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G. Greenbaum
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#201 Post by G. Greenbaum » October 2nd, 2017, 9:47 am

P. Willenberg wrote:
G. Greenbaum wrote:Any updates on PDX new and exciting venues? Would also appreciate any recs for small plates geared towards veg/pescatarian with natural wine list.
Nearly every place in Portland will have a selection of veg and fish. Check out these places:

http://www.damerestaurant.com/menus/ probably has the biggest natural wine list and pretty good food

http://holdfastdining.com/ if you're planning ahead and feeling daffy, check this out. Charlie recently went on my rec. and enjoyed it. set menu and set parings but they will make the dinner to your dietary preferences.

http://www.castagnarestaurant.com/ has one fo the best wine lists in the city if you like Italy, Champagne, Riesling and Oregon Pinot. You can eat in the Café and order get access to the full wine list. don't miss his mushroom and pasta dishes.

https://www.tuskpdx.com/menus/#our-menus if you like modern middle eastern food. It's not my thing but it's well executed.

https://www.coquinepdx.com/ fits your bill perfectly but you'll need reservations or be prepared to wait for a table. The list is excellent and the food is exactly what you're looking for.

Almost all of those have food menus and bottle lists on their website but they'll be happy to e-mail them to you too, if you want an updated list. I usually ask for one because I enjoy the research both personally and professionally.
Thanks for the info Paul.
Regards,
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#202 Post by c fu » October 2nd, 2017, 3:57 pm

Holdfast also only serves natural wine. Nothing crazy, mostly $10-15 retail stuff. Food is quite good tho.
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#203 Post by dsGriswold » October 4th, 2017, 9:58 pm

My wife went to Holdfast in the old IRRC Savauge space, FausePiste wines with friends and was quite pleased.
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#204 Post by Chris.Martin » February 25th, 2018, 9:33 am

We just booked a anniversary trip to Portland (March 23-26). It will be our first time to Portland so we're super excited. After reading this thread I'm equally excited and overwhelmed with the seemingly endless amount of wonderful restaurants and bars in the Portland area. We're probably going to be staying downtown (Kimpton Monaco or The Duniway). What are the places that are not to be missed? Any suggestions for our anniversary dinner (March 24)? Any helpful input would be appreciated.

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#205 Post by Steven Miller » February 25th, 2018, 11:55 am

Chris.Martin wrote:We just booked an anniversary trip to Portland (March 23-26). It will be our first time to Portland so we're super excited. After reading this thread I'm equally excited and overwhelmed with the seemingly endless amount of wonderful restaurants and bars in the Portland area. We're probably going to be staying downtown (Kimpton Monaco or The Duniway). What are the places that are not to be missed? Any suggestions for our anniversary dinner (March 24)? Any helpful input would be appreciated.
What are you looking for in a restaurant for your anniversary?
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#206 Post by Chris.Martin » February 25th, 2018, 3:52 pm

Steven Miller wrote: What are you looking for in a restaurant for your anniversary?
I guess we're looking for something that's unique to Portland. I realize my post was very general but mostly looking for fun bars, restaurants, breweries, points of interest, etc. that are not to be missed in Portland.

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#207 Post by Steven Miller » February 25th, 2018, 4:09 pm

So many choices, but here are some favorites.

3 of our very best, reservations can be challenging:

Le Pigeon
Castagna
St. Jack

Langbaan or Nodoguro (sold out long in advance, but sometimes there's a cancel)

Much easier to get a table, often just a willingness to wait in line:

Pok Pok (multiple locations, perhaps try NW)
Afuri
Ataula

I typically suggest a great beer bar vs. breweries so you can sample from across the region.

Loyal Legion (mediocre food, but 100 taps)
Bailey's Taproom (no food but walking distance from a downtown hotel, 26 taps downstairs, 6 upstairs)
Horse Brass (good British pub food, 50+taps)

That said, a very good downtown (Pearl District) Brewpub

Deschutes
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#208 Post by S t e p h e nK » February 27th, 2018, 5:37 pm

Steven gave great suggestions. I would add Paleys, Higgins, and Q for great NW fare. These are old standbys. I’ve never had a bad meal at Paleys and frequently take visitors to. Fun meals/experience at Toro Bravo and Kachka. You won’t go wrong for food here. Couple other ones to look at are Beast, Ned Ludd and Ox. Only Q and Higgins are downtown, but most are a ten min cab ride.
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#209 Post by P. Willenberg » March 1st, 2018, 12:51 pm

