The Cocktail Thread

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Tran Bronstein
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#601 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE MIDORI AGRUMENTO: AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL

I decided to make an original cocktail using the Pomelocello grapefruit infusion from my thread on Italian Cello Infusions over on Epicurean Exploits:

MIDORI AGRUMENTO

  • Spirits: 2 Gin
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Midori; 1 part Grapefruit liqueur (I used my homemade Pomelocello)
  • Fruit: .5 Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: a few dashes Angostura Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright green yellow in the glass. Very smooth texture and near perfect integration of juniper, melon, and sweet grapefruit. Lemon is not too pronounced which is nice. I am very happy with this original cocktail.
  • Agrumento is Italian for citrus grove. I thought it was an appropriate name for this citrus focused cocktail.
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Last edited by Tran Bronstein on September 27th, 2020, 1:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#602 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CANADIAN BOULEVARDIER

I've always wanted to try a Boulevardier and gave it a twist with Canadian Whisky tonight:

CANADIAN BOULEVARDIER

  • Spirits: 1 part Canadian Whisky
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Shake or stir all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Dark reddish brown in the glass. Great nose and flavors of red berries, herbs, bitters and almond cream. Delicious.
  • The original Boulevardier calls for American Whisky, either Bourbon or Rye. I can't wait to try this with my 25 YO Rhetoric and see how the smoky char changes the cocktail.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#603 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE LOST LAKE

I just caught this one on the Educated Barfly so I decided to make it:

LOST LAKE

  • Spirits: 2 Rum
  • Liqueurs: .25 Maraschino
  • Fruit: .75 lime; .5 Pineapple; .75 Passionfruit
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: .25 parts Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. If you are using fresh passionfruit as I did instead of juice or bottled pulp or concentrate, shake for twice as long as you need the ice to rip the pulp away from the passionfruit seeds. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright green yellow in the glass. Very smooth texture and near perfect integration of juniper, melon, and sweet grapefruit. Lemon is not too pronounced which is nice. I am very happy with this original cocktail.
  • Agrumento is Italian for citrus grove. I thought it was an appropriate name for this citrus focused cocktail.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#604 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

Man, that feels reallllly sweet.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#605 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Andrew Kotowski wrote: September 24th, 2020, 5:56 pm Man, that feels reallllly sweet.
Surprisingly not. Keep in mind, there is no added simple syrup or other sweetener and it really doesn't need any. There is definitely some sweetness but not a lot. My next cocktail, however, is another matter entirely...
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#606 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE FRENCH RIVIERA

You say you want a sweet cocktail? A REALLY sweet cocktail? Oh wait, you didn't? Well, surprisingly, neither did I but we're all getting one anyway because that's what I ended up making. Have those insulin pills on standby:

FRENCH RIVIERA

  • Spirits: 1.5 parts Brandy; .5 parts Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 tsp jam or preserves (classic recipe calls for apricot)
  • Sweets: .25 parts Honey; .5 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Strain into a glass over LOTS of ice. You'll see why below. Enjoy.

Opaque reddish brown in the glass due to my using cherry as the choice of jam flavoring. Smooth texture and very tasty but also insanely sweet. We're talking like icewine/Sauternes level sweet, maybe even beyond. By far the sweetest cocktail I have ever made. The honey and jam take center stage followed by the Brandy. The lemon balances it out a bit. I actually had to put in more ice in my glass after tasting to dilute the cocktail even further and balance this out. I suggest you do the same.
  • The recipe above is correct. I researched it several times to make sure I was reading it correctly. It calls for no less than three different sweeteners: .5 parts honey syrup, .5 parts simple syrup and 1 teaspoon of jam per serving. Even with my infamous sweet tooth, I was still hesitant to follow through on the recipe and with good reason. I even cut the honey down to its purest component and halved it for the recipe accordingly. It's still insanely sweet. It's mind-boggling to me that everwhere I found it like Difford's Guide and Steve the Bartender's website and YouTube channel that this is treated like just any other cocktail. This is basically a dessert cocktail masquerading as a classy dinner cocktail. Don't get me wrong, it's very tasty but it should really be treated as a tiki cocktail and poured into a tall glass loaded with ice because it's essentially dessert all on its own if served like a a regular cocktail. It really needs to be cut down with lots of ice. Either that or you should omit one or possibly even both of the sweeteners aside from the jam.
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Last edited by Tran Bronstein on September 25th, 2020, 8:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#607 Post by RichardFlack »

Tran Bronstein wrote: September 25th, 2020, 2:10 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE FRENCH RIVIERA

You say you want a sweet cocktail? A REALLY sweet cocktail? Oh wait, you didn't? Well, surprisingly, neither did I but we're all getting one anyway because that's what I ended up making. Have those insulin pills on standby:

FRENCH RIVIERA

  • Spirits: 1.5 parts Brandy; .5 parts Rum
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 tsp jam or preserves (classic recipe calls for apricot)
  • Sweets: .25 parts Honey; .5 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Strain into a glass over LOTS of ice. You'll see why below. Enjoy.

Opaque reddish brown in the glass due to my using cherry as the choice of jam flavoring. Smooth texture and very tasty but also insanely sweet. We're talking like icewine/Sauternes level sweet, maybe even beyond. By far the sweetest cocktail I have ever made. The honey and jam take center stage followed by the Brandy. The lemon balances it out a bit. I actually had to put in more ice in my glass after tasting to dilute the cocktail even further and balance this out. I suggest you do the same.
  • The recipe above is correct. I researched it several times to make sure I was reading it correctly. It calls for no less than three different sweeteners: .5 parts honey syrup, .5 parts simple syrup and 1 teaspoon of jam per serving. Even with my infamous sweet tooth, I was still hesitant to follow through on the recipe and with good reason. I even cut the honey down to its purest component and halved it for the recipe accordingly. It's still insanely sweet. It's mind-boggling to me that everwhere I found it like Difford's Guide and Steve the Bartender's website and YouTube channel that this is treated like just any other cocktail. This is basically a dessert cocktail masquerading as a classy dinner cocktail. Don't get me wrong, it's very tasty but it should really be treated as a tiki cocktail and poured into a tall glass loaded with ice because it's essentially dessert all on its own if served like a a regular cocktail. It really needs to be cut down with lots of ice. Either that or you should omit or possibly even both of the sweeteners aside from the jam.
Maybe a ripple in ice cream? I’m

