Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

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Jason T
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Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#1 Post by Jason T » September 12th, 2019, 2:19 am

Well, I know where you've been, and can I just say, 'it was not you, it was me?'.

My wife got me into wine 10-ish years ago, and her palate at the time was decidely new-world. And thus, that's the world I knew. From the beginning I definitely trended more towards the restrained version of the new world. Over time I drifted a bit more to the old world, and found I loved Bordeaux and Chinon. But despite a love for restrained new-world Pinot, the handful of Burgundies and Beaujolais I tried just didn't resonate.

Over the last 3 years though my palate has really continued shifting to the old world, though in New Orleans my access to interesting wines wasn't great. Now that I'm in London, I've made a conscious descision to focus entirely on old-world wines, including becoming more familiar with Burgundy.

As part of that I was hoping to identify more 'daily drinker'-type wines and figured maybe it was time to explore Beaujolais in earnest. I picked out maybe 7-8 different producers and have been trying one a week for the last couple of weeks.

I guess instead of saying 'Beaujolais where have you been?' I should so 'Beaujolais, I'm so sorry I waited so long to fall in love with you!'.

I've tremendously enjoyed every one that I've tried. So light, delicate, refreshing. Not overly-serious but still complex enough to make me pause and think for a moment. Completely fine on their own when I want a red but not looking for something 'profound'. And of course tremendous with food.

I realize now that some of that is due to palate shift, and some of it comes down to producer. Before I was rolling the dice whereas now I'm working with retailers whom I trust, know my palate and are making recommendations accordingly. Much higher success rate.

It's a love affair, and one I don't have to feel guilty about, because, SO CHEAP!
Last edited by Jason T on September 12th, 2019, 8:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#2 Post by Richard T r i m p i » September 12th, 2019, 6:58 am

Neal Mollen couldn't be more appreciative of your new discovery.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#3 Post by T. Altmayer » September 12th, 2019, 7:04 am

Agreed, love the wine and also love that fact that it is affordable.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#4 Post by Doug Schulman » September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am

Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#5 Post by Dennis Atick » September 12th, 2019, 9:51 am

Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
+1 Jason- had the same realization about 5 years ago. And a big +1 to what Doug said above.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#6 Post by Neal.Mollen » September 12th, 2019, 9:53 am

Richard T r i m p i wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 6:58 am
Neal Mollen couldn't be more appreciative of your new discovery.

RT
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#7 Post by Jason T » September 12th, 2019, 11:59 am

Dennis Atick wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:51 am
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
+1 Jason- had the same realization about 5 years ago. And a big +1 to what Doug said above.
Oh boy. One love affair at a time, please.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#8 Post by William Kelley » September 12th, 2019, 12:07 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
Too true! I am planning to write an article on aged Beaujolais, and going into some depth on Beaujolais' 20th-century history, looking at the evolution of viticulture, winemaking, and the emergence of the natural wine movement.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#9 Post by Dennis Atick » September 12th, 2019, 12:38 pm

Jason T wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 11:59 am
Dennis Atick wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:51 am
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
+1 Jason- had the same realization about 5 years ago. And a big +1 to what Doug said above.
Oh boy. One love affair at a time, please.
Like this!
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#10 Post by GregT » September 12th, 2019, 12:47 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
This is absolutely true. Those wines seem to age faster than Pinot Noir but they're no less lovely and if you bought them before prices started rising over the past 10 years, you're truly in luck.

And don't overlook Duboeuf. He's kind of a hero in many ways, responsible for keeping a lot of growers in business and you could do a lot worse that trying his cru wines.

It's a lovely area, with rolling green hills and great food, and the wines are good both young and old. A few years ago WB had the idea of creating posts on specific areas and I posted on the various crus of Beaujolais, but I have no idea where that thread is now.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#11 Post by Claus Jeppesen » September 12th, 2019, 12:57 pm

Old Beaujolais is an old story
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#12 Post by Doug Schulman » September 12th, 2019, 1:22 pm

Dennis Atick wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 12:38 pm
Jason T wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 11:59 am
Dennis Atick wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:51 am


+1 Jason- had the same realization about 5 years ago. And a big +1 to what Doug said above.
Oh boy. One love affair at a time, please.
Like this!
That wine is so good! So cheap, too.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#13 Post by Doug Schulman » September 12th, 2019, 1:25 pm

