The Cocktail Thread

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Bryce K
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#651 Post by Bryce K »

Tran Bronstein wrote: October 25th, 2020, 6:38 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CLASSIC NEGRONI

NEGRONI
  • Maybe it's me, but I don't really find this as well integrated as it should be. The Gin was actually a bit distracting which surprised me because it paired so oddly with the Vermouth and Campari. I thought the Bourbon based Boulevardier was a far better cocktail in terms of flavor and integration. I was actually more than a tad disappointed given that this is a classic. I'll be sticking with the Boulevardier.
I stir my negroni, rather than shake, and than pour over a single large ice cube - see if that makes any difference on how the drink comes together. Shaking is going to add froth to the drink, as well as change how the ice melts into the drink.
Also, your unhappiness with the drink may also be because of the choice of gin - I haven't had the Botanist in a long time, so I can't remember what style it is, but I have found that I like my negronis best with London dry gins.

Boulevardiers are in my top 5. Also, try using mezcal instead of gin - makes a really interesting blend of favors.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#652 Post by Kris Patten »

Been on a bit of a run with the Boulevardier with 4 Roses Single Barrel, Small Batch or Select, Carpano Antica, Carpano Bitters at 0.5 oz to 2 oz Bourbon and a dash of smoke flavored bitters.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#653 Post by TGigante »

Kris Patten wrote: November 8th, 2020, 3:29 pm Been on a bit of a run with the Boulevardier with 4 Roses Single Barrel, Small Batch or Select, Carpano Antica, Carpano Bitters at 0.5 oz to 2 oz Bourbon and a dash of smoke flavored bitters.
Bitters instead of the Campari, Kris?
Cheers,
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#654 Post by J.Vizuete »

Stumbled onto this gem of a drink from the fantastic book, Cocktail Codex..

1 ounce chamomile-Infused rye whiskey
1 1/2 ounces La Gitana manzanilla sherry
1/2 ounce yellow Chartreuse
3/4 ounce lemon juice
1/2 ounce simple syrup
1 dash Angostura bitters

It is remarkably tasty - with a bit of fall flare.. approachable like any sour, with orchard notes from the sherry, some spice from the rye. I dial back the simple by half and that seems to result in better balance. Enjoy

https://www.liquor.com/recipes/la-valencia/
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#655 Post by Kris Patten »

TGigante wrote: November 8th, 2020, 6:07 pm
Kris Patten wrote: November 8th, 2020, 3:29 pm Been on a bit of a run with the Boulevardier with 4 Roses Single Barrel, Small Batch or Select, Carpano Antica, Carpano Bitters at 0.5 oz to 2 oz Bourbon and a dash of smoke flavored bitters.
Bitters instead of the Campari, Kris?
Cut back on Carpano bitters, add a splash of flavored.....no Campari, don't sell it....can't support it.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#656 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

Kris Patten wrote: November 8th, 2020, 7:44 pm
TGigante wrote: November 8th, 2020, 6:07 pm
Kris Patten wrote: November 8th, 2020, 3:29 pm Been on a bit of a run with the Boulevardier with 4 Roses Single Barrel, Small Batch or Select, Carpano Antica, Carpano Bitters at 0.5 oz to 2 oz Bourbon and a dash of smoke flavored bitters.
Bitters instead of the Campari, Kris?
Cut back on Carpano bitters, add a splash of flavored.....no Campari, don't sell it....can't support it.
Then you aren’t making a Boulevardier. Come up with a Tran name for your cocktail, but you’re not even substituting another Amaro :)
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#657 Post by Kris Patten »

Andrew Kotowski wrote: November 8th, 2020, 8:07 pm
Kris Patten wrote: November 8th, 2020, 7:44 pm
TGigante wrote: November 8th, 2020, 6:07 pm

Bitters instead of the Campari, Kris?
Cut back on Carpano bitters, add a splash of flavored.....no Campari, don't sell it....can't support it.
Then you aren’t making a Boulevardier. Come up with a Tran name for your cocktail, but you’re not even substituting another Amaro :)
Not true.....Bourbon, Bitters, Sweet Vermouth.

If you haven't tried the new Carpano bitters BBM vs
Campari, you should.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#658 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Oh ho, a cocktail controversy! [popcorn.gif]

But in all seriousness, I too have a hard time picturing a Campari without the traditional bitter red aperitivo to balance out and complement the sweetness and baking spices of the vermouth. That said, I am intrigued by Kris' variation so I will try both sometime this week as well as trying the Mezcal/Tequila based variation. It's going to be a good week! [cheers.gif]
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#659 Post by TGigante »

Tran Bronstein wrote: November 8th, 2020, 9:16 pm Oh ho, a cocktail controversy! [popcorn.gif]

But in all seriousness, I too have a hard time picturing a Campari without the traditional bitter red aperitivo to balance out and complement the sweetness and baking spices of the vermouth. That said, I am intrigued by Kris' variation so I will try both sometime this week as well as trying the Mezcal/Tequila based variation. It's going to be a good week! [cheers.gif]
I’m from the make em how you like em school and not a Campari fan so would like to try Kris’ recipe
Cheers,
Tony

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#660 Post by TGigante »

TGigante wrote: November 9th, 2020, 9:47 am
Tran Bronstein wrote: November 8th, 2020, 9:16 pm Oh ho, a cocktail controversy! [popcorn.gif]