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#608 Post by RichardFlack »

Tran Bronstein wrote: September 24th, 2020, 5:16 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE LOST LAKE

I just caught this one on the Educated Barfly so I decided to make it:

LOST LAKE

  • Spirits: 2 Rum
  • Liqueurs: .25 Maraschino
  • Fruit: .75 lime; .5 Pineapple; .75 Passionfruit
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: .25 parts Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. If you are using fresh passionfruit as I did instead of juice or bottled pulp or concentrate, shake for twice as long as you need the ice to rip the pulp away from the passionfruit seeds. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright green yellow in the glass. Very smooth texture and near perfect integration of juniper, melon, and sweet grapefruit. Lemon is not too pronounced which is nice. I am very happy with this original cocktail.
  • Agrumento is Italian for citrus grove. I thought it was an appropriate name for this citrus focused cocktail.

20200924_193832.jpg
Sounds pretty good. I’m pretty new to cocktails (aside from Martini or Negroni and not sure if they count given their simplicity).

I’m not a huge fan of Maraschino (albeit I love cherries) - any suggested substitute?

Also would upping the Campari component a bit wreck it?

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#609 Post by Tran Bronstein »

RichardFlack wrote: September 25th, 2020, 6:13 pm
Tran Bronstein wrote: September 24th, 2020, 5:16 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE LOST LAKE

I just caught this one on the Educated Barfly so I decided to make it:

LOST LAKE

  • Spirits: 2 Rum
  • Liqueurs: .25 Maraschino
  • Fruit: .75 lime; .5 Pineapple; .75 Passionfruit
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: .25 parts Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. If you are using fresh passionfruit as I did instead of juice or bottled pulp or concentrate, shake for twice as long as you need the ice to rip the pulp away from the passionfruit seeds. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright green yellow in the glass. Very smooth texture and near perfect integration of juniper, melon, and sweet grapefruit. Lemon is not too pronounced which is nice. I am very happy with this original cocktail.
  • Agrumento is Italian for citrus grove. I thought it was an appropriate name for this citrus focused cocktail.

20200924_193832.jpg
Sounds pretty good. I’m pretty new to cocktails (aside from Martini or Negroni and not sure if they count given their simplicity).

I’m not a huge fan of Maraschino (albeit I love cherries) - any suggested substitute?

Also would upping the Campari component a bit wreck it?
I'm fairly new to this myself but will attempt to answer. If you're not a fan of Maraschino and love cherries, I will hazard a guess that it's the syrupy sweetness of Maraschino that is the issue for you. If this is indeed the case, substitute Kirsch or a German, Italian or Austrian cherry based eau-de-vie instead. I mentioned in a previous cocktail post that true Maraschino is nothing more than Kirsch mixed with simple syrup.

I'd say you can safely up the Campari component to .5 parts, especially if you're taking out the Maraschino and substituting in dry Kirsch. Give it a try and let me know how it turns out.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#610 Post by ClarkstonMark »

All those high end ingredients and you use Smuckers.
neener
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#611 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CALI BY WAY OF JAPAN: AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL

Here's a more tropical variation of my original Midori Agrumento that forgoes the Gin for a bit of sweet Vermouth and more of the Pomelocello for something much more tropical:

CALI BY WAY OF JAPAN
  • Spirits: None
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Midori; 2 parts Grapefruit Liqueur (I use my homemade Pomelocello)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: .5 parts Vermouth; a few dashes Orange Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright green yellow in the glass. Very smooth texture like the Agrumento but far fruitier and slightly sweeter without the savory Gin botanicals. A good variation on my original cocktail for those who don't like the taste of Gin. Surprising, I know, but there are apparently a few genetically deficient people in the world who actually don't.
  • Everyone knows that California, like Florida, is famed for growing fresh citrus. What few realize is that California is also the biggest cantaloupe grower in the US and that is of course the main flavor in Japanese Midori liqueur. Hence the cocktail's name.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#612 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

Thank you for acknowledging your sin. I audibly yelled when I saw that pic :)
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#613 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: TROPICAL NEGRONI: AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL

Here's a twist on a classic Negroni giving up the requisite Vermouth for a trio of more interesting ingredients:

TROPICAL NEGRONI

  • Spirits: 2 parts Oak-aged Gin
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Midori; 1 part Grapefruit Liqueur (I use my homemade Pomelocello)
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur; A few drops Absinthe
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a coupe glass. Enjoy.

Bright and translucent green brown in the glass. Heavy texture and boozy on the palate in a good way. The oak-aged Gin is the definite hero, but the interest comes from the supporting cast -- the super strong Absinthe and Midori and Pomelocello essentially take the place of sweet Vermouth, replacing its sweetness, fruit flavor and botanicals with a different herbal flavor leaning heavily on Anise and of course melon and grapefruit. It works but only if you like Anise flavor which I do. It plays especially well with the oak-aged Gin.

  • The craft Gin used in this cocktail is the Willibald Farm Distillery Gin. It's made from Ontario rye, corn and barley -- the same grains used in making Bourbon and Canadian Whisky -- that have been triple distilled together, infused with botanicals and then finally aged in oak for a few months. The oak aging definitely adds an interesting component to the gin.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#614 Post by scamhi »

tonight's cocktail
2oz blanco tequila
1 oz fresh lime juice
1/2oz small hand gum syrup
Shaken with ice poured over fresh ice and topped off with Fever tree grapefruit tonic.
Delicious
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#615 Post by Tran Bronstein »

scamhi wrote: September 27th, 2020, 2:52 pm tonight's cocktail
2oz blanco tequila
1 oz fresh lime juice
1/2oz small hand gum syrup
Shaken with ice poured over fresh ice and topped off with Fever tree grapefruit tonic.
Delicious
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#616 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BRANDY CRUSTA

Here's a more sophisticated upscaled version of the classic Sidecar:

