The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

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scamhi
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#351 Post by scamhi » July 29th, 2013, 5:12 pm

Alan,
My timing was as follows. I started at 1am at 180 degrees with the apple chips let that go overnight and in the morning 7am bumped the temp up to 250. At 4pm I was in a stall at 170 degrees and up bumped the temp up to 275 and pulled it off at 5pm at 190 degrees.

wrapped it in a double layer of heavy duty foil and into a cooler lined with towels top and bottom. removed it at 7pm and carved.
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#352 Post by Alan Rath » July 29th, 2013, 6:07 pm

OK, thanks! That's an approach I haven't tried - I usually just set it and forget it, around 220-230. But I think that ends up taking so long that it dries out more than I'd like. Maybe a little hotter and faster is the way to go.
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#353 Post by Brian Tuite » July 29th, 2013, 8:13 pm

7hrs @250 degrees then a foil wrap for 1-1/2hrs.
[resizeableimage=800,600]http://i970.photobucket.com/albums/ae19 ... e1b370.jpg[/resizeableimage]

Pulled part nicely with a decent smoke ring.
[resizeableimage=800,600]http://i970.photobucket.com/albums/ae19 ... b80304.jpg[/resizeableimage]

Good yield!
[resizeableimage=800,600]http://i970.photobucket.com/albums/ae19 ... 6f8270.jpg[/resizeableimage]

Some Slaw, Carolina Sauce and an '07 Gary Farrell Ramal Pinot.
Last edited by Brian Tuite on July 30th, 2013, 6:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#354 Post by Robert.Fleming » July 30th, 2013, 4:51 am

Gorgeous meat.

And a question:
Brian Tuite wrote: Carolina Sauce
What do you consider 'Carolina Sauce'? Vinegar and pepper? Thin tomato? Thick tomato? Mustard? Other?

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#355 Post by M Hudson » July 30th, 2013, 5:12 am

blasphemy, tomato, mustard...
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#356 Post by Robert.Fleming » July 30th, 2013, 5:23 am

M Hudson wrote:blasphemy, tomato, mustard...
I agree, Mark, but mustard is quite common in parts of South Carolina, and tomato is quite common in most of North Carolina and almost all of South Carolina. So "Carolina sauce" makes me wonder....

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#357 Post by Ryan Kilkenney » July 30th, 2013, 5:35 am

I don't know much about BBQ dogma, but just as a matter of personal taste, recipe "A" ("traditional") below is my favorite sauce:

http://www.nakedwhiz.com/elder.htm

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#358 Post by Robert.Fleming » July 30th, 2013, 5:54 am

Ryan Kilkenney wrote:I don't know much about BBQ dogma, but just as a matter of personal taste, recipe "A" ("traditional") below is my favorite sauce:

http://www.nakedwhiz.com/elder.htm
That sauce puts you squarely in the Eastern NC, whole hog, no tomato within 100 miles, True Q camp.

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#359 Post by Brian Tuite » July 30th, 2013, 6:04 am

Robert.Fleming wrote:Gorgeous meat.

And a question:
Brian Tuite wrote: Carolina Sauce
What do you consider 'Carolina Sauce'? Vinegar and pepper? Thin tomato? Thick tomato? Mustard? Other?
This recipe was vinegar, catsup, sugar, salt, a dab of worcestershire sauce and red pepper flakes.
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#360 Post by Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow » July 30th, 2013, 8:24 am

So, the charcoal does add the smoked flavor of its underlying wood? And, is not just there for heating/cooking? What is the difference in the smoke from a piece of wood and from a piece of "wood charcoal"?

I'm a little confused now....not that I've really thought about it/researched the issue....about charcoal and smoking.

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#361 Post by Brian Tuite » July 30th, 2013, 8:34 am

Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow wrote:So, the charcoal does add the smoked flavor of its underlying wood? And, is not just there for heating/cooking? What is the difference in the smoke from a piece of wood and from a piece of "wood charcoal"?

