The Cocktail Thread

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Tran Bronstein
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#851 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE NEGRONI SOUR

Well this is such an obvious no-brainer I had to try it out given my ongoing Negroni obsession. I love sours so it's time to turn a Negroni into a sour:


NEGRONI SOUR

SPIRITS: 1 part Gin
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: 1 part Lemon
SWEETS: None
BITTERS: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other Italian bitter aperitivo liqueur


Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Well, this is pretty darn awesome. Right up there with every 1:1 sour cocktail like the Final Word, Paper Plane, Naked & Famous, etc. Herbaceous, bitter, sweet, red fruity, and candied lemon all playing with each other. Highly recommended.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#852 Post by RichardFlack »

Pardon my ignorance but red or white vermouth?

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#853 Post by Tran Bronstein »

RichardFlack wrote: September 20th, 2021, 8:50 pm Pardon my ignorance but red or white vermouth?
Standard Negroni recipes call for red Vermouth but I use them interchangeably myself. In this case, I used a sweet white Vermouth in this particular case.

The only instance where I know that white Vermouth is specifically required is the White Negroni as using a red one will alter the color too much.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#854 Post by RichardFlack »

Thx, yeah I would normally assume red but that didn’t seem right for this one.
Planning a trip to the Manulife centre in the next week or so !

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#855 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE EXTRA-STRENGTH PENNICILLIN

The Pennicillin is IMHO the tastiest and most famous Scotch/Irish whisky sour cocktail so I decided I'd kick it up a notch and compare my new formulation to the standard version:


PENICILLIN (STANDARD)

SPIRITS: 2 parts Scotch/Irish blended Whisky; .25 parts Islay or other peaty Scotch/Irish/blended Whisky
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: 1 part Lemon
SWEETS: .75 parts honey-ginger syrup or .75 parts honey and sliced fresh ginger
BITTERS: None

EXTRA-STRENGTH PENICILLIN

SPIRITS: 2 parts Scotch/Irish blended Whisky; .25 parts Islay or other peaty Scotch/Irish/blended Whisky
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Drambruie
FRUIT: 1 part Lemon
SWEETS: .25 parts truffled honey
BITTERS: a few dashes bottled organic Ginger Juice or fresh ginger slices

For the regular Penicillin, shake all ingredients except the peaty whisky in a shaker with ice. If using raw honey, stir the ingredients together in the shaker without ice first to dissolve the honey, then shake with ice. Strain over fresh ice into a glass. Top with the peaty whisky as a float. Enjoy.

For the Extra-Strength Penicillin, stir the ingredients together in the shaker without ice first to dissolve the honey, then shake with ice. Strain over fresh ice into a glass. Top with the peaty whisky as a float. Enjoy.

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Exactly as it sounds, this Penicillin is more of everything to love about the standard Penicillin. It's notably sweeter due to the use of both truffled honey and Drambruie, but it's offset by the peat, more lemon tartness, spicy heat from the ginger juice and umami from the truffle in the honey and spices in the Drambruie. Interestingly, it's actually a bit drier than expected on the entry but then slowly becomes sweeter in the mouth. If you love the Penicillin you should love this. Otherwise, it might be a bit too much.
  • You could also use ginger liqueur and honey in place of the honey-ginger syrup, ginger juice or fresh ginger slices
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#856 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE DELUXE SCOTCH NEGRONI -- PEATY, CHOCOLATY, AND CITRUSY

I found the standard Scotch Negroni to be right in between a classic Gin-based Negroni and Bourbon based Boulevardier when I posted on that one. I decided to return to it and give it the deluxe treatment. So what exactly makes it deluxe? Peated Scotch whisky, chocolate bitters and fresh citrus garnish.


DELUXE SCOTCH NEGRONI

SPIRITS: 1 part peated Scotch or Irish Whisky
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: 1 slice Blood Orange
SWEETS: None
BITTERS: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other Italian bitter aperitivo liqueur; a few dashes Chocolate Bitters


Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice. Stir vigorously for both chill and dilution. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Now this is more like it. The smoky peat comes through on the finish to give this an added dimension and complements the bitter component quite well, the chocolate flavor blends really well with the barley sweetness, and it's all rounded out by the fresh blood orange taste which is slightly sweeter and less tart than a standard Navel orange. Definitely recommend this over a standard Scotch Negroni.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#857 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BLOOD AND SAND

I've been meaning to try this one for quite a while after Bill "Tex" Landreth posted in this thread on one. I really wish I'd tried this a lot sooner. This was just awesome.


BLOOD AND SAND

SPIRITS: 1 part Scotch or Irish Whisky
LIQUEURS: 1 part Cherry brandy, liqueur or eau de vie (i.e. Kirsch)
FRUIT: 1 part Orange juice
SWEETS: None
BITTERS: 1 part Vermouth