William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
Too true! I am planning to write an article on aged Beaujolais, and going into some depth on Beaujolais' 20th-century history, looking at the evolution of viticulture, winemaking, and the emergence of the natural wine movement.
Nice. I actually think the natural wine movement is a detriment to the region at times (I've had quite a few faulty bottles, even some from reputable producers), but it's definitely part of the modern story. It seems like too few people, even people who are into wine, are aware of how beautiful Beaujolais can become with time in the cellar. Of course, plenty of people here are well aware.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#14 Post by Brian G r a f s t r o m » September 12th, 2019, 1:35 pm

GregT wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 12:47 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
. A few years ago WB had the idea of creating posts on specific areas and I posted on the various crus of Beaujolais, but I have no idea where that thread is now.
I would love to read that post if I can find it.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#15 Post by Nathan V. » September 12th, 2019, 3:35 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 1:25 pm
William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
Too true! I am planning to write an article on aged Beaujolais, and going into some depth on Beaujolais' 20th-century history, looking at the evolution of viticulture, winemaking, and the emergence of the natural wine movement.
Nice. I actually think the natural wine movement is a detriment to the region at times (I've had quite a few faulty bottles, even some from reputable producers), but it's definitely part of the modern story. It seems like too few people, even people who are into wine, are aware of how beautiful Beaujolais can become with time in the cellar. Of course, plenty of people here are well aware.
According to a recent thread it is a lesser region so visiting is a waste of time. It’s can’t be as beautiful as the RN74...
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#16 Post by adam caldwell » September 12th, 2019, 4:22 pm

good post and agreed. I am also in my exploration of the Cru Beaujolais phase as well. Very open to recommendations. Generally I see value, accessibility and drinkability. Its hard to keep the stuff that is ready to drink in the house.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#17 Post by Markus S » September 12th, 2019, 4:48 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 1:25 pm
... I actually think the natural wine movement is a detriment to the region at times (I've had quite a few faulty bottles, even some from reputable producers), but it's definitely part of the modern story.
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#18 Post by Markus S » September 12th, 2019, 4:49 pm

adam caldwell wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 4:22 pm
Generally I see value, accessibility and drinkability. Its hard to keep the stuff that is ready to drink in the house.
Except not so much when you now see $70 bottles of Bojo! [wow.gif]
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#19 Post by William Kelley » September 12th, 2019, 5:34 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 1:25 pm
William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
Too true! I am planning to write an article on aged Beaujolais, and going into some depth on Beaujolais' 20th-century history, looking at the evolution of viticulture, winemaking, and the emergence of the natural wine movement.
Nice. I actually think the natural wine movement is a detriment to the region at times (I've had quite a few faulty bottles, even some from reputable producers), but it's definitely part of the modern story. It seems like too few people, even people who are into wine, are aware of how beautiful Beaujolais can become with time in the cellar. Of course, plenty of people here are well aware.
I do sometimes think it's a pity that so many of the region's aspirational producers tend to head in that direction. More aspiration to produce twenty-year Beaujolais would be nice, too—(though unfortunately in practice that would likely lead to more aggressive extraction and oak, rather than simply concentrated, balanced and unforced wines). The region is certainly big enough to encompass multiple visions and aesthetics.

But more and more of the natural producers are using microscopes and aspiring to make wines that are not merely vinified without sulfites, but clean and stable, too. So that's a positive trend, and for the top fifty or so producers in the region, I would say the future is very bight. For the remaining 2,000+, bulk wine prices are flatlining, and I think existence is highly precarious. So the region is more and more bifurcated in that respect.