I'm a little confused now....not that I've really thought about it/researched the issue....about charcoal and smoking.
I guess it depends on what kind of smoke you prefer with what kind of meat. Hickory, Apple, Cherry, Mesquite etc... One can add wood chips at the beginning of the cooking cycle to in fuse whatever flavor they choose.
Personally I prefer light smoke. The lump charcoal provides that. When I add wood chips it tends to be over the top sometimes. Different strokes...
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#362 Post by scamhi » July 30th, 2013, 8:44 am

Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow wrote:So, the charcoal does add the smoked flavor of its underlying wood? And, is not just there for heating/cooking? What is the difference in the smoke from a piece of wood and from a piece of "wood charcoal"?

I'm a little confused now....not that I've really thought about it/researched the issue....about charcoal and smoking.
It depends on the type of charcoal.
the charcoal I prefer Ozark Oak does give a slightly smoky taste. Less than a charcoal made from let say mesquite wood.
It is not just for heating a cooking especially when going low and slow.

Here is a great database for lump charcoal http://www.nakedwhiz.com/lumpindexpage.htm?bag
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#363 Post by Alan Rath » July 30th, 2013, 10:47 am

Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow wrote:I'm a little confused now....not that I've really thought about it/researched the issue....about charcoal and smoking.
I don't know that this answer is 100% correct, but charcoal is the remains of a substance (in this case wood) after most of the water and volatile compounds have been slowly cooked off (kind of a slow burn, but not a raging fire, as you find in your fireplace or a fire pit after the main fire has died down). Using wood charcoal in a BBQ finishes the burning process (resulting in fine gray ash), and extracts the remaining energy from the wood. Since all of the water, and most of the volatile compounds, particularly the oils, have largely been eliminated in making the charcoal, I think it's safe to say that some or much of the smoke flavor has been expelled from charcoal - but certainly not all. So the base cooking charcoal will definitely impart quite a bit of smoky character, particularly with long cooking times. When you use wood chips, I like to think of that as essentially making charcoal in-situ, and the stronger volatiles that come off the wood produce more intense flavor, more quickly. It's not really charcoal at that point, because there is air available, more like a slow burn of the wood chips, but the end result is essentially the same.
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#364 Post by Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow » July 30th, 2013, 11:25 am

interesting...never thought about the smoke from charcoal as a flavoring. Always assumed that it was the product of the burning of the things that would add the smoke/flavoring..ie, the oils...and had almost none left. But....I've never thought about this issue before this thread. At any rate...I think I'd rather have the pure wood smoke flavoring my food...rather than what might be left in the charcoal...

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#365 Post by Alan Rath » July 30th, 2013, 11:51 am

Stuart, if you use charcoal to cook (in this thread, long, low, smoking) you don't have a choice. The smoke from the charcoal is there, and permeates the food (and man, what a heavenly aroma it is to walk out onto the patio in the early morning to check on the smoker, and get that first whiff). If you're cooking with gas, you have a choice to use additional wood chips for quick grilling. And if you want to add some stronger wood flavoring during smoking, you can, but for my tastes it becomes overpowering, and unattractive.
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#366 Post by Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow » July 30th, 2013, 11:55 am

I understand, Alan...and thank you for your explanations.

I have an electric smoker...so..i just put wood in a box..and the electric element is the source of the heat; the wood I choose the source of the flavor. And....the aroma is great....first thing in the morning.....I usually do my long and slow overnight/outside...and look forward to that first whiff, especially in the cold of winter, for some reason.

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#367 Post by Alan Rath » July 30th, 2013, 12:06 pm

Ah, forgot about the electric option. Absolutely, that's where the unburned wood chips become useful. If you were to use charcoal, it wouldn't give off enough without actually burning to be noticeable. I assume you don't have wood chips in there the whole time, only in the early phases?
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#368 Post by Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow » July 30th, 2013, 12:15 pm

I use chunks..not "chips"....and, I do put them in only at the beginning.....and the smoke is still spewing out the next morning...

I've long wondered whether the charcoal option adds anything to the mix that I don't have....for smoking. But, I am very content with the setup I have, so I haven't really done much "research".

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#369 Post by Alan Rath » July 30th, 2013, 1:08 pm

I think you have the best of both worlds. Maybe not the "purist" solution, but very practical, avoids the mess and hassle of managing a charcoal fire (I assume your electric is pretty stable temp), and you can control the smoke content by using more/less/different woods (i.e., you could remove the wood after a couple of hours if you wanted to limit the imparted smokiness). Before I got my BGE, I used to attempt long cooking on my gas grill, by using a single burner at the lowest setting, and even propping open the lid to control temperature. Kind of worked, but the Egg is infinitely better, and it sounds like your electric is quite good as well.