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice. Shake vigorously for both chill and dilution. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Wow. This is just great. The concern that I had is that you have 4 elements to the cocktail of varying degrees of sweetness and no balancing acidity anywhere to be seen... and yet this is balanced, refreshing and delicious. The fresh sweet orange flavor perfectly bridges the rich Whisky flavors and the sweet cherry and vermouth, giving it all a refreshing lift while actually taming down the sweetness. Really stunning how well orange and Whisky flavors complement each other. The easy to remember 1:1:1:1 formula is the icing on the cake. Try this, it's a winner.
  • I used an equal blend of half an ounce each of Bushmill's 16 which is non-peated and Johnny Walker Black which is. Honestly, the proportion of peated Whisky was so small that whatever smoky peatiness was there was completely tamed by the fresh orange and rich cherry flavors. I wouldn't bother using peated Whisky in the future after having had my first crack at this cocktail.
  • I can easily see this working with American whisky instead of Scotch or Irish and will be trying it in the very near future.
  • On that same riff, I could also easily see subbing lemon juice for the orange and creating a sour cocktail out of this formula and I'll also be trying it in the near future as well.
  • I strongly recommend using only fresh squeezed orange juice in this. I cannot see this working with store-bought orange juice at all, not even allegedly "not from concentrate" orange juice.
  • For the cherry brandy component, I used my own homemade Cherry Marnier but you can use any cherry brandy or liqueur such as Heering, Kirsch or even sweet cherry wine if you have any for a lighter cocktail.
  • The Vermouth I used for this cocktail is Byrrh, which is technically more of a Quinquina than it is a Vermouth. The major differences Byrrh has from Vermouth are that it uses a mixed wine and mistelle (fruit juice fortified with brandy made from the same fruit) base and uses mostly quinine derived from cinchona bark as its bittering agent as well as a few spices and botanicals and then aged in oak barrels. Overall, though, it contains far less sugar, macerated spices and botanicals than a standard Vermouth does. The sweetness comes exclusively and naturally from the mistelle base as there is never any sugar added. As a result, it's a lot lighter in body and taste than a standard Vermouth and it worked perfectly with this cocktail. If you find standard Vermouth too heavy and sweet, you might want to give this a try.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#858 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE YELLOW AND SAND

So I was going to follow up yesterday's Blood and Sand cocktail post by doing the Bourbon version of the cocktail. Except that I absentmindedly went for my fresh squeezed lemon juice instead of my orange juice. And thus, a new riff on the Bourbon Sour is born. Is this a happy accident? Or a new genius creation that was fated to be? Let's have a taste and see:


THE YELLOW AND SAND

SPIRITS: 1 part Bourbon
LIQUEURS: 1 part Cherry brandy, liqueur or eau de vie (i.e. Kirsch)
FRUIT: 1 part Lemon
SWEETS: None
BITTERS: 1 part Vermouth

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice. Shake vigorously for both chill and dilution. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

This ended up as a pretty good variation on the traditional Whisky Sour. The sweet caramel corn, oak and vanilla go very well with the cherry accent and the tart lemon singes the tastebuds from start to finish. The Vermouth surprisingly has very little influence with just a slight touch of spice on the finish. This is good but I think it will actually work out much better with the orange juice.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#859 Post by RichardFlack »

Made a New York Sour yesterday for the first time ever. We used an Okanagen Meritage (Lake Breeze) that was on hand for the float, and it seemed to work well, everyone really liked it.
We just used Woodford Bourbon, again avoiding anything too fancy. Was that the right call?
We also used Maple syrup rather than simple syrup.
Wondering if there’s a recommended bourbon and also style of wine for this? What have others used, or does it really not matter?

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#860 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE "AMARETTO" SOUR

So I've always wanted to try an Amaretto sour, but there's always been a slight hiccup with that plan: I really detest Amaretto liqueur. Nothing but sugar syrup and a cheap grain alcohol infusion of cherry, peach or apricot pits which mimics the flavor of real almonds. If you're lucky, you might come across a true Amaretto that is actually made from almonds but best of luck finding one of those artisanal versions.

Rather than waste the money on a bottle of cheap Amaretto, I decided to replicate the flavors using what I felt were more natural ingredients. So here's my take on the *ahem* "Amaretto" Sour.


THE "AMARETTO" SOUR

SPIRITS: 2 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: 1 part Lemon
SWEETS: .5 parts Orgeat
BITTERS: A few drops pure Almond Extract or Almond Bitters; .5 parts egg white

Pour all ingredients into a shaker without ice and dry shake first to get the egg white nice and foamy. Add ice and shake again. Pour into a cocktail glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

On first sip, the bourbon overwhelmed and dominated the entire cocktail. However, with a little more time to chill and dilute, the almond flavors came to the fore to take center stage and balance things out, allowing the tart lemon to also come out and play. The almond and bourbon flavors are actually really complementary once the cocktail settles down. Nice. Definitely good enough taht I cannot see myself wasting money on Amaretto for this cocktail.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#861 Post by Michael Martin »

Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#862 Post by Mike Cohen »

Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
You're in for a treat. So many interesting Amaro's.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#863 Post by Mike Cohen »

Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#864 Post by Michael Martin »

Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm
Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Oh, now that sounds interesting.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#865 Post by Tom G l a s g o w »

Michael Martin wrote: October 30th, 2021, 5:32 pm
Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm
Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Oh, now that sounds interesting.
Back on topic!

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#866 Post by RichardFlack »

Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm
Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Could you sub Campari for the Aperol? Aperol isn’t something I’m ever likely to have around.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#867 Post by Michael Martin »

Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm
Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Made one of these tonight. Very orange, citrusy. Like a dreamsicle.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#868 Post by Michael Martin »

RichardFlack wrote: October 30th, 2021, 8:15 pm
Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm
Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Could you sub Campari for the Aperol? Aperol isn’t something I’m ever likely to have around.
I would think Campari would take it herbal/licorice rather than orange which is the base of Amaro.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#869 Post by Mike Cohen »

RichardFlack wrote: October 30th, 2021, 8:15 pm
Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm
Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Could you sub Campari for the Aperol? Aperol isn’t something I’m ever likely to have around.
I would definitely try it. Obviously it would be different, but it could be really interesting. I love a Paper Plane, but my one little nit to pick is that it's slightly on the sweet side for me, so Campari might be an interesting twist.