But in all seriousness, I too have a hard time picturing a Campari without the traditional bitter red aperitivo to balance out and complement the sweetness and baking spices of the vermouth. That said, I am intrigued by Kris' variation so I will try both sometime this week as well as trying the Mezcal/Tequila based variation. It's going to be a good week! [cheers.gif]
I’m from the make em how you like em school and not a Campari fan so would like to try Kris’ recipe
Looks like the Carpano bitters are similar but different to Campari
Cheers,
Tony

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#661 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

Kris Patten wrote: November 8th, 2020, 9:03 pm
Andrew Kotowski wrote: November 8th, 2020, 8:07 pm
Kris Patten wrote: November 8th, 2020, 7:44 pm

Cut back on Carpano bitters, add a splash of flavored.....no Campari, don't sell it....can't support it.
Then you aren’t making a Boulevardier. Come up with a Tran name for your cocktail, but you’re not even substituting another Amaro :)
Not true.....Bourbon, Bitters, Sweet Vermouth.

If you haven't tried the new Carpano bitters BBM vs
Campari, you should.
Ok. Every version I’ve ever seen has Campari in it. Here’s Death and Co’s version.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#662 Post by Rodrigo B »

I'm a big fan of using Tempus Fugit's Gran Classico instead of Campari for most drinks that call for Campari. I've had several bartenders comment that it's what Campari used to taste like in the "good old days."

The thing that's really interesting about drinks like the Boulevardier (and other Negroni variants) is that while the recipe is incredibly simple, the end results change drastically depending on the selection of each ingredient. A Boulevardier with EC12+Carpano+Campari is going to taste different than say a Boulevardier with Michter's+Cocchi+Gran Classico. They're all still called Boulevardier if its whiskey+sweet vermouth+bitter aperitif. he fun is in experimenting with it and finding a combo you like.

I'll leave the debate as to whether a Boulevardier is with bourbon or rye for another time [stirthepothal.gif] [stirthepothal.gif]
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#663 Post by Mike Cohen »

Tran,

Appreciate your enthusiasm. A couple of thoughts. With almost no exception you stir boozy drinks and shake fruity drinks. So if the drink is all alcohol like a Negroni or Boulevardier, you stir. A Naked and Famous or Last Word...you shake. Stirring is designed to do three things...get proper dilution, chill, and develop a silky mouthfeel. Shaking is designed to get that frothy mouth feel.

Second thing is your choice of ice for a boozy drink...once you've stirred to your chosen dilution level, chances are you want to maintain the same level. So one large cube will melt more slowly than several smaller cubes. Plus, it looks classier.

Lastly, with a Negroni, I find that the choice of gin is very important. I feel like a London Dry Gin works better and I like it slightly over proofed so Tanqueray works very well. The boutique gins like Monkey 47, etc. feel like they are overpowered in a Negroni to me.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#664 Post by Mike Cohen »

Rodrigo B wrote: November 9th, 2020, 11:03 am I'm a big fan of using Tempus Fugit's Gran Classico instead of Campari for most drinks that call for Campari. I've had several bartenders comment that it's what Campari used to taste like in the "good old days."

The thing that's really interesting about drinks like the Boulevardier (and other Negroni variants) is that while the recipe is incredibly simple, the end results change drastically depending on the selection of each ingredient. A Boulevardier with EC12+Carpano+Campari is going to taste different than say a Boulevardier with Michter's+Cocchi+Gran Classico. They're all still called Boulevardier if its whiskey+sweet vermouth+bitter aperitif. he fun is in experimenting with it and finding a combo you like.

I'll leave the debate as to whether a Boulevardier is with bourbon or rye for another time [stirthepothal.gif] [stirthepothal.gif]
Rodrigo,

Excellent post. Brings up a bunch of important points. A close friend of mine really got me into cocktails and he hates Campari. Subs in Gran Classico all the time. While I find that GC is an excellent Campari substitute, there is something about the reddish color of a Negroni/Boulevardier that is lost when subbing in GC. Other good Campari subs that maintain the color are the Forthave Apertivo and St. George Bruto Americano.

As to how differing spirits can change a cocktail, I couldn't agree more. Go to a local bar/restaurant (not a cocktail lounge) and ask for a Negroni or Manhattan and I can almost guarantee that it's borderline unrecognizable from what you make at home. Cheap rye/bourbon/gin/vermouth...yuck. I would also go as far as saying that its easy to develop a preference for your own cocktail. So my go to Manhattan and your go to Manhattan both may be excellent and it wouldn't surprise me if I preferred mine.

I am happy to stir the pot. Not a huge bourbon fan. Almost always too sweet. Give me rye any day of the week. Manhattans, Old Fashioned, Boulevardier, etc. Rye all day long.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#665 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

To Mike's point, I've been experimenting with Barrel Proof spirits in my Manhattans lately and it's been a lot of fun. Interesting to see the different profiles across the board and how the high-octane pairs with the vermouth (using 1/2 punt e mes, 1/2 Dolin).

My preferences in order, so far:
* Elijah Craig BP (Batch B520, 127.2)
* Larceny BP (Batch C920, 122.4)
* Wild Turkey Rare Breed BP (112.8)
* Pinhook High Proof (114.5)
* Knob Creek Single Barrel (Old Town Liquors, 120)
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#666 Post by Rodrigo B »

Mike Cohen wrote: November 9th, 2020, 11:41 am
Rodrigo B wrote: November 9th, 2020, 11:03 am I'm a big fan of using Tempus Fugit's Gran Classico instead of Campari for most drinks that call for Campari. I've had several bartenders comment that it's what Campari used to taste like in the "good old days."

