Mountain Lions

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Theodora Lee
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Mountain Lions

#1 Post by Theodora Lee » October 2nd, 2019, 11:53 am

I have encountered two mountain lions near my Theopolis Vineyard on hwy 128 on the Sonoma/ Mendocino border.They are stunning magnificent creatures. They appear healthy and relaxed while lying in the sun. Should I take this as a positive sign for the upcoming Harvest?
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Re: Mountain Lions

#2 Post by Nate Simon » October 2nd, 2019, 12:03 pm

They’re definitely looking forward to harvest.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#3 Post by brigcampbell » October 2nd, 2019, 12:47 pm

They'll keep the deer out of your vineyard.

As well as the workers...

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Re: Mountain Lions

#4 Post by John S » October 2nd, 2019, 12:50 pm

They are strikingly beautiful and majestic creatures to see in person. Super rare to see them in person and I've been in the right place and time 3 times in my life and always consider myself amazingly lucky. I keep it quiet for fear someone will try to find them and kill them.

And yeah, they may be waiting for wild turkeys who are foraging for nice ripe grapes. Certainly not gonna mess with pickers.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#5 Post by Chris Seiber » October 2nd, 2019, 12:53 pm

Take some pictures and post them here. I'd love to see them.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#6 Post by Ken Zinns » October 2nd, 2019, 1:15 pm

Theodora Lee wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 11:53 am
I have encountered two mountain lions near my Theopolis Vineyard on hwy 128 on the Sonoma/ Mendocino border.They are stunning magnificent creatures. They appear healthy and relaxed while lying in the sun. Should I take this as a positive sign for the upcoming Harvest?
Sounds like a good sign to me! [cheers.gif]
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Re: Mountain Lions

#7 Post by Chris Johnson » October 2nd, 2019, 1:37 pm

I hope so. I think that’s better than the dead boar in the middle of the road I saw by your place 3 weeks ago. You have a beautiful spot up there. Good luck this year.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#8 Post by Wes Barton » October 2nd, 2019, 3:48 pm

You've got your harvest, they've got theirs.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#9 Post by Nathan Smyth » October 2nd, 2019, 4:17 pm

Theodora Lee wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 11:53 am
Should I take this as a positive sign for the upcoming Harvest?
Not if you're the one they're gonna harvest.

As an adult male [simian], you ought to be able to fight off a single lion by yourself, at least if you have an aluminum baseball bat in your hands [or a nice heavy length of galvanized pipe, such as 1" or 1&1/4" or similar].

But definitely I wouldn't want to go up against lions [plural] without a 12-gauge shotgun and the proper ammunition.

In all seriousness, if you've got a lion problem, then I'd have everyone slinging a 12-gauge over their shoulders - especially if you have women working for you [up in the hill country, mountain lions kill female (human) joggers for fun].

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Re: Mountain Lions

#10 Post by YLee » October 2nd, 2019, 4:36 pm

I thought Nathan was going to post about economics again.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#11 Post by Dave McIsaac » October 2nd, 2019, 5:49 pm

Nathan Smyth wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 4:17 pm
Theodora Lee wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 11:53 am
Should I take this as a positive sign for the upcoming Harvest?
Not if you're the one they're gonna harvest.

As an adult male [simian], you ought to be able to fight off a single lion by yourself, at least if you have an aluminum baseball bat in your hands [or a nice heavy length of galvanized pipe, such as 1" or 1&1/4" or similar].

But definitely I wouldn't want to go up against lions [plural] without a 12-gauge shotgun and the proper ammunition.

In all seriousness, if you've got a lion problem, then I'd have everyone slinging a 12-gauge over their shoulders - especially if you have women working for you [up in the hill country, mountain lions kill female (human) joggers for fun].
You do realize that Theodora is not an "adult male [simian]"???? It's also good to know that mountain lions single out "female (human) joggers"

This one's for you Nathan.....

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Re: Mountain Lions

#12 Post by GregT » October 2nd, 2019, 6:35 pm

In all seriousness, if you've got a lion problem, then I'd have everyone slinging a 12-gauge over their shoulders
So in addition to working in the hot sun and carrying tubs of grapes, they're supposed to carry around fully loaded 12-guages? And will all of them know how to use those guns and be ready for the recoil? Or do you only hire workers who are trained in firearms?

