Coffee Roasting Question

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Faryan Amir-Ghassem¡
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Coffee Roasting Question

#51 Post by Faryan Amir-Ghassem¡ » May 19th, 2017, 6:46 am

Just to revive this thread, curious for how long you guys let your beans sit after roasting. I've read overnight, but I tend to get best results diving in day 2-3. Also do you hermetically seal a fresh roast in a jar or leave the jar a little loose to let gases escape?

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Corey N.
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Coffee Roasting Question

#52 Post by Corey N. » May 19th, 2017, 8:52 am

I usually find most beans taste better after sitting for a week. I usually don't keep my beans in a jar; most often, I just put them in a ziploc.
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Coffee Roasting Question

#53 Post by D Zurcher » May 19th, 2017, 11:01 am

Funny, I use the same novice technique...I have this large, plastic "strainer" (for lack of a better word), it has fairly large openings. I swirl the cooled beans in this for a bit and it gets most, of not all of the remaining chaff out.
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Coffee Roasting Question

#54 Post by Brian Gilp » May 19th, 2017, 2:53 pm

I seem to roast when I run out so most of the times the beans only sit overnight. I've tried to plan further ahead because I do think they are better after 2-3 days.

I use a metal canister with a gasket for a tighter seal but really for the look and convenience. I do let the freshly roasted beans sit out in the colander for a few hours before putting them in the canister but I doubt it really makes a difference.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#55 Post by alan weinberg » May 20th, 2017, 10:45 am

Brian Gilp wrote:I seem to roast when I run out so most of the times the beans only sit overnight. I've tried to plan further ahead because I do think they are better after 2-3 days.

I use a metal canister with a gasket for a tighter seal but really for the look and convenience. I do let the freshly roasted beans sit out in the colander for a few hours before putting them in the canister but I doubt it really makes a difference.
for me, 2-7 days post roast is best. Find no difference leaving beans out after roast--they get enough oxygen. Store them in one lb plastic bags with a one way valve (from Sweet Maria). Reusable and it's amazing how the bag plumps repeatedly as beans blow off CO2. Usually do two weeks of roast every other weekend. Last weekend because kids were home and wanted beans, I roasted 10 lbs one at a time. Wore me out.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#56 Post by alan weinberg » May 20th, 2017, 10:49 am

Corey N. wrote:Faryan, I have a Behmor and I simply agitate the beans in the container/cage. I've also seen mesh colanders used. Some beans seem to have more chaff left on than others.

Speaking of Guatemala, the new crop should be arriving on US shores soon. I'm going to try to do some roasting this weekend and want to use up what I already have before buying more beans, but an assortment of Guatemalan is definitely my next order -- definitely my favorite country for beans.
99% of what I roast is Guat. Once had over 2 dozen different ones. Love Huehuetenango Guat beans. Buy usually at Bodhi Leaf, lots cheaper than SM.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#57 Post by Corey N. » May 22nd, 2017, 12:18 pm

alan weinberg wrote:
Corey N. wrote:Faryan, I have a Behmor and I simply agitate the beans in the container/cage. I've also seen mesh colanders used. Some beans seem to have more chaff left on than others.

Speaking of Guatemala, the new crop should be arriving on US shores soon. I'm going to try to do some roasting this weekend and want to use up what I already have before buying more beans, but an assortment of Guatemalan is definitely my next order -- definitely my favorite country for beans.
99% of what I roast is Guat. Once had over 2 dozen different ones. Love Huehuetenango Guat beans. Buy usually at Bodhi Leaf, lots cheaper than SM.
We have similar tastes in beans (and shoes). I love the milk chocolate notes I get from Guatemalan beans.

--

I've had some minor issues with the Behmor lately...looks like I will be making a call to customer service.
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Coffee Roasting Question

#58 Post by Tom G l a s g o w » May 23rd, 2017, 4:57 am

Corey N. wrote:
alan weinberg wrote:
Corey N. wrote:Faryan, I have a Behmor and I simply agitate the beans in the container/cage. I've also seen mesh colanders used. Some beans seem to have more chaff left on than others.