BRANDY CRUSTA

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Orange liqueur (I use my homemade Mandarinocello); .5 parts Maraschino
  • Fruit: .5 parts Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: A few dashes Angostura bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright semi-translucent brown in the glass. Kirsch, mandarin peel and oak dominate the nose. Balanced tastes of smoek, chocolate, mandarin and liqueur cherries with a slight hint of spices from the bitters. Very nice stuff. Richer overall than a classic Sidecar but not as bright as there is less lemon and orange liqueur.
  • The standard orange liqueur component is Cointreau, Triple Sec, Grand Marnier or Curacao. I used my homemade Mandarinocello which was a mandarin orange peel infusion. That probably helped lift the cocktail quite a bit as there was only one brandy based component.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#617 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ARIANCELLO SIDECAR

Well I dissed the Sidecar last time as unexciting but I have all this citrus infused Italian style cello liqueurs including orange, so why not make a classic Sidecar with them and see what turns out:

ARIANCELLO SIDECAR

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy
  • Liqueurs: 1 parts Orange liqueur (I use my homemade Ariancello)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: A few dashes Angostura bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright semi-translucent orange-brown in the glass. Oak and orange peel on the nose. Balanced tastes of dried fruit, oak, orange peel and lemon. A touch of sweetness on the finish but palate is overall quite dry especially the mid-palate. Nice.
  • Again, the standard orange liqueur component is Cointreau, Triple Sec, Grand Marnier or Curacao. Without the addition of more brandy or grain based alcohol, the orange flavor really seems to shine through. I'd definitely have this one again.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#618 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ALMOND CRUSTA

So I came across this cocktail recipe in an unusual way -- it was a thread reply on a YouTube channel dealing with cocktails after I gushed over how much I enjoyed the Brandy Crusta. And so

ALMOND CRUSTA

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy; .5 parts Gin
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .75 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .5 parts Orgeat (I used my homemade Orgeat)
  • Bitters: A few dashes Angostura bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Opaque pink white in the glass, almost looks like paint. Almond, orange flower and rose water dominate the nose. On the palate, however, the gin surprisingly takes center stage along with the lemon and Orgeat and a hit of vanilla. Creamy texture. A touch of sweetness on the finish but really not that sweet overall. Practically a tiki cocktail.
  • This is of course a variation on the Brandy Crusta which I already posted which substitutes in Gin in place of the traditional orange liqueur and adds Orgeat to boot. I thought that it could've even used a touch of orange liqueur which was omitted from the original Brandy Crusta for the gin and it would still work. So I added a tiny splash of it to my glass. It doesn't work. It actually upset the balance of the cocktail. So I recommend sticking to the recipe above. Whoever came up with it obviously did their homework in its formulation. Kudos for that.
  • In case you missed it from an earlier post, Orgeat is a sugar almond syrup flavored with vanilla, orange flower water and/or rose water. My homemade version of it is pre-sweetened vanilla almond milk based creamer flavored with pure orange flower water and rose water. Extremely easy to make at home with just three ingredients easily found at your local grocery store.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#619 Post by Kris Patten »

My latest fall cocktail...

2.5 oz. Bourbon/Rye...generally 4R Single Barrel or Saz Rye

2 oz. Carpano Antica or Punt e Mes

1 oz. Cherry Rocher

Top with ice....and sometimes soda water.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#620 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Kris Patten wrote: October 4th, 2020, 9:45 pm My latest fall cocktail...

2.5 oz. Bourbon/Rye...generally 4R Single Barrel or Saz Rye

2 oz. Carpano Antica or Punt e Mes

1 oz. Cherry Rocher

Top with ice....and sometimes soda water.
Nice. I believe this is the Red Hook cocktail.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#621 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BEE'S BREAKFAST

A friend casually asked me if there were any cocktails made with yogurt. I looked it up and made this one for us:

BEE'S BREAKFAST

  • Spirits: 2 parts Gin
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .75 part Lemon; 5 Raspberries or 3-4 small Strawberries (I used strawberries)
  • Sweets: .75 parts Honey syrup
  • Bitters: 1 tsp yogurt per serving
  • Sodas: None
Add all the liquid ingredients and honey into a shaker. Stir gently to dissolve the honey if using pure raw honey instead of honey syrup. Add in 1 teaspoon of plain yogurt per each serving assuming the parts you are using are a liquid ounce. (Adjust accordingly if doing more). Shake over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Opaque reddish white in the glass. Refreshing sweet flavors of strawberries and cream highlighted by a little lemony sweetness. The botanicals take a backseat make a slight appearance at the beginning and on the finish to add a touch of complexity. Texture is surprisingly similar to an egg white shaken sour cocktail.
  • This is the only cocktail recipe I have found to date using yogurt. It's a little too simplistic to dismiss it as an alcoholic fruit smoothie. First, the gin botanicals do add some complexity and the small amount of yogurt ensures it is not a dominant flavor. It is actually the fruit and then the gin that are the stars. The yogurt adds a creaminess to the body and gives the cocktail a nice texture.
  • You can use pure raw honey instead of honey syrup as I did. In this case, reduce the amount to a mere .25 parts and stir gently to dissolve it in the liquid ingredients before shaking. Make sure to do this before adding the yogurt so that you can actually see if the honey has dissolved first.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#622 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE GENTLEMAN

Here's a Bourbon cocktail with a unique addition of bitter components:

GENTLEMAN

  • Spirits: 2 parts Bourbon or Canadian Whisky
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .75 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .25 Simple syrup
  • Bitters: 1.5 parts Campari, Aperol, Antico Ross or other bitter red aperitivo; A few dashes Orange bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Reddish brown in the glass. Bitterness, red berries, and oranges dominate. A touch of sweetness but not too much. Lemon brightness and then a touch of smoke and oak on the finish. One friend felt the whisky and Cmapari clashed while the other and I loved this.
  • The unusual addition to this cocktail is the use of both a relatively large amount of Campari and orange bitters. I used Fee Brothers. This ensures that the bitter components are actually very much the leading players in this cocktail. The whisky is the supporting act.
  • I suspect that the reason orange bitters are used is that the addition of an orange liqueur instead would bring the alcohol level up to an alarming rate given the already high amounts of whisky and Campari used to make this. That said, feel free to go with some curacao, triple sec, Cointreau or Grand Marnier instead of the bitters if you have a high tolerance. I'd cap it off at .25 parts myself if going for the liqueur.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#623 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ALMOST FAMOUS

