09 Wine

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
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Jeremy Holmes
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09 Wine

#1 Post by Jeremy Holmes » August 13th, 2019, 12:28 am

Rod decided that Monday Table should have a look at 2009 Burgundy, after a couple of 2002 Champagnes that is. We had an excellent meal at Matilda in Melbourne.

2002 Pol Roger Champagne Cuvée Sir Winston Churchill: A fresh nose of ripe apple, toast and peach. It is complex, full and rich, with a relatively high dosage feel, countered by chalky acidity. Length is good.

2002 Salon Champagne Blanc de Blancs Brut: Pure white peach and green apple fruits. There’s a hint of spice and good richness. It is certainly ripe yet possesses a high degree of elegance and a long finish that is loaded with chalk and flint.


2009 Maison Leroy Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières: A punchy, tropical nose of pineapple, mango and apricot. It is a rich wine but also with a high degree of precision and freshness. Drinking right in the zone.

2009 Olivier Leflaive Montrachet, Grand Cru: A dense and powerful wine that has just had the edges planed off a little by some oxidation. There are petrol and sappy white peach notes and it is unctuous of feel with good acidity buried under the flesh.

2009 Domaine Marc-Antonin Blain Bâtard-Montrachet, Grand Cru: Quite a bit of spearmint and spice along with pure white peach fruit. It is an elegant Bâtard, of moderate weight but beautifully long, fine and persistent.

2009 François Raveneau Chablis 1er Cru Les Forêts: White peach, fennel and white flowers on the nose. Rich, sappy and layered in the mouth. Good volume and a clean and fresh finish.


2009 Louis Jadot Charmes-Chambertin, Grand Cru: Charming, opulent and ready to go. Pretty red and blue fruits. Good flesh and perfume and really breathes up ion the glass. Textural with a savoury closure.

2009 Domaine Tortochot Charmes-Chambertin, Grand Cru: Meaty, funky, wild and woolly.

2009 Domaine Humbert Frères Charmes-Chambertin, Grand Cru: A whiff of clay, a shot of espresso and deep dark fruits. Good density and weight. Rich and creamy and crammed with black cherry and earthy flavours.

2009 Leflaive et Associés Charmes-Chambertin, Grand Cru: There’s some smoke to the aroma along with rose petals, pomegranate and raspberry. It is elegant and nicely detailed, with good finesse and persistence.

2009 Bonneau du Martray Corton, Grand Cru: Very youthful and quite tight, showing a glimpse of red berry and some meat. Chalky of structure and long and dry.

2009 Domaine Dujac Bonnes Mares, Grand Cru: A highly perfumed nose of rose petals, root vegetables, pomegranate, dark cherry and earth. It is rich. Complex and layered, a highly perfumed yet supremely powerful wine. Delicious now, even better in another 10 years.

2009 Egly-Ouriet Coteaux Champenois Cuvée des Grands Côtés Vieilles Vignes Rouge Ambonnay: Kind of has a ‘Leroyesque’ smokiness with real floral spice lift. It is only mid-weight but has lovely balance and has some beef stock and Hoisin development. With further air the scent of violets appears.

2009 Domaine Armand Rousseau Père et Fils Chambertin, Grand Cru: Big G made comment that ‘Chambertin is the sort of wine that makes Willy Wagtails fight Emus. It certainly made me feel strong. This is an even and calm wine, with real latent power. There are berry and cherry fruits and a cool feel. It is complex and voluminous, with great breadth and outstanding length. It strikes the perfect balance between sweet and savoury elements.

2009 Domaine Armand Rousseau Père et Fils Chambertin-Clos de Bèze, Grand Cru: A sweet core of fruit and more opulent than the Chambertin at this stage. It is luscious and velvety, with spiced laden red and black fruits that glide over the palate. There’s great depth here but also a lightness in the mouth and the long finish is carried by sweet tannins.

