Geriatric Cellar Planning

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
Message
Author
User avatar
Glenn L e v i n e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 20246
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 6:16 pm
Location: Coos Bay, OR
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Geriatric Cellar Planning

#1 Post by Glenn L e v i n e »

So, as I approach decade seven of life I’m clearly in possession of enough wine for 15-20 years. As I’m semi-retired, secondary to our nation's top-tier pandemic management, my wine purchasing is decelerating like a space capsule with the three parachutes deployed.

Will I still really like wine in my 70s? 80s? Will I even be around if enjoyment doesn’t wane? Clearly spending retirement dollars on travel isn’t going to tap me dry. Might have to get a boat to deplete my son’s inheritance if wine buying trickles to a halt.

Election Day thoughts of mortality, and it’s not even a white wine lunch kind of day.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

User avatar
D@vid Bu3ker
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 39149
Joined: February 14th, 2009, 8:06 am
Location: Connecticut
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 128 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#2 Post by D@vid Bu3ker »

My dad is in his late 70s, and still buying, and enjoying wine.

My wine budget will largely disappear when my wife (probably) retires in a year or two. That's OK, as I have enough to get my to my late 70s, and will likely inherit a decent sized chunk of my parents' holdings.
David Bueker - Rieslingfan

User avatar
Stephen Faulkner
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 443
Joined: September 6th, 2010, 8:30 am
Location: WV Panhandle
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#3 Post by Stephen Faulkner »

So, you will limit the purchase of your Bedrock winter allocation to just 2 cases now? champagne.gif

I hear you, Doc. First, no more Bordeaux or Barolo and now . . . everything as Father Time combines with Lovely Wife no longer enjoying more than a glass with dinner. My Bedrock comment was only partially facetious; I will have to (meaning "should") do a serious assessment of my allocation. Unless things go south today . . .

User avatar
J D o v e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 463
Joined: July 4th, 2012, 3:12 pm
Location: NYC
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#4 Post by J D o v e »

Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
J i m (Bordeauxnut)

Brian_K
Posts: 16
Joined: October 1st, 2020, 5:22 am
Has thanked: 1 time

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#5 Post by Brian_K »

J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
[popcorn.gif]
K @ y

User avatar
John J
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 280
Joined: November 19th, 2015, 5:02 am
Location: Tampa Bay

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#6 Post by John J »

J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
Awesome question [popcorn.gif]
J. Johnson

Ron Erickson
Posts: 6457
Joined: April 26th, 2010, 4:18 pm
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#7 Post by Ron Erickson »

According to a certain country attorney's father, one's taste buds get shot as age increases. I'd start buying more shiraz.

[cheers.gif]
"Think of how stupid the average person is, and realise half of them are stupider than that." George Carlin (1937-2008)

User avatar
John Danza
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1542
Joined: December 4th, 2009, 12:23 pm
Location: Chicagoland
Has thanked: 2 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#8 Post by John Danza »

Glenn, I'm about to turn 61 and about 5-6 years ago I thought about the same issue. I love port, but to me it needs to be at least 25 years old to start to be pleasurable to drink, so I stopped buying new vintages of port. Fortunately, you can buy well cellared port from the 1970s/1980s for about the same price as current vintages.

I haven't slowed down purchasing wines I'll drink over the next 10 years however. I do want that experience of opening a well-aged bottle when I'm in my 70s. But I'm not buying any table wines that reports indicate that they need 15-20 years of age. I figure I'll buy those at that time should I want them.

So I would recommend against shutting down purchases but instead tailor what you buy more towards near term drinking. That might be more auction purchases of wine with age already.
John Danza

User avatar
Stephen Faulkner
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 443
Joined: September 6th, 2010, 8:30 am
Location: WV Panhandle
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#9 Post by Stephen Faulkner »

J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
Like Graham Nash, I am a simple man, so: go for quality over quantity. Although it is easy to get sucked into "deals", I've had more "meh" moments than "best qpr evah". I really wish I would have followed that advice when I was 40 and bought more high quality, long-lived wines like Bordeaux, Barolo, etc. to lay down. I am enjoying drinking twice as well (or more) half as often now.
Last edited by Stephen Faulkner on November 3rd, 2020, 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
François Audouze
Posts: 1289
Joined: July 26th, 2010, 2:49 am
Location: near Paris (picture : Tokay 1819 not Hungarian drunk in May 2010)

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#10 Post by François Audouze »

I buy wine since 1970. My rate of buying has never been lower but always higher.
I would consider absolutely depressing to take my death into consideration.

