The Cocktail Thread

BEERserkers and fans of spirits, come on in! Discussion about beer, spirits, liquor - anything beverage non-wine related
Message
Author
User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#701 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Corey N. wrote: December 11th, 2020, 7:19 am Tran, I really mean no disrespect, but I hate your ice. Perhaps you can find some inexpensive ice molds?

Also, happy Chanukah.
I have traditional ice cube molds. If you saw my superhero and clear ice threads elsewhere, I just went whole hog on using those superhero ice cube molds for fun and am now using them all up. Next batch will be standard cubes.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#702 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE WARD NINE

Here's a slightly upscale version of the classic Ward Eight cocktail:

WARD NINE

  • Spirits: 2 parts Bourbon
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Yuzu juice (see note below)
  • Sweets: .25 parts Simple syrup; .25 parts Pomegranate molasses (aka real grenadine)
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together with ice in a shaker. Pour into a glass filled with ice. Enjoy.

Tartness from the citrus and pomegranate dominate underscored by nice smoke and caramel notes from the Bourbon base. Very interesting interplay from the bourbon and citrus, not too sweet despite the molasses and simple syrup. Quite tart and refreshing.
  • Yuzu is of course the famous Japanese citrus fruit with a unique taste that's rather hard to find in North America. You can mimic the taste, however, by mixing 2 parts lemon, 2 parts lime and 1 part grapefruit juice. Fresh squeezed is preferable.
20201215_192142.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Jorge Henriquez
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 14505
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 12:11 pm
Location: Westchester County, NY
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 14 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#703 Post by Jorge Henriquez »

Tran Bronstein wrote: November 26th, 2020, 1:59 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE VIKING

I don't often see cucumber in a Brandy based cocktail so I gave this a try:

VIKING

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy
  • Liqueurs: .5 Parts Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; 3 slices cucumber
  • Sweets: .25 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: 4 oz Tonic Water


Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. The shaking will tear the cucumber apart so no need to muddle. Pour over ice into a large glass.

Greenish brown in the glass. The smoky sweet Brandy de Jerez dominates followed by some sweet herbs and then the cucumber asserts itself. Basically, nothing in this cocktail is melding together. Maybe the Brandy de Jerez is too strong. I might have to try this again with a regular Brandy. I'm not really taking to this as it is, though.


20201125_180346.jpg
Tran, where did this recipe come from? Sounds not too appealing.
ITB - Grapes The Wine Co.
Cohort Numero Uno!
"I'm a bowl of excitement, bitch!" TMF 08/13/10

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#704 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Jorge Henriquez wrote: December 16th, 2020, 2:40 pm
Tran Bronstein wrote: November 26th, 2020, 1:59 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE VIKING

I don't often see cucumber in a Brandy based cocktail so I gave this a try:

VIKING

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy
  • Liqueurs: .5 Parts Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; 3 slices cucumber
  • Sweets: .25 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. The shaking will tear the cucumber apart so no need to muddle. Pour over ice into a large glass.

Greenish brown in the glass. The smoky sweet Brandy de Jerez dominates followed by some sweet herbs and then the cucumber asserts itself. Basically, nothing in this cocktail is melding together. Maybe the Brandy de Jerez is too strong. I might have to try this again with a regular Brandy. I'm not really taking to this as it is, though.


20201125_180346.jpg
Tran, where did this recipe come from? Sounds not too appealing.
I have collected literally hundreds of recipes off of the Internet now so it would be hard to pinpoint the source. On YouTube I follow Behind the Bar, The Educated Barry, Steve the Bartender, Cocktail Chemistry and Vlad Slick Bartender. On websites I follow Paste, Spruce Eats, Difford's Guide and Liquor.

As for the cocktail itself, hey, they can't all be winners. The purpose and the fun of the journey is finding out which ones are.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

Abbie S.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 343
Joined: March 29th, 2011, 11:09 am
Location: Cleveland, OH
Has thanked: 22 times
Been thanked: 14 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#705 Post by Abbie S. »

A new favorite-

We've been playing with different mezcals, sherry and amaro.

Smoke in the Well

1 oz Mezcal, Vida
3⁄4 oz Manzanilla sherry, La Gitana
3⁄4 oz Amaro Montenegro
1⁄2 oz Campari

Stir and strain into OF glass with big cube. Garnish with dehydrated/dried orange wheel.
IG abbieroads

salovon

User avatar
Jorge Henriquez
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 14505
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 12:11 pm
Location: Westchester County, NY
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 14 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#706 Post by Jorge Henriquez »

Sounds awesome! Works well in winter or more of a summery drink?
ITB - Grapes The Wine Co.
Cohort Numero Uno!
"I'm a bowl of excitement, bitch!" TMF 08/13/10

Joe Chanley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1030
Joined: February 1st, 2010, 1:13 pm
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#707 Post by Joe Chanley »

Looking for advice on coupe and nick and Nora glasses. What is everyone’s go to? Would appreciate some recommendations.

User avatar
Rodrigo B
Monopole Crü
Monopole Crü
Posts: 1354
Joined: June 9th, 2020, 11:21 pm
Location: New York
Has thanked: 52 times
Been thanked: 197 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#708 Post by Rodrigo B »

It's become harder to find and more expensive at retail, but I like the RONA's vintage lace Nick and Nora glasses.
B r @ g @

Joe Chanley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1030
Joined: February 1st, 2010, 1:13 pm
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#709 Post by Joe Chanley »

thank you

User avatar
Jorge Henriquez
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 14505
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 12:11 pm
Location: Westchester County, NY
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 14 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#710 Post by Jorge Henriquez »

ITB - Grapes The Wine Co.
Cohort Numero Uno!
"I'm a bowl of excitement, bitch!" TMF 08/13/10

Joe Chanley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1030
Joined: February 1st, 2010, 1:13 pm
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#711 Post by Joe Chanley »

Very nice, thanks Jorge

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#712 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ST. STEPHENS SOUR

Happy New Year everyone. I took a break from mixing new cocktails over the holidays while I isolated with my sister's family in Montreal and now it's time to ring in a brand new year of mixing and drinking. Here's the first cocktail of 2021:

ST. STEPHEN'S SOUR

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy; 1 part Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon (see note below)
  • Sweets: 1 part Orgeat
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together with ice in a shaker. Pour into a glass filled with ice. Enjoy.

Creamy texture with a strong almond aroma and flavor. The caramel, char and smoke flavors from the spirits really complement the almond cream flavors well and the sweetness is balanced out by the tart lemon. Pretty nice take on a tiki cocktail.
  • As always, you can make your own Orgeat by flavoring either pre-sweetened almond milk or almond creamer with 1 tsp each of rosewater and orange flower water per cup of milk or creamer.
20210104_192812.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#713 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ST. STEPHENS SOUR

Happy New Year everyone. I took a break from mixing new cocktails over the holidays while I isolated with my sister's family in Montreal and now it's time to ring in a brand new year of mixing and drinking. Here's the first cocktail of 2021:

ST. STEPHEN'S SOUR

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy; 1 part Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon (see note below)
  • Sweets: 1 part Orgeat
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together with ice in a shaker. Pour into a glass filled with ice. Enjoy.