Speaking of Guatemala, the new crop should be arriving on US shores soon. I'm going to try to do some roasting this weekend and want to use up what I already have before buying more beans, but an assortment of Guatemalan is definitely my next order -- definitely my favorite country for beans.
99% of what I roast is Guat. Once had over 2 dozen different ones. Love Huehuetenango Guat beans. Buy usually at Bodhi Leaf, lots cheaper than SM.
We have similar tastes in beans (and shoes). I love the milk chocolate notes I get from Guatemalan beans.

--

I've had some minor issues with the Behmor lately...looks like I will be making a call to customer service.
Hopefully you're using a zero water filter. My first behmor clogged up but it was replaced at no charge. I also discovered just how many disolved solids were in our water, about 200 ppm. brita filters are no god at filtering out dissolved solids.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#59 Post by TimF » February 20th, 2018, 6:14 am

A few weeks ago my wife was roasting in our eight year old Hottop and the darn thing caught on fire. There were actual flames in the roasting chamber. I tried to put it out quickly but couldn't. So I brought the unit outside. Tried covering it with a towel -- didn't work. Tried covering it with my grill cover and eventually it went out. This went on for several minutes. There was so much smoke in our house that it stunk like, well, like we had a fire for several days.

I put the unit in the basement to look at it later figuring a new model would be in our future. After a couple of weeks of living on store bought beans (blech) I took a look at the burn victim on Sunday. I carefully took the unit apart, vacuumed it, cleaned it thoroughly, and changed the filters. I plugged it in and it started right up. It roasted just like the day I bought it.

A few lessons learned:
1. Store bought coffee beans are the devil.
2. Probably a good idea to do a thorough cleaning every six months or so.
3. The Hottop was worth every penny I paid for it.
Last edited by TimF on February 20th, 2018, 6:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Coffee Roasting Question

#60 Post by D Zurcher » February 20th, 2018, 6:23 am

Great story-we have a HotTop also. Luckily it hasn't caught on fire!

We bought this one probably 9-10 years ago. About 2 years ago the heating element failed. I decided we had gotten plenty of use out of it, I would just buy a new one. After looking at prices for a new one (+/- $1,300?) I started looking to see if I could repair what we had. I'm no expert on electronics, or repairs, but I thought I would give it a shot. HotTop has all the parts for the machine online. I emailed them, and they were incredibly helpful with tips and videos for repairs. They told me these were built to be able to repair and last a long time.

It was quite the project and took me a week or so to pull it all apart, clean as many parts as I could (6 years of bean oil buildup is hard to get rid of). I replaced the heating element, upgraded the control pad, and replaced a few other worn parts. Probably cost me $250 and it has worked great ever since. The guys at HotTop were amazingly helpful as well.

Our HotTop has been a workhorse, and it's great that even I can fix whatever goes wrong....I told myself I would give it a thorough cleaning every 6 months too...but I think I am behind schedule :).
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Coffee Roasting Question

#61 Post by Mary Deem » March 7th, 2018, 7:18 pm

I roast on a modified West Bend Poperry I that has the thermostate turned up and the heat and fan switch seperated. I love the manual control that I have roasting with it.

I always roast indoors with the window cracked, but I am only roasting 2-3 times per week, average 9 min 30 sec roasts, and have never worried about my lungs. I can't imagining roasting outdoors in the winter as the temp difference is a pain in the butt...bad enough roasting indoors with a cold draft coming in from the window. Having said that, I am of course curious how you folks roast outdoors in the winter ;)

Coffee resting time, depends on the bean for me. Coffees that get better from 24-48 hours rest are ...Sumatra, Java, Moka Hariz, some Hawaii....everything else gets consumed over a period of the day roasted to 5 days out. I usually follow the supplier's recommendations (Sweet Maria's has fab roasting and rest suggestions).