My favorite 4 equal parts cocktail is the Naked and Famous. It's the following:

.75oz Mezcal
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Yellow Chartreuse
.75oz Fresh Lime Juice

However, I went to one of my favorite NYC restaurants and they had a cocktail on the menu called a Fool Hearted Memory. It's the same as the Naked and Famous except it subs out the Aperol for Contratto. I don't have (and can't find) Contratto so I asked around and was told that Campari is a good substitute. I found it to work well in my home version of the FHM.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#870 Post by RichardFlack »

Michael Martin wrote: October 30th, 2021, 8:41 pm
RichardFlack wrote: October 30th, 2021, 8:15 pm
Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm

Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Could you sub Campari for the Aperol? Aperol isn’t something I’m ever likely to have around.
I would think Campari would take it herbal/licorice rather than orange which is the base of Amaro.
For me at any rate, Campari has a strong orange note but with bitter finish to cut the sweetness. I’m not big on simple sweet cocktails.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#871 Post by Otto Dobre »

One cocktail I've recently had and loved is Corpse Revival #2. Will have to try it here at Starlite.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#872 Post by RichardFlack »

Made this - Paper Plane, tweaked - yesterday using Campari (and Legent bourbon, Nonino Amaro). Three out of four really liked it. Really a summer drink. Very refreshing, perhaps a little too sharp. May tweak the ratios next time. I don’t think this dethrones Negroni and it’s variants (Grand Marnier cuvee Alexandre, or Bourbon).

By the way, does any one know the origin of the name Paper Plane?
Last edited by RichardFlack on November 11th, 2021, 1:25 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#873 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SAUTERNEGRONI

Well, the Grand Marnier Negroni worked so well that I thought I'd switch up the base again. This time, I used a lighter ABV Sauternes. Well, that's a bit pricy so instead I used a Monbazillac instead for a similar effect :


SAUTERNEGRONI

SPIRITS: 1 part Sauternes (or equivalent)
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: None
SWEETS: None
BITTERS: 1 part Vermouth; 1 part Campari, Aperol, Rosso Antico or other Italian bitter aperitivo liqueur

Pour all ingredients into a stirring glass with ice. Stir vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

This is nice. The vanilla and roasted fruit flavors of the Monbazillac make for a nice base on which the spices and wormwood from the Campari and Byrrh interact and play with very well. Be warned, however, that like the Grand Marnier Negroni I also invented this is much sweeter than a classic Negroni. You have been warned.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#874 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BORDEAUX BANANA

One of the best Scotch cocktails I've ever had is the Tokyo Banana which I've posted here, a complex mix of Scotch, honey, banana, ginger and lemon. Continuing with the theme of playing with my full bottle of Monbazillac, this riff uses Sauternes as the base instead:


BORDEAUX BANANA

SPIRITS: 2 parts Sauternes (or equivalent)
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: 1 part Lemon; 2 slices fresh Banana; 2 slices fresh ginger (if not using ginger juice)
SWEETS: .25 Honey (or .5 Honey syrup)
BITTERS: A float of peated Whisky (see note below); a few dashes organic bottled Ginger Juice (if not using fresh)

If using raw honey, pour all ingredients into a shaker without ice and stir first to dissolve the raw honey. Then add ice and shake vigorously. If using honey syrup, add all into a shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain and pour into a glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

This is nice. The vanilla sweetness of the Sauternes complements the honey and banana well, the tangy lemon keeps it refreshing and from being cloying, and the peat and ginger add nice spicy notes. Very nice. More vanilla sweet than rich barley sweet which the classic Tokyo Banana is due to the main Scotch whisky component.
  • You can find organic bottled ginger juice at your local supermarket or health food store. I find it very convenient as I'm not always likely to have fresh ginger on hand.
  • The reason the peated Whisky is listed here as a "bitter" instead of a spirit is because you are in fact using it the same way as you would a cocktail bitter -- you are using it specifically to spice the drink as opposed to being one of its main components. You want just a float here to season the drink with a touch of smoky peat. Nothing more.
  • Alternatively to pouring a float, you can fill a small spritzer bottle with some whisky and do a spritz over the cocktail glass to finish it.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#875 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE TENNESSEE MAI TAI

Here's a clever and cheeky cross between a Whisky Sour and a classic Mai Tai cocktail I found online:


TENNESSEE MAI TAI

SPIRITS: 2 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: 1 part Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Triple Sec or other orange liqueur (I used my homemade Ariancello)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; .5 parts Lime
SWEETS: .5 Orgeat
BITTERS: None

Shake all ingredients together in a cocktail shaker with ice. Pour into a glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

Okay, this was pretty good. The Bourbon provides a nice little kick from the charred oak that elevates this quite a bit as well as a mellow sweet vanilla base. The tangy sour lemon-lime elevates it but then the almond sweetness kicks in on the finish. Fun little cocktail.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#876 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE AVIATION

Do you like the taste of soap in your cocktails? Did you actually enjoy chewing on Thrills gum as a kid? If so, this classic cocktail is the one for you:


AVIATION

SPIRITS: 2 parts Gin (I used pink colored Mistral Gin from France which affects the color)
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Maraschino or Kirsch; .25 parts Creme de Violette (if not using Violet syrup; see below)
FRUIT: .75 parts Lemon
SWEETS: .25 parts Violet syrup (if not using Creme de Violette liqueur; see above)
BITTERS: None

Shake all ingredients together in a cocktail shaker with ice. Pour into a glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