Not to mention that you'll have a crew of workers out there so firing into the crowd will likely take out one or two of your workers, and if you're going to do that anyway, why not just let the lions have them?

Since 1850, when California became a state, there have been 16 mountain lion attacks on people. Six were fatal; of those, two were fatal because of untreated rabies.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's Book of Odds, an you have a 1 in 100,000 chance of suffering a serious toothbrush-related injury in any year, but your chances of being injured by a mountain lion are like one in several million.

I'd be cautious not to surprise the lions, but even that is unlikely, as they're pretty aware animals.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#13 Post by Ian S » October 2nd, 2019, 7:01 pm

No pictures? I think you're lion to us Theodora! [snort.gif] [wink.gif]
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Re: Mountain Lions

#14 Post by Kim Z » October 2nd, 2019, 7:15 pm

"Since 1850, when California became a state, there have been 16 mountain lion attacks on people. Six were fatal; of those, two were fatal because of untreated rabies.

I'd be cautious not to surprise the lions, but even that is unlikely, as they're pretty aware animals."

Yes and if you look at human homicides over any comparable period, you are about 10,000X more likely to die by a human hand than cougar teeth. So if you want to stay safe, leave the city and move to the mountains [thankyou.gif]

They are very secretive and for the most part assiduously avoid people. Also, unlike wolves or coyotes, they are solitary hunters.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#15 Post by Randy Bowman » October 2nd, 2019, 7:39 pm

The only mountain lion I have ever seen was a house pet named Toby. He was like a 120 pound house cat that rubbed up against you and loved to be petted.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#16 Post by P@u1_M3nk3s » October 2nd, 2019, 7:41 pm

Nathan Smyth wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 4:17 pm
Theodora Lee wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 11:53 am
Should I take this as a positive sign for the upcoming Harvest?
Not if you're the one they're gonna harvest.

As an adult male [simian], you ought to be able to fight off a single lion by yourself, at least if you have an aluminum baseball bat in your hands [or a nice heavy length of galvanized pipe, such as 1" or 1&1/4" or similar].

But definitely I wouldn't want to go up against lions [plural] without a 12-gauge shotgun and the proper ammunition.

In all seriousness, if you've got a lion problem, then I'd have everyone slinging a 12-gauge over their shoulders - especially if you have women working for you [up in the hill country, mountain lions kill female (human) joggers for fun].
Shooting mountain lions in California is correctly against the law. As to Theodora's original post, that is just stupendous. Not many people have been lucky enough to glimpse one in the wild. I managed to see one, just once, in the Selenite Range in Nevada. Awesome.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#17 Post by R Roberts » October 2nd, 2019, 8:11 pm

Jealous. I have yet to see one, thought given how much time I'm outdoors, I'm sure they've seen me.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#18 Post by Jason T » October 3rd, 2019, 2:49 am

GregT wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 6:35 pm
In all seriousness, if you've got a lion problem, then I'd have everyone slinging a 12-gauge over their shoulders
So in addition to working in the hot sun and carrying tubs of grapes, they're supposed to carry around fully loaded 12-guages? And will all of them know how to use those guns and be ready for the recoil? Or do you only hire workers who are trained in firearms?

Not to mention that you'll have a crew of workers out there so firing into the crowd will likely take out one or two of your workers, and if you're going to do that anyway, why not just let the lions have them?

Since 1850, when California became a state, there have been 16 mountain lion attacks on people. Six were fatal; of those, two were fatal because of untreated rabies.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's Book of Odds, an you have a 1 in 100,000 chance of suffering a serious toothbrush-related injury in any year, but your chances of being injured by a mountain lion are like one in several million.