Creamy texture with a strong almond aroma and flavor. The caramel, char and smoke flavors from the spirits really complement the almond cream flavors well and the sweetness is balanced out by the tart lemon. Pretty nice take on a tiki cocktail.
  • As always, you can make your own Orgeat by flavoring either pre-sweetened almond milk or almond creamer with 1 tsp each of rosewater and orange flower water per cup of milk or creamer.
20210104_192812.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#714 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SOUTHERN COMFORT

My second new cocktail this year is a recreation of one of the most famous yet disrespected liqueurs on the planet, Southern Comfort. Let's see how close it gets.

SOUTHERN COMFORT

  • Spirits: 1 part Bourbon; 1 part Canadian Whisky
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Peach liqueur (I used my own homemade Peach Marnier infusion)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Amaro
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together with ice in a shaker. Pour into a glass filled with ice. Enjoy.

Strong caramel and peach aromas. On the palate, however, the whiskies and lemon dominate with the peach flavor and Amaro spices and bitters more background supporters. Well balanced and not too sweet as the only sugar is from the peach liqueur. I can see this being easily tweaked by adding a bit of sugar syrup and perhaps substituting out the peach liqueur for peach nectar for even more peach flavor if you actually prefer something more akin to the sweeter Southern Comfort liqueur. Nice but not mind-blowing.
  • The original Southern Comfort liqueur was a cheap Bourbon based liqueur flavored with sugar, stone fruit juice concentrate and spices. The current version uses cheap neutral grain spirit (aka vodka aka moonshine) instead of cheap Bourbon. It's sweet, fruity and strong and tries to ape the respectability of American Whisky aka Bourbon aka the Nectar of the Gods. I have absolutely zero interest in trying it, but the mix of flavors did sound intriguing enough to recreate in this cocktail which I found on the Internet.
20210105_193427.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
stevealbrecht
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 280
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 7:33 pm
Location: Grayslake, IL

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#715 Post by stevealbrecht »

Tran Bronstein wrote: December 10th, 2020, 1:23 pm
stevealbrecht wrote: December 8th, 2020, 5:56 pm "Canadian Sneak"

2 ounces whiskey
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
1/2 ounce maple syrup
4 dashes angostura bitters
2 pinches of ground cinnamon

combine in shaker with ice and shake vigorously

It calls for a rocks glass with ice, but I put it in a coupe (no ice) instead

Tastes like fresh apple cider
Holy crap, I just did this exact cocktail because I couldn't resist after reading Steve's post and hot damn but it looks, smells and tastes EXACTLY like fresh apple cider! flirtysmile [cheers.gif] There literally is no other note to add, the exact combination of flavors somehow manages to mimic those found in apple cider perfectly! [shock.gif] I used exactly 1 part of Canadian Club 20 Year Old and 1 part of Maker's Mark 46 for the Whisky component, fresh lemon juice, real Quebec maple syrup, Angostura bitters and freshly ground cinnamon. Damn but this is incredible! No need to make mulled apple cider this holiday season, just follow the recipe above!


20201210_161025.jpg
That is exactly what I thought when I tried it. No heat at all from alcohol.....If you gave this to someone that doesn't drink, I bet they would not notice the difference.

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#716 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE LATE HARVEST/ICEWINE VESPER

Here's a Canadian twist on one of the most famous cocktails ever invented:

LATE HARVEST/ICEWINE VESPER

  • Spirits: 2 parts Canadian Gin (I use Dillon's Unfiltered 22); 1 oz Late Harvest sweet wine or Icewine (I used Johnson Estates Chambourcin icewine from the Finger Lakes area)
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: A few drops bitters
  • Sodas: None
Add all ingredients to a glass with ice. Stir until well chilled and diluted. Pour into a glass. Enjoy.

Gin botanicals are foremost on the notes and palate. The sweet red berry flavor of the Chambourcin icewine comes in on the backend but the Gin botanicals come roaring right back. Slight touch of spices from the bitters. Pleasant take on a Martini.
  • The traditional Vesper is the classic twist on a Martini made famous by the Ian Fleming James Bond novels. It consists of Gin, white Lillet and bitters. The Late Harvest/Icewine version created by local Ontario company Barchef substitutes out the Lillet for either a late harvest sweet wine or an icewine. I chose to use a red icewine for this variation.
20210109_202259.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#717 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ICEWINE MANHATTAN

Here's another Canadian twist on another of the most famous cocktails ever invented. This one is championed by Inniskillin, one of the first and still most famous Canadian wineries to successfully produce icewine:

ICEWINE MANHATTAN

  • Spirits: 1 part Canadian Whisky; 1 part Bourbon; 1 oz Icewine (I used Johnson Estates Chambourcin icewine from the Finger Lakes area)
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: A few drops Angostura bitters
  • Sodas: None
Add all ingredients to a glass with ice. Stir until well chilled and diluted. Pour into a glass. Enjoy.

The sweet vanilla, smoky char and spicy rye from the whiskies are prominent on the nose and palate. They are lifted by the sweetness and sweet cherry flavor of the icewine and actually get stronger. Finish is all smoke from the Bourbon and spice from the rye. It's basically less spicy and more fruity than a traditional Manhattan. Very appealing.
  • This cocktail was created at Inniskillin winery in Niagara, Ontario, Canada. Inniskillin's founders Karl Kaiser and Donald Ziraldo put Canadian icewine on the map in the late 90's as Ziraldo championed it around the world. Canada has since become one of the world's foremost icewine producers.
20210110_184402.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#718 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE DUBLIN MINSTREL

Here's an interesting cocktail that uses ingredients you wouldn't think would go well together but it actually works:

DUBLIN MINSTREL

  • Spirits: 2 parts Scotch or Irish Whisky
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Maraschino; 1 part green Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Add all ingredients to a glass with ice. Stir until well chilled and diluted. Pour into a glass. Enjoy.

The Chartreuse dominates the nose but there is a touch of barley sugar in there. The palate is very well balanced between the sweet barley of the Scotch and the sugar sweetness and herbaciousness of the Chartreuse. Slight fruit note from the Kirsch but the lemon puts it all together. An interesting sour in that it doesn't really have any business working but it does.


20210112_144623.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#719 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE JAGERITA

Amaros are usually used as an accent and a supporter in a cocktail, but can it carry the show as the main spirit base? Let's find out:

JAGERITA
  • Spirits: None
  • Liqueurs: .75 parts Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Curacao or other orange liqueur (I used my homemade Pineapple Marnier)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: .15 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: 1.5 parts Amaro, preferably 35-40% ABV (original recipe calls for Jagermeister)
  • Sodas: None
Add all ingredients to a shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Pour into a glass over ice. Enjoy.