Glad to see we have so many coffee roasters on board :)

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Coffee Roasting Question

#62 Post by alan weinberg » March 7th, 2018, 9:33 pm



Be careful, Mary.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#63 Post by TimF » March 8th, 2018, 6:20 am

alan weinberg wrote:

Be careful, Mary.
I have a feeling there's a big difference between roasting at home a couple times a week and roasting 40 hours a week at a work. Having said that, my wife usually roasts outside. Even in the winter. We have a pretty good fan above our stove but it's not good enough.
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Coffee Roasting Question

#64 Post by Andrew M c C a b e » March 8th, 2018, 7:12 am

I roast inside but I guess I might start roasting outside. I am using the Behmor though so I don't really see much smoke. Most roasting I do is City-Fullcity
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Coffee Roasting Question

#65 Post by alan weinberg » March 8th, 2018, 8:17 pm

I roast outside. Open the Behmor door just before hitting cool and vacuum out the chaff, leave door open, cools faster to minimize coasting.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#66 Post by Faryan Amir-Ghassem¡ » March 15th, 2018, 1:46 pm

Thanks for the link Alan. I may start using a surgical mask when roasting, as I don't really have the flexibility to roast outdoors.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#67 Post by alan weinberg » March 15th, 2018, 2:08 pm

Faryan Amir-Ghassem¡ wrote:Thanks for the link Alan. I may start using a surgical mask when roasting, as I don't really have the flexibility to roast outdoors.
get an antiviral surgery mask, stops smaller stuff, not just a regular mask.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#68 Post by David Wright » March 15th, 2018, 2:53 pm

Isn't diacetyl a gas at coffee-roasting temperatures? In that case, a respirator would be more appropriate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacetyl#Safety

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/flavor ... ssing.html

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Coffee Roasting Question

#69 Post by alan weinberg » March 15th, 2018, 3:26 pm

David Wright wrote:Isn't diacetyl a gas at coffee-roasting temperatures? In that case, a respirator would be more appropriate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacetyl#Safety

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/flavor ... ssing.html
probably right.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#70 Post by TimF » May 31st, 2018, 7:43 am

The latest chapter in my Hottop story...

A couple of weeks ago my wife goes to roast beans. Plugs the thing in, walks away, comes back a couple of minutes later and it has no power. "Tim!"

So I go out to the website and begin going through trouble shooting procedures. I remove the back. Test the heating element with my multi-meter and it's fine. I start emailing Hottop. I check for the red diagnostics light that is on the back left of the circuit board when I plug it in. No dice. They tell me it's probably the fuse. I check the fuse -- no issues.

They don't believe me. They tell me these circuit boards "never die". I clean the chaff off, spray the board with electronics cleaner. Still no good. At this point I have nearly the entire machine apart. They reluctantly sell me a new board for $200.

The blessed day arrives and I hook up the new board. Plug it in and... no red light on the board. Boo. WTF?!? Swearing commences.

On a hunch and through no prompting from hottop, I plug the old board into an old cord from a broken lamp. Red light shines brightly on the old board. I test the hottop's power cord with my multi meter. Yup, bad cord.

I email them and let them know. They credit my account for the $200 and send me a new cord gratis. My wife was roasting beans this weekend and I no longer have to drink the absolute shit we've been drinking for the last two weeks.
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Coffee Roasting Question

#71 Post by alan weinberg » June 1st, 2018, 11:01 am

at least you are back in action roasting.

I did 8 lbs last weekend—kids wanted restocking and I was out.

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Coffee Roasting Question

#72 Post by Brian Gilp » June 3rd, 2018, 4:27 am

It’s so often a wire or power cord regardless of what isn’t working that I routinely check those first anymore. Recently had my refrigerator die and it was nothing more than the signal wire for the fan.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#73 Post by Faryan Amir-Ghassem¡ » December 19th, 2018, 8:28 am

Anyone have any experience with the Kaldi Home or Kaldi mini? Evaluating that vs the Behmor.
The main drawback imo seems to be the Kaldis are way messier for a NYC apartment.
Also the need for gas setup is a bit annoying but could also be addicting for precision.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#74 Post by alan weinberg » December 20th, 2018, 3:39 pm

Faryan Amir-Ghassem¡ wrote:
December 19th, 2018, 8:28 am
Anyone have any experience with the Kaldi Home or Kaldi mini? Evaluating that vs the Behmor.
The main drawback imo seems to be the Kaldis are way messier for a NYC apartment.
Also the need for gas setup is a bit annoying but could also be addicting for precision.
a comparison: https://www.walletpath.com/best-home-coffee-roaster/

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#75 Post by Gary Zimberg » December 21st, 2018, 8:20 am

alan weinberg wrote:
May 20th, 2017, 10:45 am
Brian Gilp wrote:I seem to roast when I run out so most of the times the beans only sit overnight. I've tried to plan further ahead because I do think they are better after 2-3 days.

