Aging Oregon chardonnay

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#101 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » May 11th, 2020, 9:49 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 11th, 2020, 12:38 pm
John Peacock wrote:
May 11th, 2020, 8:51 am
lleichtman wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 6:13 pm
Just had a 2007 Ayoub chardonnay and it was really nice.
Lawrence, please re-check the vintage. Ayoub didn't make chardonnay until 2009.
Didn't know Rudy had an interest in OR wine :D
Ha! [wow.gif]
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#102 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » May 11th, 2020, 10:04 pm

Ken Pahlow wrote:
May 4th, 2020, 3:35 pm
Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
May 2nd, 2020, 9:31 pm
James Lyon wrote:
May 2nd, 2020, 8:54 pm
I have enjoyed quite a few Oregon Chardonnay's with at least 5-9 years of age within the last year. The list would include 2011 Eyrie Original Vines, 2011 and 2012 Domaine Drouhin Arthur, 2012 and 2015 Arterberry Maresh Maresh, numerous 2013-2015 Walter Scott's, 2012 Belle Pente, Brick House, J. Cristopher, 2014 Soter North Valley, 2015 Crowley Four Winds, Chehalem Ian's, 2015 Lingua Franca Sisters and a number of Goodfellow bottles including a 2013 Richards last weekend. All good to exceptional. I don't have any answers for you, but I was kinda surprised that the most recent 2012 Maresh consumed last month lacked the snap or electricity from my experience in January 2019. As others have mentioned, perhaps the freshness or electricity wanes or dissipates around 7-8 years. Not a bad thing, just different. I think that 2016 is my oldest vintage with Cameron Chardonnay's, so I'm looking forward to enjoying them in the future.

Unrelated, but related, a 2017 Vincent Ribbon Ridge Brick House Chardonnay was a head turner last night and tonight.

James
2012 was a horribly small crop, that in my mind made nice wines but needed to be picked a week earlier by almost everyone that I have tasted, Tyson Crowley's Four Winds being the exception. While the Richard's is holding up fine, it's quite tropical. For me, I think the vintages that I would prefer to be judged on for our Chardonnays ability to age are 2014-2018. While the earlier versions are good wines, they are still marked by the hands of a winemaker finding the process(still the case in 2016-2018 but at least I have the basics covered now).

Noting the earlier mention of lower yields by John. I am seeking lower sugars, better acidity, and smaller berries(more phenolics). None of those things happen with lower yields. Please see Terry Theise's comments, in his Germany catalogues, on yields and Rieslings. My own experience mirrors what he is reporting. Low yields unquestionably lead to bigger berries with thinner skins, and generally higher sugars and lower acids.

We carry whatever Mother Nature will give us for Chardonnay fruit, no thinning. In 2018, I sent Paul Durant a text(mostly joking) asking him which row he was going to pick our 10 tons from, so that we could get useful samples. I am not trying to be a jackass, but the low yields mantra is, IMO, overstated. In Oregon Pinot Noir, this has led to an over abundance of "unctuous" and expensive Pinot Noirs(we target 3-3.5 tons/acres) and low yields produce exactly the opposite results from what I am looking for in Chardonnay.

We all work with different sites, vine ages and clones and have our own unique approach to the wines that we make. On the point of yield, our experience has been dramatically different than that of Marcus. 2012, as Marcus mentioned, was a low yielding vintage and many producers picked too late. This was followed by 2013 with modest but not heavy yields, 2014 gave a lighter crop, 2015 was larger, 2016 gave us a smaller crop again and then came 2017. 2017 was a slightly more classic Willamette Valley vintage with normal bud break, a warm, dry summer and cooling temps in September. Given the later nature of harvest in the Willamette Valley and Burgundy being earlier than us by over two weeks in 2017, I had the great opportunity to go work harvest for 2 weeks alongside Dominique Lafon. A hug thanks to my amazing wife and daughter for holding down the fort while I went on a learning mission. During my time in Burgundy with Dominique I had the opportunity to do everything from picking, processing the fruit, running press cycles and barreling down wines. I traveled between Meursault, Blagny and the Macon to the three Lafon Domaines as well as spent a day with the lovely family at Lafarge. My two biggest observations that vintage in France? Timing of picking and yields.

Who were the first Domaine's to pick in Meursault that year? Arnaud Ente, Lalou Bize-Leroy, Roulot, Coche Dury and Comtes des Lafon.

The next spring in 2018 we reflected on our previous vintages here in the Willamette Valley and the experience I had in Burgundy. Our favorite chardonnay vintages here have always been the lower cropping ones, and with what I had experienced in Meursault, we decided to lower our yields in our Chardonnay vineyards. Working with our growers we decided to shoot thin aggressively. Everyone shoot thins or de-buds, but usually it's for removing excess buds from one growing point. We set about reducing our crop through this process by 20-30% by removing additional shoots. Instead of, for example, 18-20 shoots per vine, we reduced that down to 14-16 shoots per vine in an 1100 vine per acre block. At veraison, when we typically thin the crop, there was very little thinning to do. At picking, our sites achieved what we had hoped for, appropriate sugars (potential alcohols 12.8%-13.2%), low PH's, low malics, high TA's and the intensity of flavor that we were striving for. The goal with extra shoot thinning wasn't increased 'ripeness,' but increased intensity and concentration. As there is usually some extra fruit around the valley as we approach harvest, we grabbed a little from two Eola-Amity Hills sites to augment our increasing chardonnay production. These sites were 'classically' farmed, had hung a larger crop and then thinned at veraison to allow the vine a chance to ripen. Here we saw the vine struggling to build the sugars (12.1%-12.3% potential alcohol), higher PH's, higher malics and lower TA's.

2019 was a much cooler vintage than 2018. We set out with the same goals with each of our vineyards. Shoot thin aggressively and early to set a balanced crop that the vine will ripen all the way to harvest. We experienced nearly identical results compared to 2018 in all the sites using this protocol. We did have one site that did not follow it, hung lots of fruit and thinned at veraison. The results reaffirmed what we were seeing; higher PH, higher malics, lower TA's and simple flavor profile.