The thing that's really interesting about drinks like the Boulevardier (and other Negroni variants) is that while the recipe is incredibly simple, the end results change drastically depending on the selection of each ingredient. A Boulevardier with EC12+Carpano+Campari is going to taste different than say a Boulevardier with Michter's+Cocchi+Gran Classico. They're all still called Boulevardier if its whiskey+sweet vermouth+bitter aperitif. he fun is in experimenting with it and finding a combo you like.

I'll leave the debate as to whether a Boulevardier is with bourbon or rye for another time [stirthepothal.gif] [stirthepothal.gif]
Rodrigo,

Excellent post. Brings up a bunch of important points. A close friend of mine really got me into cocktails and he hates Campari. Subs in Gran Classico all the time. While I find that GC is an excellent Campari substitute, there is something about the reddish color of a Negroni/Boulevardier that is lost when subbing in GC. Other good Campari subs that maintain the color are the Forthave Apertivo and St. George Bruto Americano.

As to how differing spirits can change a cocktail, I couldn't agree more. Go to a local bar/restaurant (not a cocktail lounge) and ask for a Negroni or Manhattan and I can almost guarantee that it's borderline unrecognizable from what you make at home. Cheap rye/bourbon/gin/vermouth...yuck. I would also go as far as saying that its easy to develop a preference for your own cocktail. So my go to Manhattan and your go to Manhattan both may be excellent and it wouldn't surprise me if I preferred mine.

I am happy to stir the pot. Not a huge bourbon fan. Almost always too sweet. Give me rye any day of the week. Manhattans, Old Fashioned, Boulevardier, etc. Rye all day long.
I was impressed with the Forhave Red when I picked up a bottle of it a long while back. It worked really well in many cocktails and was awesome on its own. It did have a prominent medicinal taste that sometime overwhelmed many cocktails, which made it a challenge to use sometimes. I would have bought it again to keep experimenting, but by the end of my bottle there were little red droplets floating throughout the liquid. It appeared that something they used in the aperitif fell out of solution. It really wasn't an appetising look for a distillate. So that brought questions about shelf stability and I didn't purchase it again, but maybe mine was an off batch/bottle and I have to give it another try at some point.

I'm in the rye camptoo, but recognise that all of those cocktails (Manhattans, Old Fashioned, Boulevardier, etc) can be made with both Rye and Bourbon
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#667 Post by Tran Bronstein »

I looked up both the Carpano Bitters and the Gran Clasico online. The Carpano Bitters are indeed a traditional Italian red bitter aperitivo. I think the actual title threw us off into thinking they were more like Angostura Bitters because I would've expected it to be called Carpano Aperitivo or some such title.

I didn't realize there was such an anti-Campari movement out there. Personally I am using Rosso Antico but I will eventually run out and have to consider Campari. I'd also consider the Martini Riserva Bitter. There was a rather expensive cask aged Campari on sale a while back last year that was aged in Bourbon barrels but I didn't get into cocktails until Spring of this year so I didn't pick it up. Now I am wondering if it was any good and slightly regret not getting a bottle. Maybe I'll catch it some other time.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#668 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: JOURNEY INTO MYSTERY

So I decided to make a Sherry Cobbler style cocktail using the Florio Bagio Marsala Virgine (I'll post a tasting note on that in the Wine Talk forum after this) and came across this cocktail in my cocktail collection spreadsheet with no title and no notes as to its origin or where I got it from. No idea if it's a classic or someone else's modern invention. This is the only egregious omission in my entire spreadsheet. But it looked tasty from the ingredient list so I gave it a whirl and a new title. If anybody knows what this is, I will be happy to properly retitle it. Until then, it is the Journey into Mystery because that's what this is:

JOURNEY INTO MYSTERY (At least until I find out the real title)

  • Spirits: .5 parts Bourbon; 2 parts Dry Sherry (I used the Florio Baglio Marsala Virgine; see note below)
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Orange liqueur (Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec) (I used my homemade Ariancello)
  • Fruit: .5 parts Lemon
  • Sweets: .5 parts Simple syrup (I used Agave syrup)
  • Bitters: A few drops Mint Bitters or extract
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Semi-opaque brownish in color from the Bourbon. Really intriguing mix of flavors as the strong Bourbon smoke, Marsala rancio and concentrated mint flavors are very strong but also really complementary to each other and balanced out by candied orange and lemon flavors. Smooth texture. Complex and really nice.
  • The most interesting part of the cocktail for me is that it calls for a few drops of mint bitters or extract instead of natural mint leaves. Mint extract is highly potent and the natural mint flavor is so concentrated it actually can come off as artificial because it's so strong and pure and lacks the herbacious aspects and naturally mild flavor of real mint. On the other hand, it stands up really well to the very strong Orphan Barrel Rhetoric 25 I use. I'd have no problem recommending you use muddled natural mint leaves when making this cocktail if you'd rather do that.
  • The Florio Baglio Marsala Virginie is a Marsala that is treated and aged like Sherry and aged in oak for 10 years without the must being cooked first. It's very unique and I'll post a note on it in the Wine Talk section. Highly recommended.
20201109_150208.jpg
  • P.S. The title Journey into Mystery is the name of the comic book in which Marvel superhero Thor first appeared. I was inspired by my World's Greatest Ice Cubes thread over in Epicurian Exploits to come up with this title as the cocktail really is a mystery to me at this point.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#669 Post by Mike Cohen »