I use a metal canister with a gasket for a tighter seal but really for the look and convenience. I do let the freshly roasted beans sit out in the colander for a few hours before putting them in the canister but I doubt it really makes a difference.
for me, 2-7 days post roast is best. Find no difference leaving beans out after roast--they get enough oxygen. Store them in one lb plastic bags with a one way valve (from Sweet Maria). Reusable and it's amazing how the bag plumps repeatedly as beans blow off CO2. Usually do two weeks of roast every other weekend. Last weekend because kids were home and wanted beans, I roasted 10 lbs one at a time. Wore me out.
My wife got me a Behmor Plus for Hanukkah. First two roasts, were done too dark for our liking.
Received a sample pack (4 x 2lbs) from Sweet Maria's, and did a 1/4lb batch of each. I have carefully been writing down my times and temps, but all of these 2nd batches are a bit on the too light side.
We drink espresso, and have a Kafatek Flat Grinder and a Lucca M58 Double Boiler. To date our Go To espresso bean is La Colombe's Nizza. Its a blend of Brazil, Columbia, Nicaragua and Congo. It is a medium roast, with no citrus finish. Its more about nuts and chocolate.
So far the 6 batches I have done are unacceptable to my wife. First too dark (I agree) then too light. I first tried the Lighter Roasted Batches (Columbia Narino, Barundi, Espresso Monkey Blend) on day 2 but none were good. Went back on day 4 and they are MUCH better. Lots going on in the finish. Funky notes in the Espresso Monkey Blend, the Narino, as a citrusy finish, but not acidic Lemon typical to me in Light Roast like a Yergacheffee), which I think if I roast a bit further would be much better.

In the 1st two batches, it seemed to roll directly from First Crack into Second Crack, and I hit cool when it seemed mostly thru 2C, but it was too late.... at Day 3 Post roast beans were oily and dark. no burnt, but a Dark Roast.

I have had some trouble controlling the roasts, and understanding is it better to roast faster or slower. All batches below were 115 Gram. I PreHeated at P5 to 270F, then ;

Columbia Narino - 1st Crack was at 7:47 @ 261F. I waiting 30 seconds post 1C and hit cool, after 1 minutes removed the drum took it outside in the cool air, and shook off the chaf, then cooled on a large cookie sheet. Ended at 9:10 @ 288F

Burundi - Roasting Manual on P5 at 5:00 increased Drum Speed to D 1C @ 7:15 @ 270F, then hit P3 to slow it down 1C ended at 8:20 @ 275F. Finished at 9:00 hit cool and did same cool down, removing the drum and taking it outside to quickly cool, then onto a Cookie sheet.

Espresso Monkey Blend - 1C @ 7:00, 1C ended at 8:05 removed at 8:45 (tried roasting hotter this batch and also sped up drum speed at 5:00))
heat profile 1:00= 270F 2:00= 282F, 3:00= 286F , 4:00= 293F, 5:00= 295F, 6:00= 300F, 7:00= 315F, 8:00= 295F

Ethopia Agaro Quota Co Op = preheat to 290F
Similar to last roast, but at 5:00= 300F, at 6:00 = 320F, switched to P3, but at 7:15 just as First Crack was Starting, ERR2. it seemed to go thru most of 1C, but probably a Throwaway batch. Roast looks uneven, some medium, some light..

I will roast 4 more batches tomorrow, and am hoping to get a little into 2C... Any suggestions are very welcome. I have watched at least 10 YouTube Video's...
BTW I am roasting under a 48" 1300CFM kitchen Hood (ducted outside) using an upside down cooksheet to put my Behmor on. Next Roasts I plan on reducing heat to P3 as soon as 1C starts, maybe even opening the door a crack to try to stretch the time 2C starts, but am unsure how long into 2C I should run before going into cool.