The only thing I would add to Steve's post is Le Pigeon. It defines Portland dining.
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#210 Post by Larry Kaplan » March 1st, 2018, 1:44 pm

I just returned I noticed most list neglect Breakfast. We had an amazing meal at Screen Door, there is always Pine State Biscuit, also loved Country Cat, Love Portofino and Tasty and Adler. None is Up scale of wine centric just solid food and fun places
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#211 Post by Steven Miller » March 1st, 2018, 4:50 pm

P. Willenberg wrote:The only thing I would add to Steve's post is Le Pigeon. It defines Portland dining.
Forget to wear sunglasses on the mountain? #1 on my list above. :-)
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#212 Post by Rick Allen » April 20th, 2018, 7:31 am

When Jan and I visited Le Pigeon a year or so ago, we ended up arriving about 20 minutes early. Since there really isn't any excess room inside the restaurant, we ducked into the Wurst, a dive bar in the same block for a beer. While I'm pretty comfortable in dive bars (one "plus" of the beer biz), I'm not sure that Jan really appreciated it.

Now we have Canard, the sister restaurant to Le Pigeon and Little Bird, that is right next door to Le Pigeon. We visited last Saturday with Mike and Kate Passo, and our hosts, Andy and Sue Steinman, Canard serves small plates, so we just ordered one of everything on the menu. I don't think there was anything that wasn't delicious. My favorites were Oeufs en Mayonnaise, Shrimp Toast (a take-off on Portland's obsession with avocado toast), Smoked Mackerel dip and chips, Garlic Fries, and the Swordfish Oscar. I even liked the Cabbage Salad, and I usually can't stand cabbage. Mike (aka, Dr Bubbles) brought a magnum of 1996 Deutz Cuvee William (corkage on bottles over 15 years old is waived), and Andy picked a bottle of Raveneau (superb) and a 2008 d'Angerville Champans (great but needs another decade) off the extensive (in Burgundy at least) and well curated wine list that includes some older local wines as well. Although we were very full by this time, the desserts were great as well, especially the peanut butter fun cone filled with soft serve.

All in all, this place is a winner, whether you're going there as a destination, or need a place to chill for a few minutes before (or after) your Le Pigeon reservation.

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#213 Post by P. Willenberg » April 20th, 2018, 9:23 am

I totally agree Rick. It's worth mentioning the Happy Hour is 4-5 and includes oysters for $18dz and $3 White Castle style burgers. Service was excellent from Maggie.

Having Le Pigeon next door means it's highly likely you'll be able to get into at least one of them anytime you go.

Parents should note kids are allowed until midnight and they have spaghetti.
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#214 Post by M Passo » April 22nd, 2018, 8:41 pm

I will also applaud the reasonably priced awesome wine list. Much less than twice retail pricing and lots of grower champagne. Bring on the old bottles but buy off the list with joy!
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#215 Post by Steven Miller » April 22nd, 2018, 9:28 pm

P. Willenberg wrote:I totally agree Rick. It's worth mentioning the Happy Hour is 4-5 and includes oysters for $18dz and $3 White Castle style burgers. Service was excellent from Maggie.

Having Le Pigeon next door means it's highly likely you'll be able to get into at least one of them anytime you go.

Parents should note kids are allowed until midnight and they have spaghetti.
I few years back I stopped at a Minneapolis White Castle fondly remembering the "slider with a raincoat" from my high school visits, but once you've discovered what good food should take like, those memories went 'poof'. It's a good thing the steam burgers at Canard taste nothing like the crap White Castle is peddling. [cheers.gif]
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#216 Post by TR Barry » May 25th, 2018, 9:15 am

Another post with praise for Canard. My wife and I were down for a wedding last weekend and were able to sneak in an extra night to spoil ourselves with food and drink. I can echo the above comments about the menu and overall experience at Canard.

My wife stuck with cocktails, which were playful and well executed, while I explored the glass pour list. For our food we thoroughly enjoyed the roasted carrots, burgers, quack stack and the dumplings with the dumplings being something my wife will now expect on every visit to Portland.