Of course I do not buy the same wines as before, but I continue to increase my cellar.

I have put my new buys, since 20 years in a company which is 75% owned by my children. And there is no better investment than to buy wine. The prices of certain wines have so grown up that my cellar has a value which increases every day even after all what I drink. I think it is one of the greatest assets that I will give to my children when I die.

The fact to think that I do not buy with a limit of time is very refreshing. The domains that are highly represented in my cellar are Romanée Conti, Champagne Salon, Champagne Krug and Vega Sicilia Unico. My children with congratulate me post mortem.
Kind regards

François Audouze

ITB for # 150 bottles a year, sold through dinners

Jim Hanlon
Posts: 86
Joined: February 5th, 2015, 3:33 pm
Location: Oakland, CA
Been thanked: 8 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#11 Post by Jim Hanlon »

I'm 44, so still at the planning stage, I guess, although I have about a 30 year cellar at present rate of consumption. I've been seriously into wine for about 15 years now. I've been through the palate twists and turns and now think of myself has having pretty settled tastes in wine. My cellar strategy is depth in certain wines, rather than overall breadth. I hope to follow these wines over decades and get to know them, and use them to reflect on my own time. This also helps a bit with purchasing discipline, though not as much as I might hope.

User avatar
Glenn L e v i n e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 20246
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 6:16 pm
Location: Coos Bay, OR
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#12 Post by Glenn L e v i n e »

J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
Well, if you have a shitton of domestic Pinot and > 100 bottles of Burgundy don’t marry a woman who discovers she dislikes PN.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

User avatar
Brian Lynch
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1237
Joined: April 29th, 2010, 8:36 am
Location: Philly

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#13 Post by Brian Lynch »

J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
Buy less quantity and more quality

Don't go deep on blind purchases you haven't tasted , e.g., based off of Expert scores or Parker/Berserker board posts

When you find something really dialed into your tastes, go long (1) if generally available (+) or (2) seek out in auctions or reputable dealers

Avoid fancy sounding Brunello and Barolo new releases and buy older vintages instead

Buy and drink Burgundy in France only (this keeps me sane and disciplined)
The Waterboys

User avatar
AndrewH
Posts: 2981
Joined: May 14th, 2010, 1:34 pm
Has thanked: 8 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#14 Post by AndrewH »

François Audouze wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 11:52 am
I would consider absolutely depressing to take my death into consideration.
I think that is a given for all of us!
Andrew H e i m e r t

Michael S. Monie
Posts: 4437
Joined: May 14th, 2013, 7:36 am
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 7 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#15 Post by Michael S. Monie »

Act 4 Scene 3 for me is red Burgundy. It was my greatest frustration sending me to Piemonte but is now a snug harbor. No, I will never know the joy of a 30+ year old Corton, but thanks to global warming I'm finding plenty of relatively inexpensive Burgs that are a pleasure to drink.
Hubris Gravitas

In the myriad of involvements in living, there are two primary obligations: to know one's self and to be kind. And the more one engages in one , the more the other becomes apparent.

User avatar
John O'
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 948
Joined: October 30th, 2011, 4:24 am
Location: Skaneateles, NY
Has thanked: 3 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#16 Post by John O' »

I'm in the home stretch of work and am buying a lot. My rationale is that I wont have to buy when I'm retired,
O Sullivan

User avatar
David Baum
Posts: 1621
Joined: August 24th, 2017, 5:26 pm
Location: Carlsbad CA
Has thanked: 7 times
Been thanked: 9 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#17 Post by David Baum »

My father barely sick a day in his life contracted cancer at 68 and died 6 months later. In my mind once I get there its all borrowed time. Thats 11 years away for me. Whatever is ready to drink, any day of the week it will be open season on anything and everything. You can get struck down by something out of left field at anytime and once you hit whatever number it is you have in your mind I say have at it. With auctions and online buying if I want something i dont have or run low Ill deal with buying more then

R. Frankel
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1986
Joined: January 24th, 2014, 11:07 pm
Has thanked: 7 times
Been thanked: 7 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#18 Post by R. Frankel »

I’m 57 and I’m struggling a bit. 2013 was going to be my last big Barolo vintage, but then came 2016. So my cellar grows. Ideally I’d like to be slowing down but I’m not going to agonize about it. My plan, like David B’s is to relentlessly drink the good stuff whenever I feel like it. And to try to buy more wine that is ready to drink now, or at least a lot sooner than current releases. With prices going nuts that often means lower than current release $$.