Rodrigo B wrote: November 9th, 2020, 11:54 am I was impressed with the Forhave Red when I picked up a bottle of it a long while back. It worked really well in many cocktails and was awesome on its own. It did have a prominent medicinal taste that sometime overwhelmed many cocktails, which made it a challenge to use sometimes. I would have bought it again to keep experimenting, but by the end of my bottle there were little red droplets floating throughout the liquid. It appeared that something they used in the aperitif fell out of solution. It really wasn't an appetising look for a distillate. So that brought questions about shelf stability and I didn't purchase it again, but maybe mine was an off batch/bottle and I have to give it another try at some point.

I'm in the rye camptoo, but recognise that all of those cocktails (Manhattans, Old Fashioned, Boulevardier, etc) can be made with both Rye and Bourbon
Rodrigo,

I've seen the "floaters" in the Forthave as well. But I've also seen them in Gran Classico and Velvet Falernum too. I feel like its the liquor equivalent of aged wine sediment. Definitely don't want that in a cocktail, but I also feels like I see it when its a bottle that doesn't get used that often and sits for a long time.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#670 Post by Mike Cohen »

Andrew Kotowski wrote: November 9th, 2020, 11:50 am To Mike's point, I've been experimenting with Barrel Proof spirits in my Manhattans lately and it's been a lot of fun. Interesting to see the different profiles across the board and how the high-octane pairs with the vermouth (using 1/2 punt e mes, 1/2 Dolin).

My preferences in order, so far:
* Elijah Craig BP (Batch B520, 127.2)
* Larceny BP (Batch C920, 122.4)
* Wild Turkey Rare Breed BP (112.8)
* Pinhook High Proof (114.5)
* Knob Creek Single Barrel (Old Town Liquors, 120)
I tend not to go up that high in my Manhattan's (my fave). I've had the Willet 3 and 4 year in a Manhattan and it feels too hot. But I love the experimentation.

Go to is:

2 Rittenhouse (sub in High West Double Rye occasionally)
.5 Carpano Antica Formula
.5 Punt es Mes
Generous shakes of Miracle Mile Forbidden Bitters

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#671 Post by Chris.Martin »

My go to is a Manhattan as well. I make it very similar to you Mike, with the only difference being 1 part Carpano Antica (no Punt es Mes) and I'll typically use Sazarac, Rittenhouse, or High West Double Rye.

One issue I find is that if I buy full liters of Vermouth, they tend to start going "bad" after a week (maybe two) or so. Other then keeping them in the refrigerator (which I do after opening), how does everyone else keep these "fresh" tasting?

[/quote]

I tend not to go up that high in my Manhattan's (my fave). I've had the Willet 3 and 4 year in a Manhattan and it feels too hot. But I love the experimentation.

Go to is:

2 Rittenhouse (sub in High West Double Rye occasionally)
.5 Carpano Antica Formula
.5 Punt es Mes
Generous shakes of Miracle Mile Forbidden Bitters
[/quote]

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#672 Post by Rodrigo B »

Mike Cohen wrote: November 9th, 2020, 1:30 pm
Rodrigo B wrote: November 9th, 2020, 11:54 am I was impressed with the Forhave Red when I picked up a bottle of it a long while back. It worked really well in many cocktails and was awesome on its own. It did have a prominent medicinal taste that sometime overwhelmed many cocktails, which made it a challenge to use sometimes. I would have bought it again to keep experimenting, but by the end of my bottle there were little red droplets floating throughout the liquid. It appeared that something they used in the aperitif fell out of solution. It really wasn't an appetising look for a distillate. So that brought questions about shelf stability and I didn't purchase it again, but maybe mine was an off batch/bottle and I have to give it another try at some point.

I'm in the rye camptoo, but recognise that all of those cocktails (Manhattans, Old Fashioned, Boulevardier, etc) can be made with both Rye and Bourbon
Rodrigo,

I've seen the "floaters" in the Forthave as well. But I've also seen them in Gran Classico and Velvet Falernum too. I feel like its the liquor equivalent of aged wine sediment. Definitely don't want that in a cocktail, but I also feels like I see it when its a bottle that doesn't get used that often and sits for a long time.
Mike
As you noted "floaters" definitely can happen to bottles that sit for a bit. The floaters in the Forhave Red popped up towards the end of the bottle (maybe ~1/4 left or less). Didn’t have any issues with it with their Marseille amaro (also great). The floaters in falernum is definitely common given the ingredients that go into it. They’re gonna fall out of solution, especially if its home made. I haven’t seen the issue with floaters in Gran Classico (even after in the past having bottles open for 6+ months) which is why I tend to gravitate towards it. The reality of it is that having enough variety in my home bar to allow me to make several different cocktails makes it so that I don’t churn through bottles like a cocktail bar. Bottles that have a longer shelf life are definitely preferred when I stock up.