Here's a bitter Rum cocktail which I often don't come across:

ALMOST FAMOUS

  • Spirits: 1 Rum
  • Liqueurs: 1 Chartreuse (Green or Yellow), Strega or other herbal liqueur
  • Fruit: 1 Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Campari, Aperol, Antico Ross or other bitter red aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Ruby red in the glass. Well integrated herbs, red berries, and lime flavor. Rum falls to the background but provides a smooth sweetness. Nice cocktail.
  • This interesting because I usually see Rum as the base for fruit based cocktails and sours. Rarely do I see bitters used as a component for Rum cocktails. In fact, I see more Bourbon based cocktails with bitter mixers like Campari and Amaro than I do Rum despite the fact that Rum is a more natural match.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#624 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ST. STEPHEN'S SOUR

Saw this on Steve the Bartender's YouTube channel earlier this year. Interesting finding a Brandy cocktail with orgeat so I am giving it a try:

ST. STEPHEN'S SOUR

  • Spirits: 1 part Rum; 1 part Brandy
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 Lemon
  • Sweets: 1 Orgeat
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Opaque brownish white in the glass. Brown sugar and almond dominate the nose. The rum's brown sugar flavors hit first followed by creamy lemon and almond curd and then the Brandy dried fruit and oak kick in on the end. Waffles between sweet and dry.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#625 Post by Corey N. »

Tran Bronstein wrote: October 5th, 2020, 5:47 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ALMOST FAMOUS

Here's a bitter Rum cocktail which I often don't come across:

ALMOST FAMOUS

  • Spirits: 1 Rum
  • Liqueurs: 1 Chartreuse (Green or Yellow), Strega or other herbal liqueur
  • Fruit: 1 Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Campari, Aperol, Antico Ross or other bitter red aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
This seems to be a riff on a Naked and Famous, which I'd recommend to you if you like smoke.

Equal parts (typically 3/4oz to make a 3 oz cocktail, but I often kick it up to 1 oz):

Mezcal
Aperol
Yellow Chartreuse
Lime

Shake with ice, strain. Delicious. I typically use a slightly less smoky mezcal, otherwise it can overwhelm the subtleness of the Chartreuse.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#626 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Corey N. wrote: October 6th, 2020, 5:55 pm
Tran Bronstein wrote: October 5th, 2020, 5:47 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ALMOST FAMOUS

Here's a bitter Rum cocktail which I often don't come across:

ALMOST FAMOUS

  • Spirits: 1 Rum
  • Liqueurs: 1 Chartreuse (Green or Yellow), Strega or other herbal liqueur
  • Fruit: 1 Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Campari, Aperol, Antico Ross or other bitter red aperitivo
  • Sodas: None
This seems to be a riff on a Naked and Famous, which I'd recommend to you if you like smoke.

Equal parts (typically 3/4oz to make a 3 oz cocktail, but I often kick it up to 1 oz):

Mezcal
Aperol
Yellow Chartreuse
Lime

Shake with ice, strain. Delicious. I typically use a slightly less smoky mezcal, otherwise it can overwhelm the subtleness of the Chartreuse.
Ah, now the cocktail's name makes senses as in it is Almost a Naked and Famous. I thought for a second it was related somehow to the movie.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#627 Post by Corey N. »

Tran Bronstein wrote: October 6th, 2020, 6:42 pm Ah, now the cocktail's name makes senses as in it is Almost a Naked and Famous. I thought for a second it was related somehow to the movie.
A number of cocktails that riff off of other cocktails, also riff on the name.

For example, the Last Word is a cocktail composed of 4 ingredients of equal parts, just like the Naked and Famous.

3/4 oz Gin
3/4 oz Green Chartreuse
3/4 oz Lime juice
3/4 oz Maraschino liqueur

Shake with ice. Strain.

The Final Ward is a riff on the above (named after bartender Phil Ward, who invented the drink), which substitutes rye for gin and lemon juice for the lime.

The 4 ingredients of equal parts cocktails are a staple in my home; the paper plane (equal parts bourbon, aperol, amaro nonino and lemon juice -- freshly squeezed, no real lemon allowed) is my favorite. I tend to heavy pour the bourbon though, so not quite equal parts after all.

--

A bit OT, but I appreciate the enthusiasm that comes through on your posts. Thank you for that.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#628 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SCOFFLAW

Here's a nice take on a Bourbon Sour called the Scofflaw:

SCOFFLAW

  • Spirits: 1 part Bourbon; 1 part Canadian Whisky (original calls for 2 parts Bourbon)
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .5 Lemon
  • Sweets: .25 Grenadine (I used real pomegranate molasses)
  • Bitters: 1 Vermouth; a few dashes Orange Bitters (I used my homemade Ariancello)
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Rich brown in the glass. Bourbon smoke, herbs and lemon drop on the nose. Smoke, caramel, lemon curd, red berries and subtle baking spices on the palate. Very high tartness from the lemon and pomegranate. Nice upscale Bourbon Sour variation.
  • As per my last Bourbon cocktail, cutting the 25 year old Rhetoric bourbon with 19 year old Canadian Whisky properly tames the aggressive smoke and caramel from the Bourbon for mixing where I get just enough to complement the cocktail and not completely overwhelm it like happened with the Apricot Sour.
  • I have tasted orange bitters and they are exactly what I expected: orange peel macerated in 40% ABV alcohol solution with some bitter spices. As such, I was able to substitute in my pure homemade Ariancello and the Vermouth supplied the necessary spices.
  • As always, use either real grenadine or pomegranate molasses. Do not use the artificially colored and flavored sweetened bottled crap most people think of as grenadine.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#629 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE EPONINE COLLINS

Here's a complex and extremely tasty take on a classic Tom Collins called the Eponine Collins that is well worth the extra time and ingredients:

EPONINE COLLINS

  • Spirits: 1.5 parts Gin
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Suze or other Gentian liqueur
  • Fruit: .5 parts Lemon; 1 part Grapefruit
  • Sweets: .75 parts Simple syrup
  • Bitters: .5 parts Amaro
  • Sodas: 4 parts Soda


Shake all the ingredients except the soda together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Top gently with the soda. Enjoy.