The mild violet flavor is unmistakable in this drink but actually very pleasant, as it is complimented well by the Kirsch's almond flavors and the Gin's botanicals. Interestingly, the botanicals, violet and dried almond flavors also soften the tart lemon quite a bit. It will definitely remind you of soap or Thrills gum. Either you enjoy that flavor or you don't. That should be the basis of your decision to make this cocktail.
  • For a less alcoholic cocktail, do as I did and use Violet syrup in place of Creme de Violette. You'll find many different flavored gourmet syrups from many different makers including Marie Brizzard, Torani, Monin and 1883 that will allow you to substitute in a syrup instead of an alcoholic liqueur and achieve the same results in your cocktails. My current library consists of Lychee, Passion Fruit, Violet, Strawberry, Raspberry and Peach non-alcoholic syrups and will expand over the holidays to include many other flavors
  • For less sugar and sweetness, use a dry Kirsch instead of Maraschino liqueur which is really just Kirsch sweetened with simple syrup
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#877 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE STABLE RESIDENT

Over on Wine Talk, I posted on the recent Toronto Wine Elitist Cabal (TM) birthday sojourn to Langdon Hall. TWEC (TM) and fellow board member Jay Shampur and I had a great cocktail called the Stable Resident from their in-house bar, Wilke's Bar. I have endeavored to recreate it here because I enjoyed it so much:


STABLE RESIDENT

SPIRITS: 1.5 parts Tequila; .5 parts Mezcal
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Bergamot liqueur (You can sub in Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec; I used my homemade Ariancello infused liqueur)
FRUIT: .75 parts Lemon; 1 part Pineapple; 2 slices Ginger root (You can use .25 parts organic bottled ginger juice as I did instead as well)
SWEETS: .25 parts Agave syrup (you can substitute in Ginger syrup if you have but should omit the fresh ginger root if you do
BITTERS: A few dashes Absinthe; 1/4 tsp Miso paste

Muddle the fresh ginger root slices in a shaker. Add the rest of the ingredients and shake together in a cocktail shaker with ice. Pour into a glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

This is a refreshing complex cocktail with lots going on here. The Tequila base is spiced up by the ginger and salt from the Miso; tropical flavor from the lime and pineapple; and umami flavor from the fermented soy and rice of the Miso and the Absinthe used to accent this. Great cocktail.
  • This is the first time I've endeavored to add umami flavor to a cocktail. It works but is not as potent as you might think. The amount of Miso used is very small as both the Miso itself and the added salt are strong flavors that could overwhelm the cocktail.
  • I used organic bottled ginger juice but you can use fresh ginger root slices or even ginger syrup. If using ginger syrup, make sure to omit the Agave so as not to overwhelm this with sweetness.
  • Go easy on the Absinthe with this one. It's meant to be used as a bitter here, just a few drops to add a little licorice accent.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#878 Post by TGigante »

Tran Bronstein wrote: November 15th, 2021, 8:41 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE TENNESSEE MAI TAI

Here's a clever and cheeky cross between a Whisky Sour and a classic Mai Tai cocktail I found online:


TENNESSEE MAI TAI

SPIRITS: 2 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: 1 part Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Triple Sec or other orange liqueur (I used my homemade Ariancello)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; .5 parts Lime
SWEETS: .5 Orgeat
BITTERS: None

Shake all ingredients together in a cocktail shaker with ice. Pour into a glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

Okay, this was pretty good. The Bourbon provides a nice little kick from the charred oak that elevates this quite a bit as well as a mellow sweet vanilla base. The tangy sour lemon-lime elevates it but then the almond sweetness kicks in on the finish. Fun little cocktail.


20211115_213437.jpg
Where's the Tennessee part?
Cheers,
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#879 Post by RichardFlack »

They don’t make Bourbon there?

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#880 Post by TGigante »

RichardFlack wrote: November 23rd, 2021, 3:46 pm They don’t make Bourbon there?
Tennesseans make bourbon but don't like to call it that. Most bottle them as Tennessee Whiskey (see Jack Daniels). To call it Tennessee Whiskey it has to be run through sugar maple charcoal (The Lincoln County process).

Tennesseans leave the bourbon making to the Kentuckians. So a more appropriate name would be Kentucky Mai Tai if using bourbon.

I'm going to make one regardless.
Cheers,
Tony

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#881 Post by Corey N. »

Michael Martin wrote: October 30th, 2021, 8:40 pm
Mike Cohen wrote: October 30th, 2021, 2:55 pm
Michael Martin wrote: October 29th, 2021, 5:19 pm Just got introduced into the world of Amaro. Love this one as a digestive.
Michael,

One more thing...the classic cocktail that uses Nonino is a Paper Plane

.75oz Bourbon
.75oz Nonino
.75oz Aperol
.75oz Fresh Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain and pour.
Made one of these tonight. Very orange, citrusy. Like a dreamsicle.
I strongly suggest using more bourbon or a higher proof bourbon in this cocktail, otherwise the bourbon gets washed out.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#882 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE IRON RANGER

Here's another popular Bourbon based Tiki style cocktail you can find online, more along the classic style that uses pineapple as a major component:

IRON RANGER

SPIRITS: 2 Bourbon
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: .75 parts Lemon; 1 part Pineapple
SWEETS: .5 parts Falernum (Substitute in Orgeat if you don't have Falernum)
BITTERS: A few dashes Angostura bitters

Add all ingredients and shake together in a cocktail shaker with ice. Pour into a glass over fresh ice. Enjoy.