I'll have to check out Miracle Mile Forbidden Bitters sometime. Try throwing some black walnut bitters in your manhattan some time. That's one of my go to bitters during the fall season.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#673 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE GUARDIAN ANGEL

This was just posted by Leandro from the Educated Barfly on his channel. An Amaro based Tiki cocktail? I'm in:

GUARDIAN ANGEL

  • Spirits: .75 parts Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .75 parts Lime
  • Sweets: .75 parts Orgeat
  • Bitters:1.25 parts Amaro
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Opaque brownish-white in the glass, like tea with milk. Rum and Amaro are prominent on the nose. On the palate, complex flavors of coffee, burnt sugar, bitters, almonds and lemon drop candy in the background smoothing everything out. Nice creamy texture from the Orgeat. More complex and less fruity than an average Tiki cocktail. Fairly sweet from the Rum, Amaro and Orgeat combination.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#674 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE DECONSTRUCTED SILVER AND SAND -- DECONSTRUCTING A COCKTAIL

Ever wanted to try a cocktail recipe but found it a little too pretentious? I found one and decided to deconstruct it to its most basic flavor components with mixed results:

DECONSTRUCTED SILVER AND SAND

  • Spirits: 1 part Scotch (original calls for ginger and lemon tea infused Scotch; see note below)
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Cherry brandy or liqueur (I used my own homemade infused Cherry Marnier)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters:1 part Vermouth (original calls for Lillet Rouge specifically; see note below); 1/4 tsp fresh grated ginger per serving
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over a strainer into a glass with ice. Enjoy.

Opaque brownish-white in the glass, like tea with milk. Ginger and cherry are prominent on the nose. On the palate, complex flavors of smoky Scotch, cherry, spicy ginger and lemon drop. Ginger spice really comes on strong despite the small amount used and carries all the way through to the finish. This cocktail is good on its own but is actually excellent with savory food.
  • There are two original versions of this cocktail, both of which I find equally pretentious. The first calls for a full bottle of 12 year old Scotch to be steeped with 3 bags of lemon-ginger tea which is a hell of an expensive proposition for a cocktail that only calls for 1 ounce of it per serving and prevents you from using the Scotch for anything else thereafter except for this cocktail. The second forgoes this steeping and requires you to use grapefruit bitters instead, not exactly the easiest item to find.
  • In lieu of either of these pretentious propositions, I decided to deconstruct the cocktail to its most basic flavors. It requires Scotch, cherry, lemon, ginger and Vermouth. Well actually Lillet Rouge, but I'll get to that. So rather than steep expensive Scotch, I decided to add lemon juice as though it were a standard sour cocktail and some fresh ginger. Fresh ginger is extremely potent stuff, so you'll notice I went very easy on it. You may just want to muddle a couple of ginger slices instead of grating it and having to strain it out as I did.
  • The original also calls for the travesty of Lillet Rouge instead of real Vermouth. While Lillet is theoretically supposed to be a quinquina or American style of aperitif, the modern version is a candy sweet concoction without the balls to even use a decent amount of quinine (aka wormwood) and covering up what little there is with citrus flavor that tastes like it came from extract and not actual fruit peels. I'm not the only one who feels this way, I've read online of bartenders actually formulating their own versions of Lillet to match what the original formulation is supposed to taste like. Might I strongly suggest you use real Vermouth for this cocktail. If you can't do that, at least use Byrrh, real French Dubonnet or Cocchi Rosa Americano.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#675 Post by Bryce K »

The Negroni/ Boulevardier discussions above prompted me to return to a Boulevardier this evening.

I like Knob Creek for sipping, but it does have some bite to it. In a Boulevardier it is tempered out and makes for a really nice cocktail. I may try one with rye tomorrow night.

1.5 ounce Knob Creek
1 ounce Campari
1 ounce Punt e Mes red vermouth

Stir with ice long and well. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a Luxardo cherry. Smile.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#676 Post by JDavisRoby »

Not by any means a fancy cocktail but the “Ranch Water” has become popular in our house this fall. Tequila, Topo Chico, squeeze of lime over ice. Easy and refreshing.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#677 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Bryce K wrote: November 14th, 2020, 6:10 pm The Negroni/ Boulevardier discussions above prompted me to return to a Boulevardier this evening.

I like Knob Creek for sipping, but it does have some bite to it. In a Boulevardier it is tempered out and makes for a really nice cocktail. I may try one with rye tomorrow night.

1.5 ounce Knob Creek
1 ounce Campari
1 ounce Punt e Mes red vermouth

Stir with ice long and well. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a Luxardo cherry. Smile.

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Cool. I just picked up some Knob Creek Single Batch, Maker's Mark 46 and Baker's 7 to try with some Boulevardiers. [cheers.gif]
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#678 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CORPSE REVIVER #2.5

Here's a take on the classic Corpse Reviver #2 using passion fruit liqueur instead of the traditional orange liqueur. Ergo, the 2.5:

CORPSE REVIVER #2.5

  • Spirits: 1 part Gin
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Passion Fruit liqueur (original calls for orange liqueur)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .25 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters:1 part Vermouth; a few drops Absinthe
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over a strainer into a glass with ice. Enjoy.

