Wine Books - Must Haves

A section for those relatively new to wine, 'geeks in training', and for common wine topics
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Andrew A r n t f i e l d
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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#51 Post by Andrew A r n t f i e l d »

Michael_H wrote: August 7th, 2020, 1:40 pm If anyone is looking for a deep dive of Champagne, Peter Liem's box set can't be recommended highly enough. The maps + the text are amazing. I wish there was its equivalent for the piedmont.
+1 on the Liem book.

Best books I’ve read on various regions:

Champagne by Peter Liem (2017)
Barolo and Barbaresco by Kerin O’Keefe (2014)
Brunello di Montalcino by Kerin O’Keefe (2012)
Inside Bordeaux by Jane Anson (2020)
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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#52 Post by Neal Addy »

I'm a bit surprised that Hugh Johnson's "The Story of Wine" has not been mentioned. It's got some whiskers but a new addition was just released. I'm in the middle of it now and quite enjoying it.

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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#53 Post by jnbrown »

I second Cork Dork. It is far from a reference but entertaining and somewhat educational.
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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#54 Post by Andrew Bair »

K N Haque wrote: August 7th, 2020, 9:02 pm
Brian S t o t t e r wrote: June 6th, 2020, 8:34 pm Is there a book out there that goes over MSR German riesling vineyards? Not just some general German riesling book or overview of the 13 major wine-producing regions.
Brian, I just saw this. Are you looking specifically for a book or do online resources work? As far as a book, Stuart Piggott's Wine Atlas of Germany is probably about as detailed as you can get in English, as far as I know. I realize it covers all the growing areas, but at over 200 pgs., clearly MSR takes up a lot of space. Unfortunately, it is outdated from the mid 1990's and only available used, but of course the iconic vineyards are the iconic vineyards. Same for most of the producers.

Also, though they are printed and bound copies out there, I read terry Theise's catalogs online. They are of course not unbiased (he is an importer after all) and sometimes overwrought, but they also have a ton of information in them. He lists Mosel and Saar at the very end. Since he left Skurnik, he has now put up some of the old catalogs at https://www.terrytheise.com/portfolio.

Finally, Mosel Fine Wines is a good source.
These are all great recommendations. I would second KN's point about Stuart Piggott's Wine Atlas of Germany being a useful reference, albeit a bit outdated now. The 2014 Braatz/Sautter/Swoboda Wine Atlas of Germany is also a must-have if you are interested in German wine, although I find myself disagreeing with its classification in some cases. For example, my experience suggests that Bernkastler Doctor is indeed worthy of being in the top tier of Middle Mosel sites even though Thomas Haag is the first elite winemaker to own land in this einzellage in many years.

If you are looking for info on sites owned by VDP members, the VDP Vineyard Online website is a great resource. Of course, there are several elite MSR producers who are not in the VDP, such as Selbach-Oster, Markus Molitor, and Falkenstein.

Unfortunately, I am not aware of a MSR-specific resource in English, either. My knowledge of German is very limited outside of wine-related terminology.

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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#55 Post by Andrew Bair »

As an update, I received Anne Krebiehl's The Wines of Germany as a Christmas gift. Having read through it a few times, it's definitely worth buying if you're interested at all in German wine. Anne's profiles are very up to date, and her spotlight on sekt is much appreciated here.

A couple of quibbles are the lack of maps and visuals, and a perceived bias against co-ops. I'm certainly not the first to have criticized the Classic Wine Library series for being bereft of maps and photos. To the latter point, Germany may not have an equal to Produttori del Barbaresco (nobody does), but the best wines of the better German co-ops are more than worthy in my experience, especially those from Baden. Certainly, Moselland and others could afford to step up their game, but not everyone has the resources to leave a co-op and bottle their own wine. Adulating ""entrepreneurial" growers and winemakers for the fact that they left a co-op, which Anne does on several occasions, is misleading in my opinion.

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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#56 Post by Howard_K »

Judgement of Paris by George Taber: this recounts the whole 1976 tasting in Paris. Taber was the Time magazine reporter who was the only reporter present during the tasting, and it was his article that really brought the news of the tasting to the world. This book is the detailed and elaborated version of that pivotal article.

Harvests of Joy: How the Good Life Became Great Business by Robert Mondavi: An autobiography of Mondavi who is so important to the development of Napa Valley. It talks about a few key moments that have now entered the legend of the region, such as the family feud in the mondavi family, the development of opus one, and other, obviously from Bob Mondavi's perspective.

Wine and War- already recommended by many others

In vino Duplicitas, by Peter Hellman, which you read, is entertaining, and I would recommend to other forum viewers, as the forum played a huge role in unraveling the whole Rudy Kurniawan case

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Free Online Archives

#57 Post by Drew Goin »

I would like to share a couple of online resources for reading about wine-related topics. The second website is most useful when one has a very specific subject in mind.


· Free Wines & Vines Archives:

https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Wines+%26+Vines-p24874


· Newpaper Archives (California):

http://www.newspaperabstracts.com/index ... &catid=319

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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#58 Post by Otto Forsberg »

If one doesn't want to deep-dive into regions or countries or grape varieties first, but instead wants to understand wine itself - on a deeper level - I'd argue Goode's Authentic Wine is one of the best books out there. The Science of Wine is a wonderful reference book, but a bit heavy read, whereas Authentic Wine is so well-written it basically reads itself. Tons of interesting and important stuff not just for beginners, but also for people who have been into wine for years.
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Online Libraries of Wine Texts

#59 Post by Drew Goin »

Here are two massive internet collections of full-text copies of books, reports, articles, etc, related to grape-growing and winemaking:


University of Penn State Library
The Online Books Page



Hathi Trust Digital Library

Examples of Full Texts:

California Agricultural Experiment Station
Every Report of the Viticultural Work (1883 through 1896)

Dr E.W. Hilgard, Director
Sacramento, J. J. Ayres, Supt. State Print, 1886-96

The California Viticultural Commission performed several studies in the late 1800s investigating best practices in defeating the Phylloxera epidemic, investigating successful grape-growing and vinification protocols, etc.

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More Online Reading Material

#60 Post by Drew Goin »

More Online Reading Material:


· Internet Archive
Search: "Wine and Wine Making - California" (172 Results, many fairly recent books)


· Internet Archive
Economic Status of the Grape Industry (1927)
by Shear, S. W.
Publisher: Berkeley, CA Agricultural Experiment Station


· Internet Archive
Collection: UC Davis Library
Search: "Wine"


· Hathi Trust
Grape Industry Statistics as of November 1951
by S.W. Shear

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Re: Wine Books - Must Haves

#61 Post by victor j »

Big Macs and Burgandy is very interesting

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