The Bourbon and Falernum go great together, the smoky charred caramel and vanilla going extremely well with the spicy almond and creamy rum flavors of the Falernum. The lemony sweetness brings it all together and then the pineapple comes in on the finish. Nice little cocktail.
  • Falernum is a seemingly hard to get ingredient, a rum based syrup/liqueur flavored with almond, spices and lime. If you don't have any, just substitute in Orgeat which is the closest possible substitute.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#883 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE ANGEL EYES

Bourbon and grapefruit juice make for a shockingly good cocktail combination even though it doesn't appear so on paper. The most famous Bourbon and grapefruit cocktail is the Brown Derby. Here' san interesting variation I found called the Angel Eyes :


ANGEL EYE

SPIRITS: 2 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: 4 parts Grapefruit juice (Yes, 4 parts. Not 1 or 2 parts. A full 4 parts. See Notes below)
SWEETS: .5 parts Honey syrup (or .25 parts raw honey)
BITTERS: .5 part Amaro[/b]

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker. If using raw honey, stir first to dissolve before adding ice. If using honey syrup, feel free to shake immediately. Add ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a Collins style long glass. Enjoy.

Really interesting combination here. Sweet caramel and vanilla from the bourbon gives way to candied grapefruit and bitter spices from the Amaro. Harmonious cocktail with a bit of an edge thanks to the small amount of Amaro.

  • This recipe calls for 4 parts grapefruit juice. This is not a typo. I thought I had made a typo mistake copying the recipe, especially since the classic Brown Derby is a similar cocktail minus the Amaro and requires just 1 part of grapefruit juice. So I reduced the amount of grapefruit juice to just 1 part. This was a huge mistake. I added another part. Still doesn't work. You absolutely need the full 4 parts of grapefruit juice. The reason: the Amaro. When combined with the Bourbon, it makes a ridiculously intense spirit base. The full 4 parts of grapefruit are an absolute necessity in balancing out this cocktail. Trust me on this or find out for yourself as I did. This means a lot of volume and it's a rare cocktail that requires a full sized Collins glass for serving despite not requiring any soda or tonic water addition.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#884 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CLOISTER???

So I just made an awesome Gin cocktail which is called the Cloister per my cocktail spreadsheet, but when I Google it up I get a recipe for a completely different cocktail that also sounds really good that I should try! Did I mislabel a cocktail in my own database? [scratch.gif] Regardless, this is pretty awesome and I suggest you give it a try. Since I don't know if I have the correct name or not now, I rechristen in as the Cloister??? :


CLOISTER????

SPIRITS: 1.5 parts Gin
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec orange liqueur; .5 parts St-Germain or other Elderflower liqueur (omit if using Elderflower syrup)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; 1 part Passion fruit
SWEETS: .5 parts Elderflower syrup (Omit if using Elderflower liqueur)
BITTERS: .5 part Campari

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

This is a ridiculously refreshing and well-balanced tropical cocktail, made even more impressive by the fact that Gin isn't usually associated with tropical cocktails. The gin's botanicals enhance the tropical fruit flavors and there's quite the mix there with elderflower, orange, lemon and passionfruit flavors in a sweet tropical candy drop mix and the Campari botanicals kick in right at the end. It's not too sweet and not too tart. Probably my favorite Gin based cocktail to date. Really, really good.
  • I found some Elderflower syrup on my last visit to Montreal. The low or no ABV movement has led to many questionable non-alcoholic "spirits" being developed, but I feel that many other non-alcoholic ingredients which would lower a cocktail's alcoholic content are going overlooked. Syrups are a great option. Feel free to sub in Elderflower syrup in place of liqueur.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#885 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BOURBON CLOISTER???

So I was curious as to how my mystery cocktail from yesterday would taste if I subbed out the bright botanical gin for some American Bourbon. And since I'm still not sure about the exact name of the cocktail, I have dubbed it the Bourbon Cloister???:


BOURBON CLOISTER????

SPIRITS: 1.5 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec orange liqueur; .5 parts St-Germain or other Elderflower liqueur (omit if using Elderflower syrup)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; 1 part Passion fruit
SWEETS: .5 parts Elderflower syrup (Omit if using Elderflower liqueur)
BITTERS: None

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

So here's the deal. I mixed this from memory and forgot the Campari. Without it, the Bourbon took center stage and added some nice spice and vanilla to the mellow sweet tropical fruit flavors. When I took a sip and realized I forgot the Campari, I went back and added it and regretted it. Unlike with the Gin version, the Campari overwhelms the Bourbon and comes to the forefront. Still tasty, but too Campari forward. It is much better off with the formulation above without Campari.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#886 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CLAUSTRO???

Still on my mystery Cloister???? cocktail kick, I tried it again with Tequila and Mezcal this time, giving it a Mexican kick. So I gave it the Spanish translated name of Claustro.


CLAUSTRO???

SPIRITS: 1 part Tequila; 1 part Mezcal
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec orange liqueur; .5 parts St-Germain or other Elderflower liqueur (omit if using Elderflower syrup)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lime; 1 part Passion fruit
SWEETS: .5 parts Elderflower syrup (Omit if using Elderflower liqueur)
BITTERS: .5 Campari

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Easily as good as the original Gin version with a nice little kick of smoke and sea salt. Unlike the Bourbon version, the Campari works well with the base Tequila and Mezcal. Nice alternative to the Gin version.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#887 Post by RichardFlack »

Tran Bronstein wrote: December 4th, 2021, 5:33 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BOURBON CLOISTER???

So I was curious as to how my mystery cocktail from yesterday would taste if I subbed out the bright botanical gin for some American Bourbon. And since I'm still not sure about the exact name of the cocktail, I have dubbed it the Bourbon Cloister???:


BOURBON CLOISTER????