Semi opaque pink brownish in the glass. Botanicals completely dominate the nose, particularly wormwood. In the mouth, lovely sharp complex botanical flavors highlighted by juicy citrus. You can distinctly make out the Gin's juniper, the Genitian's wormwood, and the Amaro's bitters separately even as they blend together seamlessly. The grapefruit pairs stunningly well with the bitterness and botanicals! Sweetness from the Agave makes its presence known just before the finish and then the Amaro's bitterness finishes it all off. Lovely complex cocktail. I can only imagine how good it'd be with fresh squeezed grapefruit juice.
  • Gentian liqueur is a light-bodied slightly sweet herbal liqueur with an emphasis on wormwood and botanicals. Suze is by far the most well-known brand but is certainly not the only Gentian liqueur on the market. It usually clocks in around 20% ABV and a great way to describe it as a much milder version of Chartreuse. In fact, the Gentian liqueur I use is actually made by the same Carthusian monks that make the famous Chartreuse liqueur. You could probably substitute it in but I would definitely cut the amount to a mere teaspoon or barspoon or it will completely overtake the cocktail.
  • My homemade Amaro is an equal parts blend of China-China from France, Fernet Branca from Italy and Unicum from Hungary. You don't have to mix your own but try to use an Amaro that is 40% ABV if you can find it. Any Amaro will do but remember that less ABV usually means more sugar.
  • If you don't care for carbonation in your cocktails, feel free to skip the soda but add in lots of ice in your glass to compensate and get proper dilution. As always, use ice made from high quality water you'd actually drink on its own. See my Ice-ology 101 thread over in Epicurean Exploits.
  • If you do enjoy carbonation, try omitting the simple syrup when shaking and substituting in some lemon-lime soda or tonic water instead of the soda for an extra hit of flavor.
  • I just realized that this is the first cocktail I've made that uses at least one ingredient in every single one of my cocktail formula categories.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#630 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE MILLIONAIRE

I've previously made the Billionaire cocktail here on the thread so it's only fair that I make the prequel cocktail, the much more modest, humble and austere mere Millionaire. I made it twice over the weekend:

MILLIONAIRE

  • Spirits: 1 part Bourbon; 1 part Canadian Whisky (original calls for 2 Bourbon)
  • Liqueurs: .25 parts Absinthe
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .5 Grenadine (I use pomegranate molasses)
  • Bitters: a few dashes Angostura Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Dark brown in the glass with a slight hint of red. Coarse texture from the strong smoky bourbon and lemon juice combo but I like it. Bourbon caramel dominates the nose. On the palate, the bourbon smoke and caramel and the pomegranate and lemon tartness are the stars with the anise notes from the absinthe kicking in on the finish before the smoke and tartness clean up. Vanilla caramel sweetness on the backend there as well. A coarse but tasty cocktail.
  • If you prefer a milder cocktail, use 2 parts Canadian Whisky as I did on the first attempt this weekend for a much smoother cocktail. Contrarily, use all aged Bourbon if you prefer a stronger more aggressive cocktail.
  • As always, try to use real pomegranate molasses if you can find it instead of grenadine syrup. If you can't find that, then at least try finding bottled pomegranate juice.
  • Although quite sweet on its own, real pomegranate molasses is balanced out by insanely high acidity. So you should still find this sour quite dry despite the high amount of called for.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#631 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE GOLDEN LOTUS

This cocktail contains a highly unusual and uncommon ingredient for a sour cocktail -- salt. As we'll see, it's a make or break proposition for cocktail lovers:

GOLDEN LOTUS

  • Spirits: 1 Gin
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Suze or other Gentian liqueur; 1 part Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Curacao, Triple Sec or other orange liqueur (I used my homemade Ariancello)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: a pinch or shake of salt (I used Pink Himalayan) (IMHO this should really be omitted; see notes below)
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Bright translucent yellow in the glass. Light herbal nose. Light refreshing body. Salt hits the palate immediately followed immediately by bright and refreshing juniper and wormwood flavors. Lemon perks it all up but is not too tart. Slight sweet orange water flavors there as well. Salt carries through all the way through the midpalate and into the finish. A real distraction to an otherwise bright and refreshing cocktail.
  • There is no getting around the fact that the use of salt defines this cocktail. Without it, it would be a simple and relatively straightforward variation on a Gin Sour made a little more interesting by the use of Gentian liqueur. Once the salt comes into play, however, it essentially becomes the dominant flavor. Here's the issue with this: salt is traditionally used in either a deliberately savory cocktail like a Bloody Mary or a Bloody Caesar or as a balancer/cover for a cocktail using crappy cheap alcohol. I am of course referring to a salt rimmed Margarita which requires a ton of sugar to mask the horrible cheap Tequila flavor and in turn now requires the salt to balance the overuse of sugar.

