Burgundy 2019 report

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Philip Ente
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Burgundy 2019 report

#1 Post by Philip Ente » September 15th, 2019, 11:03 am

From my cousins in Meursault

How much higher than $850 a bottle can Arnaud's wine go?
Benoit has lowered his acid levels and his recent wines are great.
----


En ce qui concerne notre récolte 2019, c’est une petite moitié de récolte à cause du gel et ensuite la sécheresse des mois de juillet et août 😢, mais le peu qu’il y a sera certainement bon.

(enfin pour ceux qui n’auront pas trop attendu pour vendanger , on entend parler chez certain de 15, 7 degrés !!! C’est de la folie !)

Il n’y aura pas beaucoup de vin chez Ente pour le Millesime 2019 , le prix va encore monter 😉

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#2 Post by m. ristev » September 15th, 2019, 1:06 pm

if people are actually paying $850 i will gladly sell all of mine. i suspect it is mostly just market manipulation via wine-searcher...
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#3 Post by Philip Ente » September 15th, 2019, 1:15 pm


m. ristev
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#4 Post by m. ristev » September 15th, 2019, 1:39 pm

benchmark sold seve du clos mags earlier this year for $599...
i am sure there is far more reasonable pricing than that especially in france.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#5 Post by Dave Nerland » September 15th, 2019, 2:08 pm

My understanding from friends who have been in France in the last 12 months, is that Arnaud Ente wines are harder to find then Coche...I could be wrong. Price seems like it is only going one way and that is up.

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#6 Post by c fu » September 15th, 2019, 4:18 pm

m. ristev wrote:
September 15th, 2019, 1:06 pm
if people are actually paying $850 i will gladly sell all of mine. i suspect it is mostly just market manipulation via wine-searcher...
Sells fairly high at auction.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#7 Post by YLee » September 15th, 2019, 4:31 pm

Even his bourgogne blancs are over $150.
-¥ 0 ñ 9

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#8 Post by Fred C » September 15th, 2019, 5:06 pm

m. ristev wrote:
September 15th, 2019, 1:39 pm
benchmark sold seve du clos mags earlier this year for $599...
i am sure there is far more reasonable pricing than that especially in france.
Are you sure it wasn’t $1599? I saw some on benchmark for close to 2k.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#9 Post by m. ristev » September 15th, 2019, 5:26 pm

nope, it was $599 for the '12 mag offered this past feb according to the email. i have noticed they priced more recent offerings in line with other wine-searcher listings. the '15 seve du clos mag was $9xx at zachys but sold out in about 24 hours. i noticed some more obscure shops offering recent vintage premier cru bottlings for <$500. these prices are obviously quite a bit less than wine-searcher but again i am certain there is even better pricing out there.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#10 Post by Mattstolz » September 16th, 2019, 3:52 pm

Philip Ente wrote:
September 15th, 2019, 11:03 am
From my cousins in Meursault

How much higher than $850 a bottle can Arnaud's wine go?
Benoit has lowered his acid levels and his recent wines are great.
----


En ce qui concerne notre récolte 2019, c’est une petite moitié de récolte à cause du gel et ensuite la sécheresse des mois de juillet et août 😢, mais le peu qu’il y a sera certainement bon.

(enfin pour ceux qui n’auront pas trop attendu pour vendanger , on entend parler chez certain de 15, 7 degrés !!! C’est de la folie !)

Il n’y aura pas beaucoup de vin chez Ente pour le Millesime 2019 , le prix va encore monter 😉
I used Google translate for everyone:

"As for our 2019 harvest, it's a small half of the harvest because of frost and then the drought of July and August, but the little that there will be will certainly be good.

(Finally, for those who have not waited too long to harvest, we hear about some 15, 7 degrees! It's crazy!)

There will not be much wine at Ente for the 2019 Millesime, the price will go up again"

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#11 Post by Robert Panzer » September 20th, 2019, 2:36 pm

Elaborating on the theme of the 2019 burgundy harvest outside of things Ente, Michel Mallard told me today that although yields are quite low due to the general lack of water throughout the season, what little there is has tremendous potential. Everything in red between 13.2-13.4% alcohol, with crazy good balance. Once again, sulfurless vinifications, 70%+ whole cluster for him.
Thomas Bouley's team is qualitatively very happy, although again, yields are down in certain drought affected parcels.
Images from folks all over look like fruit is impeccably clean.
Promising birth year wine for our lil' girl, hopefully?
Looking forward to another tasting tour bonanza in November, where I will certainly learn a lot more.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#12 Post by Nick Gangas » September 20th, 2019, 2:51 pm

so to sum it up, vintage of the century but prices need to go way up ?