Through these experiences, we feel that the key to making great chardonnay is lower yields. 2018 set the stage for how we will work with our growers to farm the Chardonnay vineyards we are so fortunate to work with. We will fine tune the yields in the beginning of the growing season to allow the vine to focus on fruit it is ripening and we will harvest, rather than leaving more with the intention of dropping it later.
Our experience is different from yours in this respect. My feeling is that canopy control(less leaf surface area) is what I am seeking. By restricting early season(and later) vigor by use of cover crop, and later in the season by leaf pulling, our pHs are the lowest, in both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, that I have ever produced. And I definitely don’t feel a need to defend the acidity in my wines. Malics are also the lowest(we do seem to be seeking the same thing). And I am very happy with 12.1-12.3%, as evidenced by the 2018 chardonnays from Whistling Ridge at 12.1%. There is no green flavor nor lack of complexity in the wines. I love the Chardonnays from Walter Scott, and take a lot of pride in ours.
I look forward to seeing how both evolve over the next decade.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#103 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 12th, 2020, 4:14 am

Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
May 11th, 2020, 10:04 pm
Ken Pahlow wrote:
May 4th, 2020, 3:35 pm
Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
May 2nd, 2020, 9:31 pm


2012 was a horribly small crop, that in my mind made nice wines but needed to be picked a week earlier by almost everyone that I have tasted, Tyson Crowley's Four Winds being the exception. While the Richard's is holding up fine, it's quite tropical. For me, I think the vintages that I would prefer to be judged on for our Chardonnays ability to age are 2014-2018. While the earlier versions are good wines, they are still marked by the hands of a winemaker finding the process(still the case in 2016-2018 but at least I have the basics covered now).

Noting the earlier mention of lower yields by John. I am seeking lower sugars, better acidity, and smaller berries(more phenolics). None of those things happen with lower yields. Please see Terry Theise's comments, in his Germany catalogues, on yields and Rieslings. My own experience mirrors what he is reporting. Low yields unquestionably lead to bigger berries with thinner skins, and generally higher sugars and lower acids.

We carry whatever Mother Nature will give us for Chardonnay fruit, no thinning. In 2018, I sent Paul Durant a text(mostly joking) asking him which row he was going to pick our 10 tons from, so that we could get useful samples. I am not trying to be a jackass, but the low yields mantra is, IMO, overstated. In Oregon Pinot Noir, this has led to an over abundance of "unctuous" and expensive Pinot Noirs(we target 3-3.5 tons/acres) and low yields produce exactly the opposite results from what I am looking for in Chardonnay.

We all work with different sites, vine ages and clones and have our own unique approach to the wines that we make. On the point of yield, our experience has been dramatically different than that of Marcus. 2012, as Marcus mentioned, was a low yielding vintage and many producers picked too late. This was followed by 2013 with modest but not heavy yields, 2014 gave a lighter crop, 2015 was larger, 2016 gave us a smaller crop again and then came 2017. 2017 was a slightly more classic Willamette Valley vintage with normal bud break, a warm, dry summer and cooling temps in September. Given the later nature of harvest in the Willamette Valley and Burgundy being earlier than us by over two weeks in 2017, I had the great opportunity to go work harvest for 2 weeks alongside Dominique Lafon. A hug thanks to my amazing wife and daughter for holding down the fort while I went on a learning mission. During my time in Burgundy with Dominique I had the opportunity to do everything from picking, processing the fruit, running press cycles and barreling down wines. I traveled between Meursault, Blagny and the Macon to the three Lafon Domaines as well as spent a day with the lovely family at Lafarge. My two biggest observations that vintage in France? Timing of picking and yields.

Who were the first Domaine's to pick in Meursault that year? Arnaud Ente, Lalou Bize-Leroy, Roulot, Coche Dury and Comtes des Lafon.

The next spring in 2018 we reflected on our previous vintages here in the Willamette Valley and the experience I had in Burgundy. Our favorite chardonnay vintages here have always been the lower cropping ones, and with what I had experienced in Meursault, we decided to lower our yields in our Chardonnay vineyards. Working with our growers we decided to shoot thin aggressively. Everyone shoot thins or de-buds, but usually it's for removing excess buds from one growing point. We set about reducing our crop through this process by 20-30% by removing additional shoots. Instead of, for example, 18-20 shoots per vine, we reduced that down to 14-16 shoots per vine in an 1100 vine per acre block. At veraison, when we typically thin the crop, there was very little thinning to do. At picking, our sites achieved what we had hoped for, appropriate sugars (potential alcohols 12.8%-13.2%), low PH's, low malics, high TA's and the intensity of flavor that we were striving for. The goal with extra shoot thinning wasn't increased 'ripeness,' but increased intensity and concentration. As there is usually some extra fruit around the valley as we approach harvest, we grabbed a little from two Eola-Amity Hills sites to augment our increasing chardonnay production. These sites were 'classically' farmed, had hung a larger crop and then thinned at veraison to allow the vine a chance to ripen. Here we saw the vine struggling to build the sugars (12.1%-12.3% potential alcohol), higher PH's, higher malics and lower TA's.

2019 was a much cooler vintage than 2018. We set out with the same goals with each of our vineyards. Shoot thin aggressively and early to set a balanced crop that the vine will ripen all the way to harvest. We experienced nearly identical results compared to 2018 in all the sites using this protocol. We did have one site that did not follow it, hung lots of fruit and thinned at veraison. The results reaffirmed what we were seeing; higher PH, higher malics, lower TA's and simple flavor profile.