2009 Domaine Château De La Tour Clos Vougeot Vieilles Vignes: Very primary, smelling of Vitamin B and ripe berry fruit. It is rich and dense, with so much power and presence. The finish is quite stony and possesses so much grip. Should be pretty special in two or three decades.

2009 Maison Albert Bichot Grands-Echezeaux Domaine du Clos Frantin: Had a bit too much coffee and chocolate and I just reckon may have suffered from a little bit of oxidation.


2011 Château d'Yquem, Sauternes: Immediately expressive, showing notes of apricot, coconut, lavender and vanilla. Explosive in the mouth, dripping with luscious fruits and exotic spices. There is so much happening in the mouth, even after swallowing.

2015 Château d'Yquem, Sauternes: One of my favourite young Yquems. Complex aromatics of passionfruit, coconut, apricot and honey. It hits the palate with a hit of sweetness then continues to build. There’s terrific underlying acidity and for a wine of such flavour intensity it is light on its feet. Length is simply superb.


1909 Laurent Viguier Sainte Croix: Plenty of Indian spice on the nose. It is full and sweet in the mouth, with notes of salty plum, chocolate and grilled nuts. It has nice finesse and decent persistence.
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Re: 09 Wine

#2 Post by William Kelley » August 13th, 2019, 3:52 am

Nice notes. Was the Olivier Leflaive still under natural cork at that point? I presume so.

For some reason your comment about the Chambertin reminded me of Saintsbury's line about Montrachet to the effect that "it makes your veins swell like whipcord".
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Re: 09 Wine

#3 Post by Jeremy Holmes » August 13th, 2019, 4:22 am

Hi William,

I didn't see the cork, I assume it was natural. having had their '09 Batard and Corton-Charlemagne recently, and both of them showing particularly well, I had hoped the Monty would have shone.

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Re: 09 Wine

#4 Post by Joshua Kates » August 13th, 2019, 4:26 am

Thanks for the notes, Jeremy (and the citation, William),
(I had to look up "willy wagtails.") I opened an '09 Fourrier G-C VV this weekend; after an initial blast of raspberry and plum, it settled into a more subdued, sinuous delicious drink, still recognizable as Burgundy and Gevrey.

Is it your opinion, then, Jeremy, and yours William, that despite worries about overripeness or their being "too big," the '09's are serious wines giving serious pleasure and enjoyment relatively early (which has largely been my experience)?

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Re: 09 Wine

#5 Post by William Kelley » August 13th, 2019, 5:59 am

Joshua Kates wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:26 am
Thanks for the notes, Jeremy (and the citation, William),
(I had to look up "willy wagtails.") I opened an '09 Fourrier G-C VV this weekend; after an initial blast of raspberry and plum, it settled into a more subdued, sinuous delicious drink, still recognizable as Burgundy and Gevrey.

Is it your opinion, then, Jeremy, and yours William, that despite worries about overripeness or their being "too big," the '09's are serious wines giving serious pleasure and enjoyment relatively early (which has largely been my experience)?
I haven't run into many overripe 2009s Burgundies, but I do find that both reds and (especially) whites can simply be a bit boring and facile, without much energy or concentration. To be clear, plenty of great wines were produced, and Jeremy tasted several, but I think many are marked by the comparatively large yields of the vintage and the comparatively low acidities. Raphaël Coche likes to call it the year with the 'flat electroencephalogram', meaning it lacks what one might call signs of life, and I don't disagree. I am happy to have the 2009 Burgundies that I purchased in my cellar, and it's a vintage I look for on restaurant lists in the search for something open and expressive, but it isn't a vintage I'm trying to backfill with (and it is generally quite aggressively priced now).
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Re: 09 Wine

#6 Post by Joshua Kates » August 13th, 2019, 6:49 am

Great characterization, William,

Very helpful and very clear. Obviously, I taste far fewer Burgundies than you, and I don't really own much white. The reds from my own cellar that I've had so far I've been happy with (and a few from restaurant wine lists as well). But what you say seems spot on and sums up succinctly much of what's been said around the vintage. Maybe I'll have to do some '09/'10 comparisons to see if I find these differences myself.