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#13 Post by c fu » September 20th, 2019, 4:13 pm

Nick Gangas wrote:
September 20th, 2019, 2:51 pm
so to sum it up, vintage of the century but prices need to go way up ?
Burgundy is like Napa Cab now, goes up in price regardless of the vintage now.. seeing my 2017 offers...
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#14 Post by bruce curfman » September 20th, 2019, 5:45 pm

So is the harvest still ongoing, especially in the Cote de Nuits? It sounds like the Cote de Beaune is wrapping up. The weather forecast for the next couple of weeks looks to be pretty wet. Is that any problem at this point?

I don't have any direct contact over there now, but we will be in Burgundy beginning the 9/27 for 10 days or so. Definitely taking all our rain gear!

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#15 Post by Robert Panzer » September 20th, 2019, 6:01 pm

Another vintage, this century, Nikos.
Like every vintage, different, with lots of great wines made.
One doesn't need any of them.
One doesn't need any wine at all.
But are there going to be nice experiences in store for those who wish to enjoy them?
Yes, just like every year.
As to pricing, on my side of the fence dealing with ex-cellars pricing and many growers both superstars and those less limelit, it has been fairly stable. Crazy increases are the exception, not the rule.
But feel free to cry yourself a river, or make yourself a snark sandwich to chew on if that satisfies whatever appetite beckons you.
I apologize in advance for my tone (particularly because you're a nice fellow), but I am sick of people complaining about overpriced Burgundy.
There are oceans of affordable Burgundy, never has there been more, I would surmise.
But you won't find those on auction in Hong Kong.
I would posit that the wines that keep escalating are precisely the wines that fools continue to chase at any price, then moan about how much their favorite trophy producer costs.
Authentic, emotionally captivating red and white Burgundy still exists at what I consider to be very fair prices ($40-70 US Doooolars).
You summed it up so neatly, in just one sentence.
And then I go and make a mess of things with my wordy rants......
[cheers.gif]

Depending on folks' starting dates, Monsieur Curfman, some have finished, and many will be finished by the time the rains hit (which looks to be substantial on Sunday .75 inches, and then sprinkles throughout the week .1-.2 inches per day). It would be nice if anyone who is a grower would opine on the effect of rain at this juncture, as I could take a whack at it, but would likely paint too coarse of an idea. There's always Ponsot and the Confuron-Cotetidot/Courcel late pickers....
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#16 Post by Martin Steinley » September 20th, 2019, 9:42 pm

That's a great post, Robert. Bravo!
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#17 Post by Philip Ente » September 21st, 2019, 8:48 am

More feedback from Burgundy.

This person's knowledge of what is going on chez lui is second to none

Les rouges seront meilleurs que les blancs en 2019.

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#18 Post by William Kelley » September 21st, 2019, 9:14 am

Despite the crazy temperatures and drought conditions, the red wine chemistry is actually pretty classical. I'm making a couple of barrels of Chambolle-Musigny this year—the best way to understand the vintage—and picked on Thursday. Potential alcohol is around 13.5% with a pH of 3.2 before malolactic. Couldn't be much happier. By comparison, last year alcohol was 13.95% with a pH of 3.35 before malo (though there was very little malic acid so it didn't change much).
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#19 Post by Robert Panzer » September 21st, 2019, 9:16 am

Pierre Duroché is excited about the potential, 12.5-13.2% alc, better acidity than '18....
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#20 Post by Philip Ente » September 21st, 2019, 9:22 am

What about the Ente's report of levels of 15.7 % Can Meursaults carry that in any year?

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#21 Post by Dennis Borczon » September 21st, 2019, 10:33 am

William Kelley wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 9:14 am
Despite the crazy temperatures and drought conditions, the red wine chemistry is actually pretty classical. I'm making a couple of barrels of Chambolle-Musigny this year—the best way to understand the vintage—and picked on Thursday. Potential alcohol is around 13.5% with a pH of 3.2 before malolactic. Couldn't be much happier. By comparison, last year alcohol was 13.95% with a pH of 3.35 before malo (though there was very little malic acid so it didn't change much).
OK I admit I am not an advocate subscriber anymore, do tell about your winemaking adventure in Burgundy. Is this a homemade garage project? Commercial? Are you getting any help in production? It is rare indeed to have a writer/critic and vigneron contributing here!