In any case, what might be called the "intellectual history" of the natural wine movement is quite interesting, beginning with Chauvet and his influence over Lapierre, and then spreading throughout the Beaujolais, and it emerged in a very different context from that offered by the region today. On the flight over to France, I read an interesting book by Sébastien Lapaque, Chez Marcel Lapierre, which any Francophone Beaujolais fans might enjoy.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#20 Post by Nathan V. » September 12th, 2019, 6:46 pm

William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 5:34 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 1:25 pm
William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 12:07 pm


Too true! I am planning to write an article on aged Beaujolais, and going into some depth on Beaujolais' 20th-century history, looking at the evolution of viticulture, winemaking, and the emergence of the natural wine movement.
Nice. I actually think the natural wine movement is a detriment to the region at times (I've had quite a few faulty bottles, even some from reputable producers), but it's definitely part of the modern story. It seems like too few people, even people who are into wine, are aware of how beautiful Beaujolais can become with time in the cellar. Of course, plenty of people here are well aware.
I do sometimes think it's a pity that so many of the region's aspirational producers tend to head in that direction. More aspiration to produce twenty-year Beaujolais would be nice, too—(though unfortunately in practice that would likely lead to more aggressive extraction and oak, rather than simply concentrated, balanced and unforced wines). The region is certainly big enough to encompass multiple visions and aesthetics.

But more and more of the natural producers are using microscopes and aspiring to make wines that are not merely vinified without sulfites, but clean and stable, too. So that's a positive trend, and for the top fifty or so producers in the region, I would say the future is very bight. For the remaining 2,000+, bulk wine prices are flatlining, and I think existence is highly precarious. So the region is more and more bifurcated in that respect.

In any case, what might be called the "intellectual history" of the natural wine movement is quite interesting, beginning with Chauvet and his influence over Lapierre, and then spreading throughout the Beaujolais, and it emerged in a very different context from that offered by the region today. On the flight over to France, I read an interesting book by Sébastien Lapaque, Chez Marcel Lapierre, which any Francophone Beaujolais fans might enjoy.
If you've never met and talked to Eric Texier you should make the trek down to Charnay. He's literally down the street from John-Paul Brun and has made a study of this. His wines are great too.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#21 Post by Jayson Cohen » September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm

The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.

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#22 Post by William Kelley » September 12th, 2019, 7:20 pm

Nathan V. wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 6:46 pm
If you've never met and talked to Eric Texier you should make the trek down to Charnay. He's literally down the street from John-Paul Brun and has made a study of this. His wines are great too.
I am a fan of Eric's wines and have long wanted to meet him. I need to get my colleague Luis to introduce us.
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#23 Post by William Kelley » September 12th, 2019, 7:23 pm

Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm
The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.
Yeah, and I don't get the impression that importers of older wines are especially seeking it out. Kinda surprised that someone like Mannie Berk hasn't made a push with it (or perhaps he did, and I just missed it). In the last month, I bought a bunch of '71s and '64s with pricing in the 20-35 EUR per bottle range here in France, and the most I have ever spent on a bottle of Beaujolais was something like 120 EUR for a 1945 Fleurie. That level of affordability is just not attainable with old reds from the Côte de Nuits.
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#24 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » September 12th, 2019, 7:26 pm

Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm
The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.
Well, in all fairness, like Kabinett, they are so ridiculously good young and with just a few years, that I cannot keep my grubby paws off them. I think the oldest in my holdings is 2005 and 07. Sheez, even 2017 is drinking gorgeously right now. I have had some sublime ones with 30+ years on them from Bern’s, and they were dirt cheap. Will be there Sunday but with the wrong crowd for mature Beaujolais.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#25 Post by Jayson Cohen » September 12th, 2019, 7:28 pm

William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:23 pm
Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm
The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.
Yeah, and I don't get the impression that importers of older wines are especially seeking it out. Kinda surprised that someone like Mannie Berk hasn't made a push with it (or perhaps he did, and I just missed it). In the last month, I bought a bunch of '71s and '64s with pricing in the 20-35 EUR per bottle range here in France, and the most I have ever spent on a bottle of Beaujolais was something like 120 EUR for a 1945 Fleurie. That level of affordability is just not attainable with old reds from the Côte de Nuits.
I don’t recall seeing a Beaujolais offer like that in the US, but maybe David Lillie/Chambers has and I am just not aware.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#26 Post by Tom G l a s g o w » September 12th, 2019, 7:41 pm

Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:28 pm
William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:23 pm
Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm
The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.
Yeah, and I don't get the impression that importers of older wines are especially seeking it out. Kinda surprised that someone like Mannie Berk hasn't made a push with it (or perhaps he did, and I just missed it). In the last month, I bought a bunch of '71s and '64s with pricing in the 20-35 EUR per bottle range here in France, and the most I have ever spent on a bottle of Beaujolais was something like 120 EUR for a 1945 Fleurie. That level of affordability is just not attainable with old reds from the Côte de Nuits.
I don’t recall seeing a Beaujolais offer like that in the US, but maybe David Lillie/Chambers has and I am just not aware.
I think CSW had an offer for 1998 Chamonard. It may be hard to source older Beaujolais in volume for import.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#27 Post by William Kelley » September 12th, 2019, 7:57 pm

Tom G l a s g o w wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:41 pm
I think CSW had an offer for 1998 Chamonard. It may be hard to source older Beaujolais in volume for import.
They late release! Offering 1997s and 1999s at the moment along with newer vintages.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#28 Post by Kirk.Grant » September 12th, 2019, 8:44 pm

I never started aging them until 2009...but I've been lucky to have a few 96's & 2000's along the way. I don't think it will be too long before the better producers are allocated and buying history may impact your ability to get what you want (or 1/3 of what you used to).
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#29 Post by R Roberts » September 12th, 2019, 9:54 pm

Kirk.Grant wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 8:44 pm
I never started aging them until 2009...but I've been lucky to have a few 96's & 2000's along the way. I don't think it will be too long before the better producers are allocated and buying history may impact your ability to get what you want (or 1/3 of what you used to).
Do you think the demand is that close to outstripping the supply? I would think if anything the prices will creep up first.

There are certainly some good values, but there is also the minefield of natural wine roulette that will put off plenty of consumers.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#30 Post by joz€f p1nxten » September 13th, 2019, 1:53 am

Kirk.Grant wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 8:44 pm
I never started aging them until 2009...but I've been lucky to have a few 96's & 2000's along the way. I don't think it will be too long before the better producers are allocated and buying history may impact your ability to get what you want (or 1/3 of what you used to).
Clos de la roilette was easily available at the estate. Bouland on the other hand was not available for purchase at the estate. So I think you are right that it's moving in that direction, but only a few estates are concerned.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#31 Post by Mike Evans » September 13th, 2019, 5:40 am

Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm
The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.
I still have a little 1997, 1998, and 1999 Roilette Tardive and 1997s from Desvignes, Lapierre, Rochette, and Savoye. Almost all of these have been enjoyable over the past several years.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#32 Post by Nathan V. » September 13th, 2019, 5:59 am

William Kelley wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:23 pm
Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm
The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.
Yeah, and I don't get the impression that importers of older wines are especially seeking it out. Kinda surprised that someone like Mannie Berk hasn't made a push with it (or perhaps he did, and I just missed it). In the last month, I bought a bunch of '71s and '64s with pricing in the 20-35 EUR per bottle range here in France, and the most I have ever spent on a bottle of Beaujolais was something like 120 EUR for a 1945 Fleurie. That level of affordability is just not attainable with old reds from the Côte de Nuits.
On this note, I was lucky enough to drink a bunch of Beaujolais from the 60s and 70s that my friends grandfather, who owned a restaurant/hotel in Divonne, had bottled himself! They were remarkably full of life in the 2000s.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#33 Post by Nathan V. » September 13th, 2019, 6:03 am

Kirk.Grant wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 8:44 pm
I never started aging them until 2009...but I've been lucky to have a few 96's & 2000's along the way. I don't think it will be too long before the better producers are allocated and buying history may impact your ability to get what you want (or 1/3 of what you used to).
In my market Roilette, Foillard, Dutraive and Lapierre are all allocated.

Descombes is readily available and I find that I like them more than most Foillard and Lapierre in a similar GoF way.

