Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

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Paul Bacino
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Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#1 Post by Paul Bacino » January 25th, 2011, 5:00 am

I am always interested in others recipes, please add your thoughts , comments and your own recipe.

Sunday gravy for us is a long cooked tomato red sauce with braised meats, called Sugo ( at least for me ). I usually cook mine for hrs, 4 or more for sure, but I like to turn mine off and on and often serve it a day later. Our usual recipe starts with , canned sauces, I think whole hand squeezed tomato, get lost in a long cook. I reserve that for quick cooking.

1 29 Oz Hunts Sauce
1 6 Oz Hunts Paste
Plus one large can of water!!

Now stating that, I have used whole tomatoes too. Carmelina, Bella Terra, Battaglia, La Squisita. The one thing about making the sauce is having fun in the kitchen on Sat or Sunday.

So this gets the red sauce cooking in its own pot, Now In a fry pan, I begin to brown my meat and cook my aromatics . I like the combination of a pork part and beef, preferable with some nice bone product. My friend suggests I try using Pigs feet. Here is a good go to

2-3 Beef Short Ribs
3 Pork Neck bones or feather bones or country rib

Brown these real well on all sides, add to pot.

Aromatics now in the pan

1/2 yellow diced onion cook first, till soft then below
3-4 cloves of garlic minced fine

I like to use alot of olive oil. which helps flavor the sauce. Cook the above, add to pot, and deglaze the pan, I use what ever wine I have .. red or white.

Seasoning the sauce: I add by eye so sorry on any amounts. So lets say Table spoon of ea. ( Yikes ). I like to keep it simple because its about the braised beef and you don't need to get to crazy here, but that's up to you

Sugar
Black Pepper
Italian Seasoning- bulk buy crap!! Not always done-- but this is the basic idea
Salt-- this just depends on how it tastes. I tend to add anise to mine.. either seed of star.
Red Pepper Flakes

This is the basic, which you can deviate from any time.

To this basic, You add meatballs ( another post ) and sausage ( another post ). What the sausage adds to the flavor is a bit of fennel flavor.

Cheers.

Hope I didn't miss anything. Now off to shower

Best wishes and Happy New Yr!!

Paul

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#2 Post by Bob Wood » January 25th, 2011, 5:46 am

Using a tip from John Tomasso, I broke my 40-year habit of adding oregano and have learned to stick with just basil, which eliminates the Italian seasoning and whatever crap it contains including thyme, which doesn't seem to fit the flavor profile I'm looking for. I've been really happy with the results. Strictly fresh basil in the summer for me, but dried works fine if you can't find any in the winter. Now and then I'll live dangerously and put a whole sprig of rosemary in the sauce and remove the stem before serving, but it does alter the taste significantly.

I usually add a couple of handfuls of chopped flat-leaf parsley but I won't panic if I don't have any, and dried works, too, because of the long simmer time. I also use whole tomatoes that I break up in a Cuisinart with a couple of quick pulses because I like the chunkiness they offer and I don't like the artificial, tinny flavor I seem to get from canned "tomato sauce".

Meat? I'll make it meatless now and then, or I'll add a pork "steak" and/or some beef - cut not important - and those are mostly for flavor, though I'll usually serve the sauce with meat chunks in it for one meal since I always make enough sauce to have a lot left over. One thing I will NOT do is add ground beef. If I'm going to do that I'm going to go all the way and make ragu bolognese. If I want meat it's meatballs or sausages, but I really like to live large and have both.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#3 Post by mike pobega » January 25th, 2011, 5:58 am

I use a half cup of red wine, country pork ribs (boneless), and freshly ground beef meatballs. Dried garlic and fresh basil. 2/4 hours and it really becomes otherworldly if I must say so myself.

olive oil
country pork ribs (browned)
4 cloves garlic chopped
1/2 cup red wine
1 can (28 oz) crushed tomatoes-Jersey Fresh brand
1 can (35 oz) italian tomatoes- Cento
pinch garlic (dried)
fresh basil
salt/sugar to taste

I fry the meatballs til pink in the middle and finish them in the sauce.....I mean gravy for the last couple of hours

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#4 Post by Jorge Henriquez » January 25th, 2011, 6:11 am

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#5 Post by Walt Hoehler » January 25th, 2011, 6:29 am

I use one pot. Brown meats then set them aside, add onion/aromatics, deglaze with wine, add tomatoes and meat. Then that goes on a very low simmer for 4-5 hours. I don't use sugar but instead rely on the onions and (sometimes) carrots for the sweetness. Basil has some sweet qualities too, IMO so fresh basil is also key.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#6 Post by Paul Bacino » January 25th, 2011, 11:18 am

Interesting about the fresh Basil, I was under the impression that the flavor would be cooked out over time?