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#22 Post by Nick Gangas » September 21st, 2019, 11:53 am

Robert Panzer wrote:
September 20th, 2019, 6:01 pm
Another vintage, this century, Nikos.
Like every vintage, different, with lots of great wines made.
One doesn't need any of them.
One doesn't need any wine at all.
But are there going to be nice experiences in store for those who wish to enjoy them?
Yes, just like every year.
As to pricing, on my side of the fence dealing with ex-cellars pricing and many growers both superstars and those less limelit, it has been fairly stable. Crazy increases are the exception, not the rule.
But feel free to cry yourself a river, or make yourself a snark sandwich to chew on if that satisfies whatever appetite beckons you.
I apologize in advance for my tone (particularly because you're a nice fellow), but I am sick of people complaining about overpriced Burgundy.
There are oceans of affordable Burgundy, never has there been more, I would surmise.
But you won't find those on auction in Hong Kong.
I would posit that the wines that keep escalating are precisely the wines that fools continue to chase at any price, then moan about how much their favorite trophy producer costs.
Authentic, emotionally captivating red and white Burgundy still exists at what I consider to be very fair prices ($40-70 US Doooolars).
You summed it up so neatly, in just one sentence.
And then I go and make a mess of things with my wordy rants......
[cheers.gif]

Depending on folks' starting dates, Monsieur Curfman, some have finished, and many will be finished by the time the rains hit (which looks to be substantial on Sunday .75 inches, and then sprinkles throughout the week .1-.2 inches per day). It would be nice if anyone who is a grower would opine on the effect of rain at this juncture, as I could take a whack at it, but would likely paint too coarse of an idea. There's always Ponsot and the Confuron-Cotetidot/Courcel late pickers....
Nope you got it wrong buddy. I'm not crying nothing. I'm laughing at the shill masters with their tired one trick pony sales pitch. Don't matter to me because I'm out. My trophy case has been greatly reduced and diversified. No more $1200 bottles that wholesale for $300 for me. You know I know the truth.

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#23 Post by Nick Gangas » September 21st, 2019, 11:54 am

c fu wrote:
September 20th, 2019, 4:13 pm
Nick Gangas wrote:
September 20th, 2019, 2:51 pm
so to sum it up, vintage of the century but prices need to go way up ?
Burgundy is like Napa Cab now, goes up in price regardless of the vintage now.. seeing my 2017 offers...
yes. As great as the 2007's ! Buy now !

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#24 Post by Keith Levenberg » September 21st, 2019, 5:25 pm

The grape cluster pics growers have been posting on Facebook this year have been super-porny.

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#25 Post by William Kelley » September 21st, 2019, 11:10 pm

Dennis Borczon wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 10:33 am
William Kelley wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 9:14 am
Despite the crazy temperatures and drought conditions, the red wine chemistry is actually pretty classical. I'm making a couple of barrels of Chambolle-Musigny this year—the best way to understand the vintage—and picked on Thursday. Potential alcohol is around 13.5% with a pH of 3.2 before malolactic. Couldn't be much happier. By comparison, last year alcohol was 13.95% with a pH of 3.35 before malo (though there was very little malic acid so it didn't change much).
OK I admit I am not an advocate subscriber anymore, do tell about your winemaking adventure in Burgundy. Is this a homemade garage project? Commercial? Are you getting any help in production? It is rare indeed to have a writer/critic and vigneron contributing here!
I've worked a bunch of harvests and make a bit of my own wine in California, so vinifying in Burgundy was always something I was keen to do, and that's an understatement. When I decided to have a go, the premise was to prioritize first vine genetics, then vine age, and only finally appellation, but happily the vines are in Chambolle. I don't review the vigneron that sells me the grapes to avoid the appearance of any conflict of interest, but I'm thinking I might start this year, with a very explicit disclosure in each note, as several subscribers have been asking about the producer's wines. I'm planning to drink most of the production but will give / sell some to friends. I have found it the best way to get real insight into a vintage, and it means I have to be in Burgundy at harvest time so I see what's going on along the Côte.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#26 Post by William Kelley » September 21st, 2019, 11:12 pm

Philip Ente wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 9:22 am
What about the Ente's report of levels of 15.7 % Can Meursaults carry that in any year?
Chardonnay seems to be much higher than Pinot Noir this year! Certainly fully 14% seems to be routine. Clusters and berries were tiny, with a very poor juice yield. But there is acidity, and lots of concentration, so I think folks who picked before the potential alcohol levels got too crazy will make good wines. Let's see!
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#27 Post by Craig G » September 22nd, 2019, 5:10 am

William Kelley wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 11:10 pm
I don't review the vigneron that sells me the grapes to avoid the appearance of any conflict of interest, but I'm thinking I might start this year, with a very explicit disclosure in each note, as several subscribers have been asking about the producer's wines. I'm planning to drink most of the production but will give / sell some to friends.
This is not meant as a criticism and I totally get why you would want to do this, but in my opinion, if you sell the wine it’s a clear conflict of interest, because you’re reviewing your competitors. Selling or trading at cost to friends, maybe not.