Bright golden yellow in the glass. Refreshing tastes of juniper, baking spices, and candied fruit with a little lemony zing and then the anise kicks in on the finish to wrap it all up. Nice.
  • The original Corpse Reviver #2 calls for Cointreau or Grand Marnier as the liqueur. Obviously, this can be changed out for any fruit liqueur to come up with a brand new cocktail as I did.
  • The original recipe also calls for white vermouth. Note that white Vermouth still has sweetness and is not the same as a dry Vermouth. You could use dry Vermouth, of course, if you want the cocktail less sweet.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#679 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CHOCOLATE ORANGE BOULEVARDIER

Just in time for American Thanksgiving, I give you a festive twist on a classic Bourbon cocktail:


CHOCOLATE ORANGE BOULEVARDIER

  • Spirits: 1 part Bourbon
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur; a few drops Orange Bitters; a few drops Chocolate Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake or stir all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Semi-translucent reddish brown in the glass. Great nose and flavors of red berries, herbs, bitters, cream and a strong chocolate orange note on the finish. Fun little cocktail.
  • I mentioned that I couldn't wait to try this with my 25 YO Rhetoric to see how the smoky char changes the cocktail in my Canadian Boulevardier post and I was not disappointed in the least. It really gives a nice little extra kick to the Boulevardier.
  • I'm loving the Fee Brothers orange and chocolate bitters which I've used a few times now. I wish they were easy to find up here in Canada but I can't find them anywhere.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#680 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE WRY GRIN

I opened up a fresh bottle of aged Canadian Whisky and decided to give a new cocktail a try with it:

WRY GRIN

  • Spirits: 1.5 parts Canadian Whisky (original calls for Bourbon)
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .75 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters:.5 parts Amaro; Mint leaves
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over a strainer into a glass with ice if you don't want mint leaves in your drink. Otherwise just pour it in for a visual kick to the cocktail. Enjoy.

Bright semi translucent brown in the glass with flecks of dark green mint leaves. Mellow rye and lemon drop flavors followed by baking spices and a nice soft minty finish. A little sweet, I followed the traditional recipe above but I'd reduce the simple syrup to just .5 parts myself. Other than that, very good.
  • I find the difference between Canadian Whisky and American Bourbon is that the former emphasizes the smooth creamy body while the latter goes for bold smoky charred flavors. Both are equally enjoyable to me and interchangeable in cocktails depending on what kind of profile you're going for. The original recipe does in fact call for Bourbon so feel free to use that.
  • My Amaro as always is an equal blend of China-China, Unicum and Fernet Branca. Feel free to use any Amaro you have on hand.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#681 Post by Rodrigo B »

Was in the mood for something tropical so I figured a Jungle Bird. Didn't have any Jamaican and blackstrap rum, so decided to try it with some rye. Worked surprisingly well


Jungle Bird-ish
1.5 oz Rittenhouse Rye
1.5 oz pineapple juice
1 oz Gran Classico
1/2 oz Demarara syrup (2:1)
1/2 oz Lime juice
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#682 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Rodrigo B wrote: November 18th, 2020, 8:11 pm Was in the mood for something tropical so I figured a Jungle Bird. Didn't have any Jamaican and blackstrap rum, so decided to try it with some rye. Worked surprisingly well


Jungle Bird-ish
1.5 oz Rittenhouse Rye
1.5 oz pineapple juice
1 oz Gran Classico
1/2 oz Demarara syrup (2:1)
1/2 oz Lime juice
Sounds deelish and I like the name. However, maybe you should change it to something more marketable like the Wry Bird (See what I did there?) and make money off it by trademarking the name and printing it in a cocktail recipe book. [wow.gif]
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#683 Post by Paul Miller »

My Fall/Holiday cocktail that I’m enjoying for Thanksgiving

(makes 2)

4 oz Bourbon
1 oz St. George Spiced Pear liqueur
1 oz Luxardo Cherry liqueur
1 oz Old Smoky cherry white lightning
1 oz maple syrup

Shake. Poor over large ice cube. Garnish with cherries.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#684 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ENZONI

Happy American Thanksgiving everyone. Here's a classic Gin cocktail that uses those fresh grapes you're using as a decoration on your food platters:

ENZONI

  • Spirits: 1 Gin
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .75 parts Lemon; 5 grapes
  • Sweets: .5 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: 1 Campari, Rosso Antico, Aperol or other red Italian bitter aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
Slice the grapes into a shaker or else drop them in whole and muddle them. Add the rest of the ingredients and shake over ice. The shaking should tear the grape pulp apart and imbue the cocktail with their juices. Pour into a glass over ice. Enjoy.

Reddish brown in the glass with slices of grape. Really nice lemon drop and herbal flavors. A touch of fresh fruit flavor from the grapes but nothing mind-blowing. This cocktail would have actually worked without them. Pleasant enough cocktail but not one I'd have to have on a repeated basis like, say, the Paper Plane.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#685 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE PIMM'S NO. 9 CUP -- AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL.... SORT OF

So I've recreated the Pimm's Cup No. 2 before but I decided this past weekend to give a new variation a try using a spirit base previously unassociated with the drink:

PIMM'S CUP NO. 8

  • Spirits: 1 part Canadian Whisky; 1 part Port (Ruby, Tawny or Vintage)
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Curacao, Triple Sec or orange liqueur
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime; 2-3 thin slices Cucumber per serving
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth (I mistakenly used Campari); a few dashes Angostura Bitters; a few Mint leaves
  • Sodas: 4 oz Ginger Beer, Ginger Ale Sprite or 7UP


Shake all the ingredients except for the soda of your choice together vigorously over ice in order to rip up the mint and cucumber. Pour over ice into a large glass. Top with the ginger or lemon-lime soda of your choice. Stir very gently to combine. Enjoy.