    The issue with this cocktail is the fact that the ingredients are generally of much better quality and don't need either sugar to cover it up and salt to balance it out. Sure you could use cheap Gin but even the most affordable Gentian liqueur, such as Suze, would be of a decent quality and assuming you're using fresh lemon you can't get higher quality for your juice. So there's actually nothing to cover up. And because of that, the salt actually distracts and gets in the way. I honestly can see absolutely no good reason after this why salt should be used in a sour cocktail and I personally advise omitting it.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#632 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ORANGE SARATOGA

This cocktail is a riff on a riff of a classic. Let's see how this twice updated take on a Sidecar holds up:

ORANGE SARATOGA
  • Spirits: None (original calls for 2 parts Brandy)
  • Liqueurs: 2 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Curacao, Triple Sec or other orange liqueur (I used my homemade Mandarinocello); .25 parts Maraschino
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon; .5 parts Pineapple
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: a few dashes Angostura Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Translucent reddish brown in the glass. Candied cherries and mandarin peel on the nose, natch. In the mouth, nicely textured flavors of mandarin, cherries, almonds, a surprisingly strong saline note, a touch of bitterness from the mandarin pith, and an almost Midori like fruit flavor which is odd and intriguing given the major fruit lfavors are mandarin, cherry, lemon and pineapple. The lemon and pineapple are in fact completely integrated into the cocktail and nowhere near as pronounced as I thought it would be.
  • This cocktail is a riff on the Saratoga II sour cocktail which is a riff on the original ancestral style all-booze Saratoga and is also a riff on the classic Sidecar. The Sidecar contains Brandy, orange liqueur, and lemon juice. The original Saratoga II contains Brandy, maraschino, lemon, pineapple and bitters. I just substituted the Brandy for my homemade Mandarino liqueur for a brighter flavor. If you don't care for this strong of an orange flavor, you can use 2 parts of Brandy instead though I really feel Grand Marnier would work just as well.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#633 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE PIMM'S NO. 2 CUP -- A COPYCAT RECIPE COCKTAIL

A couple of years ago when I first started getting into wine, a friend made me a Pimm's Cup cocktail which I'd never had before and enjoyed. Turns out it's one of the most researched copycat recipes on the Internet so I decided I'd give it a try. I intend to try every version except the Vodka one which I will substitute with Tequila. First, up, though, let's go with the Scotch version which is the Pimm's No. 2. Cup:

PIMM'S CUP NO. 2

  • Spirits: 1 part Scotch; 1 part Port (Ruby, Tawny or Vintage)
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Curacao, Triple Sec or orange liqueur(I used my homemade Ariancello)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime; 2-3 thin slices Cucumber per serving
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; a few dashes Angostura Bitters; a few Mint leaves
  • Sodas: 4 oz Ginger Beer, Ginger Ale Sprite or 7UP


Shake all the ingredients except for the soda of your choice together vigorously over ice in order to rip up the mint and cucumber. Pour over ice into a large glass. Top with the ginger or lemon-lime soda of your choice. Stir very gently to combine. Enjoy.

Bright translucent reddish brown in the glass. Nose is honestly kind of mute but boy does this ever pick up on the palate. All the flavor blend seamlessly into a rich but refreshing spritzer. The Scotch does provide quite a bit of richness, the ginger and vermouth provide spice, and the cucumber, mint, orange liqueur and lime juice provide zesty fruit flavor. A great spritzer cocktail, the one you graduate to after an Aperol Spritz.
  • The original Pimm's No. 1 is a Gin, Port and spice aperitif that is of course famous for the Pimm's Cup. But few people remember or know that there was once an entire range of Pimm's aperitifs based on Gin, Scotch, Brandy, Rum, Bourbon and Vodka. Today only the Gin version survives as a product.
  • Copycat Recipes were one of the first certifiable Internet fads. With the ease it allowed information to be shared, recipes that mimicked famous brand name foods, candies and snacks from restaurant chains and food companies popped up all over the Internet in the late 90s and early 2000s. At one point there were even mainstream published copycat recipe books that could easily be found in bookstores. While the fad has died down quite a bit, you can easily search for and find hundreds of copycat recipes on the Internet today.
  • The Pimm's Cup No. 2 doesn't have to be shaken, particularly if you prefer the visual aesthetics of whole cucumber slices and mint leaves in the glass. If this is the case, simply stir the ingredients over ice into a glass and add in the whole cucumber slices and mint leaves. The flavors will macerate naturally over time in the glass. Of course, the shaken version I use forces the maceration to occur immediately in the shaker and brings out the flavors immediately. It's a tradeoff. The choice of mixing and serving is yours.
  • It is commonly accepted bartending practice to make a Pimm's Cup with either a ginger or lemon-lime flavored soda. Ginger beer as I used will obviously up the spice flavors while lemon-lime soda will make it more fruit-forward. I personally prefer the added spice ginger beer adds. Again, though, the choice is yours.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#634 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CHOCOLATE BOULEVARDIER

So my friends have a bottle of chocolate bitters and had no idea what to do with them. So I did some research and found this chocolate tinged cocktail that is just perfect:

CHOCOLATE BOULEVARDIER

  • Spirits: 1 part Bourbon or Canadian Whisky
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red Italian bitter liqueur; 1 part Amaro; a few dashes Chocolate Bitters (I used Fee Brothers)
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour into a glass over ice. Enjoy.

Dark brown in the glass. Rich and creamy dark chocolate flavors accented by the spices from the Rosso Antico and the dark bitter Amaro. The chocolate bitters are the definite star of the show but the other ingredients provide stellar support. This is just great.
  • The friend I made this for argued that this cocktail was a great argument for vodka in mixed drinks as he felt that chocolate was the dominant flavor. I see where he was coming from but I disagree as the rich and creamy Canadian Whisky was a great complement for the chocolate bitters. I really don't think vodka would have worked as well. /list]
    • The original recipe calls for Bourbon which will provide much stronger smoke, vanilla and caramel flavors as opposed to the rich creaminess provided by the Canadian Whisky. Either version works.
    • As always, my home blended Amaro is actually a blend of Fernet Branca, Unicum and China-China bitters and clocks in at a full 40% ABV. Try to use high ABV Amaro, the lower ABV you go the higher the amount of sugar and the lower the amount of quality ingredients including bitter botanicals.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#635 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE PIMM'S NO. 3 CUP -- A COPYCAT RECIPE COCKTAIL

So it's time for another variation of the Pimm's Cup and this time I decided to try the Rum variation:

PIMM'S CUP NO. 3

  • Spirits: 1 part Rum; 1 part Port (Ruby, Tawny or Vintage)
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Curacao, Triple Sec or orange liqueur(I used my homemade Ariancello)
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime; 2-3 thin slices Cucumber per serving
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; a few dashes Angostura Bitters; a few Mint leaves
  • Sodas: 4 oz Ginger Beer, Ginger Ale Sprite or 7UP


Shake all the ingredients except for the soda of your choice together vigorously over ice in order to rip up the mint and cucumber. Pour over ice into a large glass. Top with the ginger or lemon-lime soda of your choice. Stir very gently to combine. Enjoy.