Dark reddish brown in the glass. Dark coffee and bitters are surprisingly complemented very well by the tangy lime and pineapple sweetness of the Marnier as they lighten up the normally dense liqueur. This surprisingly works really well together! Tasty stuff but if Amaro is not your thing you should steer away from this as it is still the dominant flavor.

20210114_142311.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#720 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: USING THE BLENDER METHOD

This week I saw an interesting YouTube video in which an American bartender explained his preference for using a blender instead of a shaker to make a single serving cocktail. He felt that this gave sours a far more uniform and frothier texture, especially if egg whites, cream or aquafaba were being used. Plus, you can easily scale the amount upwards to server more than one person the same cocktail and cleanup was a snap.

The key to his method was specifically NOT to use the same amount of ice in the blender as you would use in a shaker. Remember, in a shaker you would strain the ice back after shaking the cocktail and pour it over fresh ice. The key to his method was to use the equivalent of a single standard freezer tray ice cube and no more to blend the sour with for each individual serving I was intrigued so I decided I'd pick a random sour cocktail from my vast spreadsheet and give it a try.

QUAKER

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy; 1 part Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .5 parts Lemon; 4-5 fresh raspberries
  • Sweets: .15 parts Agave syrup
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Add all ingredients to a standard blender with just one single standard ice cube for each serving. Blend away for a few seconds until smooth and frothy. Pour into a glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

Bright thick red in the glass. The cocktail is thick not due to the ice but the fruit mass of the raspberries and is almost but not quite a smoothie in texture. The rum and brandy work great together as a spirit base with lots of cocoa, smoke, oak and brown sugar flavor. Tart raspberry fruit lifts it all and prevents the cocktail from cloying despite the thick texture and slight bit of added sweetness. Nice change of pace from a standard fruit Daiquiri or Margarita.

So here's all the ingredients in my blender. Since I'm only make a cocktail for myself, I used a fluid ounce as the parts measure. So per my recipe above, I have all of 2.5 oz. of liquid along with probably an ounce of solid raspberries in a 6 cup blender. Seems like overkill but I am committed to trying this out so here we go:
20210115_191016.jpg
20210115_191122.jpg
20210115_191159.jpg
20210115_191310.jpg
The final cocktail is definitely much finer in its consistency than if I just shaken the raspberries in a cocktail shaker. Also frothier and a lot higher in volume due to much more air being whipped up in there. Still feels like overkill though.

And here is the final cocktail:
20210115_191510.jpg
I have to say this is pretty good as a technique but I think a full size blender is a bit much for making a single serving cocktail. I think I'd be better off using a single serving Magic Bullet type blender instead. I also have to say it's not as or visceral as doing the shaking yourself. I'm going to have to give this a couple of more tries with different sour cocktails before deciding whether or not to give up the shaker tin.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#721 Post by Tran Bronstein »

THE COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: WHEN BAD COCKTAILS GO SOUR

Initially, this was going to be a post on the classic Yellow Parrot Cocktail. That is, until I tasted it. Probably the worst and most unbalanced Ancestral booze-only cocktail I have ever had. The problem is that good liquor is not exactly cheap and I was not willing to throw three ounces of high-end liqueurs and spirits down the drain. So what to do? Simple -- save the Ancestral cocktail by turning it into a sour cocktail.

YELLOW PARROT
  • Spirits: None
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Apricot brandy or liqueur (I used my homemade Apricot Marnier); 1 part Chartreuse
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Absinthe
  • Sodas: None
This was godawful. The anise of the Absinthe completely clashes with the heral Chartreuse and both team up to kill any apricot flavor in the brandy. This just leaves a really unpleasant herbal licorice flavor with no real appeal. Now let's add a couple of ingredients to save this:

YELLOW PARROT SOUR
  • Spirits: None
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Apricot brandy or liqueur (I used my homemade Apricot Marnier); 1 part Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Absinthe; 1 dash Orange Bitters
  • Sodas: None
20210117_140832.jpg

Wow, did these two fruit forward ingredients make a huge difference. The anise is still the dominant flavor but but the lemon and orange help bring out the apricot. The fruit helps tame the lethal herb and anise combination and turns it into a relatively pleasing and fruity sour with a pronounced but no longer overpowering herbal anise flavor.

Well, that was a lifesaver. I'll never drink a straight Yellow Parrot cocktail ever again, but I'd definitely enjoy another sour variation on it.

So if turning a bad cocktail sour makes it good... will turning a good cocktail sour make it great? Let's find out.


BOULEVARDIER SOUR
  • Spirits: 1 part Bourbon
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Rosso Antico, Aperol or other red bitter liqueur; 1 dash Orange Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Bright reddish brown in the glass. Orange and herbs dominate the nose. Sweet herbs, red berries and orange dominate the nose with the smokiness of the bourbon coming on strong mid-palate and into the finish. Very fun and refreshing sour but I have to admit some of the nuances of the classic Boulevardier are lost in the exchange. So what we end up with is a good cocktail morphing into just another good cocktail.

The bottom line here is that converting it into a Sour style of cocktail saved what I feel was a pretty bad Ancestral style cocktail. Definitely a trick I'll be employing again in the future.

As an added note, I tried the blender technique again for this cocktail. I have to say I like the fact that there's no wasted ice at all and the cocktail is definitely a lot more aerated.

20210120_151649.jpg
20210120_151914.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#722 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE HAWAIIAN GOLD RUSH

I don't often see a cocktail using pineapple juice with a spirit other than rum and this one uses Bourbon so I gave this one a try:

HAWAIIAN GOLD RUSH

  • Spirits: 1 part Canadian Whisky; 1 part Bourbon (original calls for just Bourbon)
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .75 parts Lemon; .75 parts Pineapple
  • Sweets: .5 Honey syrup (or. 25 raw honey)
  • Bitters: A few dash Grapefruit bitters
  • Sodas: None
Add all ingredients to a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour into a glass over ice. Enjoy.

The smoky complex whisky notes are lifted by the honey and balanced out by the tart lemon. The problem is that the pineapple juice really gets in the way of everything as it doesn't meld well with the other flavors. The grapefruit is kind of lost as well. This seems to have overcomplicated a classic Gold Rush cocktail which ditches the pineapple and grapefruit bitters. That's what I'll try next time.
  • This is based upon the original Gold Rush cocktail which is a simpler Bourbon, honey and lemon affair.
  • I actually don't have grapefruit bitters. So I simulated them by mixing a few drops of Angostura bitters with a few drops of my homemade Pomelocello. Excellent result. The bitters mixture turned out better than the actual cocktail that needed them did.
20210122_190358.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#723 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE EL DORADO

Most cocktails use one or at most 2 spirits as their base. Here's one I found that uses 3 different spirits as the base:

EL DORADO

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy (I used my homemade Pineapple Marnier; see notes below); .5 parts Rum; .5 parts Bourbon
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .75 Simple syrup
  • Bitters: None[/list
    • Sodas: None
    Add all ingredients to a shaker with with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour into a glass over ice. Enjoy.