Bright translucent ruby pink in the glass because I mistakenly used Campari as well as Port. As a result, this is fruitier and more bitter than a standard Pimm's. Canadian Whisky adds a nice creamy texture.
  • The original Pimm's lineup of aperitifs are based on Gin, Scotch, Brandy, Rum, Bourbon and Vodka. There are no No. 7 or No. 8 versions. I made those two up using Tequila and Canadian Whisky, respectively. Therefore I can claim they are original cocktails. [wow.gif]
  • The Pimm's Cup No. 8 doesn't have to be shaken, particularly if you prefer the visual aesthetics of whole cucumber slices and mint leaves in the glass. The flavors will macerate naturally over time. I always prefer shaken myself.
  • I mistakenly used Campari instead of Vermouth. The Pimm's Cup does in fact call for Vermouth and not a bitter red Aperitivo. Still pretty good though.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#686 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE GIN ATOMIC

Here's a nice variation on the classic Gin & Tonic that shows how versatile the drink is, as one slight change plus one simple ingredient addition gives it a whole new dimension:

GIN ATOMIC

  • Spirits: 2 parts Gin
  • Liqueurs: 1 part St-Germain
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: 4 oz Tonic Water


Stir all the ingredients together except for the Tonic Water. Pour over ice into a large glass. Top gently with the tonic and give it all a very gentle stir to combine. Enjoy.

Slightly opaque straw yellow in the glass. Same color as lemonade, really. Really nice elevated juniper and botanical flavors as the elderflower and lemon provide a gently sweet backdrop. The Gin really shines through, though, as it seems to be elevated by the quinine from the tonic water. Very refreshing.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#687 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE VIKING

I don't often see cucumber in a Brandy based cocktail so I gave this a try:

VIKING

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy
  • Liqueurs: .5 Parts Chartreuse
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; 3 slices cucumber
  • Sweets: .25 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: 4 oz Tonic Water


Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. The shaking will tear the cucumber apart so no need to muddle. Pour over ice into a large glass.

Greenish brown in the glass. The smoky sweet Brandy de Jerez dominates followed by some sweet herbs and then the cucumber asserts itself. Basically, nothing in this cocktail is melding together. Maybe the Brandy de Jerez is too strong. I might have to try this again with a regular Brandy. I'm not really taking to this as it is, though.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#688 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CUBANADA

A Daiquiri made with maple syrup posted by an Australian on YouTube (Steve the Bartender) has to appeal to this Canadian, so I gave the Cubanada atry:

CUBANADA

  • Spirits: 2 parts Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: .5 parts Maple syrup
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. Pour over ice into a large glass. Enjoy.

Bright translucent brown in the glass. Sweet smoky rum and maple flavors complement each other very well and are then lifted by the tangy lime. This was absolutely delicious. My biggest fear is that the maple flavor would overwhelm the drink and that's far from the case. Very nice drink. Really hard to go back to a regular Daiquiri after this.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#689 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE FRENCH NEGRONI

So I've done the Gin based classic Negroni twice and the Bourbon based Boulevardier. Of course I have to try it with Rum and Brandy. Here's the Brandy based French Negroni up first:

FRENCH NEGRONI

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. Pour over ice into a large glass. Enjoy.

Dark reddish brown in the glass. Sweet brandy and smoky oak flavors are lifted by smooth candied cinnamon and baking spices and red fruit. Pretty good but if I'm being fair it lacks the distinctive herbaciousness and lighter body of a classic Gin based Negroni and the smoky charred flavor of the Boulevardier that sets those two drinks apart. I still favor the Boulevardier above all and this hasn't changed my mind.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#690 Post by Kelly Walker »

Watched this last night. Free for Prime members. Pretty good.

https://www.amazon.com/Bar-Talks-Charle ... B07L6MVGXR
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#691 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ARTIST'S KICK/CAMERON'S KICK

A Scotch/Irish whisky based Tiki cocktail?!? [swoon.gif] I'm so there. This one goes by a couple of names so I included them both

ARTIST'S KICK/CAMERON'S KICK

  • Spirits: 2 parts Scotch or Irish Whisky
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .5 parts Orgeat
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. Pour over ice into a large glass. Enjoy.

Opaque dark cream colored. Whisky dominates the nose with a slight whiff of almond. On the palate, the whisky integrates perfectly with the sweet marzipan and is lifted by the lemon on the finish. Creamy texture and backbone throughout. This is delicious and shows that you can actually substitute Whisky for the Rum in any tiki style cocktail that uses Orgeat.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#692 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SARATOGA #2

The original Saratoga cocktail is an interesting Ancestral style (i.e booze only) cocktail. It's basically a standard Manhattan cocktail uplifted with Brandy. So I'm not sure how it evolved into this sour version but it looked interesting so I thought I'd try it:


SARATOGA #2

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy (I used my homemade Pineapple Marnier; see note below)
  • Liqueurs: .25 Maraschino or Kirsch
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; .5 parts Pineapple
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: A few drops Angostura bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. Pour over ice into a large glass. Enjoy.

Candied pineapple, cherry and lemon on the palate, followed by a touch of raisin and smoke from the Brandy and then baking spices from the bitters. This is almost liquid fruitcake in a glass. Not too sweet as there is no added simple syrup, it all comes from the spirits. Very refreshing.
  • The original recipe calls for Brandy or Cognac. I decided to substitute in my homemade Pineapple Marnier for an extra burst of flavor. You could probably also sub in Grand Marnier as well.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#693 Post by Mike Cohen »

Tran Bronstein wrote: November 28th, 2020, 3:12 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE FRENCH NEGRONI

So I've done the Gin based classic Negroni twice and the Bourbon based Boulevardier. Of course I have to try it with Rum and Brandy. Here's the Brandy based French Negroni up first:

FRENCH NEGRONI

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
Shake all ingredients together in a shaker with ice. Pour over ice into a large glass. Enjoy.