I'd be cautious not to surprise the lions, but even that is unlikely, as they're pretty aware animals.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#19 Post by Jason T » October 3rd, 2019, 2:50 am

Randy Bowman wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 7:39 pm
He was like a 120 pound house cat that rubbed up against you and loved to be petted.
That sounds terrifying, whether it enjoyed being petted or not.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#20 Post by Casey Hartlip » October 3rd, 2019, 5:15 am

I'm not a fan of MTN lions. If you have any domestic animals or house pets they will be in danger. When they have no fear of humans I don't think that's a good thing.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#21 Post by Scott G r u n e r » October 3rd, 2019, 7:27 am

Casey Hartlip wrote:
October 3rd, 2019, 5:15 am
I'm not a fan of MTN lions. If you have any domestic animals or house pets they will be in danger. When they have no fear of humans I don't think that's a good thing.
We have occasional Cougar attacks in washington. Wouldn’t happen if we weren’t shrinking and dividing up their territory. They were here first and our suburbian invasion is the issue. Seems “stand your ground” laws should apply here in favor of the cougars.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#22 Post by Tom Reddick » October 3rd, 2019, 11:40 pm

Kim Z wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 7:15 pm
"Since 1850, when California became a state, there have been 16 mountain lion attacks on people. Six were fatal; of those, two were fatal because of untreated rabies.

I'd be cautious not to surprise the lions, but even that is unlikely, as they're pretty aware animals."

Yes and if you look at human homicides over any comparable period, you are about 10,000X more likely to die by a human hand than cougar teeth. So if you want to stay safe, leave the city and move to the mountains [thankyou.gif]

They are very secretive and for the most part assiduously avoid people. Also, unlike wolves or coyotes, they are solitary hunters.
About 10 years ago, I spent a few weekends at a large ranch in South Texas that was largely abandoned and only visited occasionally by the family. It was predominantly used for hunting parties. Outdoor plumbing and there were many layers of carpet fragments covering holes in the floor of the living room so you wouldn't fall through- but it had two huge state of the art fridges filled with booze. A real man cave kind of place.

I was out there to get some solitude, and in return I cleared waist high weeds and mesquite for about an acre surrounding the main house.

Not far from the main house was a decrepit old barn-like structure that had been used for storage. It was falling apart, and largely propped up by the contents against which the failing walls rested. Old furniture and farm implements.

The first day I was there, I went inside and looked around. As I entered the furthest room of the 3, I heard what sounded like a mouse squealing quietly- very soft animal sounds. It was not a mouse- that is just the closest thing I can think of- and so I was intrigued and starting looking around.

After a few moments I looked straight ahead and down, and I was face to face with a mountain lion- probably 4-5 feet away from her face as she was crouched under the remains of an old desk.

I very quietly started moving backward- never taking my eyes away- and the noises stopped and all was well.

For the rest of my many visits, I saw her often at dawn and dusk. I never went into the structure where she was living again- but I saw her almost every day. She would come out and look at me if I was there, I would look back and nod- and as soon as I nodded, she would turn and go off hunting or whatever else she was up to.

To this day I remember what a stunningly beautiful creature she was- and how quickly we came to an understanding about a peaceful coexistence.

To the OP- take it for good luck.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#23 Post by Scott E. » October 4th, 2019, 9:06 am

Do you ever get that creepy feeling that something bad could happen?

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Re: Mountain Lions

#24 Post by John S » October 4th, 2019, 11:06 am

That is a great story Tom. I'll share one as well.

We used to live in the foothills above Boulder CO at 8,000ft elevation. We bordered National Forest on two sides on the property and had lots of "wild" wildlife in that the critters that came around were generally not very used to humans. Anyhow at night I started hearing loud and weird large cat sounds. Not quite growling but more like a loud and agitated mtn lion. And it went on for hours at night. After the third night I started to get concerned that it was a injured mtn lion as there were some old mines down in that ravine that I knew big kitties used to go inside. I'd seen tracks going in those tunnels quite a few times and was always careful before I went inside.

So on the fourth day I called a neighbor to help me investigate. I was not dumb enough, in this rare instance, to go down into that ravine solo hence getting my neighbor to join me. The purpose was to see if we needed to called someone from the Wildlife Division to help an injured or trapped lion. So we go down into this wooded ravine and we find numerous cone shaped piles of bark and other forest floor debris about a foot high and in diameter. These were new and certainly made by some large creature making those piles. I later learned that is one way a lion marks its territory by piling that stuff up and then peeing on the piles.