I also forgot to say, sometimes I toast/cook my paste in EVOO.

paul

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#7 Post by mike pobega » January 25th, 2011, 11:35 am

You could add it at the last half hour if you chose. I never had an issue.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#8 Post by Bob Wood » January 25th, 2011, 11:42 am

mike pobega wrote:You could add it at the last half hour if you chose. I never had an issue.
I add it in stages sometimes. It doesn't "cook out" any more than dried does but it does get somewhat muted. Adding some toward the end gives you that bright basil flavor. I've also been known to stir in a tablespoon or so of pesto I've frozen - same thing.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#9 Post by John Tomasso » January 25th, 2011, 3:27 pm

It's been a long time since I wrote this out. - Here goes

For the meat:

Meatballs - ground chuck, fresh parsley, salt, pepper, granulated garlic (so sue me), breadcrumbs, eggs, grated pecorino Romano
Sausages - good Italian sausage, I prefer hot, but mixed is fine too
Two or three pork neck bones - absent those, I'll use spare ribs
(I consider the above ingredients necessary, the remainder are optional and can be mixed and matched at will)
Hunk of boneless pork and / or beef, trimmed from a roast
Beef braciole

Brown the neck bones, any hunks of beef or pork, and the sausages. Set aside.
Add fresh oil to the pot, add a few cloves of garlic, and brown until golden, remove the cloves, then
brown the meatballs. Set aside.

For the gravy, I start with about 2 tablespoons of oil in the bottom of a heavy pot, and drop in 2 cloves of garlic, chopped, and some crushed red chili flakes, and let it all sizzle for about 30 seconds. Then, depending upon how much meat I'm using, I'll blend 2 or more 28 oz cans of whole tomatoes - a few pulses, I like to keep texture, as was mentioned above.
Here, I'll season with salt and pepper, nothing else, and let it come to a boil.

Now, I start dropping the meat in. Once it is all submerged, I turn down the fire to a slow simmer. I leave the pot uncovered. If it is too much meat to tomato ratio, I'll add half a can of water, or red wine.
I stir every 20 minutes, up from the bottom, for at least two hours, but more like 3 -3.5 hours. I also degrease throughout, skimming the excess oil off the top with a ladle, and depositing into a grease can.
What I'm looking for is thickening, and like pornography, I know it when I see it.
When it gets to that stage, it's done, and all I do at that point is chop some up a handful of fresh basil, and stir it in.

I dress my pasta with the sauce, and serve as a first course.
Once everyone is done, I bring the meat out on a platter, and that is the second course, which we usually serve along with a green salad.

Everyone tells me how good it is, and then I go to sleep.
It's supposed to taste like that

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#10 Post by JMunro » January 25th, 2011, 7:56 pm

One thing that I've learned is to not "over herbalize" your sauce. Fresh basil and black pepper is all you should need. Let the meat flavors with the onion and garlic take center stage with the basil added late in the cooking as a backdrop. Sometimes simpler is better, IMO (and probably a couple other people). Another thing is to use high quality canned tomatoes(read DOC San Marzano), and simmer the sauce for a *long* time. A few red pepper flakes to give it some tangy heat, and you should be all done.

Another approach (which I like to do with a ragu bolognese) is to have the sauce based on on a celery/carrot starter keeping it simple again and allowing the vegetables and tomatoes to meld with the ground meat (prefer veal - hardly browned) simmered over 2+ hours.