Well done to Gabriel and his team opening another amazing restaurant.
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#217 Post by S t e p h e nK » May 25th, 2018, 3:45 pm

I recently visited Jacqueline in SE. The $12/Dzn happy hour oysters drew us in and were great, but the highlight was the tasting menu. Well prepared, creative and fresh. 7 courses $55. I don’t know of another place where you get tuna, smoked cod, halibut and scallops in one meal.
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#218 Post by P. Willenberg » June 7th, 2018, 6:25 am

S t e p h e nK wrote:I recently visited Jacqueline in SE. The $12/Dzn happy hour oysters drew us in and were great, but the highlight was the tasting menu. Well prepared, creative and fresh. 7 courses $55. I don’t know of another place where you get tuna, smoked cod, halibut and scallops in one meal.
Most Izakaya :)
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#219 Post by Roger Ouellette » June 18th, 2018, 1:27 pm

Going to be in Portland in November for our son's wedding and was reading fine dining reviews on Yelp.

Anyone been to Willow? Nothing but 5 star reviews and lots of high praise.

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#220 Post by Steven Miller » June 18th, 2018, 4:37 pm

Roger Ouellette wrote:Going to be in Portland in November for our son's wedding and was reading fine dining reviews on Yelp.

Anyone been to Willow? Nothing but 5 star reviews and lots of high praise.
Yelp?

Tell us more about what you like and the PDX gang will set you straight.
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#221 Post by Roger Ouellette » June 19th, 2018, 5:59 pm

Hey Steven, obviously I started here first and have a good list going from everyone's posts, Yelp is at best a secondary source.

Our son and his fiance have been living in Portland for several years and each time we visit they take us out somewhere different and fun. Last time we were there we ate at Kachka (Russian fare) and drank some interesting wines.

This November I'm looking to step it up a notch for the wedding celebration. They're keeping the wedding very small, Justice of the Peace on Friday and then a party for their close friends and family on Saturday at a venue downtown. So I'm looking for an upscale restaurant, not a chain, that could handle a party of up to 12. The group will be all adults with varying degrees of food preferences, so I think I'm looking for a place that may have a little something for everyone.

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#222 Post by Steven Miller » June 19th, 2018, 7:55 pm

Downtown...

Little Bird upstairs can easily handle 12.

Higgins can handle 12 but not sure they will set aside that much space on a Saturday.

Other choices

Imperial
Departure
Bistro Agnes (a bit small but worthwhile if they will take a rez for 12
Roe (seafood)


Outside of downtown more options of course in the SE or NE.
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#223 Post by Dave McCloskey » June 20th, 2018, 7:59 am

Heading to Le Pigeon next month. Looking forward to it!

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#224 Post by John Osburn » June 20th, 2018, 5:16 pm

Steve's suggestions are good ones. I'd add Headwaters, Jackrabbit and Clyde Common for downtown spots.

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#225 Post by Richard Malloy » July 3rd, 2018, 3:47 pm

I had no idea there was such a knowledgeable contingent of PDXers here!

My wife and I have a last minute chance to travel to Oregon this weekend and are hoping to make the most of a whirlwind trip and this thread has been immensely helpful.

I can’t quite believe our luck, but a cancellation scored us a reservation at Longbaan on Friday. The wine list is pretty exceptional, but given the abundance of flavors and textures - many totally unknown to me - I wonder if we should order the pairings?

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#226 Post by Richard Malloy » July 3rd, 2018, 3:50 pm

Here’s the current tasting menu

Snacks

เมี่ยงส้มโอ: Miang som-O
Grapefruit, shrimp, herbs, betel leaf

ขนมครก: Kanom krok
Scallop, coconut cream, lemongrass, makrut lime, crispy rice cup

แกงกระด้าง: Gang gra dang
Pig head terrine, water chestnut, black wood ear mushroom, pickled green strawberry juice

Soup

ก๋วยจั๊บน้ำเงี๊ยว: Guay jub nahm ngiaw
Chicken, rice noodle, tomatoes, taro root, ginger, cilantro

Salad

ปลาย่าง มะม่วง และผักตามฤดูกาล: Plaa yang lae pak tam le-du
Ora king salmon, ikura, mango, fava bean, fresno pepper, garlic, nasturtium

ยำลิ้นวัว ไส้อั่วเนื้อ และเห็ดดอง: Yum lin wua sai oua lae hed dong
Beef tongue, sai oua, pickled porcini mushroom, padron pepper, tendon chip

Main Course

แกงหัวปลี: Gang hua plea
Northern style curry broth with Opah, banana blossom, artichoke, betel leaves, cha om, dill

น้ำพริกข่าอกเป็ด: Nahm prik kha
Relish of ground duck breast with galanga, market greens