SPIRITS: 1.5 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec orange liqueur; .5 parts St-Germain or other Elderflower liqueur (omit if using Elderflower syrup)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; 1 part Passion fruit
SWEETS: .5 parts Elderflower syrup (Omit if using Elderflower liqueur)
BITTERS: None

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

So here's the deal. I mixed this from memory and forgot the Campari. Without it, the Bourbon took center stage and added some nice spice and vanilla to the mellow sweet tropical fruit flavors. When I took a sip and realized I forgot the Campari, I went back and added it and regretted it. Unlike with the Gin version, the Campari overwhelms the Bourbon and comes to the forefront. Still tasty, but too Campari forward. It is much better off with the formulation above without Campari.


20211204_201924.jpg
No idea how it would taste but a Benedictine Cloister would seem to be a name in search of a recipe ….

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#888 Post by Tran Bronstein »

RichardFlack wrote: December 7th, 2021, 1:35 pm
Tran Bronstein wrote: December 4th, 2021, 5:33 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE BOURBON CLOISTER???

So I was curious as to how my mystery cocktail from yesterday would taste if I subbed out the bright botanical gin for some American Bourbon. And since I'm still not sure about the exact name of the cocktail, I have dubbed it the Bourbon Cloister???:


BOURBON CLOISTER????

SPIRITS: 1.5 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec orange liqueur; .5 parts St-Germain or other Elderflower liqueur (omit if using Elderflower syrup)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; 1 part Passion fruit
SWEETS: .5 parts Elderflower syrup (Omit if using Elderflower liqueur)
BITTERS: None

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

So here's the deal. I mixed this from memory and forgot the Campari. Without it, the Bourbon took center stage and added some nice spice and vanilla to the mellow sweet tropical fruit flavors. When I took a sip and realized I forgot the Campari, I went back and added it and regretted it. Unlike with the Gin version, the Campari overwhelms the Bourbon and comes to the forefront. Still tasty, but too Campari forward. It is much better off with the formulation above without Campari.


20211204_201924.jpg
No idea how it would taste but a Benedictine Cloister would seem to be a name in search of a recipe ….
Good idea, Richard. I will try it today using Scotch as the base and replacing the Campari with Benedictine/Glayva/Drambruie which are interchangeable to me. Will post back.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#889 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE SCOTTISH CLOISTER???

As promised, I have done a Scottish version of the mystery Cloister??? cocktail using Scotch and Irish whisky as the base and Drambuie instead of Campari as the bitter:


SCOTTISH CLOISTER???

SPIRITS: 1.5 parts Scottish or Irish whisky
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec orange liqueur; .5 parts St-Germain or other Elderflower liqueur (omit if using Elderflower syrup)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; 1 part Passion fruit
SWEETS: .5 parts Elderflower syrup (Omit if using Elderflower liqueur)
BITTERS: .5 Benedictine, Drambruie or Glayva

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

As usual, I mixed peated Johnny Walker Scotch and sweeter Irish Bushmill's 16 in equal parts for the whisky component. The barley from the whisky is quite prominent on the nose. On the palate, quite a complex set of flavors: Peat, cocoa, sweet barley, spices, and smoke. This turned out really well. I suspect it would work with the Campari as well.


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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#890 Post by TGigante »

Tran Bronstein wrote: December 7th, 2021, 1:13 pm COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE CLAUSTRO???

Still on my mystery Cloister???? cocktail kick, I tried it again with Tequila and Mezcal this time, giving it a Mexican kick. So I gave it the Spanish translated name of Claustro.


CLAUSTRO???

SPIRITS: 1 part Tequila; 1 part Mezcal
LIQUEURS: .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau or Triple Sec orange liqueur; .5 parts St-Germain or other Elderflower liqueur (omit if using Elderflower syrup)
FRUIT: .5 parts Lime; 1 part Passion fruit
SWEETS: .5 parts Elderflower syrup (Omit if using Elderflower liqueur)
BITTERS: .5 Campari

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

Easily as good as the original Gin version with a nice little kick of smoke and sea salt. Unlike the Bourbon version, the Campari works well with the base Tequila and Mezcal. Nice alternative to the Gin version.


20211207_152959.jpg
Like the naming convention. Cocktail looks good on the glass and sounds like it worked from a taste perspective
Cheers,
Tony

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#891 Post by RichardFlack »

I have a number of questions about smoking cocktails. In the back of my mind is a fuzzy recollection of a Negroni with some smoked orange zest. I can’t recall exactly how they did it though , does any one have any suggestions? The result was good (in Fall at a Glamping site a while back).

Spelunking the interweb I stumbled across this recipe
https://www.liquor.com/recipes/rum-and-smoke/

I have no idea what the Tempus Fugit is really like. Notes on their web site suggest primary flavour of rhubarb with hints of orange. Any one familiar with this? Would Campari work?

With the other ingredients being rum and oloroso Sherry, I have no idea why they suggest it’s a winterised Negroni, or am I missing something.

Looks like this doesn’t need smoking equipment other than saucepan with lid and some sort of cloche. But I have been wondering about getting a smoking gun for other purposes. Any tips for the newbie in regard to smoking cocktails? (Eg unnecessary, see above ) or suggested makes (Breville makes one of course) and other recipe ideas?

What’s the over and under for how long before I’m getting liquid nitrogen? 😱

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#892 Post by Abbie S. »

RichardFlack wrote: December 11th, 2021, 3:00 pm I have a number of questions about smoking cocktails. In the back of my mind is a fuzzy recollection of a Negroni with some smoked orange zest. I can’t recall exactly how they did it though , does any one have any suggestions? The result was good (in Fall at a Glamping site a while back).