Through these experiences, we feel that the key to making great chardonnay is lower yields. 2018 set the stage for how we will work with our growers to farm the Chardonnay vineyards we are so fortunate to work with. We will fine tune the yields in the beginning of the growing season to allow the vine to focus on fruit it is ripening and we will harvest, rather than leaving more with the intention of dropping it later.
Our experience is different from yours in this respect. My feeling is that canopy control(less leaf surface area) is what I am seeking. By restricting early season(and later) vigor by use of cover crop, and later in the season by leaf pulling, our pHs are the lowest, in both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, that I have ever produced. And I definitely don’t feel a need to defend the acidity in my wines. Malics are also the lowest(we do seem to be seeking the same thing). And I am very happy with 12.1-12.3%, as evidenced by the 2018 chardonnays from Whistling Ridge at 12.1%. There is no green flavor nor lack of complexity in the wines. I love the Chardonnays from Walter Scott, and take a lot of pride in ours.
I look forward to seeing how both evolve over the next decade.

[cheers.gif] [cheers.gif]
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2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2018 Donnhoff Niederhauser Hermannshöhle GG
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#104 Post by Vincent Fritzsche » May 12th, 2020, 11:37 am

+1 on the picking earlier. I've honestly never found anything that I picked too early, white or red. I've definitely picked too late, though not much in recent years. I remember when the Evening Land project started and I'd hear from other growers - "they've already picked their Chardonnay!" - with a mix of wonder and judgement in their voices. "They'll probably have to chaptalize" usually came next. Then "we're giving the grapes hang time and waiting for flavors..." My how things have changed, in many vineyards anyway, certainly not all.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#105 Post by Marshall Manning » May 12th, 2020, 1:32 pm

Vincent Fritzsche wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 11:37 am
+1 on the picking earlier. I've honestly never found anything that I picked too early, white or red. I've definitely picked too late, though not much in recent years. I remember when the Evening Land project started and I'd hear from other growers - "they've already picked their Chardonnay!" - with a mix of wonder and judgement in their voices. "They'll probably have to chaptalize" usually came next. Then "we're giving the grapes hang time and waiting for flavors..." My how things have changed, in many vineyards anyway, certainly not all.
You mean you aren't waiting for "physiological ripeness" anymore, Vincent? [wow.gif]
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#106 Post by Rick Allen » May 12th, 2020, 3:37 pm

Marshall Manning wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 1:32 pm
Vincent Fritzsche wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 11:37 am
+1 on the picking earlier. I've honestly never found anything that I picked too early, white or red. I've definitely picked too late, though not much in recent years. I remember when the Evening Land project started and I'd hear from other growers - "they've already picked their Chardonnay!" - with a mix of wonder and judgement in their voices. "They'll probably have to chaptalize" usually came next. Then "we're giving the grapes hang time and waiting for flavors..." My how things have changed, in many vineyards anyway, certainly not all.
You mean you aren't waiting for "physiological ripeness" anymore, Vincent? [wow.gif]
You mean waiting until the fruit is rotting on the vine?

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#107 Post by Marshall Manning » May 12th, 2020, 4:29 pm

Rick Allen wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 3:37 pm
You mean waiting until the fruit is rotting on the vine?
Exactly, Rick! I remember hearing people saying going on about "physiological ripeness" 20 years ago to justify a big, oozemonster style of wine. Harvesting should always be about what makes the best wine as the end result, not what tastes best as a table grape.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#108 Post by James Sanders » May 12th, 2020, 8:49 pm

This string inspired me to open a 2011 Cameron Clos Electrique Blanc. Still a youthful gold. Typical lemon and pineapple aromas with just a hint of caramel and nut. It's weighty, as usual, with bracing acidity. I have had a lot of these back to 2004 and buy them almost every year. My only reservation is that they are so intense they tend to taste better than they drink. John Paul does great work.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#109 Post by Ethan Abraham » May 13th, 2020, 3:59 am

This thread is excellent and inspired me to order some Goodfellow chards to compare with and also age for future comparison with the Walter Scott's I got a few weeks ago. Great to see multiple winemakers with different strategies and opinions have a respectful and interesting discussion.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#110 Post by Richard T r i m p i » May 13th, 2020, 5:15 am

James Sanders wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 8:49 pm
This string inspired me to open a 2011 Cameron Clos Electrique Blanc. Still a youthful gold. Typical lemon and pineapple aromas with just a hint of caramel and nut. It's weighty, as usual, with bracing acidity. I have had a lot of these back to 2004 and buy them almost every year. My only reservation is that they are so intense they tend to taste better than they drink. John Paul does great work.
Thanks for the TN. I have 5 of 6 of these sleeping undisturbed. It's a perennial fav. 2011 is a structured vintage so not planning to resume enjoyment for another few years.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#111 Post by Vincent Fritzsche » May 14th, 2020, 9:38 am

Marshall Manning wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 1:32 pm
Vincent Fritzsche wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 11:37 am
+1 on the picking earlier. I've honestly never found anything that I picked too early, white or red. I've definitely picked too late, though not much in recent years. I remember when the Evening Land project started and I'd hear from other growers - "they've already picked their Chardonnay!" - with a mix of wonder and judgement in their voices. "They'll probably have to chaptalize" usually came next. Then "we're giving the grapes hang time and waiting for flavors..." My how things have changed, in many vineyards anyway, certainly not all.
You mean you aren't waiting for "physiological ripeness" anymore, Vincent? [wow.gif]
LOL, yeah since 2011 I've really embraced picking "al dente" and understanding that so much flavor and aroma is created in fermentation, so if you're looking for all that in the grapes before you pick you're essentially overcooking the meat. MHO! [berserker.gif]
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#112 Post by Dale McClaran » May 15th, 2020, 2:28 pm