    The spirit base works well, with the Bourbon smokiness and the Rum's brown sugar toffee sweetness supporting the fruity brandy quite well. Tart lemon with a touch of candied pineapple sweetness to lift it all. Not really complex despite the multiple spirits but very tasty and enjoyable.
    • The original recipe calls for standard Brandy. I decided to use my Pineapple Marnier to give it a touch more fruit flavor. You might want to try subbing in Grand Marnier or Giffard pineapple liqueur instead of the Brandy if you have any.
    20210123_173314.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#724 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CHOCOLATE MARTINI

Every version of this drink I've found on the Internet uses cheap sweet Creme de Cacao liqueur for the chocolate flavor and completely misses out on a high-end quality ingredient they should be using instead -- chocolate bitters. So here's my variations:

CHOCOLATE MARTINI

  • Spirits: 2 parts Gin
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; a few dashes Chocolate Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Stir all ingredients together in a glass over ice. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

I was worried about how well the Gin would take to the chocolate bitters but this was fantastic. The botanicals actually complemented the baking spices and bittersweet chocolate flavors quite well. Great stuff.
  • Chocolate Orange Martini variation: add in a few dashes of Orange bitters as well.
  • Chocolate Covered Cherry Martini variation: add in a few dashes of Cherry bitters as well.
20210124_162751.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#725 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE PETE'S WORD

This is a Scotch based variant on the Last Word cocktail. Let's see what happens when you trade botanical flavors for sweet barley ones instead:

PETE'S WORD

  • Spirits: 1 part Scotch or Irish Whisky
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Kirsch or Maraschino liqueur; 1 part Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Stir all ingredients together in a glass over ice. Pour into a serving glass over lots of ice. Enjoy.

Barley and herbs dominate the nose. On the palate, very sweet flavors of cherries, lemon drop grass and herbs. The sweetness is magnified by the Scotch but its very pleasant and mellow and complements the sweet Kirsch and Chartreuse very well. Lemon provides a little balancing acidity but overall this is a pretty sweet cocktail so use lots of ice.
  • As a PSA reminder, if you substitute Gin in for the Scotch, you have the classic Last Word cocktail.
  • If you substitute Bourbon in for the Scotch, you get the Final Ward variant.
  • There really isn't an official variant involving them, but I can definitely see this cocktail also working with Tequila and Rum subbing in for the Scotch as well.
20210124_162751.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#726 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: LA ULTIMATE PALABRA -- AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL (UNTIL SOMEBODY PROVES OTHERWISE [wow.gif] )

This is a sequel post of sorts to my previous one. I decided to in fact do the Tequila based variant of the Last Word/Final Ward/Pete's Word because I haven't seen it done anywhere before. Therefore, I am officially this cocktail's creator until someone proves it has been done before and demand royalties on it. Of course since Tequila is a Mexican spirit I had to give this variant a Spanish name. Behold my creation, La Ultima Palabra cocktail:

ULTIMA PALABRA

  • Spirits: 1 part Tequila
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Kirsch or Maraschino liqueur; 1 part Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a glass over ice. Pour into a serving glass over lots of ice. Enjoy.

Semi-translucent pale green. Looks just like fresh limeade, actually. Agave and herbs dominate the nose. Very good on the palate, the Tequila is extremely complementary to the Chartreuse and given a touch of fruit sweetness from the Kirsch. Candied lime comes on in the mid-palate and then it all finishes with a touch of smokiness and sharpness from the Tequila. There's a slight taste of raw alcohol on the finish I didn't detect in the Scotch based Pete's Word. A little surprising but honestly doesn't detract too much from the cocktail.

20210128_153631.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by Tran Bronstein on January 29th, 2021, 12:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

TGigante
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 621
Joined: January 26th, 2013, 3:11 pm
Location: BURGHen County, NJ
Has thanked: 8 times
Been thanked: 9 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#727 Post by TGigante »

Tran Bronstein wrote: January 28th, 2021, 12:58 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: LA ULTIMATE PALABRA -- AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL (UNTIL SOMEBODY PROVES OTHERWISE [wow.gif] )

This is a sequel post of sorts to my previous one. I decided to in fact do the Tequila based variant of the Last Word/Final Ward/Pete's Word because I haven't seen it done anywhere before. Therefore, I am officially this cocktail's creator until someone proves it has been done before and demand royalties on it. Of course since Tequila is a Mexican spirit I had to give this variant a Spanish name. Behold my creation, La Ultima Palabra cocktail:

ULTIMA PALABRA

  • Spirits: 1 part Tequila
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Kirsch or Maraschino liqueur; 1 part Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a glass over ice. Pour into a serving glass over lots of ice. Enjoy.

Semi-translucent pale green. Looks just like fresh limeade, actually. Agave and herbs dominate the nose. Very good on the palate, the Tequila is extremely complementary to the Chartreuse and given a touch of fruit sweetness from the Kirsch. Candied lime comes on in the mid-palate and then it all finishes with a touch of smokiness and sharpness from the Tequila. There's a slight taste of raw alcohol on the finish I didn't detect in the Bourbon based Final Ward, Scotch based Pete's Word or Gin based Last Word. A little surprising but honestly doesn't detract too much from the cocktail.


20210128_153631.jpg
Always looking for a good tequila cocktail. Have to check this out.
Thanks Tran
Cheers,
Tony

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#728 Post by Tran Bronstein »

TGigante wrote: January 28th, 2021, 5:58 pm
Tran Bronstein wrote: January 28th, 2021, 12:58 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: LA ULTIMATE PALABRA -- AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL (UNTIL SOMEBODY PROVES OTHERWISE [wow.gif] )

ULTIMA PALABRA

  • Spirits: 1 part Tequila
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Kirsch or Maraschino liqueur; 1 part Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a glass over ice. Pour into a serving glass over lots of ice. Enjoy.


20210128_153631.jpg
Always looking for a good tequila cocktail. Have to check this out.
Thanks Tran
You're welcome and thanks for the note. Just a quick little note that the cocktail will give a much sweeter impression on the palate than it actually is because of the additions of the Tequila and Kirsch. Only the Chartreuse actually adds any sugar and therefore no simple syrup is needed. But it is definitely on the sweeter side which is fine as long as you know going in this is not a dry styled cocktail. Enjoy. [cheers.gif]
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#729 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE FINAL WARD -- WHEN A COCKTAIL VARIATIONO DOESN'T WORK)

So I got carried away with the theme of my last two cocktail posts and decided to do the Final Ward which is the Bourbon based variation of the last two. Sometimes it actually is better to quit while you're ahead. Let's dive in :

FINAL WARD

  • Spirits: 1 part Bourbon (I split the part between Bourbon and Canadian Whisky; see note below)
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Kirsch or Maraschino liqueur; 1 part Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a glass over ice. Pour into a serving glass over lots of ice. Enjoy.