Spelunking the interweb I stumbled across this recipe
https://www.liquor.com/recipes/rum-and-smoke/

I have no idea what the Tempus Fugit is really like. Notes on their web site suggest primary flavour of rhubarb with hints of orange. Any one familiar with this? Would Campari work?

With the other ingredients being rum and oloroso Sherry, I have no idea why they suggest it’s a winterised Negroni, or am I missing something.

Looks like this doesn’t need smoking equipment other than saucepan with lid and some sort of cloche. But I have been wondering about getting a smoking gun for other purposes. Any tips for the newbie in regard to smoking cocktails? (Eg unnecessary, see above ) or suggested makes (Breville makes one of course) and other recipe ideas?

What’s the over and under for how long before I’m getting liquid nitrogen? 😱
I've never smoked a cocktail, but I often make Negronis with Mezcal instead of Gin. I love the smokiness of the Mezcal. You might want to give it a shot. Great combo!
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#893 Post by Rodrigo B »

RichardFlack wrote: December 11th, 2021, 3:00 pm I have a number of questions about smoking cocktails. In the back of my mind is a fuzzy recollection of a Negroni with some smoked orange zest. I can’t recall exactly how they did it though , does any one have any suggestions? The result was good (in Fall at a Glamping site a while back).

Spelunking the interweb I stumbled across this recipe
https://www.liquor.com/recipes/rum-and-smoke/

I have no idea what the Tempus Fugit is really like. Notes on their web site suggest primary flavour of rhubarb with hints of orange. Any one familiar with this? Would Campari work?
Tempus Fugit's Gran Classico is basically their version of Campari. Quite good and what I often use instead of Campari in most cocktails that call for it. So you're fine subbing in Campari for Gran Classico in this recipe. You may be losing some of the earthier notes that the Gran Classico brings, but you can probably compensate some of that with a dash or two of bitters.
With the other ingredients being rum and oloroso Sherry, I have no idea why they suggest it’s a winterised Negroni, or am I missing something.
It's a bit of a stretch IMO, but I see where they got there. The Gran Classico subs in for Campari, the sherry for sweet vermouth (think two highly aromatic fortified wines) and the aged rum for gin. Calling it a Negroni variant a bit of a stretch. Negroni and Negroni variants, to me, are for the most part roughly all equal parts in those three components (gin or other distillate, Campari or substitute, and vermouth/aromatised fortified wine), but this one is vastly different in terms of ratios which doesn't make it a Negroni variant in my books, even if it may be Negroni inspired.
Looks like this doesn’t need smoking equipment other than saucepan with lid and some sort of cloche. But I have been wondering about getting a smoking gun for other purposes. Any tips for the newbie in regard to smoking cocktails? (Eg unnecessary, see above ) or suggested makes (Breville makes one of course) and other recipe ideas?
If you're just looking to smoke cocktails, then you can just burn the wood chips, spices, etc. over a fire safe place, and flip a rocks glass over to capture the smoke.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#894 Post by RichardFlack »

Rodrigo B wrote: December 12th, 2021, 7:30 am
RichardFlack wrote: December 11th, 2021, 3:00 pm I have a number of questions about smoking cocktails. In the back of my mind is a fuzzy recollection of a Negroni with some smoked orange zest. I can’t recall exactly how they did it though , does any one have any suggestions? The result was good (in Fall at a Glamping site a while back).

Spelunking the interweb I stumbled across this recipe
https://www.liquor.com/recipes/rum-and-smoke/

I have no idea what the Tempus Fugit is really like. Notes on their web site suggest primary flavour of rhubarb with hints of orange. Any one familiar with this? Would Campari work?
Tempus Fugit's Gran Classico is basically their version of Campari. Quite good and what I often use instead of Campari in most cocktails that call for it. So you're fine subbing in Campari for Gran Classico in this recipe. You may be losing some of the earthier notes that the Gran Classico brings, but you can probably compensate some of that with a dash or two of bitters.
With the other ingredients being rum and oloroso Sherry, I have no idea why they suggest it’s a winterised Negroni, or am I missing something.
It's a bit of a stretch IMO, but I see where they got there. The Gran Classico subs in for Campari, the sherry for sweet vermouth (think two highly aromatic fortified wines) and the aged rum for gin. Calling it a Negroni variant a bit of a stretch. Negroni and Negroni variants, to me, are for the most part roughly all equal parts in those three components (gin or other distillate, Campari or substitute, and vermouth/aromatised fortified wine), but this one is vastly different in terms of ratios which doesn't make it a Negroni variant in my books, even if it may be Negroni inspired.
Looks like this doesn’t need smoking equipment other than saucepan with lid and some sort of cloche. But I have been wondering about getting a smoking gun for other purposes. Any tips for the newbie in regard to smoking cocktails? (Eg unnecessary, see above ) or suggested makes (Breville makes one of course) and other recipe ideas?
If you're just looking to smoke cocktails, then you can just burn the wood chips, spices, etc. over a fire safe place, and flip a rocks glass over to capture the smoke.
Many thanks!

So the stated rhubarb element in the TFGC is not so dominant? To me the essential core of Campari is bitter orange.

I think I’ll use Campari. I’m new to cocktails (other than Martini) and not sure I want to go crazy with adding a gazillion odd bottles of things I may not use much. My liquor cabinet is full already (mostly malts, gins, grappas, cognac, some rum and a few things for Negroni and variants I’ve been messing with lately).

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#895 Post by Rodrigo B »

RichardFlack wrote: December 12th, 2021, 9:09 am Many thanks!

So the stated rhubarb element in the TFGC is not so dominant? To me the essential core of Campari is bitter orange.