So we continue up the ravine with clear signs of a active lion nearby. The forest and canopy is becoming increasingly dense so we stay close together. I was leading and then came across a 30 foot circular area completely cleared of any forest floor debris. No leaves, no sticks, no bark nothing. And in the exact center of that circle and under all that missing debris was the partially eaten remains of a mule deer nearly completely covered in said debris. Only the cleaned off ribs stuck out and the rest was completely buried. Immediately I knew this was no injured cat but instead a very healthy cat (or mom and cubs) who had been feeding at night in a frenzy. Given we knew it was healthy and should be left alone we figured out how to leave the area. I knew and told my buddy that in all likelihood it was watching us as we were right next to its kill and we needed to be super careful now.

Being the one more versed in cat behavior (and I'd asked him for a favor) I told my buddy you head out of here first but back out as one never shows the back of your neck to a large predatory cat. He got out and then I did the same thing, slowly. Boom were were in the open and safe. While this was not one of my 3 aforementioned lion sightings it was the one that taught me the most about how they behave and perhaps the most dangerous. I heard those cats sounds for another few nights and then it was done.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#25 Post by Nathan Smyth » October 4th, 2019, 7:49 pm

Hey, if y'all Do-Gooders' greatest aspiration in life is to be harvested by Mountain Lions, then PLEASE, walk on up there with no armament whatsover, and let 'em harvest you to their hearts' content.

Me? I'ma be quite well-armed when I head up into known [or even potential] Mountain Lion territory.

And if I were a human female, then I'd be decked out like Angelina Jolie in Mr & Mrs Smith.


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Re: Mountain Lions

#26 Post by Randy Bowman » October 4th, 2019, 8:32 pm

Jason T wrote:
October 3rd, 2019, 2:50 am
Randy Bowman wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 7:39 pm
He was like a 120 pound house cat that rubbed up against you and loved to be petted.
That sounds terrifying, whether it enjoyed being petted or not.
Jason, I'll tell you the truth about the encounter. I'm working graveyard patrol as a police officer with 9 months experience. We get a call of a prowler in the back yard of a house on Silverado Trail, pretty much in the city but three blocks from the boonies. I'm one of three officers who respond. The Sergeant and beat officer go into the house and I guard the gate that leads into the backyard. While I didn't see it, apparently the beat officer and sergeant went out the back door to search the back yard. Their flashlights illuminated the mountain lion. The sergeant stepped back into the house and shut the door, leaving the beat officer in the back yard with the mountain lion. At the same time, the neighbor/owner had contacted me asking me not to shoot his "cat." The beat officer was severely rubbed and pinned against the back door and realized he wasn't going to be attacked. Still had to change his undershorts. We all got to spend some time with Toby, who died a couple years later of old age.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#27 Post by Alan Rath » October 4th, 2019, 8:36 pm

GregT wrote:
October 2nd, 2019, 6:35 pm
Since 1850, when California became a state, there have been 16 mountain lion attacks on people. Six were fatal; of those, two were fatal because of untreated rabies.
Seven. Jimmy Hoffa.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#28 Post by Tom Reddick » October 4th, 2019, 10:54 pm

John S wrote:
October 4th, 2019, 11:06 am
That is a great story Tom. I'll share one as well.

We used to live in the foothills above Boulder CO at 8,000ft elevation. We bordered National Forest on two sides on the property and had lots of "wild" wildlife in that the critters that came around were generally not very used to humans. Anyhow at night I started hearing loud and weird large cat sounds. Not quite growling but more like a loud and agitated mtn lion. And it went on for hours at night. After the third night I started to get concerned that it was a injured mtn lion as there were some old mines down in that ravine that I knew big kitties used to go inside. I'd seen tracks going in those tunnels quite a few times and was always careful before I went inside.

So on the fourth day I called a neighbor to help me investigate. I was not dumb enough, in this rare instance, to go down into that ravine solo hence getting my neighbor to join me. The purpose was to see if we needed to called someone from the Wildlife Division to help an injured or trapped lion. So we go down into this wooded ravine and we find numerous cone shaped piles of bark and other forest floor debris about a foot high and in diameter. These were new and certainly made by some large creature making those piles. I later learned that is one way a lion marks its territory by piling that stuff up and then peeing on the piles.