Dark reddish brown in the glass. Sweet brandy and smoky oak flavors are lifted by smooth candied cinnamon and baking spices and red fruit. Pretty good but if I'm being fair it lacks the distinctive herbaciousness and lighter body of a classic Gin based Negroni and the smoky charred flavor of the Boulevardier that sets those two drinks apart. I still favor the Boulevardier above all and this hasn't changed my mind.


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Tran,

I'm begging you...stir your Negroni's. Do not shake!

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#694 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE KINGSTON NEGRONI -- STIRRED NOT SHAKEN (PLUS A BONUS CHOCOLATE BOULEVARDIER)

I saw Mike Cohen's note to me and realized I'd forgotten my commitment to stir and not shake all my future Ancestral/booze only cocktails. I finally got around to doing the promised Rum based Negroni as well as redoing the Chocolate Boulevardier tonight. (Also fixed my title above which I had reversed.) Here we go:

KINGSTON NEGRONI

  • Spirits: 1 part Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
Pour all ingredient in a glass filled with ice. Stir slowly to chill the drink and dilute slowly. Enjoy.

OK, it was overdue that I do this properly. And the end result completely won me over. Stirring it is for all future Ancestral style cocktails. So the first thing I notice is that the cocktail's color is quite clear and concentrated. As I'm stirring with a glass full of my clear superhero ice, the color completely comes through with no cloudy white patches. The top view picture shows how nice the color is in the glass that a side view really doesn't do justice to. Dark reddish brown but very translucent. Sweet brown sugar, oak, baking spices and baked red fruit. Kind of reminds me of a rum soaked fruitcake. Flavor is definitely way more concentrated versus shaking. This was very good, right up there with the Boulevardier. All that's left to do is a proper Gin Negroni and Tequila Negroni with a proper stir.

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Bonus: so now that I was convinced to stir, I revisited the Chocolate Boulevardier. Same recipe as above using Bourbon instead of Rum along with the addition of a few drops of chocolate bitters. Again, both the color and flavor are much clearer and concentrated. This was done with regular ice cubes and it still looks pretty amazing in the glass:

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#695 Post by Mike Cohen »

Well done Tran!

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#696 Post by stevealbrecht »

Joe G a l e w s k i wrote: May 5th, 2011, 9:53 pm I tend to like whiskey and cognac drinks. I've been making this one lately because it's complex : Waltzing with Vincent Price

Although I have not been using the crispin cider simply because I don't have any on hand. If I had it, I would use it, as it is the only hard cider I've had that doesn't taste like vomit.


Also, this one is nice as well because of the complex flavors it creates :

First Fleet

2oz Rye whisky
½ oz jasmine syrup
½ Fernet Branca liquer
Regans orange bitters

Shake all and pour into a Chartreuse rinsed glass
His hairstyle in the video is hilarious

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stevealbrecht
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#697 Post by stevealbrecht »

"Canadian Sneak"

2 ounces whiskey
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
1/2 ounce maple syrup
4 dashes angostura bitters
2 pinches of ground cinnamon

combine in shaker with ice and shake vigorously

It calls for a rocks glass with ice, but I put it in a coupe (no ice) instead

Tastes like fresh apple cider

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Tran Bronstein
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#698 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE AVAGONI aka THE TEQUILA NEGRONI-- STIRRED NOT SHAKEN

As promised, here is the Tequila based variation of the Negroni:

KINGSTON NEGRONI

  • Spirits: 1 part Tequila
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
Pour all ingredient in a glass filled with ice. Stir slowly to chill the drink and dilute slowly. Enjoy.

This is really nice. The black pepper spice and jackfruit flavors from the Tequila go together very nicely with the baking spices and red fruit from the bitters. As good as the Boulevardier for sure.


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Tran Bronstein
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#699 Post by Tran Bronstein »

stevealbrecht wrote: December 8th, 2020, 5:56 pm "Canadian Sneak"

2 ounces whiskey
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
1/2 ounce maple syrup
4 dashes angostura bitters
2 pinches of ground cinnamon

combine in shaker with ice and shake vigorously

It calls for a rocks glass with ice, but I put it in a coupe (no ice) instead

Tastes like fresh apple cider
Holy crap, I just did this exact cocktail because I couldn't resist after reading Steve's post and hot damn but it looks, smells and tastes EXACTLY like fresh apple cider! flirtysmile [cheers.gif] There literally is no other note to add, the exact combination of flavors somehow manages to mimic those found in apple cider perfectly! [shock.gif] I used exactly 1 part of Canadian Club 20 Year Old and 1 part of Maker's Mark 46 for the Whisky component, fresh lemon juice, real Quebec maple syrup, Angostura bitters and freshly ground cinnamon. Damn but this is incredible! No need to make mulled apple cider this holiday season, just follow the recipe above!

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Corey N.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#700 Post by Corey N. »

Tran, I really mean no disrespect, but I hate your ice. Perhaps you can find some inexpensive ice molds?

Also, happy Chanukah.
I'm with Corey on this. - Todd W.

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Nøv¡¢k

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