Semi-opaque pale green. The nose is quite muted where the spirits all seem to oddly cancel each other out though the Chartreuse eventually comes forward if I keep sniffing. On the palate, the rich Canadian whisky and smoky bourbon absolutely clash with the sweet Chartreuse as each tries to dominate the cocktail. The smoky Bourbon eventually wins out. I imagine it would be worse in a pure Bourbon variation. After a few sips and allowing for a little more dilution from the ice in the glass, the flavors blend together a little better. Candied lime comes in near the finish before the smoky char flavor returns. To be fair, the cocktail gets more mellow and better integrated as it dilutes because the vanilla from the whiskies becomes more prominent as the smoky char fades but it's rather unharmonious at the start.
    • So yeah. This just didn't work for me. At least not at the beginning. And I absolutely love whisky sours normally. But in this case the whisky just did not meld at all with the Chartreuse. The smoky char just clashed with the intensely sweet and herbal Chartreuse. The barley sweet Scotch and tropical Tequila were much better matches. Thus far, I'd rate the Tequila based Ultima Palabra first and not just because I created it followed by the Scotch based Pete's Word and the Bourbon based Final Ward dead last. All that's left to do now is try the Gin based original variant, The Last Word, to complete this series.
    • For my Bourbon component in my cocktails lately, you may have noticed I have taken to mixing equal parts of a 20 year old Canadian whisky along with a young Bourbon. In my previous cocktails like the Apricot Sour, I found the super intense Rhetoric 25 to completely overpower any cocktail it was in requiring me to either dilute it or forgoe it altogether. I find that mixing an aged Canadian Whisky with a younger Bourbon allows me to keep the depth and richness I want in a high-end version of a cocktail while also having that distinctive smoky char and sweet vanilla flavor from Bourbon. It's definitely a case of having your cake and eating it too. Or in this specific case, having your dram and drinking it too.
    20210129_142955.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#730 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SACRILEGE -- AN ORIGINAL WINE BASED COCKTAIL

So it seems a little odd to me after becoming a mixologist for a year now that it never occurred to me once yet before to do a cocktail using wine as its base. Sure there are plenty of cocktails that use Vermouth and fortified wines but given their high alcohol content it is arguable that they are interchangeable with spirits. And there are a few cocktails that specifically call for the addition of wine like the New York Sour that adds a float of red wine or the Vesper that adds a sweet wine to a Martini but it's not the basis itself for the cocktail. I mean actually using wine as the base. Well I have opened the Domaine Cauhape 2012 Symphonie de Novembre so I thought I'd play around with it and make a cocktail out of it. As some would consider it sacrilege to turn a fine wine into a cocktail, that's the name I actually gave my creation:

SACRILEGE

  • Wine: 2 parts Late Harvest sweet wine
  • Liqueurs: .25 parts St-Germain; .25 parts Pineapple liqueur (I used my homemade Pineapple Marnier)
  • Fruit: .5 parts Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: Orange bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a glass over ice. Pour into a serving glass over lots of ice. Enjoy.

Dark golden yellow in the glass. The wine's tropical fruit flavors go well with the elderflower and sweet pineapple. Candied lemon on the finish. This is a little sweet as the wine and the spirits are of course all sweet so no simple syrup is needed. Pretty nice and lighter than most cocktails due to the use of wine as a base. Pretty and tasty, though nothing mind-blowing.
    • Well, a sweet wine definitely works as a cocktail base. It would be interesting to try this with a dry wine base like a Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc and see what kind of effect that has.
    • If you don't care for or don't have pineapple liqueur, feel free to substitute in Cointreau, Grand Marnier, a Triple Sec or a Curacao liqueur instead.
    20210129_201105.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#731 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SMOKED MANHATTAN

So I see on the Internet that smoking cocktails is a thing. As a barbecue fanatic, that certainly appeals to me. But will it actually work in a cocktail? Let's try it out:

SMOKED MANHATTAN

  • Spirits: 2 parts Bourbon (I split the part between Bourbon and Canadian Whisky
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: A few dashes Angostura bitters; A few dashes Orange bitters; a few drops liquid smoke OR 1 cocktail smoker gun shot
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a glass over ice if using liquid smoke. Pour into a serving glass over lots of ice. Enjoy.

If using a cocktail smoking gun instead, follow the manufacturer's directions. There are various methods of infusing a cocktail with smoke including pre-smoking the actual serving glass beforehand; transferring the shaken cocktail into another shaker and infusing it before pouring into the serving glass; or covering the poured cocktail with a large dome, firing off the smoke and then covering the cocktail and letting it infuse.

Dark translucent coffee black in the glass. Smoke and spices dominate the nose. On the palate the liquid smoke flavor is strong but it is not melding at all with the sweet and mellow Manhattan. Rather, it seems to float above it as an intense but wholly separate flavor. I can easily separate the smoke flavor from the cocktail flavor itself. The smoke flavor just doesn't play with or complement the smoky char, caramel, vanilla and rye notes from the Bourbon and Canadian Whisky or the sweet red fruit and baking spices from the Vermouth or the tangy bitters. This might have been a lot better with a smoker gun shot as that probably would have been more subtle but to be honest I'm not really motivated to go out of my way to buy a smoker gun just to find out. This just doesn't meld as a whole.
    • So yeah, this really comes as nothing more than just a gimmick to me. There's just nothing harmonious about this at all. To be honest, I'm kind of perplexed now as to how the whole smoked cocktail craze has taken off without somebody stepping in and realizing that it's actually not that great of an idea. While the idea of a smoked cocktail sounds pretty cool, in actual practice it's not doing anything for me at all. I love real smoked barbecue and dare say I fancy myself an expert at it. I've managed to smoke not just meat and fish but even vegetables, sauces, cheeses, fruits, nuts, breads and even a whole apple pie and a baked chocolate cake once with far, far better results than this. Turns out that even for barbecue fanatics like me who will smoke anything edible they can get their hands on and make it work, there are just some things that weren't meant to be.
    20210201_191611.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#732 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SYMPHONIE DE NOVEMBRE -- ANOTHER WINE COCKTAIL

I decided to use the last of my Domaine Cahaupe 2012 Symphonie de Novembre to make a second wine based cocktail with a bit of a more tropical bent and named it after the wine itself:

SYMPHONIE DE NOVEMBRE

  • Spirits: 2 parts Late Harvest sweet wine
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Passion Fruit liqueur; 1 part Mandarin liqueur (I used my homemade Mandarinocello)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: A few dashes Angostura bitters; A few dashes Cherry bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker over ice. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

Bright golden orange in the glass. The passionfruit and mandarin aromas dominate the nose. Sweet flavors of quince, passionfruit, mandarin orange and candied lemon and cherries with a hint of spices. Very pleasant fruit forward sour cocktail.