Best,

Gary

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#76 Post by Brian Gilp » December 21st, 2018, 9:35 am

Gary Zimberg wrote:
December 21st, 2018, 8:20 am
Ethopia Agaro Quota Co Op = preheat to 290F
Similar to last roast, but at 5:00= 300F, at 6:00 = 320F, switched to P3, but at 7:15 just as First Crack was Starting, ERR2. it seemed to go thru most of 1C, but probably a Throwaway batch. Roast looks uneven, some medium, some light..
I don't understand the Behmor language as I use a different roaster so can't help you with most of your post. However, if you got into first crack on an ethiopian, i seriously doubt its a throw away. Yes, it should look light and unevern and you may need to cull some quaker beans if they concern you. But I think this is a very good roast for most ethiopian coffees. Give it 2 days rest and then try it.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#77 Post by alan weinberg » December 21st, 2018, 12:27 pm

Roast outside so when you hit cool you can open the door and get cooling faster. You are having “coasting” to a darker roast. Outside roasting also minimizes possible lung damage (popcorn lung) from inhaling the chemicals given off during roasting.

Sweet Maria has a roast forum and videos.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#78 Post by Gary Zimberg » December 21st, 2018, 1:03 pm

alan weinberg wrote:
December 21st, 2018, 12:27 pm
Roast outside so when you hit cool you can open the door and get cooling faster. You are having “coasting” to a darker roast. Outside roasting also minimizes possible lung damage (popcorn lung) from inhaling the chemicals given off during roasting.

Sweet Maria has a roast forum and videos.
I watched all of the Sweet Maria Videos for the Behmor and a many others on YouTube. Cannot find a forum on Sweet Maria's, that would be great.... I have been removing the drum almost immediately and taking it outside, to cool and shake off the chaff. so there is no coasting.. (I understand my 2 two batches were effected by this)., but not next 4 (which were too light).

I will consider roasting outside tomorrow (if it stops raining), last time I roasted under our large kitchen hood (and hood on). Do you have any tips regarding Roasting Temperatures? Better to get to first crack faster or slower? Do you use your Behmor on Full Power (P5)?
thanks for the feedback!

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#79 Post by Gary Zimberg » December 21st, 2018, 1:29 pm

Brian Gilp wrote:
December 21st, 2018, 9:35 am
Gary Zimberg wrote:
December 21st, 2018, 8:20 am
Ethopia Agaro Quota Co Op = preheat to 290F
Similar to last roast, but at 5:00= 300F, at 6:00 = 320F, switched to P3, but at 7:15 just as First Crack was Starting, ERR2. it seemed to go thru most of 1C, but probably a Throwaway batch. Roast looks uneven, some medium, some light..
I don't understand the Behmor language as I use a different roaster so can't help you with most of your post. However, if you got into first crack on an ethiopian, i seriously doubt its a throw away. Yes, it should look light and unevern and you may need to cull some quaker beans if they concern you. But I think this is a very good roast for most ethiopian coffees. Give it 2 days rest and then try it.
Seeing your comment made me go pull a shot, and you are right, not a throw away batch. Very small beans, I took a guess on how much finer than normal to grind, but my pull ran a little faster than I would like... Very bright and Very drinkable!
Lots of sweet fruit, hi acid, but not out of balance. Lots of Zesty Orange spice on the finish... You can see in the photo, how uneven the roast turned out. The ERR2, means the Oven overheated and turned off. P3 , P5 are power level and yes are "Behmor" specific language. The rest was just notes of Temperature and Time@ up to 1C (First Crack) etc.
IMG_0819.jpg
IMG_0818.jpg

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#80 Post by alan weinberg » December 21st, 2018, 7:24 pm

I do a 2 minute preheat. Turn on P1 and run my 400 gm of beans for 2 minutes, then turn off and back on to max of 20:30, set alarm for 13 min so I can hit the button at 7 min and keep roast going. Come back at about 2 min left and listen to first crack. At about 1 min hit C and then P4. Run either P4 or p5 keeping chamber temp under 305. At end of first crack, open door, vacuum chaff and then hit cool. I don’t keep the chaff collector in the roaster.