Yep all good. Hmm, starting to hear good things about 2019 Burgundy.
Rich Frankel

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 22186
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.
Has thanked: 15 times
Been thanked: 25 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#19 Post by Alan Rath »

J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
Buy more and better burgundy. Buy less middle tier wine, instead focus on whatever your best is, along with nice daily drinkers.
I'm just one lost soul, swimming in a fish bowl, year after year

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 24718
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida
Has thanked: 22 times
Been thanked: 44 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#20 Post by Robert.A.Jr. »

John J wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 11:00 am
J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
Awesome question [popcorn.gif]
1. Buy way more 375s.

2. Buy way more classic, everyday wines that benefit from age, like Cru Bordeaux, Chianti, Village Burgs, etc.

My parents at 80 still drink wine every night, just as I recall them doing back when I was a child, and like I do as well. Great to have these classic wines with meals on a regular basis. I value them as much as I value the super premium, special occasion wines.
“Dammit Brian, until you tuited this diatribe, I was haiku aging my sh*t.“
(Country Squire, circa 2020)

User avatar
Richard T r i m p i
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16430
Joined: September 11th, 2009, 1:29 pm
Location: Within walking distance of William Penn's Walking Purchase
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#21 Post by Richard T r i m p i »

Glenn L e v i n e wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 12:29 pm
J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
Well, if you have a shitton of domestic Pinot and > 100 bottles of Burgundy don’t marry a woman who discovers she dislikes PN.
Gut punch. OUCH!

RT

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 24718
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida
Has thanked: 22 times
Been thanked: 44 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#22 Post by Robert.A.Jr. »

And you know damn well Big Doc goes out swinging hard. He knows no other way.
“Dammit Brian, until you tuited this diatribe, I was haiku aging my sh*t.“
(Country Squire, circa 2020)

User avatar
dave kammerer
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 342
Joined: November 19th, 2009, 12:36 pm
Location: Geneva IL, Phoenix AZ
Has thanked: 1 time

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#23 Post by dave kammerer »

I am 74 and still buy lots of Dehlinger, Scherrer, Quivet, Myriad etc. My kids can drink whatever is left.

User avatar
Chris Seiber
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 9704
Joined: April 28th, 2010, 3:22 pm
Location: Newport Beach, CA
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 29 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#24 Post by Chris Seiber »

If we are honest with ourselves, discovering and obtaining wines to add to our collections is part of the overall fun and experience. Sure, we do that with the goal of eventually drinking the wines, but those pre-drinking stages actually have their own enjoyment and satisfaction, too.

Put another way, if I died tomorrow, I don't think all the wine that I hadn't drunk yet was a waste or a big mistake -- I enjoyed everything about the hobby, and I'm glad I've participated in it.

Sure, I'm not going to buy new releases of vintage port and Barolo when I'm 75, but for the most part, I'm not going to stress about somehow needing to time my life and my wine collection so they come to an end at the same time. Whatever will be, will be, and the surviving members of my family can have what is left, or they can sell them, or make Sangria, and whatever happens won't be any issue for me at that point.