  • Feel free to sub in Cointreau, Grand Marnier, a Triple Sec or a Curacao liqueur instead of the Mandarin liqueur if you can't find any. Even some Orange Bitters would probably do as you're just looking for an orange accent here.
20210203_180020.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#733 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE HEART-SHAPED BOX

It's getting close to Valentine's Day and nothing is more romantic than a sweet cocktail. Here's one modeled after the classic sweet dessert of Strawberries and Balsamic called the Heart-Shaped Box:

HEART-SHAPED BOX

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy
  • Liqueurs: 1 part St-Germain
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; 1 whole Strawberry
  • Sweets: .25 Cinnamon syrup (see note below)
  • Bitters: .25 Balsamic Vinegar
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker over ice. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

Dark opaque red with a purplish hue in the glass, heavily influenced by the dark balsamic vinegar. The nose has some heat from the aged Armagnac I am using (Delord 1988) and is dominated by strawberry and lemon rather than the balsamic. On the palate, interesting flavors of candied lemon and strawberries with a sweet elderflower note followed by a bittersweet balsamic note. A sweet and refreshing fruit forward cocktail lent a very interesting note by the cinnamon and balsamic. I was afraid one or both would dominate and ruin the cocktail, especially the balsamic, but they actually provide a really interesting support note. I'd be very happy to use balsamic vinegar in other cocktails even if they didn't call for it.
  • If you don't have cinnamon syrup on hand, feel free to substitute in either Simple Syrup or Agave syrup as I did along with a dash of ground cinnamon.
  • No need to muddle the strawberry beforehand. Just slice it and toss into the shaker. The whip shaking motion will tear the fruit apart and infuse it into the cocktail.
  • I like the remnants of the fruit in my glass but I recognize this is not very attractive, especially if serving this drink to another person. So feel free to strain out the strawberry pulp as you wish.
20210205_193652.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#734 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE IRISH DERBY

So here's a cocktail focused on American Whiskey and French Curacao liqueur so naturally it's called the Irish Derby even though there's not a drop of Irish Whisky in it. [wow.gif] Well, let's see how it is then:

IRISH DERBY

  • Spirits: 1.5 parts Bourbon or Canadian Whisky (I used both in equal parts)
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Triple Sec, Curacao or other orange liqueur
  • Fruit: .5 parts Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: .5 parts Vermouth; a few dashes Angostura bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker over ice. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

Bright translucent orange brown in the glass. The whiskies, vermouth and my homemade ariancello provide a sweet and soft nose that smells like a baked orange muffin. On the palate, caramel, vanilla, smoke and sour lime are dominant and the cocktail is rather dry. But the finish is all candied citrus peel and as my ice melted into the drink, it interestingly actually got quite sweeter. An interesting cocktail but nothing mind-blowing.


20210216_193021.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by Tran Bronstein on February 18th, 2021, 7:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Jorge Henriquez
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 14505
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 12:11 pm
Location: Westchester County, NY
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 14 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#735 Post by Jorge Henriquez »

Tran,

I believe that the failure in your smoked Manhattan was using the liquid smoke in lieu of actual smoke via a gun or even some herbs or chips lit on fire and then covered next to the glass under a glass cloche (which looks super cool).

I’ve had many a smoked drink at cocktail bars that I found delicious.
ITB - Grapes The Wine Co.
Cohort Numero Uno!
"I'm a bowl of excitement, bitch!" TMF 08/13/10

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#736 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Jorge Henriquez wrote: February 18th, 2021, 7:12 am Tran,

I believe that the failure in your smoked Manhattan was using the liquid smoke in lieu of actual smoke via a gun or even some herbs or chips lit on fire and then covered next to the glass under a glass cloche (which looks super cool).

I’ve had many a smoked drink at cocktail bars that I found delicious.
That's fair, Jorge. I don't own a smoking gun and think it's too much money to invest simply to try for one cocktail but this summer when I can barbecue outdoors I'll use some smoking wood chips and give the chip method a try. We'll see if that brings me around. [cheers.gif]
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#737 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ANGEL EYES

Bourbon and grapefruit make for a stunning flavor combination that I think is very underrated in the cocktail world and should be mixed together much more often than it actually is. Here's a nice Bourbon and grapefruit based cocktail I found on the internet:

ANGEL EYES

  • Spirits: 2 parts Bourbon or Canadian Whisky (I used both in equal parts)
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 4 parts Grapefruit
  • Sweets: .5 parts Honey Syrup or .25 parts Honey
  • Bitters: .5 parts Amaro
  • Sodas: None
If you're using pure honey, put all the ingredients together in a shaker without ice and stir gently until the honey is dissolved. Then add ice to the shaker. If using honey syrup, put all the ingredients in together with your ice. Shake together. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

Bright translucent orange brown in the glass. The whiskies, vermouth and my homemade ariancello provide a sweet and soft nose that smells like a baked orange muffin. On the palate, caramel, vanilla, smoke and sour lime are dominant and the cocktail is rather dry. But the finish is all candied citrus peel and as my ice melted into the drink, it interestingly actually got quite sweeter. An interesting cocktail but nothing mind-blowing.

Opaque creamy brown in the glass with quite a frothy head on it. Only pineapple juice gets more aeration and gives a frothier head. Creamy sweet flavors of vanilla, citrus, a little mango. This is not a full on sour cocktail, but has decent acidity from the grapefruit to keep it from being sweet and cloying. The one flavor I don't get, interestingly, is grapefruit as it has blended together extremely well with the Bourbon, so much so to the extent that you'd think a different fruit was actually used in the cocktail if you didn't know better. The amaro's bitter spices also melt into the drink. This is nice. I'd definitely make it again.


