Winery Tasting Room dilemma

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Jon Hesford
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 4:20 am
Location: Roussillon, France

Winery Tasting Room dilemma

#1 Post by Jon Hesford »

At the moment, I'm between vintages on a number of wines. The previous vintage has all but run out and the new one was only bottled within a few weeks, therefore the new wines are all suffering from bottle-shock. This can last up to 2 months with the red wines.

I can tell that people are just not "getting" the new bottlings. So should I offer tasting of the previous vintage with the proviso that they would be buying the current one?

I know the ideal would be to offer tastings of both vintages but that's too many open bottles for me given the frequency of visits at the moment.

Anyone know of a winery that has a good solution to this?
In the wrong part of France

Richard Leland
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Joined: August 14th, 2009, 2:20 pm
Location: San Francisco

Winery Tasting Room dilemma

#2 Post by Richard Leland »

If the new wine isn't showing well then don't show it. Anyone taking the time to visit your winery probably has enough knowledge/sophistication about wine to understand the concept of bottle shock. If you want to be a good host you can always pull a barrel sample of the most recent vintage.
Richard

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P. Willenberg
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Winery Tasting Room dilemma

#3 Post by P. Willenberg »

How would the recently bottled wine show with a day of air?
Paul (@pwillen1 on CT, Twitter, Instagram)
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Corey N.
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Winery Tasting Room dilemma

#4 Post by Corey N. »

I wouldn't offer a sample from a shocked bottle. You can explain the issue to guests and I think most will understand. If the previous vintage is similar/different to the current one, I'd make that clear (e.g., "though stylistically similar, this wine is a bit higher in acidity than our current offering, while the current offering has a bit more concentration").
I'm with Corey on this. - Todd W.

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Jon Hesford
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Location: Roussillon, France

Winery Tasting Room dilemma

#5 Post by Jon Hesford »

Thanks everyone. That's what I've been doing and because people can see consistency between previous vintages they have all been happy to buy the new vintages.
In the wrong part of France

Andrew Kaufman
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Winery Tasting Room dilemma

#6 Post by Andrew Kaufman »

I am sure your friend Ray has some ideas. :)

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Mel Hill
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Winery Tasting Room dilemma

#7 Post by Mel Hill »

Exactly, WWRWD?

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