Just to be clear, you wouldn't gain anything by using charcoal instead of raw wood chips, but I assumed you meant a charcoal heat source, not an addition to your electric.
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#370 Post by Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow » July 30th, 2013, 1:19 pm

I don't think either of these are a "purist" solution. They would have offset ,indirect heat with large logs....burning for long periods, ie, both the heat and smoke source the wood.

Yeah...electric controls the temps...and I never worry that the heat (charcoal) goes out overnight..leaving me with raw pig/brisket for my guests...Frankly, I've never been a fan of charcoal...at any stage of my life...seems my parents used to get into fights with each other about starting charcoal...and many people saturate it with fluid..polluting the whole process...then it goes out, etc...or burns too hot or too low....and then there's the disposal issue...which is why I haven't made a wood fire in my fireplace in ages, especially after my kids refused to help in the cleanup.

Bottom line, though...they all seem to make very satisfying food. And, that's the most important.

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#371 Post by Alan Rath » July 30th, 2013, 2:27 pm

I'm guessing you're talking about charcoal briquettes, which are very different from whole lump wood charcoal than is used in a smoker or fire pit. I do use a small petroleum-based starter (about an inch square) to start the fire, but that burns out within a few minutes, and doesn't saturate the wood charcoal with any fluid. Some people use an electric starter, I just don't have one of those. I haven't cooked with the ugly briquettes in years, and would never use those for long smoking, only quick grilling, if I had to. With the BGE, once you have the fire started, and get the vents set about right (takes me about half an hour to get it roughly where I want), it doesn't take much attention to keep it going. I usually check it a couple of times in the first few hours, then it's stabilized enough that I don't really need to look at it for many hours. My last smoke I started at 9pm, had everything where I wanted it by 10:30 or so, did get up at check it in the middle of the night, but didn't have to make any adjustments. I could have let it go on its own all night and it would have been fine, but I agree it does take more effort.
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#372 Post by Mel Hill » July 31st, 2013, 11:04 pm

12:55 am and I just started some pork butts on the BGE for an overnight cook. Will check the temp in 30 min then sleep all night and check in the morning. Built the fire so that it will not go out while I'm not around. it is really not that hard.... I'd say the last 5% of great BBQ is hard and takes a lot of time to perfect but being 95% there in a few cooks is pretty easy with a bit of reading...

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#373 Post by JoeD » August 1st, 2013, 5:26 am

Mel - there is nothing like the smell of a BGE/Pork shoulder combo while you are having your morning coffee.
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#374 Post by scamhi » August 1st, 2013, 5:53 am

Mel Hill wrote:12:55 am and I just started some pork butts on the BGE for an overnight cook. Will check the temp in 30 min then sleep all night and check in the morning. Built the fire so that it will not go out while I'm not around. it is really not that hard.... I'd say the last 5% of great BBQ is hard and takes a lot of time to perfect but being 95% there in a few cooks is pretty easy with a bit of reading...
Get a digiQ and never worry about the fire going out or temperature regulation.
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#375 Post by Mel Hill » August 1st, 2013, 6:09 am

jdabrowski1027 wrote:Mel - there is nothing like the smell of a BGE/Pork shoulder combo while you are having your morning coffee.
You know, you are right!

I should listen to Scambi as my temp went to about 300 and the butts are almost done awoke to 180 deg pork on a 300 deg grill. Nothing wrong with turbo cooking but I really wanted temps to be lower this am as I've got all day to cook low and slow.
pulled_pork_9578.jpg
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#376 Post by M Hudson » August 2nd, 2013, 4:05 pm

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

I posted this recipe in the salmon thread but thought I would take a few pics. I see a lot of pictures on here with white smoke rolling out of smokers. If you can see the smoke coming out of mine in the picture, thats what you are trying for, not the thick white smoke. smoke should be like spice, not an overwhelming flavor (in my opinion and shared by lots of pros)
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#377 Post by Jay Selman » August 13th, 2013, 12:51 pm

M Hudson wrote: I posted this recipe in the salmon thread but thought I would take a few pics. I see a lot of pictures on here with white smoke rolling out of smokers. If you can see the smoke coming out of mine in the picture, thats what you are trying for, not the thick white smoke. smoke should be like spice, not an overwhelming flavor (in my opinion and shared by lots of pros)
I agree with this point. I try to get a wispy smoke that is light blue in color. The smoke should smell slightly sweet.