หมูสามชั้นย่าง: Muu sam chan yang
Pork belly, grilled onion, gang hung-lay paste

ข้าวหอมมะลิ: Khao hom mali
Jasmine rice

Dessert

ไอศครีมข้าวโพด:
Ice cream khao pod
Corn ice cream, corn rice flour cake, candied popcorn

สังขยากะทิ กับผลไม้ตามฤดูกาล:
Sung kha ya gra-ti
Coconut custard, berries, jasmine meringue, butterfly pea flower jelly

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#227 Post by Steven Miller » July 3rd, 2018, 5:08 pm

We did a Riesling pairing once -- meaning everyone brought a different bottle. That worked pretty well. I've heard their pairings are good, but haven't gone that route. I think Paul W. has.
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#228 Post by Richard Malloy » July 3rd, 2018, 6:57 pm

I’d love to hear from someone who’s done the pairings, but I suspect they’re as well thought out as the food. I’d kinda prefer to go that route, no thinking, no work, just sitting back and letting the meal wash over me.

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#229 Post by J0seph S c h e n c k » July 4th, 2018, 2:27 pm

Richard Malloy wrote:I’d love to hear from someone who’s done the pairings, but I suspect they’re as well thought out as the food. I’d kinda prefer to go that route, no thinking, no work, just sitting back and letting the meal wash over me.

The menu changes monthly as do the pairings. I have not (yet) had this month's menu but there are some items that never change. I always bring a Riesling and bubbles. Then we look at the wine pairings offered. We've only ordered the pairings a handful of times, despite dining there many many times. My advice: bring a Riesling and decide. Then, one of you order the pairing and pop your own bottle. You will not be disappointed to have some 'extra' Riesling around.

Enjoy Portland. Lots of good food and wine things happening

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#230 Post by Richard Malloy » July 24th, 2018, 7:05 am

So Portland exceeded all expectations, and my wife and I are left to bemoan our sudden realizations that (1) Thai food in Boston sucks; and (2) despite a profusion of new, interesting restaurants here there are few that satisfy so thoroughly as the gems of the Portland dining scene. It's a great town to visit for so many reasons, but I’d return for the food alone.

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#231 Post by Richard Malloy » July 24th, 2018, 8:37 am

Let me briefly describe the highlights:

Måurice - in Boston we knew Kristen Murray for her stint at the white linened and kinda-stuffy No. 9 Park, but this spare luncheonette near Powell’s Books is something altogether more interesting and unique. I loved the savory dishes but the desserts blew my mind. The lemon soufflé pudding cake was simple, perfect, unforgettable. Cue the inimitable Ruth Reichl: “This is – I have to say it – one of the most delicious things I’ve ever eaten. A citrus cloud, it whispers lemon, lemon, lemon as it slowly evaporates, leaving a trail of delicious memories in its wake.” http://ruthreichl.com/2017/10/portland- ... lums.html/
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Smørbrød du jour with confit duck
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Lemon soufflé pudding cake
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Kristen Murray (wearing glasses)
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Nong’s Khao Man Gai (SW Alder food pods) - Nong Poonsukwattana is one of the great success stories of the PDX foodcart scene, and she made her bones with one dish: the eponymous khao man gai. I’m familiar with the variation known as Hainanese chicken rice, and like that dish Nong’s is lightly poached, sliced chicken (here skinless) served on a bed of deeply aromatic rice with sauce (get extra for a quarter), cilantro, and a side of the chicken broth. Park yourself on the near concrete berm just across the street from the Domaine Serene tasting room, and try not to go back for seconds. We also really liked the jianbing (Chinese crepe) at Bing Mi, another foodcart around the corner just off Alder.
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Langbaan - discussed throughout this great thread, this is the back room at PaaDee where chef Rassamee Ruaysuntia serves 8 seatings a week and reservations are booked out 5 months in advance. As recommended above, we put in our names last minute hoping for a cancellation, and received the happy call the day before we left. The meal was sublime, the service casual, but expert and enthusiastic (thanks, Kyle!), and the setting was warm and convivial. It was a fine opportunity to meet the friendly and altogether interesting local PDXers that surprisingly outnumbered we out-of-towners. The current menu focuses on Northern Thai cuisine and marries traditional dishes with a touch of modern whimsy. For example, the Kanom krok would be familiar to anyone (“Tom kha scallop!”’exclaimed my wife), whereas the Khao pod ice cream dessert seemed sui generis, soft corn cake and corn ice cream playing against the crunch of candied popcorn studded with caramelized shallot, the savory note of the shallot perfectly harmonizing with the dessert wine. (Oh yeah, do get the wine pairings and bring that bottle of Riesling to boot!) Another absolute highlight was the pig's blood sauce dressing the Gang gra dang - it was so amazingly delicious that I threw aside any pretense of manners and licked that plate clean. Should I find myself in Chiang Mai (and I certainly hope to do so one day!), I will definitely try the raw pig's blood soup currently so famous there (and featured on that Bourdain/Ricker Thai episode of Parts Unknown). All in all, I had one of the finest meals I’ve been fortunate to experience at Langbaan, its greatness diminished only by the fact that all our other meals in Portland - both high and low - were so superlative that even the brightest light dims in a constellation of so many stars.
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Amuses
เมี่ยงส้มโอ: Miang som-O (Grapefruit, shrimp, herbs, betel leaf)
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ขนมครก: Kanom krok (Scallop, coconut cream, lemongrass, makrut lime, crispy rice cup)
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แกงกระด้าง: Gang gra dang (pig head terrine, water chestnut, black wood ear mushroom, pickled green strawberry juice, pig's blood sauce)
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Soup
ก๋วยจั๊บน้ำเงี๊ยว: Guay jub nahm ngiaw (chicken, rice noodle, tomatoes, taro root, ginger, cilantro)
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Salad
ปลาย่าง มะม่วง และผักตามฤดูกาล: Plaa yang lae pak tam le-du (Ora king salmon, ikura, mango, fava bean, fresno pepper, garlic, nasturtium)
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ยำลิ้นวัว ไส้อั่วเนื้อ และเห็ดดอง: Yum lin wua sai oua lae hed dong (beef tongue, sai oua, pickled porcini mushroom, padron pepper, tendon chip)
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Entrees
แกงหัวปลี: Gang hua plea (northern style curry broth with Opah, banana blossom, artichoke, betel leaves, cha om, dill)
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น้ำพริกข่าอกเป็ด: Nahm prik kha (relish of ground duck breast with galanga, market greens)
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หมูสามชั้นย่าง: Muu sam chan yang (pork belly, grilled onion, gang hung-lay paste)
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Desserts
ไอศครีมข้าวโพด: Ice cream khao pod (corn ice cream, corn rice flour cake, candied popcorn encrusted with caramelized shallot)
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สังขยากะทิ กับผลไม้ตามฤดูกาล: Sung kha ya gra-ti (coconut custard, berries, jasmine meringue, butterfly pea flower jelly)
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The highlights of our first half-day in Portland, more to report as I have time ... xxx

Aug. 9: Updated with photos!
Last edited by Richard Malloy on August 9th, 2018, 11:48 am, edited 3 times in total.

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#232 Post by Richard Malloy » July 25th, 2018, 11:04 am

Day 2

Pine State Bakery at the Portland Farmers Market for the chicken biscuit. Decent biscuit, well fried chicken, but the real highlight was the “BeeLocal” honey that dressed it. I mean, even as a mere condiment against strong flavors it shone through. Very deep, very complex, I ended up licking every stray drop I could spot. I understand this a well known local product (worth looking up), and we would love to have brought some home, but we weren’t checking bags.
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Note that BeeLocal honey!
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Pok Pok on SE Division for lunch. Admittedly we came here partly from a sense of obligation given the rstaurant’s importance to the local PDX dining scene and Thai food in America more generally. It’s the only Thai place we visited with an American chef at the helm, but don’t let that put you off: Ricker’s food is exceptional. If you’ve seen the Bourdain Thailand episode with him you’ll certainly come away thinking his food is as authentic as it is delicious (seriously go watch that episode right now if you haven’t seen it!). The atmosphere here at the original location is perfect, open air, Thai music lilting from the speakers, customers’ dogs playing happily in the little alley. After a warm and sunny morning checking out the (huge!) Farmers Market and crawling up SE Division’s great restaurant row (snacking all along the way), it was pure bliss to sink into Pok Pok with a cold beer and a chill breeze.