Finally if I'm going more for a umami approach, I'd start with pancetta/guanciale in oil, and after adding onions mix in some finely chopped anchovies, eventually deglazed with balsamic or a red wine of your choice, severly reduced prior to adding the tomatoes.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#11 Post by T. Melloni » January 25th, 2011, 9:19 pm

Paul and John - From what part of Italy does your family come? These sound like recipes for gravy from the southern part of Italy. My guess is that you learned these "recipes" only by observation of nona and not from a card or a book.
Ciao.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#12 Post by c fu » January 25th, 2011, 9:37 pm

sounds awesome guys, gonna try one of these recipes soon!!!
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#13 Post by T. Melloni » January 25th, 2011, 10:25 pm

Sunday was always time for Sunday gravy, a hearty meat sauce served with mostaccioli rigati. Ronzoni was the preferred brand as I was growing up. A hearty pasta with a ridged surface works well.
Here is the recipe –as best as I remember it. The cooking was more done by feel than following any specific recipe. My family was mostly from southern Italy (Puglia) so this recipe is what I understand to be typical of the region for a hearty meat sauce (sugo).
Buon appetito!

Sunday Gravy
Ingredients
1 large yellow onion – finely diced
1 celery stalk – diced
1 carrot – finely diced
3 garlic cloves – sliced
1/3 cup of olive oil (Extra virgin olive oil preferred)
1 sausage link – sweet
1 sausage link - hot
1 lamb rib chop
1 county style pork rib
Meatballs: (½ lb ground beef; ½ lb ground veal; ½ lb ground pork; 1 egg; ¼ cup grated pecorino romano; 1 tablespoon chopped parsley; 2 slices bread soaked in milk; mix altogether; roll into meatballs and brown in oven)
Salt to taste
Ground pepper to taste
1 tablespoon sugar
¼ tsp red pepper flakes
2 cans (28 oz) Italian tomatoes – remove seeds and chop in food processor
2 tablespoons of tomato paste
Parsley
Fresh basil – 8 to 10 leaves

Brown a country style pork rib, lamb rib chop, and two sausage links.
Meanwhile sauté onion, carrot and celery stalk in 1/3 cup olive oil (extra virgin) (less 1 teaspoon).
When soft, add sliced garlic.
C ook until soft but not browned. Add pinch of salt and some fresh ground pepper and red pepper flakes
Add 2 cans large crushed tomatoes (remove seeds – and roughly chop in food processor).
Add tomato paste.
Add a pint of water. Simmer over low heat.
Stir; add salt, a pinch of sugar, some chopped parsley and a few fresh basil leaves.
Meanwhile, make the meatballs
Make meatballs using 1/3 beef, 1/3 ground pork and 1/3 ground veal to which you add the bread soaked in milk, 1 egg beaten, and the cheese and parsley. Brown in oven.

When the meatballs are browned, add to the sauce.
Add the browned sausage and pork and lamb to the sauce.
Add salt and pepper to taste and a pinch of sugar.
Add chopped parsley and basil leaves.
Cover the pot and simmer on low heat for 5 or 6 hours, stirring every 15 minutes. Add water if the sauce is getting too thick. Be careful not to burn the bottom.
The gravy will be ready when it is thick and the meat is falling apart.
The gravy will improve if allowed to cool and sit overnight.


Enjoy.
Salud.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#14 Post by Paul Bacino » January 26th, 2011, 4:31 am

T.

My Nonna ( Palarmo ) and my Nonno ( Lucca ) were both labeled Sicilian .. But to me Lucca was a area near Tuscany. But all the relatives said its a special tribe near Messina.

My recipe is just from what Nonna did, to the best of my recollection. I tend to very the recipe ( more pasty ) , more to what my mother ( Irish ) did and adapted learning from my dads mom. AS kids growing up at Sunday dinner at grandma's.. at least in our real young days.. we sat on the plastic cover [swoon.gif] couch.. and was seen and not heard of to much ( Out of the kitchen ). so we played it was outside. AS we grew older I tried to learn as much cooking from my grandma and bachelor uncle that lived with her. Grandpa passed when I was about 8.

Ciao Ciao

Thanks for the post and have a great rest of the week

Ohh.. I have posted this before.. this is the family store.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#15 Post by mike pobega » January 26th, 2011, 6:38 am

Great thread.
Nice shot, Paul.