User avatar
Glenn L e v i n e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 20246
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 6:16 pm
Location: Coos Bay, OR
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#25 Post by Glenn L e v i n e »

Robert.A.Jr. wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 3:07 pm
My parents at 80 still drink wine every night, just as I recall them doing back when I was a child, and like I do as well. Great to have these classic wines with meals on a regular basis. I value them as much as I value the super premium, special occasion wines.
Good genes! I guess maybe that’s 👖 in 2020 land.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

User avatar
D@vid Bu3ker
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 39149
Joined: February 14th, 2009, 8:06 am
Location: Connecticut
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 128 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#26 Post by D@vid Bu3ker »

Anybody want to be a beneficiary in my will? Laura and I have no kids, nieces or nephews.
David Bueker - Rieslingfan

User avatar
Rodrigo B
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 745
Joined: June 9th, 2020, 11:21 pm
Location: New York
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 25 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#27 Post by Rodrigo B »

D@vid Bu3ker wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 3:58 pm Anybody want to be a beneficiary in my will? Laura and I have no kids, nieces or nephews.
Is it like a first come first serve thing? [drinkers.gif]
B r a g a

User avatar
Glenn L e v i n e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 20246
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 6:16 pm
Location: Coos Bay, OR
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#28 Post by Glenn L e v i n e »

Send some 01 Riesling before I croak.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

D@ve D y r 0 f f
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1790
Joined: May 14th, 2016, 9:22 am
Location: St. Louis, MO
Has thanked: 62 times
Been thanked: 24 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#29 Post by D@ve D y r 0 f f »

D@vid Bu3ker wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 3:58 pm Anybody want to be a beneficiary in my will? Laura and I have no kids, nieces or nephews.
I'm too old so I'll have to take myself out of consideration, but I volunteer Dr. Stotter, a/k/a RieslingFan Jr.

DanielP
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 908
Joined: October 5th, 2015, 7:21 pm
Location: NYC
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 5 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#30 Post by DanielP »

D@vid Bu3ker wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 3:58 pm Anybody want to be a beneficiary in my will? Laura and I have no kids, nieces or nephews.
Put my name into the hat for the Bueker cellar lottery
P@ik

User avatar
Patrick T a y l o r
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 356
Joined: January 27th, 2019, 6:59 am
Location: Indiana
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 65 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#31 Post by Patrick T a y l o r »

D@vid Bu3ker wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 3:58 pm Anybody want to be a beneficiary in my will? Laura and I have no kids, nieces or nephews.
PM sent. :)
The enemy of the good is the prefect.

User avatar
J D o v e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 463
Joined: July 4th, 2012, 3:12 pm
Location: NYC
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#32 Post by J D o v e »

Michael S. Monie wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 1:57 pm Act 4 Scene 3 for me is red Burgundy. It was my greatest frustration sending me to Piemonte but is now a snug harbor. No, I will never know the joy of a 30+ year old Corton, but thanks to global warming I'm finding plenty of relatively inexpensive Burgs that are a pleasure to drink.
I had enough exposure to Burgundy in the early 1990s to learn that I’d never have enough money or patience to focus on Burgundy. I remember drinking 1985s, 1989s, 1990s, 1991s, and 1993s from top producers (typically courtesy of friends at tastings). Then, the Grand Cru wines weren’t impossibly expensive. I bought 1991 la Tache for something like $275 and debated whether it was worth it at the time. I just never found my groove there. When they were great, they were certainly great. But there was so much meh in between the toe curling moments. So quickly, a gravitated toward Bordeaux.

In our new home, I built my cellar to hold ‘normal’ sized Burgundy bottles or Bordeaux bottles. I did this by design to preclude me from even considering going to the dark side. Prices have gotten so insane — I can’t imagine paying $250 for a wine I remember being $40, especially when there’s so much great wine made from so many different places that haven’t seen all the speculation or Asia-driven price pressure. I’ve gotten into Piedmont in the past few years. Fortunately, they have the good sense of not using those asinine big bottles. And, prices for the best wines are still sane. I’ve loaded up there anticipating that that too will pass sooner rather than later.
J i m (Bordeauxnut)

Barry L i p t o n
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 3503
Joined: November 8th, 2009, 8:59 pm
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#33 Post by Barry L i p t o n »

The medical guidelines for us geriatrics, tend to have gone down from 2x day to 1x day (depending on cormorbidities).

It varies a lot between individuals. But the rate of consumption change drive my purchasing changes. . .

User avatar
lleichtman
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1725
Joined: June 28th, 2014, 6:28 pm
Location: Santa Fe NM
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#34 Post by lleichtman »

Glenn L e v i n e wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 9:30 am So, as I approach decade seven of life I’m clearly in possession of enough wine for 15-20 years. As I’m semi-retired, secondary to our nation's top-tier pandemic management, my wine purchasing is decelerating like a space capsule with the three parachutes deployed.