But first we put in our names and cell # for about a half-hour wait and headed back up SE Division for more snacking. Hmmmm, dauntingly big ass line at Salt&Straw makes me wonder how bad I really want it (Pine State’s big ass line really only paid off in honey), so down another block or two until we hit Pinolo Gelateria. Oh yes, this was the place! Gorgeous gelatos and sorbettos, and no line whatsoever. Loved this.
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Back to Pok Pok where we had one of our favorite dishes of the trip: Cha ca La Vong (menu description: catfish marinated in turmeric and sour rice, fried in turmeric oil with scallions and dill, served on rice vermicelli with peanuts, mint, cilantro and mam nem). The perfect dish for a warm summery day, so fresh and herbaceous with real depth to the seasoning and such perfect noodles. My wife was deeply disappointed to discover that the NYC location does this dish sans noodles (yes she really was considering a 3+ hour drive from Boston to NYC just to order it). The grilled boar collar (Muu paa kham waan) was equally amazing for me, but I agree with my wife that it was less appropriate somehow for the midday summer heat, and the Ike’s fish sauce wings were certainly tasty enough to have earned their iconic status (yet more typical and well overshadowed by the other dishes). We also really liked the Khao Soi Neua, a beef curry noodle soup we ordered “Muslim style”, apparently a Chiang Mai classic preparation. It was an interesting, quite different counterpoint to the Northern Thai curry that capped the meal at Langbaan the night before.
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Wonderful ambience and a new little friend (we have the same camera!)
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Ike's fish sauce wings
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Cha ca "La Vong" (with fly!)
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Persistent, photogenic fly
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Khao Soi Neua
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Dogs must be acknowledged
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Pok Pok was another highlight in a series of highlights, and we will return every time we get back to Portland. Hopefully often!

Little Bird Bistro - we had planned for Padee tonight, but scoring last minute reservations for Langbaan the previous night made it seem a little superfluous. Little Bird was close to the Kimpton Monaco where we stayed, and we arrived after 10 to enjoy the Happy Hour specials. We’d be dining at Le Pigeon on Monday, and thought this might be good foreplay. Along those lines, we ordered what turned out to be the last bottle of 2016 Lapierre Morgon they had, which was the same sulfured version we get on the East Coast. We already knew that Monday we’d order the sans souffre version at Le Pigeon (Kermit does not ship these East, it’s one of my wife’s favorite wines, blah blah).

Following oysters and an appropriate pairing, the Lapierre had opened up and was effortlessly hitting the high Cs (this would prove an interesting comparison against the “N” bottle on Monday). We ate relatively lightly, but the charcuterie plate was spectacular, and a great foil for the Morgon. Dessert was likewise excellent, but it was the tea that commanded our attention. Hmmm, “Smith” tea? Doesn’t sound all that special, but damn it’s good! Unlike us, many of you probably know that Steven Smith is one of the most important names in tea (Tazo, etc) and before he died he returned to his hometown of Portland to form Steven Smith Teamaker. We have since ordered several tins by mail, and are drinking his teas daily. And of course kicking ourselves for not getting to one of the shops in Portland.
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Portland continues to surprise and delight. I am so impressed by the local products, and I would love to bring BeeLocal Honey’s business model to Boston if only I knew how to keep bees! And suddenly I’m finding tea to be as fascinating as wine. I haven’t even mentioned all the great beer we’ve had, or all the delicious nibbles along the way, or the various coffee shops (I’m much more versed in coffee than tea, so perhaps that’s why the tea was so much more memorable to me now). There are just so many interwoven threads in the fabric of this great little town.

There’s one other thread that stretched over from our first day that I have to mention. Somehow we found time on day 2 to take a hike on Lower MacLeay trail up to the Stone House. Along the way, we kept being drawn to photograph the tiny purple, blue, and white forget-me-nots lining the trail. My wife mused that these were all over Portland but she couldn’t remember where we kept seeing them. Then it hit us: the duck confit smørbrød at MÅURICE! Hey, they were also tweezed onto the Gang-gra dang and Sung kha ya gra-ti at Langbaan! So we made our way back down the trail, munching on forget-me-nots all along the way.
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More to come ...
Last edited by Richard Malloy on August 9th, 2018, 11:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Steven Miller
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#233 Post by Steven Miller » July 25th, 2018, 2:52 pm

No one here (that I know of) will recommend S&S over Pinolo. Glad you found it!
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#234 Post by John Osburn » July 25th, 2018, 5:21 pm

Dude, you are hitting some highlights all right, and apparently eating 24/7! Excellent reporting.

And Steve is correct about Pinolo/S&S....

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#235 Post by Richard Malloy » July 26th, 2018, 8:11 am

Pinolo was perfect for the gorgeously warm, bright weather, especially those amazing sorbettos. But I do lament not getting to try some of S&S’s savory flavors, especially after tasting the foie profiterole at Le Pigeon (another iconic dish that more than lived up to its billing). Isn’t bone marrow one of S&S’s regular offerings?