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#378 Post by Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow » August 13th, 2013, 1:58 pm

is this cold- or hot-smoked salmon? it looks like hot-smoked ???

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#379 Post by gene keenan » August 13th, 2013, 3:39 pm

Stuart BeauneHead Niemtzow wrote:is this cold- or hot-smoked salmon? it looks like hot-smoked ???
Definitely looks hot smoked. I really like hot smoked Salmon.
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#380 Post by gene keenan » August 13th, 2013, 3:41 pm

Jay Selman wrote:
M Hudson wrote: I posted this recipe in the salmon thread but thought I would take a few pics. I see a lot of pictures on here with white smoke rolling out of smokers. If you can see the smoke coming out of mine in the picture, thats what you are trying for, not the thick white smoke. smoke should be like spice, not an overwhelming flavor (in my opinion and shared by lots of pros)
I agree with this point. I try to get a wispy smoke that is light blue in color. The smoke should smell slightly sweet.

The amount of smoke has to do with the fat content of the meat. Salmon being a very fatty fleshed fish should have less smoke.
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#381 Post by Jay Selman » August 13th, 2013, 3:46 pm

gene keenan wrote:
Jay Selman wrote:
M Hudson wrote: I posted this recipe in the salmon thread but thought I would take a few pics. I see a lot of pictures on here with white smoke rolling out of smokers. If you can see the smoke coming out of mine in the picture, thats what you are trying for, not the thick white smoke. smoke should be like spice, not an overwhelming flavor (in my opinion and shared by lots of pros)
I agree with this point. I try to get a wispy smoke that is light blue in color. The smoke should smell slightly sweet.

The amount of smoke has to do with the fat content of the meat. Salmon being a very fatty fleshed fish should have less smoke.
I have a different perspective on this. Fire management has a huge impact on the smoke intensity and color.

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#382 Post by gene keenan » August 13th, 2013, 5:16 pm

Jay Selman wrote: I have a different perspective on this. Fire management has a huge impact on the smoke intensity and color.
I don't disagree with this. It's well established fact that proper temperature be maintained when igniting and burning the wood chips for smoking. A high temperature and you lose the essential aromatics, actual smoke, and most worse it makes your meat bitter tasting with the accumulation of creosote. Improper airflow within the smoker will also contribute to this. I use a smoke making box outside of the smoker that carefully regulates the temperature that the wood chips reach. It also prevents the chips from catching fire which again will introduce creosote into the smoker.

I modified my smoker with the addition of internal fans to fully circulate the smoke and to maintain consistent heat.
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#383 Post by Jay Selman » August 13th, 2013, 10:53 pm

gene keenan wrote:
Jay Selman wrote: I have a different perspective on this. Fire management has a huge impact on the smoke intensity and color.
I don't disagree with this. It's well established fact that proper temperature be maintained when igniting and burning the wood chips for smoking. A high temperature and you lose the essential aromatics, actual smoke, and most worse it makes your meat bitter tasting with the accumulation of creosote. Improper airflow within the smoker will also contribute to this. I use a smoke making box outside of the smoker that carefully regulates the temperature that the wood chips reach. It also prevents the chips from catching fire which again will introduce creosote into the smoker.

I about airflow. modified my smoker with the addition of internal fans to fully circulate the smoke and to maintain consistent heat.
I could not agree more on your point about airflow. Creosote (there are different types) and the reasons for its creation took me many years to grasp (perhaps i am a slow learner). For example, I used to confuse carbon deposits with creosote. A smoldering or raging fire should be avoided. My goal is a CLEAN smoke.

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#384 Post by dteng » October 17th, 2013, 7:32 am

Anyone ever smoke or plan on smoking a turkey?
Gonna try - 36 hour brine, butter under skin, smoke at 275 in my Cookshack until 170 in breast.
I have read about using butter soaked cheese cloth.