So we continue up the ravine with clear signs of a active lion nearby. The forest and canopy is becoming increasingly dense so we stay close together. I was leading and then came across a 30 foot circular area completely cleared of any forest floor debris. No leaves, no sticks, no bark nothing. And in the exact center of that circle and under all that missing debris was the partially eaten remains of a mule deer nearly completely covered in said debris. Only the cleaned off ribs stuck out and the rest was completely buried. Immediately I knew this was no injured cat but instead a very healthy cat (or mom and cubs) who had been feeding at night in a frenzy. Given we knew it was healthy and should be left alone we figured out how to leave the area. I knew and told my buddy that in all likelihood it was watching us as we were right next to its kill and we needed to be super careful now.

Being the one more versed in cat behavior (and I'd asked him for a favor) I told my buddy you head out of here first but back out as one never shows the back of your neck to a large predatory cat. He got out and then I did the same thing, slowly. Boom were were in the open and safe. While this was not one of my 3 aforementioned lion sightings it was the one that taught me the most about how they behave and perhaps the most dangerous. I heard those cats sounds for another few nights and then it was done.
Wow. Amazing creatures. Glad you got out of there okay. I was lucky in never crossing paths with cubs or meals.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#29 Post by david paly » October 5th, 2019, 6:12 am

They are closely related to house cats- the largest in the genus Felix in the world so are not truly lions. The increase in sightings and human attacks are new and not exclusively due to the intrusion in their habitat but to an expansion of their range into ours and a dramatic fall in hunting pressure. Nationwide their principal prey species, deer and rabbits, have exploded coinciding with prohibitions on using dogs to hunt cougar. It is nearly impossible to hunt them without dogs. They are able to breed rapidly and litter size increases with food availability but the males have to establish large territories so disperse widely. They used to be exclusively nocturnal but, like the deer, have become daytime active as human pressure declines . Game management , even of problem animals, has changed to a higher tolerance. We should all expect more interactions, nationwide, and be prepared for these adverse consequences on both species.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#30 Post by Ken Zinns » October 5th, 2019, 8:43 am

For those mountain lion alarmists here, a few things to consider. There are typically 30-40 fatal attacks by domestic dogs in the US each year, and over 5,000 people require hospitalization for dog bites annually. About 50 people are killed by lightning each year in the US. And what about mountain lions? According to Wikipedia, in the past 100 years there have been a total of 125 documented mountain lion attacks on people with 27 deaths in all of North America. It's obvious that the odds of being attacked are extremely remote, and it's unlikely that most people will ever even see a mountain lion due to their well-known avoidance of humans. I've hiked in mountain lion territory all my life - I've never seen one and probably never will, though I know it's very possible that some of them have seen me. Rattlesnakes are a considerably bigger concern for me on the trail than mountain lions. It's true that there are likely more mountain lions around than there were 30-40 years ago, and there are more sightings than there used to be, but there does not seem to be any statistical increase in attacks on humans. While mountain lions (like coyotes) do pose a potential danger to pets that are left outdoors, the danger to humans is negligible.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#31 Post by Scott G r u n e r » October 5th, 2019, 11:38 am

Human hubris to think in terms of having to interventionally manage all forms of nature.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#32 Post by David Wright » October 5th, 2019, 3:26 pm

david paly wrote:
October 5th, 2019, 6:12 am
They [mountain lions] are closely related to house cats- the largest in the genus Felix in the world so are not truly lions. [. . .]
Cougars/mountain lions are not particularly closely related to the domestic cat. Once upon a time, all cats big and small, were lumped together in the genus Felis. The African lion was Felis leo. Nowadays, the lion is Panthera leo, the cougar/mtn lion is Puma concolor, and the domestic cat is Felis catus. (Floridians call their cougars “Florida panthers.”)