That said, I do prefer gelato to ice cream and no-line to dauntingly big-ass line, the latter explaining our decision not to attempt brunch despite it being so thoroughly PDX (I may have been traumatized by that “brunch village” Portlandia episode!).

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#236 Post by P. Willenberg » July 27th, 2018, 4:08 pm

John Osburn wrote:Dude, you are hitting some highlights all right, and apparently eating 24/7! Excellent reporting.

And Steve is correct about Pinolo/S&S....
Agreed. lots of incredible places you got to visit.

Geeks should add Canard and OK Omens to their lists.
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#237 Post by Rick Allen » July 27th, 2018, 8:02 pm

Really wish there was something like Canard on McMinnville.

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#238 Post by Richard Malloy » July 31st, 2018, 9:14 am

Missing our chance to eat at Canard was surely regrettable, although we ultimately felt well and fully Ruckerized via Little Bird and Le Pigeon [insert avian-related Portlandia-inspired quip].

I may have given Little Bird short shrift above, and I’d hate to leave an unintendedly unimpressed impression. The space, vibe, menu couldn’t have been more suitable to a later seating or more amenable to our moods after a day well spent all over Portland. Sort of a brasserie-cum-bistro with tall, (copper?)-tiled ceilings, mirrored walls, and banquettes, yet still somehow cozy and inviting, with well controlled noise for such a large, reflective space. I loved the tiny details like the antlered signpost over the kitchen and taxidermed birdies in their carved-out cozies above the tables that recalled a similar stuffed/mounted fowl at the Stumptown-Ace Hotel. The oysters were clean and sweet, the charcuterie plate inventive and unique (among other delights, big crackling porcine clouds of crunchy fried pork skins). And when “Audrey’s Theme” from Twin Peaks wafted through the dining room my eyes rolled back deliriously as I slumped into a Lynchian reverie.

There”s a Ken Oringer spot in Cambridge Mass called “Little Donkey” that’s among a small handful of Portland-quality restaurants in the Boston area. If “Le petit âne” was the name on its door, I’d be certain Oringer was deliberately channeling Rucker. His casualy inventive dishes at Lil’ Donk — whimsical but not precious, fine but not stuffy — certainly do.

On to our final 2 days in Oregon in which we meet Rick Allen (hey Rick) and continue to stuff face with some of the finest edibles and potables the Pac-NW has to offer!

And we also ate at Nick’s.

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#239 Post by Glenn L e v i n e » July 31st, 2018, 9:26 am

OK Omens is a lovely night out. Ask for the age page.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

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#240 Post by P. Willenberg » July 31st, 2018, 10:07 am

You're right to be slightly unimpressed with Little Bird. It's what happens to a restaurant downtown. Rent is expensive and you have to cater to tourists which dampens things. Can't think of anything I'd recommend downtown sadly.
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#241 Post by Richard Malloy » July 31st, 2018, 12:09 pm

Day 3

Sunday and we drove straight to the Granary District in McMinnville for a couple of very fortunate, very last minute appointments with Rick and Marcus of Heater Allen and Goodfellow, respectively. We are incredibly fortunate that both these gentlemen participate here at the WB ranch, and as many of you surely know Rick and Marcus are as engaging and interesting in person as they are here in cyberville.

But first, we eat! Valley Commissary for a really nice burger, tremendous fries, and a truly exceptional hash of slow roasted pork (upon which, the braised greens were particularly tasty). We loved the breezy, open interior space, sun-soaked patio — the weather continued to be gorgeous — and certainly the food. I could hang here all day eating those fries and drinking Rick’s beer.

But we had appointments! Given that this thread titled is “Portland Eats” and located over here in the Epicurean forum, I probably shouldn’t dwell too long on the wine and beer, but those do make up the bulk of the next day-and-a-half!

Eyrie to start, as seemed apropos. Nice lineup but the experience was just a bit rote, the pourer not particularly engaging, and I could sense my wife looking to bail out quickly. Very nice wines, but not the uniquely personal, acutely idiosyncratic experience we’d by then come to expect in Oregon.