20210218_144250.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by Tran Bronstein on March 5th, 2021, 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#738 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE TOKYO BANANA -- SWITCHING IT UP THREE WAYS

I found a cocktail called the Tokyo Banana, a cool and delicious riff on the classic Penicillin cocktail that adds fresh banana. Since the Penicillin can be done three different ways with Scotch, Bourbon and Rum, I decided I'd do the Tokyo Banana three different ways as well by switching out the spirit base:

TOKYO BANANA I

  • Spirits: 2 parts Scotch or Irish Whisky
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; 2 -3 slices fresh Banana
  • Sweets: .5 parts Honey Syrup or .25 parts Honey
  • Bitters: 1-2 fresh Ginger slices or a few dashes Ginger Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Place all the ingredients together in a shaker. If using raw honey, stir gently with a spoon first to dissolve the honey. Add ice to the shaker, cover and shake vigorously. Strain over ice into a cocktail glass. Enjoy.
  • This is the original Tokyo Banana cocktail and ironically it is the one doing the least for me. The Pennicillin is a very good cocktail
    as the Scotch, ginger, lemon and honey work very well together. But once the banana is added, I'm finding that the Scotch isn't really adding anything anymore to complement the drink as a whole. The addition of one single ingredient has completely thrown off the balance. And I'm not using a weak whisky, either, it's an 18 year old Chivas Regal which has a decent amount of heft to it. This just isn't doing it for me.
20210222_194413.jpg

TOKYO BANANA II

  • Spirits: 2 parts Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; 2 -3 slices fresh Banana
  • Sweets: .5 parts Honey Syrup or .25 parts Honey
  • Bitters: 1-2 fresh Ginger slices or a few dashes Ginger Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Place all the ingredients together in a shaker. If using raw honey, stir gently with a spoon first to dissolve the honey. Add ice to the shaker, cover and shake vigorously. Strain over ice into a cocktail glass. Enjoy.

20210223_202714.jpg
  • Okay, now this is way better. The rich toffee and demarara flavors of the rum go exceptionally well with the banana, ginger and honey flavors. This is eassily the best of the three versions.

TOKYO BANANA III

  • Spirits: 2 parts Bourbon
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; 2 -3 slices fresh Banana
  • Sweets: .5 parts Honey Syrup or .25 parts Honey
  • Bitters: 1-2 fresh Ginger slices or a few dashes Ginger Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Place all the ingredients together in a shaker. If using raw honey, stir gently with a spoon first to dissolve the honey. Add ice to the shaker, cover and shake vigorously. Strain over ice into a cocktail glass. Enjoy.
  • The toffee, smoky char, vanilla and caramel corn flavors of the Bourbon match well with the banana and honey flavors. If anything, it's the ginger that seems incongruous but honestly not by very much. Way better than the Scotch version but definitely bested by the Rum version.
20210225_143243.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by Tran Bronstein on March 5th, 2021, 12:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Brian S t o t t e r
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2822
Joined: April 21st, 2015, 6:05 am
Location: St. Louis, MO
Has thanked: 144 times
Been thanked: 126 times
Contact:

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#739 Post by Brian S t o t t e r »

Just purchased the Death & Co cocktail book, can’t wait to dive into it!
CT and IG: rieslinghoarder

2021 WOTY Candidates:

2019 Hofgut Falkenstein Niedermenniger Herrenberg Riesling Spätlese feinherb “Meyer Nepal” #11
2006 Billecart-Salmon Champagne Cuvée Nicolas-François Billecart
2015 Kelley Fox Wines Pinot Noir Maresh Vineyard Red Barn Blocks
1997 Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt Scharzhofberger Riesling Auslese

User avatar
Rodrigo B
Monopole Crü
Monopole Crü
Posts: 1354
Joined: June 9th, 2020, 11:21 pm
Location: New York
Has thanked: 52 times
Been thanked: 197 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#740 Post by Rodrigo B »

Brian S t o t t e r wrote: February 28th, 2021, 6:12 pm Just purchased the Death & Co cocktail book, can’t wait to dive into it!
The Death & Co book is great book on much of the modern classics cannon. Solid book to dive in

For those interested in cocktails and looking for books to learn more here’s a few that I think are part of the essential cannon of cocktail books:

Imbibe and Punch by David Wondrich that go into the history of cocktails.

Liquid Intelligence by Dave Arnold is a great book that goes into modern techniques for cocktails as well as braking down much of the science of cocktails.

The Bar Book by Jeffery Morgenthaler is a great book that goes into the basics of cocktails, building a bar, and making drinks. A no fuss book that’s great for people that are starting out and want to lean more

Sipping Safari and Smuggler's Cove from Matin and Rebecca Cate and Beachbum Berry are go to resources for all thinks rum and tiki related.

Charles H Baker’s The South American Gentleman’s Companion: Being an Exotic Drinking Book Or, Up & Down the Andes with Jigger, Beaker & Flask. Highly entertaining book with stories of drinking and travelling.
B r @ g @

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#741 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ANCIENT DAIQUIRI

It's been a while since I've made a Rum sour and the Daiquiri is the quintessential Rum sour drink. I found this version, however, that is far FAR better than any Daiquiri you've ever had before:

ANCIENT DAIQUIRI

  • Spirits: 1 Part Rum
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Chartreuse; .5 parts Benedictine, Glayva, or Drambruie
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: Few dashes Orange Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together in a shaker with ice. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

Honey and herbs on the nose. The incredible palate is redolent with herbs, honey and brown sugar sweetness, candied lime, and burnt sugar caramel. This is quite sweet due to the liberal use of both Chartreuse and Drambruie, so lots of ice is recommended. Of course, a Daiquiri is a sweeter cocktail in general so you know what you're in for here.

With that in mind, this is quite simply the single best variation I've ever had on a Daiquiri. In fact, as a cocktail in and of itself, it's easily right up there with the Last Flight, Last Word and Final Ward cocktails. Highly recommended and definitely something I'll be making again.

20210305_143053.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#742 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE JAMES JOYCE

Oh Scotch, I have such a love/hate relationship with you when it comes to cocktails. The intense and unique barley and smoky peat flavors if you like that style make you such a unique and cherished spirit on your own and such a horrible cocktail ingredient. Yet, every once in a while somebody comes up with a gem like the Pennicillin and everyone just assumes they can treat you like any other cocktail spirit. And even though I know only a few precious Scotch based cocktails would even work, I keep trying and trying to find more that will. Here's one I found on the Net I thought I'd give a shot :

JAMES JOYCE

  • Spirits: 2 parts Scotch or Irish Whisky
  • Liqueurs: .75 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Triple Sec, Curacao or other orange liqueur
  • Fruit: .75 parts Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: .75 Vermouth
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together in a shaker with ice. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

Translucent light brown in the glass. The nose is muted barley and orange peel. The palate is an odd mix of cooked barley cereal, orange and tangy lime and a sliver of baking spices. To be honest, this isn't really harmonious. None of the ingredients are complementing each other. This would have worked better with Brandy or Tequila or even Rum as the base spirit. It's drinkable, but that's hardly a great victory. I'll try another Scotch sour again, but this isn't going to replace the Pennicillin as my favorite.

20210316_194608.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#743 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE AMARONE NEGRONI

So I'm enjoying a bottle of Santa Sofia 2008 Amarone and it's 16% ABV is as strong as that of Vermouth and Campari. I figured with its cherry, tobacco and cocoa flavors it would make a nice base for a Negroni/Boulevardier style cocktail. Turns out nobody thought of it before because I can't find this lower ABV cocktail on the 'Net so I can claim it as an original. [cheers.gif] Here we go:

JAMES JOYCE

  • Spirits: 1 part Amarone wine
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other Italian bitter red liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Stir all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice until well chilled. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.

