Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

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Robert Sand
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#101 Post by Robert Sand » August 1st, 2020, 11:03 am

Chris Seiber wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 9:28 am
For me, the solution (albeit a difficult one) is drinking Riesling with 15+ years of age. All young Riesling tastes too sweet to me, and too similar to each other. A tasty grape beverage, but not, to me, enough of a wine experience.

You want bones, mineral, slate, maybe earth, with a modest layer of tart fruit on it, you need to wait until the Riesling gets older. That’s where the balance and the magic is, for my palate.
That all young Rieslings taste sweet and too similar is simply not true -
Aged R. is fine, but young R. too

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D@vid Bu3ker
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#102 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » August 1st, 2020, 11:07 am

Robert Sand wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 11:03 am
Chris Seiber wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 9:28 am
For me, the solution (albeit a difficult one) is drinking Riesling with 15+ years of age. All young Riesling tastes too sweet to me, and too similar to each other. A tasty grape beverage, but not, to me, enough of a wine experience.

You want bones, mineral, slate, maybe earth, with a modest layer of tart fruit on it, you need to wait until the Riesling gets older. That’s where the balance and the magic is, for my palate.
That all young Rieslings taste sweet and too similar is simply not true -
Aged R. is fine, but young R. too
He said it too similar to him.
David Bueker - Rieslingfan

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Marc Hauser
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#103 Post by Marc Hauser » August 1st, 2020, 11:33 am

So what have we learned?

The importer and/or producer of the wine Adam drank may or may not have been misleading.

“bone dry” Riesling may or may not actually be as dry as bones.

Everyone’s perception of sweetness may or may not be different.

The producer/importer/taster/Illuminati may or may not be to blame.

Hyperbolic positions/headlines that don’t really have to do with the actual, more moderate and nuanced issue/question will never end.
ITB-ish (unfrozen caveman cannabis lawyer and erstwhile wine lawyer)

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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#104 Post by J. Rock » August 1st, 2020, 2:14 pm

Just go straight for the stickies and then you don't need to be surprised when they're sweet!
J o r d a n

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Sean S y d n e y
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#105 Post by Sean S y d n e y » August 1st, 2020, 2:57 pm

On the subject of surprising RS levels, I just opened a 2018 Carl von Schubert/Maximin Grünhaus Gutswein Riesling. Entry level bottling, apparently a blend of fruit from 3 grand cru vineyards and incredible value at less than $15 USD. LCBO says it has 10 g/L RS, their tech sheet says 8.1, but man, this is rattlingly acidic (8.4 g/L TA says same tech sheet), and during a hot year, too. Yowza! A wine I think even Adam could love.
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#106 Post by Otto Forsberg » August 1st, 2020, 3:46 pm

Sean S y d n e y wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 2:57 pm
a blend of fruit from 3 grand cru vineyards
Are they now sourcing grapes from France? [snort.gif]

I'll get me jacket.

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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#107 Post by Sean S y d n e y » August 1st, 2020, 4:00 pm

Otto Forsberg wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 3:46 pm
Sean S y d n e y wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 2:57 pm
a blend of fruit from 3 grand cru vineyards
Are they now sourcing grapes from France? [snort.gif]

I'll get me jacket.
Grand cru is a state of mind. [cheers.gif]
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#108 Post by wspohn » August 1st, 2020, 6:24 pm

Dryness IS about both RS and acidity. And it doesn't need to be evidenced by a lack of fruit, either.

I've been drinking the 2012 Pewsey Vale The Contours Riesling (1.8 g/l) with great pleasure lately. Certainly very dry but with ample fruit for me.
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D@vid Bu3ker
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#109 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » August 1st, 2020, 6:41 pm

Sean S y d n e y wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 4:00 pm
Otto Forsberg wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 3:46 pm
Sean S y d n e y wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 2:57 pm
a blend of fruit from 3 grand cru vineyards
Are they now sourcing grapes from France? [snort.gif]

I'll get me jacket.
Grand cru is a state of mind. [cheers.gif]
That’s grosses. ;)
David Bueker - Rieslingfan

Paul Fountain
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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#110 Post by Paul Fountain » August 1st, 2020, 8:56 pm

wspohn wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 6:24 pm
I've been drinking the 2012 Pewsey Vale The Contours Riesling (1.8 g/l) with great pleasure lately. Certainly very dry but with ample fruit for me.
It would be interesting to see how you find the 2013 and 2014 which are 0.8 and 0.7 g/L RS respectively.

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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#111 Post by John Morris » August 1st, 2020, 9:37 pm

Sean S y d n e y wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 2:57 pm
On the subject of surprising RS levels, I just opened a 2018 Carl von Schubert/Maximin Grünhaus Gutswein Riesling. Entry level bottling, apparently a blend of fruit from 3 grand cru vineyards and incredible value at less than $15 USD. LCBO says it has 10 g/L RS, their tech sheet says 8.1, but man, this is rattlingly acidic (8.4 g/L TA says same tech sheet), and during a hot year, too. Yowza! A wine I think even Adam could love.
But he'd hate if it if the LCBO rated it dry.

Max. Grunhaus is in the Ruwer, which is cooler than the Middle Mosel and, like the Saar, the wines tend to have much more prominent acid.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

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Re: Bone-dry meaning is completely lost. Major rant. Riesling. Again.

#112 Post by Robert Sand » August 3rd, 2020, 4:42 am

Sean S y d n e y wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 2:57 pm
On the subject of surprising RS levels, I just opened a 2018 Carl von Schubert/Maximin Grünhaus Gutswein Riesling. Entry level bottling, apparently a blend of fruit from 3 grand cru vineyards and incredible value at less than $15 USD. LCBO says it has 10 g/L RS, their tech sheet says 8.1, but man, this is rattlingly acidic (8.4 g/L TA says same tech sheet), and during a hot year, too. Yowza! A wine I think even Adam could love.
It is a mistake to think that high acidity can always balance high RS - indeed you easily may have both: sour-sweet.
With 8.1 g RS and 8.4 TA it wouly be legally ok to label it dry, but I doubt itwould taste really dry - but 10g RS would be too high.
I know Schubert/Grünhaus quite well, and the Gutsriesling is usually excellent, but rarely tasting really dry (not to speak of bone-dry)

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