Would love to get some advice.
Dan

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#385 Post by Thomas Puricelli » October 17th, 2013, 7:43 am

Sounds like a good plan Dan, although maybe remove a bit before 170. My general advice is to use a minimal amount of smoke and to have a drip pan in place to reduce grease hitting your heating source and causing grease smoke. Given the longish cooking time, in my experience, the skin takes on an acrid flavor and doesn't taste great (although it can look good). I've also experimented with stuffing in the cavity of the bird...no bueno.

Good luck. Overall it is an easy cook. With the length brine you are talking about, your breast meat may take on a firmer texture and it will be more like the processed turkey you get at a deli counter. Depending on what you are going to do with the turkey, that may not be a bad thing.

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#386 Post by Brad Walden » October 17th, 2013, 9:37 am

dteng wrote:Anyone ever smoke or plan on smoking a turkey?
Gonna try - 36 hour brine, butter under skin, smoke at 275 in my Cookshack until 170 in breast.
I have read about using butter soaked cheese cloth.

Would love to get some advice.
I am going to try the Aaron Franklin method of smoking a turkey this Thanksgiving (well I may run a few trials first). Here it is on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zWHOEkBLAg

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#387 Post by G. Bienstock » October 17th, 2013, 6:20 pm

dteng wrote:Anyone ever smoke or plan on smoking a turkey?
Gonna try - 36 hour brine, butter under skin, smoke at 275 in my Cookshack until 170 in breast.
I have read about using butter soaked cheese cloth.

Would love to get some advice.
I use apple or maple wood for the smoke. Nothing too heavy or the meat will be overwhelmed.

Stick with smoke there is no need for butter, a 24 hour brine will yield a moist bird. Leftover sliced white meat with mayo makes a great sandwich.
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#388 Post by dteng » October 17th, 2013, 7:12 pm

Thomas Puricelli wrote:Sounds like a good plan Dan, although maybe remove a bit before 170. My general advice is to use a minimal amount of smoke and to have a drip pan in place to reduce grease hitting your heating source and causing grease smoke. Given the longish cooking time, in my experience, the skin takes on an acrid flavor and doesn't taste great (although it can look good). I've also experimented with stuffing in the cavity of the bird...no bueno.

Good luck. Overall it is an easy cook. With the length brine you are talking about, your breast meat may take on a firmer texture and it will be more like the processed turkey you get at a deli counter. Depending on what you are going to do with the turkey, that may not be a bad thing.
Yes, I have read that putting stuffing in is a bad idea.

I hope it is easy, but then I have read where some people just can't do it right. pileon

Anyone use the cheese cloth with butter method?
Some advocate soaking a cheese cloth in butter and placing it over the bird during the smoke...
Dan

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#389 Post by dteng » October 17th, 2013, 7:13 pm

G. Bienstock wrote:
dteng wrote:Anyone ever smoke or plan on smoking a turkey?
Gonna try - 36 hour brine, butter under skin, smoke at 275 in my Cookshack until 170 in breast.
I have read about using butter soaked cheese cloth.

Would love to get some advice.
I use apple or maple wood for the smoke. Nothing too heavy or the meat will be overwhelmed.

Stick with smoke there is no need for butter, a 24 hour brine will yield a moist bird. Leftover sliced white meat with mayo makes a great sandwich.
Glenn,
I think the point of the cheese cloth was to prevent blackening of the skin...but is still sounds weird to me.
Dan

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Kent Zimmerman
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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#390 Post by Kent Zimmerman » October 18th, 2013, 11:03 am

I followed Kenji's advice and spatchcocked my bird last year, and cooked it on the BGE. I'm not sure I'll ever do one traditionally again. All of the advantages listed here are pretty much spot on.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/11/how- ... ocked.html

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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#391 Post by TimF » October 18th, 2013, 1:52 pm

Does anyone have a PolyScience Smoking Gun?
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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#392 Post by Jay Carroll » November 25th, 2013, 7:51 am

A little update on a big smoker weekend. Was cooking for 70 for a fundraiser for my nephew to persue his dream to make it to Sochi. He's a ski jumper.

