is quite understated and shows more of an emphasis on freshness than in the past, typical of all the Stephan von Neipperg’s wines today."-- Vinous 94, Antonio Galloni
Is it closed and understated or "super-expressive." [scratch.gif]

Not sure how "resonant" fits in.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1249 Post by William Kelley » November 11th, 2020, 1:05 pm

John Morris wrote:
November 1st, 2020, 9:52 am
FYI, here's part of the intro from Flatiron, which quoted those reviews:
Rheinhessen
This is frontier land with France and has spent centuries caught in the middle of other people’s wars. It is also where Charlemagne started planting vines in the late 700’s and has been doing so continuously ever since. Its current, enthusiastic, and highly talented winemakers are moving mountains to change that.
I thought that guy was dead.
I actually saw him in Aloxe the other day, when I was picking up some squab pigeon. Everything they say about his beard is true [rofl.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

#1250 Post by John Morris » November 11th, 2020, 1:09 pm

I hope you let him know we'd just been talking about him.
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