*


Personally, I like to keep it simple and let the quality of the ingredients show through.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#16 Post by Paul Jaouen » January 26th, 2011, 7:03 am

One of the huge differences for us is using fresh tomatoes that we grew over the summer and cooking them down and freezing as opposed to using the canned stuff.
Best,
Paul Jaouen

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#17 Post by Paul Bacino » January 26th, 2011, 7:29 am

Paul,

That will be my goal this yr!! Great advice.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#18 Post by Tom Moore » January 26th, 2011, 8:56 am

I have been making Mario Batali's Oxtail Ragu lately from his Babbo cookbook and I cant stop eating it. Incredibly rich and wholesome sauce. Takes some time but you can freeze small baggies of it and it lasts a long time. His recipe calls for serving it on gnocchi but I like it on good pasta tubes of some sort.

Oxtail Ragu
Ingredients & Method

5 lbs oxtail
Kosher salt and ground pepper
6 tbs extra-virgin olive oil
Flour, for dredging
2 onions, sliced 1/4-inch thick
4 c. red wine
2 c. chicken stock
2 c. tomato sauce (see recipe below for simple marinara - takes about 30 minutes)
2 tbs. fresh thyme leaves
Pecorino romano, for grating
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
Trim the excess fat from the oxtails and season liberally with salt and pepper. Dredge them in flour. In an 8-quart, heavy bottomed Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over high heat until it is just smoking. Sear oxtails on all sides until browned, turning with long handled tongs. Remove the browned oxtail to a plate and set aside.

Add the onions to the same pan and cook them until slightly browned. Add the wine, chicken stock, tomato sauce and thyme, and bring the mixture to a boil. Return the oxtails to the pot, submerging them in the liquid, and return the pot to a boil. Cover and cook in the oven for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, or until the meat is falling off the bone.

Remove the pan from the oven and carefully remove the oxtails with long handled tongs. When they are cool enough to handle, remove the meat from the bones and shred into small pieces with a fork. Discard the bones. With a small ladle, skim the fat from the surface of the sauce. Return the shredded meat to the pot. Place over medium high heat, bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer and allow the sauce to reduce to a very thick ragú. Season with salt and pepper.

Basic tomato sauce

Ingredients
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 Spanish onion, 1/4-inch dice
4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
3 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme leaves, or 1 tablespoon dried
1/2 medium carrot, finely grated
2 (28-ounce) cans peeled whole tomatoes, crushed by hand and juices reserved
Salt
Whole basil leaves, for garnish
Grated Parmesan, (optional)
Directions
In a 3-quart saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, and cook until soft and light golden brown, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add the thyme and carrot, and cook 5 minutes more, until the carrot is quite soft. Add the tomatoes and juice and bring to a boil, stirring often. Lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes until as thick as hot cereal. Season with salt and serve. This sauce holds 1 week in the refrigerator or up to 6 months in the freezer.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#19 Post by Brett Johnson » January 26th, 2011, 9:33 am

Loving this thread, grazie mille everyone!

I typically make a ragu, but will definitely up the ante and make a gravy next time.

Do you really need to stir the "gravy" so frequently? If the burner is on the lowest heat setting i.e. simmer I would imagine the risk of burning would be low. Does it make a huge difference in the final sauce if you don't stir so frequently i.e. every hour as opposed to every 15 minutes?

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#20 Post by mike pobega » January 26th, 2011, 10:31 am

Brett Johnson wrote:Loving this thread, grazie mille everyone!

I typically make a ragu, but will definitely up the ante and make a gravy next time.

Do you really need to stir the "gravy" so frequently? If the burner is on the lowest heat setting i.e. simmer I would imagine the risk of burning would be low. Does it make a huge difference in the final sauce if you don't stir so frequently i.e. every hour as opposed to every 15 minutes?

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Real low, stir every hour or so. Maybe 45 minutes. I use my le Creuset and get no sticking what so ever. I also don't deglaze with the wine but rather put in right in with the tomatoes. The fond is gond when I cleand.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#21 Post by Paul Bacino » January 26th, 2011, 10:47 am

I stir about every 30 -45 mins.. Unless I add parm or romano cheese to my sauce.. then I stir it every 15-20 mins to keep it from burning on the bottom..

I don't do this much any more.. but if you were to add uncooked meatballs ( it is done ).. to the sauce, you might just jiggle the pot a bit.



Paul
Last edited by Paul Bacino on January 26th, 2011, 12:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#22 Post by Frank Hronek » January 26th, 2011, 11:56 am

Great thread people!