What a great thread, its giving me flashbacks to the very best of E Parker BB when producers would often invoke on great discussions of the topic at hand. Carry on.......
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#113 Post by James Lyon » May 30th, 2020, 3:15 pm

jrozes wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 7:32 am
The knowledge being shared in this thread is great! I don't have any amazing insights to offer, just a few data points over the last year (all bottles purchased on release):
  • 2010 Anderson Family - beautiful, full of energy, silky and weightless
  • 2010 Belle Pente BP Vyd - a big, bruised golden apple; disappointing compared to my last bottle in 2015
  • 2010 Crowley Four Winds - needed a lot of air; incredible detail and depth; richness without weight
  • 2011 Crowley Four Winds - cork soaked almost to the top; battery acid at first; eventually rounded out into something enjoyable, but never entirely convincing
  • 2012 Cameron Clos Electrique - stunningly complex and gorgeous; benchmark chardonnay
My experience with 2011 chards has never been so positive as with the pinots, but most of the 2012s have been mind-bogglingly good. Of this limited sample though, I think the Cameron is the only one that has clearly improved. The 2010 Anderson Family and Crowley were excellent, but no better than at any point in the past. The BP and 2011 Crowley were better around age five than they are now. So perhaps unsurprisingly, my response to the question is, "it depends."
I knew that I would miss some folks when I started listing the bottles of aged Oregon Chardonnay that I have enjoyed over the last 6 - 12 months. Anderson Family was a glaring omission. If I remember correctly, I had the same reaction to the 2010 Anderson Family Chardonnay when tasted in a lineup at the winery a few years ago. Ended up buying a few more bottles that day. If folks visit AF, you will get the opportunity to taste several vintages of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir side by side. A great experience to get a better feel for the vintages. Anyway, I've probably enjoyed the 2010-2014 over the last year and still have a 2009 with all of the other vintages. I noted that the 2014 showed the signs of a warm vintage.

If I'm not mistaken Belle Pente was a later picker for Chardonnay until more recent vintages. My experience with the 2012 BP Chardonnay would mirror your thoughts. It was good, but not nearly the highs of other aged Oregon Chardonnay.

I have a few bottles of 2010 Crowley Arterberry Maresh Chardonnay that I'm looking forward to one day in the near future. Also, I uncovered a few 2012 Crowley WV Chards.

I teased a bottle of 2011 Whistling Ridge Whistling Ridge Chardonnay, which was crafted by Marcus Goodfellow, in the National Chardonnay Day thread last week. I opened the bottle last Friday and it was wonderful. Lemon, with an almond or nutty note and the Ribbon Ridge minerality floating effortlessly beneath the pronounced notes. I've had numerous bottles of this particular wine over the last 5 years and this was probably the best showing. I'm in no hurry to open the remaining 2-3 bottles. This particular wine has never had that sharp spine that I would associate with Goodfellow or Walter Scott Chardonnays, but it was terrific. Perhaps this bottle had some oak influence. Maybe Marcus can offer some thoughts. Well done.

And back to Crowley, we enjoyed a bottle of the 2018 Crowley WV Chardonnay last night. Oh boy, I would think that this wine will make it effortlessly to 10 years. Serious wine and potential. I had seen Sean S.'s note about the 2017 Crowley WV Chardonnay in another thread and I wanted to share my thoughts on the 2018.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#114 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 30th, 2020, 6:05 pm

I need to try out some of these other wines. Crowley and Morgen Long are on my short list of next producers to try.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2018 Donnhoff Niederhauser Hermannshöhle GG
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#115 Post by Scott Tallman » May 30th, 2020, 6:29 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:05 pm
I need to try out some of these other wines. Crowley and Morgen Long are on my short list of next producers to try.
Crowley & Morgen Long are great choices, esp as I know you like Goodfellow.

If you haven’t tried yet, don’t forget about the OGs - Eyrie (esp Old Vines) and Cameron (esp Clos Electrique). And Arterberry Maresh Maresh is money.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#116 Post by James Lyon » May 30th, 2020, 6:36 pm

Scott Tallman wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:29 pm
Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:05 pm
I need to try out some of these other wines. Crowley and Morgen Long are on my short list of next producers to try.
Crowley & Morgen Long are great choices, esp as I know you like Goodfellow.

If you haven’t tried yet, don’t forget about the OGs - Eyrie (esp Old Vines) and Cameron (esp Clos Electrique). And Arterberry Maresh Maresh is money.
And Arterberry Maresh just released an Eyrie Vineyard Chardonnay...

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#117 Post by Jim Maresh » May 30th, 2020, 6:51 pm

I popped in here looking for the Walter Scott zoom but was too late. I'm no technological expert and have never zoomed before but I have a 94 year old grandpa who's going stir crazy waiting for the dirt to dry out so he can get on the tractor. He's hilarious and will lay down the law. I'd like to get him on the zoom ranting about Oregon grapes.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#118 Post by C Prince » May 30th, 2020, 7:22 pm

Bummer! Would have been a good addition. Oregon grapes deserve much ranting!
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#119 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » May 31st, 2020, 10:41 am

Hi James,

Great to hear that the 2011 showed well. I have had mixed emotions on that wine and the 2013 Richard’s over the years. Mostly because I feel like these vintages had tremendous opportunity for great wines but both had some quirks in the process, and left me wishing I could redo the vintages. That said, great vineyards make great wines, and both have aged very, very well. Maybe I just need to cultivate more patience...
We opened the 2013 Richard’s a few days ago, having seen a number of positive notes, and I was really pleased with the freshness and elegance of the wine. Lots of layers, which I feel is typical of the Richard’s after a few years, and lighter on it’s feet than the 2015. It also checked all the boxes for terroir(smells like Richard’s, tastes like Richard’s).

