Turin For a Couple Days

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Tom DeBiase
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Turin For a Couple Days

#1 Post by Tom DeBiase » September 5th, 2018, 9:20 am

Due to a schedule change to our upcoming (two weeks) trip to Italy we will be in staying in Turin for a couple days. We have our hotel booked and was looking for sights to see, museums, restaurants, wine bars, wine shops, historical sights etc. Its one city in Italy we have not been to.

Renting a car to head to Piedmont is not an option as we are already planning a trip there for the first half of 2019. Would like to stick to Turin or the greater Turin area.

Thanks in advance for suggestions!

Tom

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Ian Sutton
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Re: Turin For a Couple Days

#2 Post by Ian Sutton » September 6th, 2018, 4:01 pm

Hi Tom
A favourite city - indeed arguably my favourite city in the world.

Plenty to see there, with museums quirky enough to greatly appeal or not appeal. A favourite was Museo Pietro Micca near Stazione Porta Susa, the nuseum itself is small and quite dull... it's the guided tour of the countermining tunnels that is the highlight.

Wine bars aplenty, but over the river near Gran Madre church (wedding scene from original Italian Job) is favourite early evening haunt. Nice atmosphere most evenings though Friday gets a little busy. Unlike most places in Torino, no free aperitivo snacks except some giant grissini, but usually a decent selection by the glass. There is a new modern place on via Lagrange that seemed popular, but maybe a bit more vibrant than I like, though they do regular themed tastings that looked very interesting indeed. RossoRubino also worth considering, but there are many more to choose from.

Likewise loads of wine shops and I'd say there is no definitive shop unless really short on time and then Eataly near the Lingotto has that convenience factor (FWIW I am not a fan, but still use it is a 'gap-filler' (for food and wine) at the end of a stay, to fill in gaps where I've not found what I want at the usually much better specialists. Grandi Bottiglie have been very successful with a mix of older wines bought at auctions etc plus a decent enough range of current vintages. Nice family who own it, and I fondly recall sitting & chatting with them at their original via Natale Palli shop (they've now moved to bigger premises and have a 2nd shop). It's a city though that rewards prepping a number of them, or just keeping eyes peeled, as I'm more likely to buy a bottle here, two bottles there, than find a single shop where I buy everything.

Restaurants also very good indeed, from decent & modest to rather fancy indeed (though we're not patrons of such places). A special 'wine-lovers' recommendation for Tre Galli, which used to be more of a drinking wine bar, but now is much more a modest but surprisingly good place to eat, with a great, extensive wine list including back vintages. Not fancy, but after a hiatus of a decade or so, we've rediscovered its merits. The sister restaurant Tre Galline ought to be better still for food, but we've not been.

Vitel etonne has varied greatly over the years, and the wine cellar shop is now long gone, but when on form can be great for a cosy little place. Often a good place for early evening aperitivi (a major feature of the city) but again this has varied from a modest but tasty plate, to a time where the chef was showcasing their talent and the buffet of that era was heavenly. No guarantee whether it will be great or banal or somewhere inbetween.

There are so many, it's difficult to pick out some specifics, though oddly I'll suggest a place I've yet to go to (but have been recommended it) : C'era una volta on Corso Vittorio Emanuele II which is meant to be very traditional in look and food. Perhaps an ideal option for a first visit?

The city easy to walk around with extensive porticoed streets and unusually for Italy, an ordered grid layout to the centre. The bus/tram system extensive and useful (we tend to buy Giornaliero - day tickets, but there are loads of options to suit how much you'll use them). The bus/tram route map is a wonder of complexity and the paper copies seemingly so rare that the GTT office themselves never have a copy. Try in a tabaccheria on the offchance they have one, or stand in front of the ones at the stops looking confused like the rest of us. They should make a board game out of it!

Loads more to recommend, but anything in particular you're looking for?

Regards
Ian
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Re: Turin For a Couple Days

#3 Post by Tom DeBiase » September 7th, 2018, 6:21 am

Ian, thanks for the summary, its what we were looking for. In every city new to us we usually schedule a couple of "main" attractions and wander around the rest of the city taking in the architecture, people and overall culture of the town. Of course stopping for the occasional glass of wine, nosh of food or gelato is a must :). This certainly gets us started.

Tom

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Re: Turin For a Couple Days

#4 Post by Ian Sutton » September 7th, 2018, 3:26 pm

Hi Tom
For a mainstream circular stroll, consider Stazione Porta Nuova (the newly revealed renovations have done a stunning job on the facade), then up either side of Piazza Lagrange to *via Roma (the main shopping street), taking time to look around the fancy Piazza San Carlo, before reconnecting with the northern section of via Roma, following that all the way up to Piazza Castello and the fancy buildings up there, before turning back and taking the next road to the east (from via Roma) via Accademia delle Scienze, taking in Piazza Carignano (often with good specialist weekend markets), then carrying on down via Accademia delle Scienze until it becomes via Lagrange. Just before the good department store (Rinascente) is the new wine shop I mentioned: Signordivino. After that there is a fine and longstanding pasta shop on the left Defilippis,opposite a very good cheese shop Bait del Formagg (ARGGHHH! Google maps says permanently closed. Damn, I have to explore the other cheese shops in the city). At the end of the road you're back at Stazione Porta Nuova.