Going to try Tom's Batali oxtail ragu.

Paul, I have your oxtails but they're frozen into one 20 lb.mass. Let me try to separate into halves over the weekend. Tell me if you need them sooner. They appear to be nicely trimmed already.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#23 Post by Paul Bacino » January 26th, 2011, 12:11 pm

Frank Hronek wrote:Great thread people!

Going to try Tom's Batali oxtail ragu.

Paul, I have your oxtails but they're frozen into one 20 lb.mass. Let me try to separate into halves over the weekend. Tell me if you need them sooner. They appear to be nicely trimmed already.

I think we'll be good for thursday night.. I'll get them then.. just send me the details.. via PM

Tom Batali [wow.gif] [cheers.gif]

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#24 Post by T. Melloni » January 26th, 2011, 9:42 pm

Paul Bacino wrote: Ohh.. I have posted this before.. this is the family store.

Image

P.
Great shot. That could be in so many towns or cities across the country.
You can smell the wonderful foods, hear the accents and the stories, the offering of a "here, taste this" from behind the counter. Kids running in and out.
Wonderful.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#25 Post by T. Melloni » January 26th, 2011, 9:49 pm

mike pobega wrote:Real low, stir every hour or so. Maybe 45 minutes. I use my le Creuset and get no sticking what so ever. I also don't deglaze with the wine but rather put in right in with the tomatoes.
Ok so maybe every 15 minutes is too often...that's usually cause I take a piece of bread and "spoonz"... that is, dip the bread in the gravy as its cooking. All about quality control. So waiting 30 minutes is too long.

It's funny how growing up, Ronzoni brand was "the brand" of dried pasta. Then again, there were not that many choices. Special occasions called for ravioli from Bruno - The King of Ravioli.
Wine was Bolla Bardolino or Chianti in a straw basket.
I'm getting hungry.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#26 Post by mike pobega » January 27th, 2011, 4:54 am

T. Melloni wrote:
mike pobega wrote:Real low, stir every hour or so. Maybe 45 minutes. I use my le Creuset and get no sticking what so ever. I also don't deglaze with the wine but rather put in right in with the tomatoes.
Ok so maybe every 15 minutes is too often...that's usually cause I take a piece of bread and "spoonz"... that is, dip the bread in the gravy as its cooking. All about quality control. So waiting 30 minutes is too long.

It's funny how growing up, Ronzoni brand was "the brand" of dried pasta. Then again, there were not that many choices. Special occasions called for ravioli from Bruno - The King of Ravioli.
Wine was Bolla Bardolino or Chianti in a straw basket.
I'm getting hungry.
T.
Sunday was gravy day in my hometown of Brooklyn, USA.
Dried pasta ruled, but yep, ravs from Pastosa or Queen Anne were the treat for birthdays and such. I would pick them up for my mom on 18th Avenue and then hit Alba's pastry shop for a Kiwanis cake. Always served espresso while you waited on line. Always a line. Believe it or not our house wine was Jordan CS!! My dad had CASES of it and loved opening them for us. BTW, he does not drink at all.
Great days.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#27 Post by Bob Wood » January 27th, 2011, 5:40 am

T. Melloni wrote:
It's funny how growing up, Ronzoni brand was "the brand" of dried pasta.
It was mine for the better part of 30 years. Now and then I'd use DiCecco but I don't find their past to be all it's cracked up to be and it's ridiculously priced to boot. In recent times I've discovered Barilla and very glad I did.

When I want fresh pasta I just go to this place. http://pastaworks.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; For $3.00 per pound, I don't find making it myself a viable alternative unless I just want to be able to say I did.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#28 Post by Paul Bacino » January 27th, 2011, 6:22 am

Few things I'm adding!!

If your interested in dried artesianal try

Latini or Rustichella d'Abruzzo !!

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#29 Post by Peter Muto » January 27th, 2011, 7:12 pm

I'll throw my two cents in.

My family is from Bari & Cosenza (Calabria) but most importantly my mom is from Bari so...

Here's how we make sugo (no Italian-Canadians use the word 'gravy')

We buy bushels of tomatoes (San Marzano or Roma locally grown) in September and make our own sauce. A little salt, and fresh basil goes in each jar before being sealed.