The 2011 does have a bit less notable acidic spine. The 2011 growing season was so cool in Oregon that malics stayed very high, and tartaric acids are not as high as expected. Our typical pH for the Richard’s is between 3.08-3.2, but the 2011 was close to 3.25 at bottling.
Last edited by Marcus Goodfellow on May 31st, 2020, 11:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#120 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » May 31st, 2020, 10:42 am

Jim Maresh wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:51 pm
I popped in here looking for the Walter Scott zoom but was too late. I'm no technological expert and have never zoomed before but I have a 94 year old grandpa who's going stir crazy waiting for the dirt to dry out so he can get on the tractor. He's hilarious and will lay down the law. I'd like to get him on the zoom ranting about Oregon grapes.
That’s a zoom, that I would sign up for!
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#121 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » May 31st, 2020, 10:46 am

Scott Tallman wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:29 pm
Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:05 pm
I need to try out some of these other wines. Crowley and Morgen Long are on my short list of next producers to try.
Crowley & Morgen Long are great choices, esp as I know you like Goodfellow.

If you haven’t tried yet, don’t forget about the OGs - Eyrie (esp Old Vines) and Cameron (esp Clos Electrique). And Arterberry Maresh Maresh is money.
+1

I like Seth’s wines quite a bit. Crowley Four Winds is a must for WV Chardonnay fans, and Clos Electrique is a Benchmark.

I also really reccommend the Chardonnays from Bethel Heights and Brickhouse.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#122 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 31st, 2020, 2:34 pm

Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
May 31st, 2020, 10:46 am
Scott Tallman wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:29 pm
Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:05 pm
I need to try out some of these other wines. Crowley and Morgen Long are on my short list of next producers to try.
Crowley & Morgen Long are great choices, esp as I know you like Goodfellow.

If you haven’t tried yet, don’t forget about the OGs - Eyrie (esp Old Vines) and Cameron (esp Clos Electrique). And Arterberry Maresh Maresh is money.
+1

I like Seth’s wines quite a bit. Crowley Four Winds is a must for WV Chardonnay fans, and Clos Electrique is a Benchmark.

I also really reccommend the Chardonnays from Bethel Heights and Brickhouse.
Thanks for the recs. Clos Electrique and Brick House have also been on my list to try.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2018 Donnhoff Niederhauser Hermannshöhle GG
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#123 Post by Marshall Manning » May 31st, 2020, 5:42 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 31st, 2020, 2:34 pm
Thanks for the recs. Clos Electrique and Brick House have also been on my list to try.
The Cameron Clos Electrique and Abbey Ridge Chardonnays just might be the best Chards produced in America.
Marshall

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#124 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » May 31st, 2020, 6:17 pm

Marshall Manning wrote:
May 31st, 2020, 5:42 pm
Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 31st, 2020, 2:34 pm
Thanks for the recs. Clos Electrique and Brick House have also been on my list to try.
The Cameron Clos Electrique and Abbey Ridge Chardonnays just might be the best Chards produced in America.
Yup. Kind of like how Coche-Dury might make the best Chardonnays produced in Burgundy...
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#125 Post by Brian Glas » May 31st, 2020, 6:37 pm

Jim Maresh wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 6:51 pm
I popped in here looking for the Walter Scott zoom but was too late. I'm no technological expert and have never zoomed before but I have a 94 year old grandpa who's going stir crazy waiting for the dirt to dry out so he can get on the tractor. He's hilarious and will lay down the law. I'd like to get him on the zoom ranting about Oregon grapes.
Sounds like he would have gotten along with Bob Wood.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#126 Post by JOSEPH G VAN MATRE » June 11th, 2020, 12:40 pm

WE DO A MAGNUM DINNER ABOUT ONCE A YEAR.
WE WERE REARRANGING THE CELLAR WHEN I FOUND SIX OREGON MAGS FROM 2000, HAD NO IDEA THEY WERE THERE.
3 OF WESTREY CHARDS AND 3 OF WITNESS TREE CHARD.
BOTH WINEMAKERS WERE WELL-KNOWN TO ME.
HAD LITTLE HOPE BUT WHEN I HELD THEM UP, GREAT CLARITY W/ NO HINT OF GOLD.
DECIDED TO PUT ON MENU THO I HAD A BACK UP PLAN. IT WAS NOT NEEDED, THE WINE WAS SUPERB, GREATLY ENJOYED
BY ALL 12 GUESTS. JUST WONDERFUL AND NOT FADING A BIT.
HAVE NOT HAD THE WITNESS TREE B/C OF COVID SOCIAL RESTRICTIONS.
MENU FOR DINNER IS BELOW.
BEST , JOE

Van Matre Magnum Dinner
February 8, 2020

Table Hors d ’Oeuvres

2012 SCHRAMSBERG BRUT ROSE
2008 MOET & CHANDON GRAND VINTAGE BRUT CHAMPAGNE

Yellow Pepper Soup w/Crab

2000 WESTREY CHARDONNAY RESERVE

Quail, Bacon, and Farro Salad

2003 CLOS des PAPES CHATEAUNEUF de PAPE

Irish Lamb and Sausage Stew

2004 PRODUTTORI del BARBARESCO RESERVA MONTESTFANO
2006 CANALICCHIO di SOPRA BRUNELLO

Gooey Butter Cake
Tea/Coffee

Cheeses and Walnuts
1983 GRAHAMS VINTAGE PORT
1988 LATOUR BLANCHE SAUTERNES

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#127 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » September 6th, 2020, 10:57 am

Thread bump.

Just went in for some 2018 Morgen Long wines to try (WV, Durant Vineyard, and Marine). For those who have had these, any recommendations regarding decanting?

Also, any of the winemakers on this thread have some insights on how the 2019 vintage chardonnays are developing?
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2018 Donnhoff Niederhauser Hermannshöhle GG
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#128 Post by Rick Allen » September 6th, 2020, 1:21 pm

Thanks for bumping this. I've had a number of older Oregon Chardonnays in the last couple of months, and I couldn't find this thread (didn't look very hard...).