This is how I roast most Central American beans.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#81 Post by Brian Gilp » December 22nd, 2018, 2:47 am

Gary, Yes that’s a little uneven but in my experience lighter roasts on Ethiopian beans are going to be uneven. Dry processed seem to be more uneven that wet processed. But if you want to keep city roast you are going to have to accept a little unevenness. That’s said, I find most other beans to be more even at lighter roast levels and I am sure that you can work with your roast profile to reduce the unevenness somewhat.

I don’t mess much with my roast profile now but have experimented with extending the time between first and second crack. I found that doing so can have an impact on body and what I can best describe as green flavors that I sometimes get out of Sumatra beans when lighter roasted. Extending that time helped me lesssen those flavors while keeping a lighter roast. I still take Sumatra coffees into second crack but most everything else I stop after first crack.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#82 Post by Andrew M c C a b e » December 22nd, 2018, 6:43 am

Is the plus upgrade worth it on the Behmor? I am still using the older version but it is still going strong. I usually stick with the 1 - P3 - C roast profile for 10 oz of coffee. Making my way though 10 lb of Guatamala Patzun Finca Las Camelias from Sweet Marias right now.
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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#83 Post by Gary Zimberg » December 23rd, 2018, 8:39 am

alan weinberg wrote:
December 21st, 2018, 7:24 pm
I do a 2 minute preheat. Turn on P1 and run my 400 gm of beans for 2 minutes, then turn off and back on to max of 20:30, set alarm for 13 min so I can hit the button at 7 min and keep roast going. Come back at about 2 min left and listen to first crack. At about 1 min hit C and then P4. Run either P4 or p5 keeping chamber temp under 305. At end of first crack, open door, vacuum chaff and then hit cool. I don’t keep the chaff collector in the roaster.

This is how I roast most Central American beans.
Alan, are you roasting for espresso or coffee?
I did 3 batches yesterday. Up’d it to 220g
And following your advise, roasted outside.
One of the batches the exhaust fan came on, at which point the temp dropped from 305 to 275 and even on P5 (full power Manual) could not get the temp back up. The batches all look like they came out better than my previous, as I roasted a bit past 1C (about a minute) and immediately removed the drum to quickly shake and cool, (while putting the Behmor in cool mode) to avoid coasting.

How do you avoid the exhaust fan coming on?

Thx hitsfan

Gary

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#84 Post by alan weinberg » December 23rd, 2018, 8:52 am

I roast Full City or Full City plus, not for espresso. Never had exhaust come on as you describe. Even at 305. I go between P4 and P5 Manual at the end to keep temp 300-305 till first crack ends.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#85 Post by alan weinberg » December 23rd, 2018, 8:54 am

Andrew M c C a b e wrote:
December 22nd, 2018, 6:43 am
Is the plus upgrade worth it on the Behmor? I am still using the older version but it is still going strong. I usually stick with the 1 - P3 - C roast profile for 10 oz of coffee. Making my way though 10 lb of Guatamala Patzun Finca Las Camelias from Sweet Marias right now.
yes. $50 for the fairly simple upgrade. Much more custom versatility w the plus.

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Gary Zimberg
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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#86 Post by Gary Zimberg » December 23rd, 2018, 10:31 am

alan weinberg wrote:
December 23rd, 2018, 8:52 am
I roast Full City or Full City plus, not for espresso. Never had exhaust come on as you describe. Even at 305. I go between P4 and P5 Manual at the end to keep temp 300-305 till first crack ends.
Thanks much Alan for your valuable input.
Seems the Exhaust coming on is a function of time more than temp. I will try to search to find out more about it. I also noted that once the timer was nearing 10:00 it would not allow me to add more time. I did as you had , and max'd out the timer from the start. on the batch where the exhaust fan came on (you can tell when it comes on by pushing the A button to see the exhaust temp rising), I did not max out the timer. It started at 18:00 and the exhaust came on around 7:00
Do you let your beans to go into Second Crack?