A pair of cougars/mountain lions/Sonoma panthers is definitely a good omen.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#33 Post by Tom G l a s g o w » October 5th, 2019, 7:46 pm

David Wright wrote:
October 5th, 2019, 3:26 pm
david paly wrote:
October 5th, 2019, 6:12 am
They [mountain lions] are closely related to house cats- the largest in the genus Felix in the world so are not truly lions. [. . .]
Cougars/mountain lions are not particularly closely related to the domestic cat. Once upon a time, all cats big and small, were lumped together in the genus Felis. The African lion was Felis leo. Nowadays, the lion is Panthera leo, the cougar/mtn lion is Puma concolor, and the domestic cat is Felis catus. (Floridians call their cougars “Florida panthers.”)

A pair of cougars/mountain lions/Sonoma panthers is definitely a good omen.
Good omen! How many cases are you in for?

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Re: Mountain Lions

#34 Post by Ian S » October 6th, 2019, 6:12 am

I see these all the time - some of my wife's divorced friends are cougars.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#35 Post by Ian Alper » October 6th, 2019, 3:59 pm

Here is a great website for those interested. Lets me see who is in my neighborhood!

http://www.santacruzpumas.org/

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Re: Mountain Lions

#36 Post by Nathan Smyth » February 17th, 2020, 1:03 pm

6-year-old girl attacked by mountain lion, saved by adult who punched cat in ribs during mauling
By Jon Haworth
February 17, 2020, 5:32 AM

...The incident occurred on Sunday morning just before 10 a.m. in the Rancho San Antonio County Park and Open Space Preserve in Santa Clara County, California, when the six-year-old was walking with her parents in a group of six adults and four children when the mountain lion suddenly jumped out of the bushes and began to attack the child...

https://abcnews.go.com/US/girl-attacked ... d=69027052

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Re: Mountain Lions

#37 Post by Bdklein » February 17th, 2020, 1:13 pm

Scott G r u n e r wrote:
October 3rd, 2019, 7:27 am
Casey Hartlip wrote:
October 3rd, 2019, 5:15 am
I'm not a fan of MTN lions. If you have any domestic animals or house pets they will be in danger. When they have no fear of humans I don't think that's a good thing.
We have occasional Cougar attacks in washington. Wouldn’t happen if we weren’t shrinking and dividing up their territory. They were here first and our suburbian invasion is the issue. Seems “stand your ground” laws should apply here in favor of the cougars.

I was once attacked by a cougar . My college roommates didn’t believe me.
Bruce Klein

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Re: Mountain Lions

#38 Post by Nathan Smyth » February 17th, 2020, 1:16 pm

One final point about these cats: From what I've read, the prophylactic rabies immunoglobulin treatments, administered s/p an intimate encounter with a warm-blooded predator, have retail prices ranging from $75,000 to $125,000.

For folks who already can't afford health insurance, that would be a financial death knell.

And even folks with 90/10 policies would be looking at $7500 to $12,500 out-of-pocket expenses [plus whatever their deductibles amounted to].

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Re: Mountain Lions

#39 Post by David Glasser » February 17th, 2020, 8:31 pm

Bdklein wrote:
February 17th, 2020, 1:13 pm
Scott G r u n e r wrote:
October 3rd, 2019, 7:27 am
Casey Hartlip wrote:
October 3rd, 2019, 5:15 am
I'm not a fan of MTN lions. If you have any domestic animals or house pets they will be in danger. When they have no fear of humans I don't think that's a good thing.
We have occasional Cougar attacks in washington. Wouldn’t happen if we weren’t shrinking and dividing up their territory. They were here first and our suburbian invasion is the issue. Seems “stand your ground” laws should apply here in favor of the cougars.

I was once attacked by a cougar . My college roommates didn’t believe me.
But did Penthouse publish your letter?

Lemme guess... you escaped in true Wine Berserker fashion by braining her with the bottle of Rombauer?