2013 Cameron Clos Electrique - I'll start this out with the one clunker. The first bottle of this I opened was oxidized, so I opened another one - advanced. Of course this made me worry about other older Camerons, so I opened a
2012 Cameron Clos Electrique - Superb wine. This one stood out along with several others at our annual Chardonnay tasting in 2018 and it is still great.
2010 Cameron Clos Electrique - A great bottle of Chardonnay. Still lots of fresh fruit, but adding baked fruit aroma and flavors as well. Probably has 5-6 years (at least) left.
2014 Cameron Clos Electrique - No problems here though a little fatter than 2012 or 2010. Maybe a little richer vintage?

Also,
2012 Walter Scott Cuvee Ann - This wine hits all the right notes - fresh citrus, baked apple, pear, nice acidity, great mouthfeel.
2011 Goodfellow Whistling Ridge - Excellent. Not quite as concentrated as the Walter Scott, but just a half-step behind.
2014 Eyrie Original Vines - When this wine was released I wasn't that impressed, but it must have been in a dumb phase, because it has gained a little weight and added several layers of depth and impact. Excellent wine.

The 2010 Clos Electrique and the Walter Scott were two of my top three pandemic wines (so far).

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#129 Post by Marshall Manning » September 6th, 2020, 4:23 pm

Rick Allen wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 1:21 pm
2010 Cameron Clos Electrique - A great bottle of Chardonnay. Still lots of fresh fruit, but adding baked fruit aroma and flavors as well. Probably has 5-6 years (at least) left.
Tried this pre-Covid at L&E and loved it. One of the best OR Chards I've ever had.
Marshall

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#130 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » September 6th, 2020, 8:34 pm

Marshall Manning wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 4:23 pm
Rick Allen wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 1:21 pm
2010 Cameron Clos Electrique - A great bottle of Chardonnay. Still lots of fresh fruit, but adding baked fruit aroma and flavors as well. Probably has 5-6 years (at least) left.
Tried this pre-Covid at L&E and loved it. One of the best OR Chards I've ever had.
When we did a tasting of 2010 Chardonnays a few years ago, this was my wine of the tasting. As you said, one of the best OR Chardonnays that I have ever had.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#131 Post by J0seph S c h e n c k » September 6th, 2020, 10:28 pm

+1. One of the best aged of Oregon chardonnays I've had. It was not my favorite upon release.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#132 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » September 7th, 2020, 8:31 am

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 10:57 am
Thread bump.

Just went in for some 2018 Morgen Long wines to try (WV, Durant Vineyard, and Marine). For those who have had these, any recommendations regarding decanting?

Also, any of the winemakers on this thread have some insights on how the 2019 vintage chardonnays are developing?
I’m really, really happy with our 2019 Chardonnays. Weirdly, wet weather seems to have less effect on white grapes(IMO). It’s my speculation that we had so much mildew pressure early in the growing season that the fruit was well protected(as much as can be) as we saw the wet weather arrive.

That’s a speculative idea, but the reality was we saw little disease pressure last fall. Numbers held steady as well, so we harvested at low Brix, good acidity, and good flavors. Alcohols are low, Whistling Ridge will be either just below 12% or just above depending upon evaporation. Durant and Temperance Hill will be less than 13%.

Flavors are excellent and reduction in Whistling Ridge is little to none, Durant is just a hint, with Temperance Hill showing just a bit more currently.

My favorite is easily the Whistling Ridge, but I am definitely in a spot where I prefer light bodied white wines with grace and no weight. Grower champagne is spoiling me....
Last edited by Marcus Goodfellow on September 7th, 2020, 10:19 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#133 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » September 7th, 2020, 9:54 am

Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
September 7th, 2020, 8:31 am
Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 10:57 am
Thread bump.

Just went in for some 2018 Morgen Long wines to try (WV, Durant Vineyard, and Marine). For those who have had these, any recommendations regarding decanting?

Also, any of the winemakers on this thread have some insights on how the 2019 vintage chardonnays are developing?
I’m really, really happy with our 2019 Chardonnays. Weirdly, wet weather seems to have less effect on white grapes(IMO). It’s my speculation that we had so much mildew pressure early in the growing season that the fruit was well protected(as much as can be) as we saw the wet weather. Many growers believe that the time to address late season botrytis is a bunch close, and both Whistling Ridge and Temperance Hill were spraying on 7 day intervals.

That’s a speculative idea, but the reality was we saw little disease pressure last fall. Numbers held steady as well, so we harvested at low Brix, good acidity, and good flavors. Alcohols are low, Whistling Ridge will be either just below 12% or just above depending upon evaporation. Durant and Temperance Hill will be less than 13%.

Flavors are excellent and reduction in Whistling Ridge is little to none, Durant is just a hint, with Temperance Hill showing just a bit more currently.

My favorite is easily the Whistling Ridge, but Inam definitely in a spot where I prefer light bodied white wines with grace and no weight. Grower champagne is spoiling me....
Sounds like a vintage for me.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2018 Donnhoff Niederhauser Hermannshöhle GG
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#134 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » September 7th, 2020, 10:25 am

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
September 7th, 2020, 9:54 am
Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
September 7th, 2020, 8:31 am
Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 10:57 am
Thread bump.

Just went in for some 2018 Morgen Long wines to try (WV, Durant Vineyard, and Marine). For those who have had these, any recommendations regarding decanting?

Also, any of the winemakers on this thread have some insights on how the 2019 vintage chardonnays are developing?
I’m really, really happy with our 2019 Chardonnays. Weirdly, wet weather seems to have less effect on white grapes(IMO). It’s my speculation that we had so much mildew pressure early in the growing season that the fruit was well protected(as much as can be) as we saw the wet weather. Many growers believe that the time to address late season botrytis is a bunch close, and both Whistling Ridge and Temperance Hill were spraying on 7 day intervals.

That’s a speculative idea, but the reality was we saw little disease pressure last fall. Numbers held steady as well, so we harvested at low Brix, good acidity, and good flavors. Alcohols are low, Whistling Ridge will be either just below 12% or just above depending upon evaporation. Durant and Temperance Hill will be less than 13%.

Flavors are excellent and reduction in Whistling Ridge is little to none, Durant is just a hint, with Temperance Hill showing just a bit more currently.