Will I still really like wine in my 70s? 80s? Will I even be around if enjoyment doesn’t wane? Clearly spending retirement dollars on travel isn’t going to tap me dry. Might have to get a boat to deplete my son’s inheritance if wine buying trickles to a halt.

Election Day thoughts of mortality, and it’s not even a white wine lunch kind of day.
I am well into my 7th decade. I have a lot of wine still in the cellar. I still buy daily drinkers but no long-term keepers. This issue comes up frequently here and I've never seen a definitive answer. I;m still enjoying my keepers and don't expect that to change unless my health declines. Wine is still my drug of choice.
Lawrence G. Leichtman

Mike S.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 397
Joined: January 23rd, 2010, 10:03 pm

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#35 Post by Mike S. »

I just turned 82. I am drinking fewer bottles per week. With coved, no wine groups, no restaurants, and no dinner groups. I am drinking more of the very good wines and much less of the everyday stuff. I still have way to many bottles in an offsite storage facility. I have sold some, and donated some to charity. Still too much wine. Don't buy mediocre wine and store it. Don't be so careful with the good stuff. You bought it for your pleasure so drink it. It sure has been, and still is fun!
Michael Silverman

User avatar
Chris Seiber
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 9704
Joined: April 28th, 2010, 3:22 pm
Location: Newport Beach, CA
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 29 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#36 Post by Chris Seiber »

Mike S. wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 9:48 pm I just turned 82. I am drinking fewer bottles per week. With coved, no wine groups, no restaurants, and no dinner groups. I am drinking more of the very good wines and much less of the everyday stuff. I still have way to many bottles in an offsite storage facility. I have sold some, and donated some to charity. Still too much wine. Don't buy mediocre wine and store it. Don't be so careful with the good stuff. You bought it for your pleasure so drink it. It sure has been, and still is fun!
Listen to the man. Great wisdom.

Trevor Looney
Posts: 38
Joined: March 13th, 2015, 8:02 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#37 Post by Trevor Looney »

My maternal grandmother's cousin, who I was very close to and taught me a lot about wine, was still visiting wineries and buying wine just months before he passed at age 88. He's my inspiration.

Paul @bbott
Posts: 167
Joined: May 25th, 2020, 8:57 am
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#38 Post by Paul @bbott »

John O' wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 2:05 pm I'm in the home stretch of work and am buying a lot. My rationale is that I wont have to buy when I'm retired,
Yep, buy it while I can afford it, and drink it at my leisure.

Dennis Borczon
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 822
Joined: January 28th, 2011, 2:46 pm
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 5 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#39 Post by Dennis Borczon »

David Baum wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 2:24 pm My father barely sick a day in his life contracted cancer at 68 and died 6 months later. In my mind once I get there its all borrowed time. Thats 11 years away for me. Whatever is ready to drink, any day of the week it will be open season on anything and everything. You can get struck down by something out of left field at anytime and once you hit whatever number it is you have in your mind I say have at it. With auctions and online buying if I want something i dont have or run low Ill deal with buying more then
Hate to say it, but it's ALL borrowed time. We Americans (type A folks on this board) all like to plan so much for the future. We only get the now. The world will not run out of great wine anytime soon. Beautiful morning here in the midwest. With the election madness (mostly) over, let's go down in the cellar and pull something nice. We all deserve it!

On impulse bought a Krug 164 at the grocery store yesterday. Living in Pennsylvania is like living in another universe. Bought it off the shelf for $174. It's why we are last in election vote counting. The horse and buggies are still delivering the last of the ballots today champagne.gif

User avatar
D@vid Bu3ker
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 39149
Joined: February 14th, 2009, 8:06 am
Location: Connecticut
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 128 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#40 Post by D@vid Bu3ker »

Paul @bbott wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 11:53 pm
John O' wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 2:05 pm I'm in the home stretch of work and am buying a lot. My rationale is that I wont have to buy when I'm retired,
Yep, buy it while I can afford it, and drink it at my leisure.
Pretty much the same as my plan. I have a little bit of “every day” wine, but generally bought “the good stuff” or wines that are “good stuff” without being acknowledged as such by the market (e.g. Edmunds St. John). I could and probably should stop now. Just buy some Champagne here and there to keep Laura happy.
David Bueker - Rieslingfan