On Sunday, brown meat (usually a combination of beef bones and pork, whatever has lot's of cartilage or marrow. Sometimes a few links of sausage, sometimes oxtail, once in a while lamb.)
A little olive oil, then dice up a small onion and cook until fragrant, put meat in, one jar of sauce, one jar of water.
Simmer at least two hours, or until you've come back from church and are ready to eat.

Pasta is usually rigatoni or penne or variation of the two.
Instead of the 'sugo meat' sometimes we'll use meatballs instead.
That's it. I've eaten this nearly every Sunday since I was a child. Until this fall when I moved away for school. I miss it so much. :-(

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#30 Post by T. Melloni » January 27th, 2011, 8:04 pm

Peter Muto wrote: My family is from Bari & Cosenza (Calabria) but most importantly my mom is from Bari so...

Here's how we make sugo (no Italian-Canadians use the word 'gravy')
Peter - Part of my family is from Bari too.
Italian - Americans called it gravy (at least where I'm from).
Perhaps the Calabrese influenced your mom. (It woud not be far-fetched to think of my own grandfather saying something to my grandmother along the lines of "You're going to make it the way my mother made it.")

The same gravy was used to make manicotti and lasagna.
The meatballs would be broken up and placed with the layers of ricotta (combination of ricotta and eggs and pecorino roman) between the pasta sheets in the lasagna.

This thread suggests that we need to hold an off-line. Forget the wine - everybody bring their gravy/sauce/sugo.
Now that would show true terroir.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#31 Post by Paul Bacino » January 29th, 2011, 10:20 am

MY Grandmother.. never said " pasta " she just called it " macaroni " [bye.gif]

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#32 Post by Bob Wood » January 29th, 2011, 10:22 am

Paul Bacino wrote:MY Grandmother.. never said " pasta " she just called it " macaroni " [bye.gif]

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#33 Post by G. Bienstock » January 30th, 2011, 9:14 am

For dried linguini I am very happy with Whole Foods 365 brand from Italy. Only 99 cents for a pound to boot.

I usually make a pomodoro sauce with the tomato playing the leading role but some of these gravies sound wonderful.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#34 Post by Peter Muto » January 30th, 2011, 11:21 am

T. Melloni wrote:
Peter - Part of my family is from Bari too.
Italian - Americans called it gravy (at least where I'm from).
Perhaps the Calabrese influenced your mom. (It woud not be far-fetched to think of my own grandfather saying something to my grandmother along the lines of "You're going to make it the way my mother made it.")
Very possible. Though the Calabrese way would have to involve frying somehow ;-)
T. Melloni wrote: This thread suggests that we need to hold an off-line. Forget the wine - everybody bring their gravy/sauce/sugo.
Now that would show true terroir.
T.
Absolutely. The sugo is slightly different for all my relatives. Not sure what exactly but it always tastes different (not worse different just not the same as my family)

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#35 Post by T. Melloni » January 31st, 2011, 12:35 pm

Paul Bacino wrote:MY Grandmother.. never said " pasta " she just called it " macaroni "
Exactly. I didn't hear the word "pasta" until the 80's (the decade, not my age).
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#36 Post by Brett Johnson » January 31st, 2011, 1:25 pm

Peter Muto wrote:I'll throw my two cents in.

My family is from Bari & Cosenza (Calabria) but most importantly my mom is from Bari so...

Here's how we make sugo (no Italian-Canadians use the word 'gravy')

We buy bushels of tomatoes (San Marzano or Roma locally grown) in September and make our own sauce. A little salt, and fresh basil goes in each jar before being sealed.

On Sunday, brown meat (usually a combination of beef bones and pork, whatever has lot's of cartilage or marrow. Sometimes a few links of sausage, sometimes oxtail, once in a while lamb.)
A little olive oil, then dice up a small onion and cook until fragrant, put meat in, one jar of sauce, one jar of water.
Simmer at least two hours, or until you've come back from church and are ready to eat.