My favorite is easily the Whistling Ridge, but Inam definitely in a spot where I prefer light bodied white wines with grace and no weight. Grower champagne is spoiling me....
Sounds like a vintage for me.
Yes, I would think so.

I keep finding myself thinking about what it will be like in 2026. The 2013 Richard’s is just in a great spot right now and the 2019s are in the same vein, but with 7 more years of vine age, and evolution of winemaking. I first bought 820 liter barrels in 2012, and since we over vintage, the 820s in 2013 were new, and most of the rest of the juice was neutral barrique.
Now we’re using older 820s, and a range of 600 and 500 liter puncheons. Almost no barriques at all. The wines develop a little slower, but the texture stays very, very fine.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#135 Post by Richard T r i m p i » September 7th, 2020, 5:12 pm

Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 8:34 pm
Marshall Manning wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 4:23 pm
Rick Allen wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 1:21 pm
2010 Cameron Clos Electrique - A great bottle of Chardonnay. Still lots of fresh fruit, but adding baked fruit aroma and flavors as well. Probably has 5-6 years (at least) left.
Tried this pre-Covid at L&E and loved it. One of the best OR Chards I've ever had.
When we did a tasting of 2010 Chardonnays a few years ago, this was my wine of the tasting. As you said, one of the best OR Chardonnays that I have ever had.
Thanks for the update. 2 bottles sleeping in the cellar. For some reason I bought more Abbey Ridge.

RT

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#136 Post by ChrisJames » September 8th, 2020, 3:11 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
September 6th, 2020, 10:57 am
Thread bump.

Just went in for some 2018 Morgen Long wines to try (WV, Durant Vineyard, and Marine). For those who have had these, any recommendations regarding decanting?
I got to try all three of these at the winery with Seth and have drank several bottles of the Marine. The Marine is good to go as a PnP Chard. It is softer and has less focused acidity than he would prefer as the fruit came in too ripe for his goals. The WV is a blend of every Chardonnay he makes and has more structure and character, and the Durant even more so. I'd expect either one to improve nicely over an evening. I got a few bottles of each to hide in the cellar for several years.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#137 Post by Brandon R » September 8th, 2020, 3:20 pm

Great thread. A couple of my recent OR Chards consumed with some age:

2013 Array Cellars Dijon Clone Otis Harlan Vineyard (a ridiculous deal from Full Pull) - alive and great a week or so ago.
  • 2016 Morgen Long Chardonnay Loubejac - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley (4/24/2020)
    Clean, mineral-driven nose. Grapefruit pith and cantaloupe rind. Bright but balanced. Lemon verbena, oyster brine and other orchard fruit on the palate. Mouthwatering and delicious and will likely improve with age. Nicely done, Seth. Paired with seared scallops and Dungeness crab cakes. (91 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#138 Post by JDavisRoby » September 8th, 2020, 7:40 pm

Brandon R wrote:
September 8th, 2020, 3:20 pm
Great thread. A couple of my recent OR Chards consumed with some age:

2013 Array Cellars Dijon Clone Otis Harlan Vineyard (a ridiculous deal from Full Pull) - alive and great a week or so ago.
  • 2016 Morgen Long Chardonnay Loubejac - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley (4/24/2020)
    Clean, mineral-driven nose. Grapefruit pith and cantaloupe rind. Bright but balanced. Lemon verbena, oyster brine and other orchard fruit on the palate. Mouthwatering and delicious and will likely improve with age. Nicely done, Seth. Paired with seared scallops and Dungeness crab cakes. (91 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
I see few posts on this board about Full Pull. I dropped Garagiste in favor of FP. Wonder why it’s not talked about more?
Joshu@

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#139 Post by James Lyon » September 9th, 2020, 5:04 am

JDavisRoby wrote:
September 8th, 2020, 7:40 pm
Brandon R wrote:
September 8th, 2020, 3:20 pm
Great thread. A couple of my recent OR Chards consumed with some age:

2013 Array Cellars Dijon Clone Otis Harlan Vineyard (a ridiculous deal from Full Pull) - alive and great a week or so ago.
  • 2016 Morgen Long Chardonnay Loubejac - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley (4/24/2020)
    Clean, mineral-driven nose. Grapefruit pith and cantaloupe rind. Bright but balanced. Lemon verbena, oyster brine and other orchard fruit on the palate. Mouthwatering and delicious and will likely improve with age. Nicely done, Seth. Paired with seared scallops and Dungeness crab cakes. (91 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
I see few posts on this board about Full Pull. I dropped Garagiste in favor of FP. Wonder why it’s not talked about more?
Regarding Full Pull, I think that they are an excellent resource for Seattle peeps. I've been tempted by a couple of FP offers, but I see more attractive pricing from Portland retailers.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#140 Post by Brandon R » September 9th, 2020, 8:46 am

James Lyon wrote:
September 9th, 2020, 5:04 am
JDavisRoby wrote:
September 8th, 2020, 7:40 pm
Brandon R wrote:
September 8th, 2020, 3:20 pm
Great thread. A couple of my recent OR Chards consumed with some age:

2013 Array Cellars Dijon Clone Otis Harlan Vineyard (a ridiculous deal from Full Pull) - alive and great a week or so ago.
  • 2016 Morgen Long Chardonnay Loubejac - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley (4/24/2020)
    Clean, mineral-driven nose. Grapefruit pith and cantaloupe rind. Bright but balanced. Lemon verbena, oyster brine and other orchard fruit on the palate. Mouthwatering and delicious and will likely improve with age. Nicely done, Seth. Paired with seared scallops and Dungeness crab cakes. (91 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
I see few posts on this board about Full Pull. I dropped Garagiste in favor of FP. Wonder why it’s not talked about more?
Regarding Full Pull, I think that they are an excellent resource for Seattle peeps. I've been tempted by a couple of FP offers, but I see more attractive pricing from Portland retailers.
I love Full Pull. It's not really about the pricing necessarily, but I very largely align with several of the palates there and can trust their judgement when they offer a wine. I find that they're supremely useful when buying inexpensive stuff. Like they frequently mention in their offers they, "Kiss a lot of frogs so you don't have to." They also are just great people.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#141 Post by Richard T r i m p i » September 10th, 2020, 3:06 pm

Popped an 08 Cameron Abbey Ridge last night. Pineapple and tropical fruit. Break out the cocktail umbrellas. In all honesty, there's excellent balance (as always), acidity, very judicious oak and lots of balance. Fine length. Riper than my sweet spot but still really tasty. No hurry to open the next bottle.