User avatar
Robert Dentice
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2430
Joined: March 5th, 2009, 11:40 am
Has thanked: 45 times
Been thanked: 30 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#41 Post by Robert Dentice »

J Dove wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:40 am Rather than start a new thread, maybe this is a good place to ask — for those forced to seriously think about what they buy today — what would you tell your 40 or 50 year old self about your wine buying?
My mistake in wine collecting was how I allocated the overall money I spent. I would have spent the same amount of money which is a significant amount and bought less overall and more high end bottles (bottles over $500+).

I refinanced my mortgage several years ago and got an insane deal through Merrill Lynch and part of the deal was I had to go through a financial planning exercise and when we added up my spending and the rep saw my wine and food line he said ah uh ah uh I have never seen anything like that before : )

To add some color behind this I feel you can buy great everyday drinkers at any time especially if, like me. you love German riesling. My average daily drinker is probably more than it should be because I have so many wines to get through.
ITB - source | material

User avatar
Robert Dentice
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2430
Joined: March 5th, 2009, 11:40 am
Has thanked: 45 times
Been thanked: 30 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#42 Post by Robert Dentice »

Chris Seiber wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 10:13 pm
Mike S. wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 9:48 pm I just turned 82. I am drinking fewer bottles per week. With coved, no wine groups, no restaurants, and no dinner groups. I am drinking more of the very good wines and much less of the everyday stuff. I still have way to many bottles in an offsite storage facility. I have sold some, and donated some to charity. Still too much wine. Don't buy mediocre wine and store it. Don't be so careful with the good stuff. You bought it for your pleasure so drink it. It sure has been, and still is fun!
Listen to the man. Great wisdom.

Don't buy mediocre wine and store it. Yes one of my big mistakes because I don't have a doorman in NYC I buy a lot of fun wines or geeky wines that end up in storage and I forgot about them.
ITB - source | material

User avatar
J D o v e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 463
Joined: July 4th, 2012, 3:12 pm
Location: NYC
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#43 Post by J D o v e »

D@vid Bu3ker wrote: November 4th, 2020, 4:28 am
Paul @bbott wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 11:53 pm
John O' wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 2:05 pm I'm in the home stretch of work and am buying a lot. My rationale is that I wont have to buy when I'm retired,
Yep, buy it while I can afford it, and drink it at my leisure.
Pretty much the same as my plan. I have a little bit of “every day” wine, but generally bought “the good stuff” or wines that are “good stuff” without being acknowledged as such by the market (e.g. Edmunds St. John). I could and probably should stop now. Just buy some Champagne here and there to keep Laura happy.
We have a lot in common. By all rights I should be done buying. Similarly was pretty careful about what I bought, and now need to remain focused on keeping my wife’s Champagne addiction satisfied.
J i m (Bordeauxnut)

User avatar
Markus S
Posts: 7072
Joined: May 20th, 2010, 7:27 am
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 15 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#44 Post by Markus S »

Glenn L e v i n e wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 9:30 am So, as I approach decade seven of life I’m clearly in possession of enough wine for 15-20 years. As I’m semi-retired, secondary to our nation's top-tier pandemic management, my wine purchasing is decelerating like a space capsule with the three parachutes deployed.

Will I still really like wine in my 70s? 80s? Will I even be around if enjoyment doesn’t wane? Clearly spending retirement dollars on travel isn’t going to tap me dry. Might have to get a boat to deplete my son’s inheritance if wine buying trickles to a halt.

Election Day thoughts of mortality, and it’s not even a white wine lunch kind of day.
Always tough when we see our mortality in front of us. Instead of spending on things though, think about what a gift to someone's education might mean, or providing means to advance social causes you believe in dearly. Much better than consumptive activities like wine or food and you get the warm fuzzies from knowing you are helping advance people in a better direction.
$ _ € ® e . k @

User avatar
Glenn L e v i n e
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 20246
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 6:16 pm
Location: Coos Bay, OR
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#45 Post by Glenn L e v i n e »

Markus, that kind of elevated thinking is what America needs more of.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

User avatar
C. Mc Cart
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2127
Joined: December 22nd, 2009, 8:44 am
Location: Ontario
Been thanked: 2 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#46 Post by C. Mc Cart »

When I 1st saw the thread title, I thought you were going to say something about accessing your cellar when you're too old.