Fortunately, our appointment with Rick at Heater Allen was up, and it was all those things. I’ve begun to drink much more beer in the last few years, but remain a neophyte. I do love the style of beer Rick brews, much moreso than the IPAs which dominate the NE beer scene. These were delicious, ideal for idyllic weather. The topic of the dog-themed Holiday Lager labels arose, and my wife couldn’t help but pitch her cat, Maximus Pattycakes, a 27-toed, slightly cross- eyed Pixie-Bob for next year. She requests that I add that Max just happens to be a Ducks and/or Beavers fan, whichever base is most prominent down McMinnville way, and willing to sport the gear (head shots available upon request.)

Speaking of sporting the gear, the Heater Allen shirt my wife was wearing got recognized in Provincetown last weekend (”Hey, is that a Heater Alien shirt?” “Why, yes it is, good sir!”) Word of your fine beer has made it all the way to the tip of Cape Cod, Rick.

Flag & Wire - just just around the way from Heater Allen and across the lane from Goodfellow, we stopped here for some pulled drinks and a nitro, all really good. Good space, too. I haven’t focused on coffee, but we managed to try Spella,, Stumptown, Coava, Case Study, Public Domaine, and possibly 1-2 others served at the restaurants we hit. Flag & Wire was among the best, but I’m very old school (read “old”) and prefer a Roman style caffe to all the new wave roasters (Spella was my favorite).

Goodfellow - This wasn’t supposed to happen as Marcus was traveling that weekend, so I was thrilled to get an email from him after our arrival in Portland saying he would be returning earlier on Sunday than expected! And what a great lineup of wines. I was so busy yakking and sipping that we never got any photos (which I really regret). The pinots were right in my zone, but lately (and that day) it was the chardonnays from Oregon that have really caught my attention, and we picked up a bottle of the 2016 Durant Chard for dinner at Le Pigeon the next evening.

I am so thoroughly impressed by Marcus’ wines and I know I’m way behind the curve on this one. Sadly, Goodfellow/Matello is not represented in Mass, but happily I’m now on the list and not-so-patiently awaiting the next offer! I’ve been drinking so much Oregon wine lately (refugee from Burgundy pricing), mostly Walter Scott, Evesham Wood, St. Innocent, Evening Land, and Goodfellow is now at the apex for me (well, along with Walter Scott!). I suspect that my cellar will be heavily tilted toward Oregon in short order!

So a bit more wine and beer content here than is probably appropriate for this thread, but I just couldn’t help it! We went on to eat at Nick’s that night (Thistle being closed on Sundays), and were really happy to get a 2016 Biggio-Hamina Noel PN off the list as we unfortunately didn’t have the time to drive over to Todd’s for a proper visit (we will be back!). Denser and richer than my usual Oregon PNs, a great alternative expression to Goodfellow’s more lithe, light-footed style, and quite good paired with some heavier sauces.

There was ice cream followed by nightcaps on the rooftop bar at Hotel Oregon (talk about Twin Peaks vibe!), and a beautiful walk down 3rd to our flat. Btw, we stayed at Douglas on Third, which appears to be newly opened/renovated and similar to Flats on Third, although less well appointed and less expensive.

A little more wine stuff in the morning, then back to Portland to conclude this great trip!
Last edited by Richard Malloy on July 31st, 2018, 9:22 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#242 Post by P. Willenberg » July 31st, 2018, 1:35 pm

you would enjoy hitting Proud Mary for Coffee and food before you head home.
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#243 Post by Z. Hu » July 31st, 2018, 9:03 pm

Thanks for the notes! Going to Portland next week with the family so this is really helpful.
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#244 Post by Todd Hamina » July 31st, 2018, 10:00 pm

Thanks Richard, hit me up next trip.
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#245 Post by Richard Malloy » August 9th, 2018, 8:30 am

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Thank you, Todd, and will-do!

I got really busy last week, but I'm still planning to wrap our wonderful Oregon vacation which includes yet another totally phenomenal meal, this time at Le Pigeon!

Also, I've added some photos above including every course at Langbaan!

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#246 Post by Andrew Kotowski » August 9th, 2018, 4:43 pm

For the local crowd, I found this interesting -> http://feastmeatswest.com/2018/03/22/ch ... -portland/

Somebody has wayyyy too much time on their hands, but the list overlaps with many of the posts here.
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#247 Post by jrozes » August 10th, 2018, 11:02 am

Andrew Kotowski wrote:For the local crowd, I found this interesting -> http://feastmeatswest.com/2018/03/22/ch ... -portland/

Somebody has wayyyy too much time on their hands, but the list overlaps with many of the posts here.
The author is a coworker. A little background: https://pdx.eater.com/2018/8/9/17671856 ... t-rankings
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