My suggestion would be to just be transparent about what you’re doing (as you are being here), and don’t claim that you’ve removed any conflict of interest. I expect people will trust you.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#28 Post by Howard Cooper » September 22nd, 2019, 5:22 am

YLee wrote:
September 15th, 2019, 4:31 pm
Even his bourgogne blancs are over $150.
So, his Bourgogne Blanc is about the price of Ramonet's premier crus. Easy pass.

I guess there will always be some wines out there from all over the world for people with more money than brains.
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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#29 Post by Dennis Borczon » September 22nd, 2019, 11:21 am

William Kelley wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 11:10 pm
Dennis Borczon wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 10:33 am
William Kelley wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 9:14 am
Despite the crazy temperatures and drought conditions, the red wine chemistry is actually pretty classical. I'm making a couple of barrels of Chambolle-Musigny this year—the best way to understand the vintage—and picked on Thursday. Potential alcohol is around 13.5% with a pH of 3.2 before malolactic. Couldn't be much happier. By comparison, last year alcohol was 13.95% with a pH of 3.35 before malo (though there was very little malic acid so it didn't change much).
OK I admit I am not an advocate subscriber anymore, do tell about your winemaking adventure in Burgundy. Is this a homemade garage project? Commercial? Are you getting any help in production? It is rare indeed to have a writer/critic and vigneron contributing here!
I've worked a bunch of harvests and make a bit of my own wine in California, so vinifying in Burgundy was always something I was keen to do, and that's an understatement. When I decided to have a go, the premise was to prioritize first vine genetics, then vine age, and only finally appellation, but happily the vines are in Chambolle. I don't review the vigneron that sells me the grapes to avoid the appearance of any conflict of interest, but I'm thinking I might start this year, with a very explicit disclosure in each note, as several subscribers have been asking about the producer's wines. I'm planning to drink most of the production but will give / sell some to friends. I have found it the best way to get real insight into a vintage, and it means I have to be in Burgundy at harvest time so I see what's going on along the Côte.
Thanks for the information. It is another dimension of understanding in reviewing the wines. Doubt this will be a significant conflict for you as it sounds like a personal project, hardly a big commercial enterprise. I enormously respect the effort. It is one thing to be a critic, another to put your foot in the fermenter and really see how things turn out.

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Re: Burgundy 2019 report

#30 Post by Howard Cooper » September 22nd, 2019, 12:47 pm

William Kelley wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 11:10 pm
Dennis Borczon wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 10:33 am
William Kelley wrote:
September 21st, 2019, 9:14 am
Despite the crazy temperatures and drought conditions, the red wine chemistry is actually pretty classical. I'm making a couple of barrels of Chambolle-Musigny this year—the best way to understand the vintage—and picked on Thursday. Potential alcohol is around 13.5% with a pH of 3.2 before malolactic. Couldn't be much happier. By comparison, last year alcohol was 13.95% with a pH of 3.35 before malo (though there was very little malic acid so it didn't change much).
OK I admit I am not an advocate subscriber anymore, do tell about your winemaking adventure in Burgundy. Is this a homemade garage project? Commercial? Are you getting any help in production? It is rare indeed to have a writer/critic and vigneron contributing here!
I've worked a bunch of harvests and make a bit of my own wine in California, so vinifying in Burgundy was always something I was keen to do, and that's an understatement. When I decided to have a go, the premise was to prioritize first vine genetics, then vine age, and only finally appellation, but happily the vines are in Chambolle. I don't review the vigneron that sells me the grapes to avoid the appearance of any conflict of interest, but I'm thinking I might start this year, with a very explicit disclosure in each note, as several subscribers have been asking about the producer's wines. I'm planning to drink most of the production but will give / sell some to friends. I have found it the best way to get real insight into a vintage, and it means I have to be in Burgundy at harvest time so I see what's going on along the Côte.
Sounds neat. Hope that this works out well for you.
Howard

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