HaJo Becker - a pioneer for Dry Riesling in Germany

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Martin Zwick
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HaJo Becker - a pioneer for Dry Riesling in Germany

#1 Post by Martin Zwick » October 15th, 2020, 12:57 am

2018 J.B. Becker "Wallufer Walkenberg" Auslese trocken

HaJo Becker from the Rheingau region is together with Bernd Philippi and Bernhard Breuer one of the pioneers for Dry Riesling in Germany. His 1989 and 1990 "Wallufer Walkenberg“ Spätlese and Auslese trocken are/were outstanding and such unique at this time. I tasted these masterpieces in 2009 together with HaJo at his estate and they were unbelievable pure&razor-sharp and young. Truly an eye-opening experience.

This just released 2018 Auslese trocken should be on your shopping list. After the first sip it reminds rather on the famous white wines from the North-Rhone. Flavors of dried flowers, intense exotic fruit in the background, pure&fresh and with an impressive salty mineral finish. Good balance too and based on 70 years old vines, bio. Open a bottle now and the next in 10 years. Vinolok glass closure. Only (!) 28€.

94+/100

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„ When this is all over, nobody will admit to ever having supported it“

David Frum

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Martin Zwick
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Re: HaJo Becker - a pioneer for Dry Riesling in Germany

#2 Post by Martin Zwick » October 18th, 2020, 2:33 am

P.S.

Since Wednesday I had some leftover and it was still in great shape on Saturday. Very pure (!), dried flowers, nuts and salty minerality.
„ When this is all over, nobody will admit to ever having supported it“

David Frum

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Otto Forsberg
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Re: HaJo Becker - a pioneer for Dry Riesling in Germany

#3 Post by Otto Forsberg » October 18th, 2020, 2:56 am

I've had some very conflicting experiences with HaJo's wines. Some vintages can be thrilling, but some can be just heavily extracted, dull, devoid or fruit and playfulness and overtly ponderous with excessive levels of alcohol. I guess quite a lot of it has to do with his fermentations that are often carried at very high temperatures, IIRC. All in all, he seems like a mad scientist, not giving a single flip about trends or tastes - just making the wines he wants to make. Although I appreciate his approach, I don't always appreciate the results.

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