Bright translucent reddish brown in the glass. Nose is honestly no different than the No. 2 Cup. All the flavor blend seamlessly into a rich but refreshing spritzer -- but that's literally what I wrote about the No. 2 Cup. The Rum does provide a hint of richness but then again so did the Scotch in my last crack at this. It's a great blend of flavors but I can't honestly tell much difference between the Rum and Scotch based Pimm's Cups. Maybe the Bourbon and Tequila versions will be different.
  • Okay, I can see why the many variations of the Pimm's aperitif liqueur were phased out. If I'm being honest, the minute amount of Rum isn't enough to make a drastic enough flavor variation between the Scotch based No. 2 Pimm's Cup I made previously and this one. Given the amount and volume of the other ingredients, it's just too subtle to notice any real variation between the two. I imagine it's the same with all the other variations but I will definitely get around to trying them.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#636 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE WHISKERS

I just picked up a bottle of Portuguese Passion Fruit liqueur so I thought I'd take a crack at using it in a fresh sour cocktail:

WHISKERS

  • Spirits: 1 part Gin
  • Liqueurs: .5 parts Passion Fruit liqueur (original calls for Orange liqueur)
  • Fruit: 1 Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 2 parts Vermouth; a few dashes Orange Bitters
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour into a cocktail over ice. Enjoy.

Bright translucent brown in the glass. The Vermouth and orange bitters dominate the cocktail with the sweet passion fruit riding in on the finish. Gin botanicals are pretty much imperceptible. Tasty and refreshing but a little unbalanced towards the Vermouth.
  • This was really not what I was expecting. It leans too heavily towards the Vermouth which should actually be knocked down to just one part while the Gin and Passion Fruit liqueur parts should each really be doubled.
  • The Passion Fruit liqueur I used was the Licor Maracuja do Ezekiel from Porutuguese producer Eduardo Ferreira.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#637 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE PASSION "YUZU" GIMLET

Yuzu is one of the most expensive and difficult to acquire cocktail ingredients ever. Fortunately, there's a way to mimic that unique citrus flavor for a cocktail:

PASSION "YUZU" GIMLET

  • Spirits: 2 Gin
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Passion Fruit liqueur
  • Fruit: 1 part "Yuzu" (mix of equal parts Tangelo, Lemon and Lime; see note below)
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. If you don't want the jammy fruit in the glass, then strain when you pour. Enjoy.

Bright semi-translucent sunshine yellow in the glass, it pretty much takes on the color of the "Yuzu" itself. Bright and smooth citrusy flavor but very strong saline and juniper notes from the gin. Smooth texture. Integrates itself more as you drink it. Nice.
  • Yuzu is an incredibly bright, flavorful and extremely tart Japanese citrus fruit. To mimic the flavor of Yuzu citrus juice, mix together equal parts of Lemon, Lime and Tangelo juice. A tangelo is a cross between a tangerine and a Pomelo grapefruit. This equal mixture provides the perfect balance. I suppose if you don't have any tangelos on hand you could substitute in white grapefruit juice and tangerine juice for the same effect.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#638 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE PINA DE ORO

Here's something relatively rare in the world of cocktails -- a Tiki style Tequila based cocktail:

PINA DE ORO

  • Spirits: 2 parts Tequila
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: .75 parts Pineapple; .5 parts "Yuzu" (mix of equal parts Tangelo, Lemon and Lime; see note below)
  • Sweets: .5 Agave Syrup
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Opaque gold brownish in the glass. Orgeat surprisingly dominates the nose with almonds and orange flower water. Smooth sweet agave dominates the palate followed by sweet almond cream and orange water. Yuzu citrus is a good supporting player. Tequila is very much the star here. Very smooth texture.
  • Wow. This might be even better than a traditional Rum based Tiki cocktail. The Tequila goes very well with my homemade Orgeat and while the end result lacks the richness that Rum brings, it more than makes up for it with texture and flavor. It's enough to get me to consider replacing Rum with Tequila in every Tiki cocktail recipe I come across just to compare the two.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#639 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CLASSIC NEGRONI

Here's the first of three classic cocktails I had with friends tonight:

NEGRONI

  • Spirits: 1 part Gin
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Reddish brown in the glass. Strong botanical flavor from the gin followed by sweet red fruit and bitters to mellow it out. Strangely, the ingredients don't mesh as well as you'd think they would given the long history of this classic cocktail. The gin stands out a lot but the botanicals don't seem to mesh cleanly with the Vermouth and Campari I used.
  • Maybe it's me, but I don't really find this as well integrated as it should be. The Gin was actually a bit distracting which surprised me because it paired so oddly with the Vermouth and Campari. I thought the Bourbon based Boulevardier was a far better cocktail in terms of flavor and integration. I was actually more than a tad disappointed given that this is a classic. I'll be sticking with the Boulevardier.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#640 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE LAST WORD

After my personal disappointment with the Negroni, I moved on to another classic cocktail with some friends:

LAST WORD

  • Spirits: 1 part Gin
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Chartreuse; 1 part Maraschino liqueur
  • Fruit: 1 part Lime
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Semi-translucent green in the glass. Smooth texture carries juniper, cherry essence, candied lime and herbs on the texture. The Maraschino punches through heavily on the finish, practically separating itself from the rest of the cocktail which is both intriguing and distracting. Pleasant enough cocktail, can't say I'm completely in love with it. I'd love to try this subbing out the Maraschino for some Cointreau or any of my homemade Italian citrus liqueurs.
  • Feel free to substitute the Maraschino with .5 parts simple syrup and .5 parts Kirsch if you have any.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#641 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

You did something wrong.