RT

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#142 Post by Rick Allen » September 10th, 2020, 6:55 pm

Richard T r i m p i wrote:
September 10th, 2020, 3:06 pm
Popped an 08 Cameron Abbey Ridge last night. Pineapple and tropical fruit. Break out the cocktail umbrellas. In all honesty, there's excellent balance (as always), acidity, very judicious oak and lots of balance. Fine length. Riper than my sweet spot but still really tasty. No hurry to open the next bottle.

RT
I opened a 13 Cameron Abbey Ridge tonight. Similar notes to yours, and none of the issues I had with the 13 Clos Electrique. Abbey always seems to lean a little more California than the Clos Electrique.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#143 Post by Adam Noble » September 10th, 2020, 10:33 pm

Rick Allen wrote:
September 10th, 2020, 6:55 pm
Richard T r i m p i wrote:
September 10th, 2020, 3:06 pm
Popped an 08 Cameron Abbey Ridge last night. Pineapple and tropical fruit. Break out the cocktail umbrellas. In all honesty, there's excellent balance (as always), acidity, very judicious oak and lots of balance. Fine length. Riper than my sweet spot but still really tasty. No hurry to open the next bottle.

RT
I opened a 13 Cameron Abbey Ridge tonight. Similar notes to yours, and none of the issues I had with the 13 Clos Electrique. Abbey always seems to lean a little more California than the Clos Electrique.
I opened one of those last week and agree. I generally agree with you I’ve noticed.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#144 Post by JDavisRoby » September 14th, 2020, 6:34 pm

Brandon R wrote:
September 9th, 2020, 8:46 am
James Lyon wrote:
September 9th, 2020, 5:04 am
JDavisRoby wrote:
September 8th, 2020, 7:40 pm


I see few posts on this board about Full Pull. I dropped Garagiste in favor of FP. Wonder why it’s not talked about more?
Regarding Full Pull, I think that they are an excellent resource for Seattle peeps. I've been tempted by a couple of FP offers, but I see more attractive pricing from Portland retailers.
I love Full Pull. It's not really about the pricing necessarily, but I very largely align with several of the palates there and can trust their judgement when they offer a wine. I find that they're supremely useful when buying inexpensive stuff. Like they frequently mention in their offers they, "Kiss a lot of frogs so you don't have to." They also are just great people.
Thoughts on a Full Pull thread similar to the Garagiste or Denegoce threads? Help with those redacted offers like this weekend?
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#145 Post by Glenn L e v i n e » September 15th, 2020, 7:28 am

We had a clunker of a 13 Clos Electrique last night. First of a case, uh vey.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#146 Post by jrozes » September 15th, 2020, 10:09 am

Glenn L e v i n e wrote:
September 15th, 2020, 7:28 am
We had a clunker of a 13 Clos Electrique last night. First of a case, uh vey.
I had one at a restaurant last month that was rough and green, but chalked it up to an off bottle. A 2013 Abbey Ridge back in July was stellar.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#147 Post by James Lyon » September 15th, 2020, 10:20 am

jrozes wrote:
September 15th, 2020, 10:09 am
Glenn L e v i n e wrote:
September 15th, 2020, 7:28 am
We had a clunker of a 13 Clos Electrique last night. First of a case, uh vey.
I had one at a restaurant last month that was rough and green, but chalked it up to an off bottle. A 2013 Abbey Ridge back in July was stellar.
Interesting notes. 2013, a tale of two vineyards or vintages?

We enjoyed a 2013 Goodfellow Richard's Cuvee Chardonnay two weekends ago. Fantastic and no sign of decline.

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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#148 Post by Glenn L e v i n e » September 15th, 2020, 10:44 am

It seemed to us like the sweetness and match/petrol qualities were infused, almost artificial in character.

Color perhaps a bit advanced, but I didn’t think freshness was a problem.
Last edited by Glenn L e v i n e on September 16th, 2020, 4:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Never lose sight of the fact that it is just fermented grape juice" - a winemaker and negotiant in Napa Valley, CA

dsGriswold
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#149 Post by dsGriswold » September 15th, 2020, 12:09 pm

Regarding Full Pull, I think that they are an excellent resource for Seattle peeps. I've been tempted by a couple of FP offers, but I see more attractive pricing from Portland retailers.
I love Full Pull. It's not really about the pricing necessarily, but I very largely align with several of the palates there and can trust their judgement when they offer a wine. I find that they're supremely useful when buying inexpensive stuff. Like they frequently mention in their offers they, "Kiss a lot of frogs so you don't have to." They also are just great people.
B. Redman

I started buying WA wines from FP, now most of the imports as they are offering some reasonably priced good values. Oregon wines mostly from Sec. You guys in Seattle are fortunate with local pick up. [cheers.gif]
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Geoff F.
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Re: Aging Oregon chardonnay

#150 Post by Geoff F. » September 15th, 2020, 10:31 pm

Had a 2009 Evening Land Chardonnay Mad Hatter over the weekend, and I was floored by how well it showed. It paired perfectly with a seared scallop roll, and paired perfectly with both the scallop's sweetness, the lemon butter, and the herb blend I used (thyme and oregano). It held up nicely over three nights too.
F r a n z

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