Pasta is usually rigatoni or penne or variation of the two.
Instead of the 'sugo meat' sometimes we'll use meatballs instead.
That's it. I've eaten this nearly every Sunday since I was a child. Until this fall when I moved away for school. I miss it so much. :-(
I made a bastardized version of this over the weekend. Ridiculously good sauce and I think the key factor was including two shanks (chock full of marrow) in the sauce. Such as an easy way to add boat loads of flavor. I also added a large chunk of guanciale.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#37 Post by T. Melloni » February 10th, 2011, 11:58 am

http://www.bravotv.com/top-chef/season- ... s?page=0,0

From Tom Colicchio's Blog on Top Chef:

Our presence at the dinner table was required every night when I was growing up, and most especially on Sundays, when family around the table expanded to include aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents. Sunday dinner was served between three and four in the afternoon and always included three courses. We started with a salad of some sort, an antipasto. We'd next have gravy and macaroni (we never called it sauce and pasta), and we'd then have the meat that had been cooked in the gravy as our third course. We wouldn't deviate from that, be it spring, summer, fall or winter.

"gravy and macaroni" - I love it!.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#38 Post by Peter Muto » February 10th, 2011, 4:10 pm

T. Melloni wrote:http://www.bravotv.com/top-chef/season- ... s?page=0,0

From Tom Colicchio's Blog on Top Chef:

Our presence at the dinner table was required every night when I was growing up, and most especially on Sundays, when family around the table expanded to include aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents. Sunday dinner was served between three and four in the afternoon and always included three courses. We started with a salad of some sort, an antipasto. We'd next have gravy and macaroni (we never called it sauce and pasta), and we'd then have the meat that had been cooked in the gravy as our third course. We wouldn't deviate from that, be it spring, summer, fall or winter.

"gravy and macaroni" - I love it!.
Awesome! Exact same here, except that is still our Sunday ritual to this day (which I sorely miss being away from home at school)
My experience is identical for every single point (other than naming) except as any Italian would tell you, salad is not antipasto. You have salad AFTER the pasta and meat.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#39 Post by Bob Wood » February 10th, 2011, 5:28 pm

Peter Muto wrote: My experience is identical for every single point (other than naming) except as any Italian would tell you, salad is not antipasto. You have salad AFTER the pasta and meat.
Yeah well . . . any Italian would tell you that pineapple doesn't belong on pizza, too. [head-bang.gif]
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#40 Post by T. Melloni » February 10th, 2011, 5:44 pm

Peter Muto wrote:... salad is not antipasto. You have salad AFTER the pasta and meat.
Exactly.
After the meat, we would have sliced cucumber and finnochio (fennel). We called the finnochio "fa-nook" - some sort of Badese dialect.

Bob - yes, pineapple has no place on pizza. I don't think a Dante, Enrico, Francesco or Salvatore came up with that one.
Wasn't it a "Wolfgang" who really made famous pizzas with fruit, avocado, smoked salmon, and all other kinds of foods that, while fine in and of themselves, have no place being even within the same zip code as a good pizza?
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#41 Post by Bob Wood » February 10th, 2011, 6:05 pm

T. Melloni wrote:
Bob - yes, pineapple has no place on pizza. I don't think a Dante, Enrico, Francesco or Salvatore came up with that one.
Wasn't it a "Wolfgang" who really made famous pizzas with fruit, avocado, smoked salmon, and all other kinds of foods that, while fine in and of themselves, have no place being even within the same zip code as a good pizza?
Well, yes. But I believe it was probably someone named Preston or Jaden who came up with pineapple on pizza. "It's really gnarly out there today, Dude. Epic tubes. Time to invent a pizza."

And what's with the Canadian bacon, eh? To be truly Hawaiian wouldn't it have to be Spam? [stirthepothal.gif]

EDIT: After researching this subject, it appears that the "Hawaiian" pizza was invented by some Greek from Ontario in 1962. I'm appalled and embarrassed to acknowledge my Greek heritage in light of this. Eh.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#42 Post by Benjamin Sullivan DNA » March 3rd, 2012, 10:14 am

Mine has been going for 4 hours so far, probably 10-12 hour in total before I eat.
Some Ingredients (all from my head)

Olive Oil
Tomato sauce and paste
Fresh and canned tomatoes
Bacon
Onions, shitload of garlic, celery
Brown sugar, honey
Anchovies
Parmesan
Chianti, Madeira
Beef, Pork (sausage)
Bay Leafs, Italian spices