The negroni has gotten me through more Intra-European flights than you can imagine. Air France lounges always stock gin, Campari and martini rossi at their self-serve bars, so I’d make a double negroni while people stared at me like I was an alcoholic or something :).
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#642 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BEE'S KNEES

And the last classic cocktail I tried today with friends turned out to be the absolute best and really quite simple:

BEE'S KNEES

  • Spirits: 2 parts Gin
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: .5 artisanal or craft Honey syrup (or .25 Honey; see below)
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. If using raw honey instead of honey syrup, stir all the ingredients first before shaking in order to dissolve the honey. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Golden yellow in the glass. Quite a bit of foam which I presume came from the fresh artisanal honey. Extremely fresh and bright wheat cracker, honey and lemon flavors with a smooth texture and refreshing pitch on the palate. GREAT cocktail!
  • This was just awesome. The cocktail was superbly integrated and any fears that it might be too sweet were completely allayed upon the first delicious sip. Where I found the Gin didn't mesh well in the Negroni, it went superbly with the honey and lemon. I was just blown away at the simplicity of this 3 ingredient cocktail and how fantastic it went down the palate. I could've easily and happily had a double sized serving of this.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#643 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Andrew Kotowski wrote: October 25th, 2020, 6:49 pm You did something wrong.

The negroni has gotten me through more Intra-European flights than you can imagine. Air France lounges always stock gin, Campari and martini rossi at their self-serve bars, so I’d make a double negroni while people stared at me like I was an alcoholic or something :).
I was much happier with the Bee's Knees tonight but I would be more than happy to try again and re-evaluate. This is a classic, after all.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#644 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

Try with Carpano Antica.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#645 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CLASSIC NEGRONI -- TAKE 2

I redid the Negroni tonight and a switchup to more premium ingredients made a world of difference:

NEGRONI

  • Spirits: 1 part Gin
  • Liqueurs: None
  • Fruit: None
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other red bitter liqueur
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Reddish brown in the glass leaning far more towards brown this time. A very smooth texture with strong but mellow botanicals which are far better integrated with the sweet red fruit, baking spices, burnt sugar and bitterness. This is a world away and far, far better than last night's attempt. Amazing what a difference high quality ingredients make.
  • There were two switchups here that made the difference. The first was using a local artisinal craft Gin. The Dillon's Unfiltered 22 is a locally vapor distilled Gin made from a grape wine distillate base and 22 locally sourced and grown botanicals. It's the only wine based Gin I am aware of beside the Mistral Pink Gin. I find it a lot softer in texture and not as rough-hewn as a grain distillate based Gin.
  • The second was the use of Cocchi Vermouth di Torino. This is as good as Carpano Antico. It's much sweeter than last night's Dolin from France but the baking spices and herbs are also much stronger and better integrated. Quality stuff and greatly improved the balance of the cocktail.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#646 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE RUBY MARIE

Here's an interesting sour cocktail that emphasizes grapefruit citrus over the usual lemon or lime:

RUBY MARIE

  • Spirits: 2 parts Brandy or Citrus Liqueur
  • Liqueurs: None (assuming you are using Brandy)
  • Fruit: .25 parts Lemon; 1 part Grapefruit
  • Sweets: .25 Pomegranate Molasses [original calls for .5 Grenadine]
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. If using real pomegranate molasses instead of grenadine, stir all the ingredients first before shaking in order to dissolve the molasses. Pour over ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Semi opaque brown in the glass. Strong candied and fresh grapefruit flavors, lemony tartness accented by the grapefruit and especially the pomegranate tartness followed by a touch of sweetness and pithy bitterness. Smooth texture. Really high bracing acidity on this cocktail.
  • For this cocktail, I used my homemade Pomelocello grapefruit liqueur, which was ruby red grapefruit peel steeped in muscat based Pisco. This will of course heavily accent the grapefruit flavor of the cocktail. The original recipe calls for Brandy, so feel free to substitute any kind in.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#647 Post by Jorge Henriquez »

Tran,

Appreciate the enthusiasm you bring to this thread.........but I REALLY think you need to rethink your glassware of choice for the vast majority of these cocktails! A Negroni in a huge wine glass?!?!?!
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#648 Post by Tran Bronstein »

Jorge Henriquez wrote: October 30th, 2020, 10:15 am Tran,

Appreciate the enthusiasm you bring to this thread.........but I REALLY think you need to rethink your glassware of choice for the vast majority of these cocktails! A Negroni in a huge wine glass?!?!?!
Understood. Proper Old-Fashioned tumblers and cocktail coupe glasses are on the horizon as Black Friday and Xmas approaches.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#649 Post by Andrew Kotowski »

Jorge Henriquez wrote: October 30th, 2020, 10:15 am Tran,

Appreciate the enthusiasm you bring to this thread.........but I REALLY think you need to rethink your glassware of choice for the vast majority of these cocktails! A Negroni in a huge wine glass?!?!?!
This made me smile :D

So, I've embraced the "infinity Manhattan" that has been popping up on cocktail threads across Reddit and the net, at large. Basically, the exercise is to take a large decanter and keep a running mix of Manhattans. I've got a decanter going of EC Barrel Proof, Wild Turkey Rare Breed, Knob Creek 10 Store Pick (Louisville) and OWA... mixed with Carpano Antica, Punt e Mes, Dolin and Drapo. Just fantastic.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#650 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE TROPICAL SIDECAR

Here's a tropical version of a sidecar using a mix of commercial and homemade ingredients:

TROPICAL SIDECAR

  • Spirits: 1 part Brandy
  • Liqueurs: 1 part Orange Liqueur (I used my infused Mandarinocello); 1 part Passion fruit liqueur
  • Fruit: 1 part Lemon
  • Sweets: None
  • Bitters: None
  • Sodas: None
Shake all the ingredients together over ice. Pour over ice into a glass. Preferably a cocktail glass, not a wine glass. Unless you don't own any cocktail glasses. Like me. In that case you should use a wine glass. Because it's better than using a plastic cup. Enjoy.

Semi translucent brown in the glass from the dark brandy. Sweet brandy, oak, candied grapefruit and passion fruit with a smooth texture. Not really tart, the lemon just helps smooth things out. Nice.
  • For this cocktail, I used my homemade Mandarinocello grapefruit liqueur, which was mandarin orange peel steeped in muscat based Pisco. Feel free to use Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec.
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