So bought 10 shoulders- about 7 lbs each, 6 after trimming. Oh and found at a local little grocery for $1.24 a pound!! Injected, rubbed, wrapped in plastic for about 24 hours. Got 8 of them on the WSM 22inch around 630 friday- aiming for a 16-18 hour smoke. Was cold out- so took some time to get the smoker to 250. Combo of hickory and apple chunks. Got my Maverick ET 732 in- meat probe into one of the shoulders on the lower level. Went to bed around 11- and the alarm went off around 5am that the temp had fallen below 210- love that feature on the Maverick. It had gotten even colder out- had to add charcoal and light some more to get it back to temp, which was 225. Got internal temp to 190 around 12:30 saturday afternoon, so a solid 18 hours. Pulled them- put a little brown sugar and more rub on them. double wrapped in foil and into a warmed cooler wrapped in towels.

Pulled them from the coolers around 6 to start the "pulling". They were still surprisingly warm- and fantastic. Great bark, smoke ring, moist and super tender.

Oh and cooked two others in the oven. Disappointing. Just mixed it into the much better smoked ones.

Lessons learned

Injection really helped the meat stay super moist.
I need to get a little more kick to my rub
The WSM is an awesome thing. Glad I have the 22 inch.
The Maverick ET 732 remote is a great tool.
It is really much more difficult to use smoker when is so cold out(was in the low 30's when put on, teens at night, 20's on saturday.

But the pork was amazingly good if I do say so myself! And fed a lot of people!!
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#393 Post by scamhi » November 25th, 2013, 1:46 pm

wow what a cook Jay. that sounds like a ton of food. any leftovers?

I am going to start the dry brine on my spatchcocked turkey tonight. A dry brine is salting on uncovered on a rack in the refrigerator.
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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#394 Post by Jay Carroll » November 25th, 2013, 3:17 pm

Thanks Suzanne- there was one extra shoulder. But can never have to much!
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Re: The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#395 Post by Nola Palomar » June 18th, 2017, 5:56 am

Thread Revival

I have a bullet gas smoker that has never really done it for me over the past few years. I've smoked salmon and trout, but found it hard to regulate the temps so I have never ventured farther.
I did just get a SmokinTex electric smoker and my smoking world has opened up!! Reviving this thread for purely selfish reasons so I can find gems like Tex's post!
Bill Tex Landreth wrote:A couple of members here have sent me PMs in regard to smoking critters. The following is what I put together for them:

I don’t make any claim to this being regionally correct for any BBQ competition, just the fact that the results work for me and my expectations of pulled pork shoulder. The rub and mop sauce recipes below have served well for shoulder/butt as well as spare and back ribs. I like sugar for pork as I feel it adds to the overall flavor profile and bark creation. When I do beef on the smoker (any cut), I do NOT have any sugar. Of course, you can tweak to your tastes for salty, sweet, acid, etc…

Pork Rub
4 Parts Sugar (I am a big fan of evaporated cane juice or even fine grained turbinado, but not white sugar)
2 Parts Salt (I like the bulk sea salt that Costco has vs. table or kosher. IMO, the crystal structure adheres to the meat better and the residual moisture in the salt helps “suck” in the seasoning to the rub)
1 Part Paprika (This is more for color than for any imparted flavor)
1 Part Seasoning Blend (This is your secret blend of spices to make your rub unique)

Seasoning Blend (Play with ingredients to customize your rub)
1 Part Telicherry Peppercorn, Finely Ground
1 Part Yellow Mustard Seed, Finely Ground
1 Part Szechuan Peppercorn, Finely Ground
1 Part Granulated Garlic
1 Part Onion Powder
1 Part Dried Thyme

Mop Sauce
2 Cups Apple Cider
1 Cup Apple Cider Vinegar
¼ Cup Sugar, as stated above
2 TBS Sea Salt
2 TBS Worcestershire Sauce
1 Cup Finely Chopped Yellow Sweet Onion
1 TBS Red Chile Flakes or Hot Sauce of your choice to get desired heat level