I think I’ll use Campari. I’m new to cocktails (other than Martini) and not sure I want to go crazy with adding a gazillion odd bottles of things I may not use much. My liquor cabinet is full already (mostly malts, gins, grappas, cognac, some rum and a few things for Negroni and variants I’ve been messing with lately).
Both are acceptable substitutes of one another in most cocktails that call for either in my book though each will change a cocktail slightly.

Side by side one will notice the Gran Classico's more herbaceous profile, though there's certainly still some of the citrus, orange peel and gentian notes one finds in Campari. Campari will be a bit more citrus driven and brighter by comparison.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#896 Post by RichardFlack »

Rodrigo B wrote: December 12th, 2021, 4:41 pm
RichardFlack wrote: December 12th, 2021, 9:09 am Many thanks!

So the stated rhubarb element in the TFGC is not so dominant? To me the essential core of Campari is bitter orange.

I think I’ll use Campari. I’m new to cocktails (other than Martini) and not sure I want to go crazy with adding a gazillion odd bottles of things I may not use much. My liquor cabinet is full already (mostly malts, gins, grappas, cognac, some rum and a few things for Negroni and variants I’ve been messing with lately).
Both are acceptable substitutes of one another in most cocktails that call for either in my book though each will change a cocktail slightly.

Side by side one will notice the Gran Classico's more herbaceous profile, though there's certainly still some of the citrus, orange peel and gentian notes one finds in Campari. Campari will be a bit more citrus driven and brighter by comparison.


Oops , I meant to say ….
To me the essential core of Negroni is bitter orange.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#897 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: THE REALLY MAD HATTER

I've moved on from my mystery Cloister??? cocktail set to try something new. I recent acquired a large set of bitters and decided to try a number of them to jazz up an already intriguing cocktail:


THE REALLY MAD HATTER

SPIRITS: 2 parts Bourbon
LIQUEURS: None
FRUIT: .5 parts Lemon; .5 parts Lime
SWEETS: .5 parts Simple syrup
BITTERS: 1 tsp Absinthe; a few dashes Angostura bitters (mandatory for original Mad Hatter); a few dashes Cherry bitters; a few dashes Orange bitters; a few dashes Cardamom bitters

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

The original Mad Hatter cocktail only calls for Absinthe and classic Angostura bitters which make for an interesting drink it and of itself. I jazzed it up with some fruit bitters and then added more spice with the Cardamom bitters. This makes for an interesting contrast between the sharp Bourbon oak and "turpentine" accents and the spicy Cardamom and licorice flavors vs the tangy lemon-lime flavors which are accented by the Cherry and Orange. However, I could see this might be too strong of a contrast for some drinkers.

Interestingly, I thought that if the lemon and lime juices were removed along with the orange and cherry bitters to completely remove the fruit flavor components, this would make for a very interesting Ancenstral style booze-only stirred cocktail. I may try that.

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#898 Post by RichardFlack »

There seems to be a dire shortage of red vermouth at the KGBO aside from Martini and Cinzano. No Dolin, Starlino, or Carpano.
There is this
Cucielo Vermouth di Torino Rosso

I’m looking for anything a step up from Martini for Negroni (and variants). Would this serve?

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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#899 Post by Tran Bronstein »

RichardFlack wrote: December 19th, 2021, 10:11 am There seems to be a dire shortage of red vermouth at the KGBO aside from Martini and Cinzano. No Dolin, Starlino, or Carpano.
There is this
Cucielo Vermouth di Torino Rosso

I’m looking for anything a step up from Martini for Negroni (and variants). Would this serve?
Yes. Vermouth di Torino Rosso is the only protected regional appellation for Vermouth in Italy and only one of two such protected appellations for Vermouth in the entire world (The other being Vermouth de Chambéry in France). If it says Vermouth di Torino on it you can pretty much expect it to be of a very high quality.

P.S. I personally would advise staying away from both Martini and Cinzano if you can unless there is just absolutely no other quality product you can get a hold of. If you're really hard up for Vermouth, go to the Eataly in the Manulife Centre in midtown Toronto and find some.
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Re: The Cocktail Thread

#900 Post by Tran Bronstein »

COCKTAIL CHRONICLES: CANADIAN TROPIC -- AN ORIGINAL COCKTAIL

Happy 2022, cocktail imbibers! [cheers.gif] I'm opening this year up with an original cocktail. The inside joke of the cocktail's name is that I'm in Toronto, the warmest city in Canada where it's currently -20 degrees Celsius with the wind chill as the entire country is stuck in the middle of a cold snap. Trust me, it's a lot worse elsewhere. Since I can't travel anywhere tropical, I made up an original tropical cocktail to take me away:


CANADIAN TROPIC

SPIRITS: 1.5 parts Gin
LIQUEURS: .5 Chartreuse; .5 parts St-Germain (if not using Elderflower syrup); .5 parts Grand Marnier, Cointreau, Triple Sec or other orange liqueur
FRUIT: 1 part Lemon; .5 parts Orange
SWEETS: 1 tsp Pineapple preserves; .5 Elderflower syrup (if not using St-Germain)
BITTERS: 1 part Plum Bitters


Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour over fresh ice into a glass. Enjoy.

This turned out to be quite nice, if a little on the sweet side. The Gin and Chartreuse bring a nice herbal content which is then balanced out by the candied pineapple, floral elderflower, tart lemon and fruity plum flavors. Really, any fruit flavored bitters would do well in this -- orange, plum, cherry, rhubarb, blueberry. Whatever tickles your fancy. This would probably also work nicely with Tequila or Rum as a base.

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Last edited by Tran Bronstein on January 15th, 2022, 7:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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