The two producers that everyone should be paying attention to for classically styled wines are Brun and Desvignes, IMO.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#34 Post by Claus Jeppesen » September 13th, 2019, 7:02 am

adam caldwell wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 4:22 pm
good post and agreed. I am also in my exploration of the Cru Beaujolais phase as well. Very open to recommendations. Generally I see value, accessibility and drinkability. Its hard to keep the stuff that is ready to drink in the house.
This is my primary rec:
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#35 Post by M.Kaplan » September 13th, 2019, 1:46 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:26 pm
...
Well, in all fairness, like Kabinett, they are so ridiculously good young and with just a few years, that I cannot keep my grubby paws off them.
...
This, exactly. I love the exuberance of young Beaujolais.
---Mark

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#36 Post by adam caldwell » September 13th, 2019, 9:32 pm

Claus Jeppesen wrote:
September 13th, 2019, 7:02 am
adam caldwell wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 4:22 pm
good post and agreed. I am also in my exploration of the Cru Beaujolais phase as well. Very open to recommendations. Generally I see value, accessibility and drinkability. Its hard to keep the stuff that is ready to drink in the house.
This is my primary rec:
Thanks Claus, I will check it out for sure.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#37 Post by m. ristev » September 13th, 2019, 10:17 pm

lucien le moine released a series of 2015 cru bottlings called 'horizon 50 ans' ...i guess he thinks they can take 50 years in bottle? i haven't seen them for sale very often, let alone any notes but at pushing 200 euro a mag it seems overly expensive. interesting intent though...
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#38 Post by Claus Jeppesen » September 14th, 2019, 1:03 am

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:26 pm
Jayson Cohen wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 7:12 pm
The trick with aging Beaujolais is not to drink it young. :) Even among the AFWE for lack of a better term, including many friends, they don’t let their Beaujolais age. Or don’t want to.

Should we create a poll? Who has aged Beaujolais more than 20 years after vintage? My oldest are just getting there personally, and I think 1999 was the first vintage I bought with the purpose of aging.
Well, in all fairness, like Kabinett, they are so ridiculously good young and with just a few years, that I cannot keep my grubby paws off them. I think the oldest in my holdings is 2005 and 07. Sheez, even 2017 is drinking gorgeously right now. I have had some sublime ones with 30+ years on them from Bern’s, and they were dirt cheap. Will be there Sunday but with the wrong crowd for mature Beaujolais.
Kabinett is even more ridiculously delicious mature (15-30 years old)
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#39 Post by Doug Schulman » September 14th, 2019, 12:57 pm

Nathan V. wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 3:35 pm
According to a recent thread it is a lesser region so visiting is a waste of time. It’s can’t be as beautiful as the RN74...
Nice! I'm always happy to see people disparage these wines so prices stay nice and low. I can even afford the top wines (and in multiples).
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#40 Post by Doug Schulman » September 14th, 2019, 1:07 pm

Markus S wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 4:48 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 1:25 pm
... I actually think the natural wine movement is a detriment to the region at times (I've had quite a few faulty bottles, even some from reputable producers), but it's definitely part of the modern story.
Metras?
I don't have much experience with Metras, but the style does concern me. I'm not a buyer. Foillard too. I seriously don't understand all of the praise, and I have significantly more experience there. I strongly suspect a lot of people will be disappointed when they start opening old bottles of Foillard to find that some have not aged well at all (people will inevitably chime in to say they've had lots of great old Foillard, and I'll guess now that many of those experiences were in Beaujolais -- the supply chain is not kind to wines like this even when care is taken). Even Lapierre has had problems that I've found in quite a few bottles from '09 and '15 (I'm sure it's no coincidence that these are ripe vintages). We had to return cases of '15 because microbial problems bad enough to start pushing corks. There are far worse worse producers whose names I have thankfully forgotten.
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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#41 Post by derekrusalen » September 19th, 2019, 9:12 am

I love the Beaujolais crus Morgon and Moulin a Vent
I have few bottles in my cellar now of Morgon 2015 Moulin a Vent and Morgon 2017 from Tramier & Fils

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#42 Post by GregT » September 19th, 2019, 1:02 pm

Brian G r a f s t r o m wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 1:35 pm
GregT wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 12:47 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
September 12th, 2019, 9:29 am
Your next Beaujolais epiphanies could be with 20-30 year old bottles. That would take this whole thing to another level.
A few years ago WB had the idea of creating posts on specific areas and I posted on the various crus of Beaujolais, but I have no idea where that thread is now.
I would love to read that post if I can find it.
Found it. Might change a few things were I writing it now. Also, keep in mind that it's about ten years old.

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Re: Beaujolais, where have you been my whole life?

#43 Post by Brian G r a f s t r o m » September 19th, 2019, 1:06 pm

Thanks, Greg. About to click-in now. [cheers.gif]
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