1. In a spice grinder or mortar and pestle, combine all the seasoning blend ingredients and grind to a fine powder.
2. In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients for the actual rub. When I do this, I usually make enough for the summer and just store in an airtight Mason jar.
3. The night before you plan on smoking the shoulder, apply a very generous amount of the rub making sure to coat every inch of the surface. Place the shoulder on a cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet. Put the sheet and shoulder in the refrigerator overnight. Some liquid will be drawn out of the shoulder, but that is an indication of the salt and sugar penetrating the meat.
4. The morning of the smoke, get your rig going with your desired wood of choice (for pork I like a 50/50 mix of hickory and apple).
5. When your rig is at 225 deg F, remove the shoulder directly from the fridge and place in smoker. Lots of folks have been very vocal that the cold meat will absorb smoke better and produce a thicker and more defined smoke ring (looks good, but no real impact on flavor).
6. While the piggy begins smoking, make your mop sauce. Combine all ingredients in a covered sauce pan and bring to a rolling boil. Once the liquid is boiling, turn off the heat and let everything steep until it reaches room temp. Strain the mixture to remove the onion and chile flakes.
7. Continue smoking on your rig for four hours untouched. This allows the bark to start its formation and any application of the mop at this point will wash off the rub.
8. At the four hour mark, check the surface of the shoulder. If it is no longer tacky/sticky and has a “hardness” to it, you can start the mopping. I use a silicone brush and just paint the entire surface every 15 to 30 minutes up until I pull it off the rig.
9. Shoot for a deep internal temperature of 195 deg F. This is generally 1 hour per pound of shoulder, but could be +/-, so plan accordingly for some extra time when shooting for service. Once this temp has been reached, remove from the smoker and wrap in aluminum foil for an hour to let everything equilibrate. You can hold it in an insulated cooler for an extended period if need be.
10. At time of service, unwrap the shoulder and shred as you see fit. At this point, if you did everything correctly, you should not need any sauce. If you need some moisture, a little splash of the mop sauce should work very well.
Notes:
1. Get a non-enhanced shoulder, bone-in. Do not get anything that has been seasoned, “packaged in a solution” or otherwise adulterated.
2. If you have access to a large syringe and large bore needle (you can buy these specifically for this) you can always inject the shoulder with a few ounces of the mop sauce for added flavor.
3. When the fat and connective tissue starts to break down at the 150 degree mark, the temperature will plateau for a considerable amount of time. This is normal and expected, so don’t worry if the temp does not move for a couple hours.
4. Everything that I have read has said that large hunks of meat, pork and beef, will only take smoke for a maximum of six hours after that you run the risk of building up nasty and bitter compounds on the meat if your fire isn’t clean and burning well. To hedge against this and cheat, I will remove the critter at this point and place into a 225 degree F oven and let it ride out the cooking indoors. This is easier for me as I don’t have to run outside every 30 minutes in 100 degree TX heat in the summer. Just something to think about.
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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#396 Post by John Davis » June 18th, 2017, 6:35 am

Loved my Smokin Tex. Gave it to a friend when we moved. Might have to replace it. Woke up early this am and have 3 slabs of ribs on the BGE for father and father in law lunch.

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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#397 Post by Dave McCloskey » June 18th, 2017, 10:37 am

M Hudson wrote:blasphemy, tomato, mustard...
Blasphemy is buying someone's sauce when it's so easy to make your own! Steven Raichlen has a great BBQ Sauce book that can be purchased from Amazon. I usually take one of his base recipes and put my spin on it.

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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#398 Post by TimF » June 19th, 2017, 12:59 pm

Has anyone had success in making pastrami? I'd like to try making some but can't even get past the cut of meat to use. I see that some places use the navel. Am I overthinking this? Should I just go to Costco and buy a brisket?
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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#399 Post by Bill Tex Landreth » June 19th, 2017, 1:07 pm

TimF wrote:Has anyone had success in making pastrami? I'd like to try making some but can't even get past the cut of meat to use. I see that some places use the navel. Am I overthinking this? Should I just go to Costco and buy a brisket?
I made beef cheek pastrami last week and it was amazing. Good luck finding the navel, even at a specialty butcher.

I would just roll with a brisket from Costco. Separate the flat from the point and use only the flat since it is relatively the same thickness throughout. Grind the point for burgers. LMK if you want the recipe that I used.

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The Smoker Thread - recipes, techniques, ideas

#400 Post by TimF » June 21st, 2017, 6:13 am

Bill Tex Landreth wrote:LMK if you want the recipe that I used.
Looks great. Yes, please share.
Tim F@itsch

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