I have 2 cellars, one is passive deep in my 'finished' crawlspace. I'm 50 and in shape and hate crawling in there now to deposit or occasionally grab something to move into my active basement cellar.
Loathe to think how I'll get in & out of there over the coming decades if my knees or back ever go.

Good advice from several here. Trying to follow much of it. Buy now, so I can stop/ severly curtail buying once into retirement (if I retire).
Chris

Paul @bbott
Posts: 167
Joined: May 25th, 2020, 8:57 am
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#47 Post by Paul @bbott »

J Dove wrote: November 4th, 2020, 5:12 am
D@vid Bu3ker wrote: November 4th, 2020, 4:28 am
Paul @bbott wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 11:53 pm
Yep, buy it while I can afford it, and drink it at my leisure.
Pretty much the same as my plan. I have a little bit of “every day” wine, but generally bought “the good stuff” or wines that are “good stuff” without being acknowledged as such by the market (e.g. Edmunds St. John). I could and probably should stop now. Just buy some Champagne here and there to keep Laura happy.
We have a lot in common. By all rights I should be done buying. Similarly was pretty careful about what I bought, and now need to remain focused on keeping my wife’s Champagne addiction satisfied.
Right now in the UK champagne is around 25% off its normal prices and I can stash plenty away for keeping a few years.

User avatar
Jay Miller
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 15452
Joined: June 19th, 2009, 5:18 pm
Location: Jersey City
Has thanked: 18 times
Been thanked: 46 times

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#48 Post by Jay Miller »

Chris Seiber wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 3:27 pm
Put another way, if I died tomorrow, I don't think all the wine that I hadn't drunk yet was a waste or a big mistake -- I enjoyed everything about the hobby, and I'm glad I've participated in it.
These are words of wisdom.

D@vid Bu3ker wrote: November 3rd, 2020, 3:58 pm Anybody want to be a beneficiary in my will? Laura and I have no kids, nieces or nephews.
If I didn't fully expect to predecease you...
Ripe fruit isn't necessarily a flaw.

User avatar
dsimmons
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 870
Joined: January 7th, 2017, 11:51 am
Location: Anchorage, AK and Rockport, TX
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#49 Post by dsimmons »

C. Mc Cart wrote: November 4th, 2020, 7:09 am When I 1st saw the thread title, I thought you were going to say something about accessing your cellar when you're too old.

I have 2 cellars, one is passive deep in my 'finished' crawlspace. I'm 50 and in shape and hate crawling in there now to deposit or occasionally grab something to move into my active basement cellar.
Loathe to think how I'll get in & out of there over the coming decades if my knees or back ever go.

Good advice from several here. Trying to follow much of it. Buy now, so I can stop/ severly curtail buying once into retirement (if I retire).
C.

As a 70 year-old with a passive crawlspace cellar you are right to be thinking ahead. I can tell you with certainty that trips to the crawl space do not get easier.
D o n

User avatar
dsimmons
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 870
Joined: January 7th, 2017, 11:51 am
Location: Anchorage, AK and Rockport, TX
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Geriatric Cellar Planning

#50 Post by dsimmons »

Glenn,

Much of what I have done is a repeat of what others have said.

First, I adopted the view that my cellar will be a legacy for my son. Although my buying has certainly slowed significantly I still buy wine. After all building a vibrant cellar is part of the fun.

Second, I focus on quality. No more daily drinker red wines, I have plenty of top quality red wine for the foreseeable future. I do buy some white wine quaffers for summer consumption.

Third, my overall % of white wine and champagne purchases has increased.

Finally, when my get'in old light blinked on my cellar size was at ~ 2800 bottles. I took a look at my consumption habits and decided that a cellar of 1700 - 2000 bottles can supply me with an ongoing supply of the aged wines that I prefer. I am actively working my cellar down to that size.
D o n

Post Reply

Return to “Wine Talk”