Best,

Gary

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#87 Post by alan weinberg » December 23rd, 2018, 12:52 pm

hitting 1 lb gives an 18 min roast. Can hit + and take it to 20:30 before hitting start. (I also do a 2 min preheat.) Have to hit start again between 6:30-7:00 or it shuts down. When I get to one minute, I hit C and P5, bouncing between P4 and P5 based on temperature. I roast 400 gm. I don't go to second crack. I go mostly by smell and sound.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#88 Post by John O' » December 24th, 2018, 5:40 am

Slight thread drift for a question from you coffee experts. I buy freshly roasted whole bean coffee from a local roaster and grind in a Capresso grinder. Was in Costco and was tempted into buying a big bag of Starbucks whole bean on sale. When I grind it, it sticks to everything and makes a mess. Asked my friend Google and he said it's due to static electricity. If so (or if not) why does my locally roasted coffee grind cleanly and the Starbucks makes such a mess?
O Sullivan

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#89 Post by Al Osterheld » December 24th, 2018, 2:31 pm

Is the Starbucks roast darker than compared to the beans from your local roaster? Typically, darker roasts have more issue with static.

-Al

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#90 Post by alan weinberg » December 24th, 2018, 2:41 pm

Al Osterheld wrote:
December 24th, 2018, 2:31 pm
Is the Starbucks roast darker than compared to the beans from your local roaster? Typically, darker roasts have more issue with static.

-Al
and lots more oil.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#91 Post by John O' » December 25th, 2018, 4:06 am

alan weinberg wrote:
December 24th, 2018, 2:41 pm
Al Osterheld wrote:
December 24th, 2018, 2:31 pm
Is the Starbucks roast darker than compared to the beans from your local roaster? Typically, darker roasts have more issue with static.

-Al
and lots more oil.
yes and yes. darker and you can see the sheen of oil.
thx and Merry Christmas!
O Sullivan

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#92 Post by Al Osterheld » December 25th, 2018, 10:38 am

I also have a Capresso and if there is an oily sheen on the beans it always has an issue with static. Supposedly, if you place three drops of water at different places on top of the beans in the hopper before grinding, the static issue goes away. I'm mainly using medium to light roasts these days, so haven't tried this trick.

-Al

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#93 Post by Michae1 P0wers » December 30th, 2018, 9:05 am

John O' wrote:
December 24th, 2018, 5:40 am
Slight thread drift for a question from you coffee experts. I buy freshly roasted whole bean coffee from a local roaster and grind in a Capresso grinder. Was in Costco and was tempted into buying a big bag of Starbucks whole bean on sale. When I grind it, it sticks to everything and makes a mess. Asked my friend Google and he said it's due to static electricity. If so (or if not) why does my locally roasted coffee grind cleanly and the Starbucks makes such a mess?
I also suspect that the big bag of Starbucks is going to be stale as sh*t by the time you're through with it, though it matters a lot less for those very darkly roasted profiles than for a lighter roast.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#94 Post by Michae1 P0wers » December 30th, 2018, 9:07 am

Looking back on this thread that I started a long time ago, I can now report that I have a Behmor that was used maybe 12 times and now sits in my basement collecting dust. I just find I don't really have the time for it so I have gone back to buying from local roasters. I should probably sell it in a coffee forum. It was fun to experiment with but I couldn't deal with the time commitment.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#95 Post by alan weinberg » December 30th, 2018, 9:33 am

Michae1 P0wers wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 9:07 am
Looking back on this thread that I started a long time ago, I can now report that I have a Behmor that was used maybe 12 times and now sits in my basement collecting dust. I just find I don't really have the time for it so I have gone back to buying from local roasters. I should probably sell it in a coffee forum. It was fun to experiment with but I couldn't deal with the time commitment.
not sure I understand. I roast Central American beans on a Behmor 1600+. I weigh the coffee, do a 2 minute preheat (outside), set time for 20:30 and my timer for 13:00, go back out there at 7:00 to hit the mandatory start again, set timer for 5 min and go out there then again for about 2-3 min to finish the roast. Return in 13 min to shake the cooled beans to rid chaff, and I’m done. Total time is about 40 min but in front of the machine only about 5 of those minutes, doing other things the rest of the time.

The superiority of fresh, quality beans roasted how I like them outweighs any time commitment. And I save a lot of money.

I usually do 3-4 400 gm roasts on a weekend when I’m hanging around the house or in the morning when reading and drinking coffee, so it’s easy.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#96 Post by Michae1 P0wers » December 30th, 2018, 10:43 am

Alan, that's still a lot of time involvement for me. Young kids, busy with work, large old house to care for, so I just find that is about an hour of involved time that I could spend doing other things. Maybe when my kids are older I'll return to it.