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Re: Mountain Lions

#40 Post by S. Rash » February 18th, 2020, 11:29 am

Cougars in the Vineyard!! Must be Rose time
S t e p h e n

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Re: Mountain Lions

#41 Post by lleichtman » February 18th, 2020, 3:53 pm

We saw two cougars during mid-day on a trip up to Chalone. Two Coyotes as well.
Lawrence G. Leichtman

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Re: Mountain Lions

#42 Post by Casey Hartlip » February 18th, 2020, 4:47 pm

If a mtn lion was crossing the road on my property, let's just say I wouldn't hit the brakes to miss it.
Ordway's Valley Foothills

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Re: Mountain Lions

#43 Post by Sean Devaney » February 18th, 2020, 5:25 pm

Only time I ever encountered a Mountain Lion was wile driving to our families cabin in the Sierra Nevada at night. We came around a corner and the big cat was crossing the road. It turned to look at our Bronco and just continued to saunter across the highway as if to say "FU I'm the baddest mofo around here". Our friend sleeping in the back woke up and asked why we stopped. He was sorry he missed the cat but saw one a few years later at Rancho San Antonio Open Pace preserve (referenced above) a few years later.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#44 Post by Dale Bowers » February 18th, 2020, 5:29 pm

Mountain lions deserve respect. Yes, they are a top predictor that can interact with humans. Just respect them, avoid encroaching on their habit, and live and let live.
Cheers!

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Re: Mountain Lions

#45 Post by Nathan Smyth » February 18th, 2020, 5:54 pm

Dale Bowers wrote:
February 18th, 2020, 5:29 pm
Just respect them, avoid encroaching on their habit, and live and let live.
The problem here is when lions view little human girls and small women as very tasty appetizers before the main course of German Shepherds & Labrador Retrievers.

People who think that lions look at you as anything other than "Dinner" are people who might be so stupid that Charles Darwin could well have the last laugh.

And I'm not kidding about those rabies immunoglobulin prices - from what I've read - they will bankrupt a normie.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#46 Post by Nick Ellis » February 18th, 2020, 6:19 pm

David Glasser wrote:
February 17th, 2020, 8:31 pm
Bdklein wrote:
February 17th, 2020, 1:13 pm
Scott G r u n e r wrote:
October 3rd, 2019, 7:27 am

.
But did Penthouse publish your letter?

Lemme guess... you escaped in true Wine Berserker fashion by braining her with the bottle of Rombauer?
[rofl.gif]

Rombauer!

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Re: Mountain Lions

#47 Post by Wes Barton » February 18th, 2020, 6:34 pm

Nathan Smyth wrote:
February 18th, 2020, 5:54 pm
Dale Bowers wrote:
February 18th, 2020, 5:29 pm
Just respect them, avoid encroaching on their habit, and live and let live.
The problem here is when lions view little human girls and small women as very tasty appetizers before the main course of German Shepherds & Labrador Retrievers.

People who think that lions look at you as anything other than "Dinner" are people who might be so stupid that Charles Darwin could well have the last laugh.

And I'm not kidding about those rabies immunoglobulin prices - from what I've read - they will bankrupt a normie.
They don't. Sorry.

I'm sure that girls strayed ahead or off from the group and triggered an instinctual reaction.

A lot of the mountain lions here have tracking devices broadcasting their gps. It's also normal these days for people living up in the foothills and mountains to have motion operated cameras. The lions are around people all the time. We aren't their preferred food, and there's no shortage of food for them. Deer and the other critters thrive around human population, driving their numbers artificially high.

Cougars hunt the same way as house cats - taking their prey from behind. They don't get rabies at anywhere near the rate as animals like dogs because of that. But, the behavior of any rabid animal will be completely different. If you've read about peoples' encounters with rabid raccoons, for example, it's scary.
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Re: Mountain Lions

#48 Post by Nathan Smyth » April 1st, 2020, 7:06 pm

Child hospitalized after coyote attack in East Bay park
https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/04/01/ ... -bay-park/

PUBLISHED: April 1, 2020 at 5:28 p.m. | UPDATED: April 1, 2020 at 7:00 p.m.

DUBLIN — East Bay Regional Park District staff closed Dublin Hills Regional Park to visitors after a 5-year-old girl was attacked and bitten by a coyote Wednesday afternoon, authorities said...

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Re: Mountain Lions

#49 Post by Nathan Smyth » April 1st, 2020, 7:07 pm

Again, as I understand it, that's gonna be about $75K to $125K for that little girl to get a round of rabies immunoglobulin boosters.

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Re: Mountain Lions

#50 Post by Wes Barton » April 1st, 2020, 8:58 pm

Was the coyote dressed up as a mountain lion? Like, for April Fool's or something?
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