Attractive crystal ruby color in the glass. Nose is muted sweet cherries and baking spices. On the mouth, extremely refreshing flavors of cherry fruit, baking spices, herbs and a decent amount acidity. This becomes more refreshing as my clear ice melts slowly in the glass. Very flavorful and definitely benefits from the lighter texture and lower ABV using the Amarone instead of a heavier spirit as the base. A winner.

20210322_191546.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#744 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SANDFLY

I was hankering for a Penicillin cocktail when I came across this variation which I feel is far more enjoyable:

SANDFLY

  • Spirits: 1 part Scotch
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 Lemon; 1-2 slices of fresh ginger
  • Sweets: .5 parts Honey
  • Bitters: 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other Italian bitter red liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Stir all ingredients in a cocktail shaker until the honey is dissolved. Add ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a cocktail glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

Ruby pink in the glass, almost looks like pink grapefruit juice. Baking spices and Scotch on the nose. On the palate, delciously balanced flavors of barley, lemon drop candy, red fruit and baking spices. The lemon comes on strong in the finish and leaves a puckering sensation. This is delicious and a definite cut above a standard Pennicillin cocktail.

20210407_151139.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Tran Bronstein
Posts: 2978
Joined: March 7th, 2011, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#745 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE EXOTIC SOUR

Steve the Bartender recently posted a video on sour cocktail and this Scotch one stood out to me as it is essentially a Scotch based tiki cocktail:

EXOTIC SOUR

  • Spirits: 1.5 parts Scotch
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .5 parts Pineapple juice; .75 parts Lime; 2 Banana slices
  • Sweets: .25 Simple or Agave syrup; .25 Orgeat (optional)
  • Bitters: .5 parts Egg white (optional)
  • Sodas: None
If using egg white, shake all ingredients together in a cocktail shaker without ice for several seconds first until the egg white has emulsified into a foam. Then add ice once done. Shake all the ingredients vigorously over ice. Pour into a serving glass over ice. Enjoy.


20210329_134225.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tran's the smart one!- M Grammer

User avatar
Brian S t o t t e r
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2822
Joined: April 21st, 2015, 6:05 am
Location: St. Louis, MO
Has thanked: 144 times
Been thanked: 126 times
Contact:

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#746 Post by Brian S t o t t e r »

Does anyone know the correct ingredients/specs for a Martinez? Got turned onto it after getting one at a bar lately, but I keep seeing variations on the type of gin (Hayman’s vs Ransom Old Tom Gin) and on the types of bitters used (orange vs. angostura).
CT and IG: rieslinghoarder

2021 WOTY Candidates:

2019 Hofgut Falkenstein Niedermenniger Herrenberg Riesling Spätlese feinherb “Meyer Nepal” #11
2006 Billecart-Salmon Champagne Cuvée Nicolas-François Billecart
2015 Kelley Fox Wines Pinot Noir Maresh Vineyard Red Barn Blocks
1997 Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt Scharzhofberger Riesling Auslese

User avatar
Rodrigo B
Monopole Crü
Monopole Crü
Posts: 1354
Joined: June 9th, 2020, 11:21 pm
Location: New York
Has thanked: 52 times
Been thanked: 197 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#747 Post by Rodrigo B »

Brian S t o t t e r wrote: April 8th, 2021, 9:35 pm Does anyone know the correct ingredients/specs for a Martinez? Got turned onto it after getting one at a bar lately, but I keep seeing variations on the type of gin (Hayman’s vs Ransom Old Tom Gin) and on the types of bitters used (orange vs. angostura).
The classic recipe is made with Old Tom Gin. There's no definitive consensus on the type of bitters used, though I opt for Angostura as I find that a classic Martinez is already quite bright and sweet from the Old Tom Gin and Marachino.

The classic recipe goes:
2oz Old Tom Gin
1oz Sweet vermouth
1 barspoon Maraschino
2 dashes bitters
Garnish with a lemon twist

Notes: I find that the "classic" recipe results in a cocktail that is a bit too sweet for my palate. So I don't use Old Tom Gin and opt for a London Dry. I use maybe 1/2 barspoon of Maraschino instead of a full one and opt for Dolin sweet vermouth rather than Carpano Antica.

Recently I've come across this take on the Martinez, which I've quite enjoyed
B r @ g @

User avatar
Andrew Kotowski
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 5649
Joined: February 7th, 2012, 1:42 pm
Location: Sammamish, WA
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 53 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#748 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

That punch article keeps landing in my Facebook feed for some reason. Other article on the Martinez that I saw recently was in Serious East (really!)

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/201 ... ecipe.html
Instagram at @akgrill

Mike Cohen
Posts: 3427
Joined: December 8th, 2009, 1:37 pm
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 13 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#749 Post by Mike Cohen »

Rodrigo B wrote: April 8th, 2021, 9:52 pm
Brian S t o t t e r wrote: April 8th, 2021, 9:35 pm Does anyone know the correct ingredients/specs for a Martinez? Got turned onto it after getting one at a bar lately, but I keep seeing variations on the type of gin (Hayman’s vs Ransom Old Tom Gin) and on the types of bitters used (orange vs. angostura).
The classic recipe is made with Old Tom Gin. There's no definitive consensus on the type of bitters used, though I opt for Angostura as I find that a classic Martinez is already quite bright and sweet from the Old Tom Gin and Marachino.

The classic recipe goes:
2oz Old Tom Gin
1oz Sweet vermouth
1 barspoon Maraschino
2 dashes bitters
Garnish with a lemon twist

Notes: I find that the "classic" recipe results in a cocktail that is a bit too sweet for my palate. So I don't use Old Tom Gin and opt for a London Dry. I use maybe 1/2 barspoon of Maraschino instead of a full one and opt for Dolin sweet vermouth rather than Carpano Antica.

Recently I've come across this take on the Martinez, which I've quite enjoyed
Rodrigo,

It seems that our palates often align when it comes to cocktails. I had a fantastic Martinez at a restaurant in Colorado last week. I made the serious eats one at home this week and it was too sweet. Definitely going to dial back the Maraschino on the next go around and up the Gin to Vermouth ratio.

Mike Cohen
Posts: 3427
Joined: December 8th, 2009, 1:37 pm
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 13 times

Re: The Cocktail Thread

#750 Post by Mike Cohen »

Andrew Kotowski wrote: April 9th, 2021, 5:47 am That punch article keeps landing in my Facebook feed for some reason. Other article on the Martinez that I saw recently was in Serious East (really!)

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/201 ... ecipe.html
Andrew,

Although I'm sure you already know...serious eats is a fantastic resource. That said, I made this exact Martinez earlier this week and it was too sweet for me. I think the 1:1 Gin to Vermouth ratio needs to be skewed towards Gin and its a touch too sweet due to the Maraschino so I'd half that component.

Post Reply

Return to “Beer and Spirits”