As for quality I completely agree wrt freshness, but there's a roaster here who, IMO, roasts absolutely top notch beans, so I go there whenever possible. There are a couple of others who do excellent work as well if I can't make it to my first choice. With any of those options I'm getting beans within 2-3 days of roast, because I always make sure to grab the most recently roasted bag. Now, the money thing is definitely a valid point, because I'm paying anywhere from $16-25 for 12 oz of beans, depending on what type I select.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#97 Post by David Wright » December 30th, 2018, 4:28 pm

My protocol is similar to Alan's... start the roast, set a timer to be in front of roaster to monitor first crack, then cool the beans. A few minutes of hands-on time 2-3 times a week yields a steady supply of fresh coffee, roasted the way I like (usually City/City+; the darkest I go is Full City). I'd spend way more than twice that time making weekly drives to a local roaster -- for coffee roasted too dark for my taste anyway.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#98 Post by Michae1 P0wers » December 30th, 2018, 6:21 pm

David Wright wrote:
December 30th, 2018, 4:28 pm
My protocol is similar to Alan's... start the roast, set a timer to be in front of roaster to monitor first crack, then cool the beans. A few minutes of hands-on time 2-3 times a week yields a steady supply of fresh coffee, roasted the way I like (usually City/City+; the darkest I go is Full City). I'd spend way more than twice that time making weekly drives to a local roaster -- for coffee roasted too dark for my taste anyway.
That all makes sense, but still too much time for me, particularly the 2-3 times a week bit. I stop at the most convenient option (my second choice roaster) on the way to work, or to the place I prefer more when I on my way to get a haircut, get beans and a drink and it adds just a few minutes to a trip I'm making anyway. However, the roasters I'm frequenting certainly don't go too dark at all. To me that would be a hallmark of a bad roaster, or at least someone I'd avoid. These are top notch places, particularly Sump, whose beans are as good as any I've had.

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#99 Post by Mary Deem » January 1st, 2019, 1:17 pm

Alan W. - Late reply on my part, sorry. I am not to worried about my lungs. I roast only a few times a week, a 9-10 minute roast each time. Having said thatm I am impressed by the amout of coffee oil at the bottom of my roasting chamber. I had to break the roaster down and clean it up...wowoo what a mess ;)

Roasting... I am in front of the roaster from start to finish since my roaster is all manual ;)

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Re: Coffee Roasting Question

#100 Post by Gary Zimberg » January 2nd, 2019, 5:07 pm

alan weinberg wrote:
December 23rd, 2018, 12:52 pm
hitting 1 lb gives an 18 min roast. Can hit + and take it to 20:30 before hitting start. (I also do a 2 min preheat.) Have to hit start again between 6:30-7:00 or it shuts down. When I get to one minute, I hit C and P5, bouncing between P4 and P5 based on temperature. I roast 400 gm. I don't go to second crack. I go mostly by smell and sound.
Just placed an order for some more Green Beans. Since I respect your Burg Palate, figured I should try some Guats too! .. Ordered some Guatemala Xinabajul La Libertad Lot 2, Guatemala Huehuetenango Xinabajul SWP Decaf, Nicaragua Dipilto Finca La Laguna, Nicaragua Finca Buenos Aires Caturra Lot 2 and 2 Espresso Blends, Sweet Maria's Altiplano Blend and New Classic Espresso.

Alan on my last 2 batches I used your method, 2 minute PreHeat, then started my Roast, stopped it just before 2:00, and restarted, adding time up to 20:30. Is it possible that you do not notice the exhaust fan coming on because you are not standing there the whole time? or maybe that you have the older model and upgraded it? Either way, my exhaust fan comes on when there is 10:30 left in the roast. Next time you roast, towards the end, hit the A and see if its above 129F. If so I believe it means the exhaust is on.... when it comes on, I get a dip in temp..
Before the fan comes up, I get up to 315 or 320 on P5, then back off to P4... but when the fan comes on , the temp drops to 280F.. using P5 I can get it back to 305..

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