In terms of pure walking if you didn't stop, it's maybe 30-35 minutes round trip, but can take as long as you want.

Plenty of other bits of town to walk,
e.g the old town (nice to tie this in with a trip to the market at Piazza della Repubblica),
or Parco Valentino,
or across Napoleon's bridge near Gran Madre taking in the slightly bohemian via Po & broad Piazza Vittorio Veneto
or criss-crossing the smaller streets
or exploring what used to be somewhat gritty (via Nizza and Via Sacchi) that have been refreshed with subtlety (and the ladies of negotiable affection moved on)

Regards
Ian

* My eclectic suggestion on this stretch. You see a shop on your left called Kelemata, who sell lotions, deodorants, creams etc. but for me their unisex range of deodorants (and bath / shower liquids) called aromi e spezie is very good, and true to what it's mean to be. Not as effective as mainstream deodorants, but the aromas much better. Stuff like Green tea and cardomom, periwinkle, plus what left of the old slim blue bottle range of herbs - now mainly mint and occasionally eucalyptus, but used to include Sage (Salvia) and Cinnamon (Canella) and possibly basil. Prices are certainly reasonable, though some of the creams can get pricey (and I speculate a bit pseudo-sciency).
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Mont Stern
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Re: Turin For a Couple Days

#5 Post by Mont Stern » September 7th, 2018, 7:33 pm


Tom DeBiase
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Re: Turin For a Couple Days

#6 Post by Tom DeBiase » September 8th, 2018, 7:08 am

Ian Sutton wrote:
September 7th, 2018, 3:26 pm
Hi Tom
For a mainstream circular stroll, consider Stazione Porta Nuova (the newly revealed renovations have done a stunning job on the facade), then up either side of Piazza Lagrange to *via Roma (the main shopping street), taking time to look around the fancy Piazza San Carlo, before reconnecting with the northern section of via Roma, following that all the way up to Piazza Castello and the fancy buildings up there, before turning back and taking the next road to the east (from via Roma) via Accademia delle Scienze, taking in Piazza Carignano (often with good specialist weekend markets), then carrying on down via Accademia delle Scienze until it becomes via Lagrange. Just before the good department store (Rinascente) is the new wine shop I mentioned: Signordivino. After that there is a fine and longstanding pasta shop on the left Defilippis,opposite a very good cheese shop Bait del Formagg (ARGGHHH! Google maps says permanently closed. Damn, I have to explore the other cheese shops in the city). At the end of the road you're back at Stazione Porta Nuova.

In terms of pure walking if you didn't stop, it's maybe 30-35 minutes round trip, but can take as long as you want.

Plenty of other bits of town to walk,
e.g the old town (nice to tie this in with a trip to the market at Piazza della Repubblica),
or Parco Valentino,
or across Napoleon's bridge near Gran Madre taking in the slightly bohemian via Po & broad Piazza Vittorio Veneto
or criss-crossing the smaller streets
or exploring what used to be somewhat gritty (via Nizza and Via Sacchi) that have been refreshed with subtlety (and the ladies of negotiable affection moved on)

Regards
Ian

* My eclectic suggestion on this stretch. You see a shop on your left called Kelemata, who sell lotions, deodorants, creams etc. but for me their unisex range of deodorants (and bath / shower liquids) called aromi e spezie is very good, and true to what it's mean to be. Not as effective as mainstream deodorants, but the aromas much better. Stuff like Green tea and cardomom, periwinkle, plus what left of the old slim blue bottle range of herbs - now mainly mint and occasionally eucalyptus, but used to include Sage (Salvia) and Cinnamon (Canella) and possibly basil. Prices are certainly reasonable, though some of the creams can get pricey (and I speculate a bit pseudo-sciency).
Hi Ian

Great minds think alike. As I was skimming through some possible sights to see - places to go in Turin I noticed in Google Maps their proximity to each other were within an easy walk. Need to work out some details but will add some of your suggestions along the way.

Tom

Tom DeBiase
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Re: Turin For a Couple Days

#7 Post by Tom DeBiase » September 8th, 2018, 7:10 am

Mont Stern wrote:
September 7th, 2018, 7:33 pm
The 2 best museums we visited there.
http://www.museoauto.it/website/en
https://museoegizio.it/en/
Mont, we were thinking the Museoegizio for our second day when we can devote a bit more time to exploring it.

Tom

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