Fkn Delicious already!
It is going to be served with homemade Pasta and Bread tonight!
Still deciding on the wine, but a nice Brunello might be in order – I will update tomorrow.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#43 Post by mike pobega » March 3rd, 2012, 12:58 pm

I tried something different this week: I got the idea to make short rib filled raviolis tomorrow, so I made the rib sauce on Thursday. I cleaned most of the obvious fat from 5 large ribs, salted and browned in olive oil. When nice and deep brown I removed, eliminated some of the excess oil and threw 3 minced cloves of garlic in. Once lightly browned, I deglazed with a bit of red wine and threw the crushed san marzanos in. Once it started boiling I lowered heat and put the ribs back in. Tasted and adjusted for a bit of salt and threw 4 large previously roasted garlic cloves in as well. Lowered to simmer and forgot it for 3 hours. The house had a sweet tomato smell that was intoxicating. My wife was even a fan. I removed the ribs skimmed the fat and separated for the chill. It was one of the tastiest sauces I have ever made. Tomorrow I make pasta and fill ravs with broken rib meat (with some grated parm reggiano). A quick boil in salted water and top with a bit of that sauce and a dollop of fresh ricotta and some fresh parmigiano reggiano..
I love Sunday.

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#44 Post by Paul Bacino » March 4th, 2012, 7:45 am

Nice Mike..

I use a lot of different meats in my sauces, specific meats too.

I use these pork feather-bones, absolutely fabulous and cheep. About a buck a pound!! flirtysmile .

Cant wait to see the final. best Paul

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#45 Post by mike pobega » March 4th, 2012, 12:35 pm

I will put this here and on my pastabilities thread as well.
Here is the raviolis with short rib filling. A bit large and rough around the edges but tasty.
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#46 Post by Nancy Dolce » March 4th, 2012, 1:13 pm

Just read the entire thread. Making me hungry! Nice photos, Mike!
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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#47 Post by keith reame » March 4th, 2012, 4:01 pm

You are all such a hoot! It amazes me how we can all live in different areas of the country, but have very similar experiences.
Yes, neck bones and meatballs always.
Sunday dinner at Grandma's. Although ours was always in her basement for two reasons. It was the only room in the house large enough to hold all of us and we did not have to worry about dodging bullets. It was tough in those days in Detroit. Think Sopranos.
Plastic covered furniture.
The small family owned grocery store.
Always "macaroni" never pasta.
Mike, the raviolis look great.
There was one other thing that we would add to our sauce. The men in the family would get up early in the morning and hunt for pheasant and rabbit until about noon. They would then clean whatever they shot and turn it over to the women to put in the sauce. The men would clean the guns and settle in for a nap until the intoxicating aroma of the sauce woke them up. It was then time to eat.
I still use pheasant or rabbit in my sauce. Clean it, brown it in a skillet and throw it in the sauce. It is unbelievable!

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#48 Post by Mel Hill » March 4th, 2012, 4:09 pm

I rolled out my just shy of a pound pasta into 10 sheets and cut it to fit a typical bread pan
So eleven layers divided between a turkey meat sauce, spinach white sauce & ricotta/ mozzarella layer it's in the oven now and the trimming are going to be cooked for my 8 year old who does not do green....
Photo to follow...

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#49 Post by LoriMcLaughlin » March 4th, 2012, 5:36 pm

Yum - this thread makes me hungry. Mike your ravioli look and sound amazing.

Our "gravy" is very similar to the ones mentioned above and both sides of the family are from Calabria (near Consenza, but in the mountains (Mottafollone, Malvito, Roggiano Gravina) and on the coast (San Nicola Arcella Scalea, Cetraro). Our traditional one uses pork and meatballs - lately I've been using pork chops and pepperoni and then add the beef meatballs closer to the end. My "treat" is the pork chops after they've simmered in the sauce.

My great aunt used to keep a pot on the stove during the week - each day, she'd add a little more stuff to the pot. I used to sneak by on my way out the kitchen door with a piece of bread. :)

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Re: Sunday Gravy-- My Red Sauce

#50 Post by Mel Hill » March 4th, 2012, 5:57 pm

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pasta-5390.jpg by Mel Hill Photography, on Flickr

Lasagna, 11 layers of turkey bolognese, spinach white sauce & ricotta/ mozzarella, 10 layers of homemade pasta.

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