Thanks again!

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Re: 09 Wine

#7 Post by A Songeur » August 13th, 2019, 8:53 am

What are the producers that avoided the facile plague? Interesting is Grivot as I just checked I bought very long on Grivot (not a bad idea as he then increased his prices big time... but only if the wines are any good...)
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Re: 09 Wine

#8 Post by Brady Daniels » August 13th, 2019, 9:14 am

A Songeur wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 8:53 am
What are the producers that avoided the facile plague? Interesting is Grivot as I just checked I bought very long on Grivot (not a bad idea as he then increased his prices big time... but only if the wines are any good...)
I think your Grivots will be fine, Antoine.

I don’t think facile is a plague in this case, just a broad vintage characteristic. At the '09 EP tastings I was terrified because I thought the wines seemed Californian. As usual, I learned that I know nothing. The wines quickly transformed to proper burgundy, though from a ripe vintage. I loved them young, not so much now, but expect I will again when they shed more baby fat. My criticism of the vintage is low detectable acidity. Hopefully with time, as the fruit subsides, the wines will seem balanced. I’d bet on it.

For those of you nervous about ‘09, you’d better back fill other vintages now. 2017 was hot, and I’m told 2018 was the hottest year in burgundy ever, dwarfing 2003. Happily the growers seem to have learned a great deal since that candied vintage.

I wonder what impact the monster 2019 heat waves have had?
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Re: 09 Wine

#9 Post by Doug Schulman » August 13th, 2019, 9:18 am

Jeremy, how do you think the Egly-Ouriet compared to some of the Burgundies in terms of quality?
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Re: 09 Wine

#10 Post by Brady Daniels » August 13th, 2019, 9:18 am

William Kelley wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 5:59 am
I am happy to have the 2009 Burgundies that I purchased in my cellar, and it's a vintage I look for on restaurant lists in the search for something open and expressive, but it isn't a vintage I'm trying to backfill with (and it is generally quite aggressively priced now).
Aggressive as in low? Any suggestions where to find some properly stored '09’s? Or do you mean in the broad wine searcher sense?
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Re: 09 Wine

#11 Post by A Songeur » August 13th, 2019, 1:55 pm

Brady, I suppose William means high prices... which would deter him from backfilling even if he wanted to.
Hoping you are doing well across the pond...
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Re: 09 Wine

#12 Post by William Kelley » August 13th, 2019, 2:26 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 9:18 am
Jeremy, how do you think the Egly-Ouriet compared to some of the Burgundies in terms of quality?
Not Jeremy, and I haven't had the 2009 recently, but it can be right up there. It has its own style, but if you had to place it in Burgundy you might think of higher-altitude Chambolle I guess. The 2015 and 2012 that I drank a couple of months ago were brilliant.

The plot is right in the heart of Ambonnay, in a gentle depression where the soil is a bit deeper and the mesclimate a bit warmer. The vines are very old but Francis still does a green harvest to keep the yields down. He has tried making still wines elsewhere in his holdings and says it just doesn't work.
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Re: 09 Wine

#13 Post by William Kelley » August 13th, 2019, 2:26 pm

A Songeur wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 1:55 pm
Brady, I suppose William means high prices... which would deter him from backfilling even if he wanted to.
Hoping you are doing well across the pond...
That's right!
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Re: 09 Wine

#14 Post by William Kelley » August 13th, 2019, 2:27 pm

Jeremy Holmes wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:22 am
Hi William,

I didn't see the cork, I assume it was natural. having had their '09 Batard and Corton-Charlemagne recently, and both of them showing particularly well, I had hoped the Monty would have shone.

Cheers
Jeremy
I just tasted through their 2017s: the "Récolte du Domaine" bottlings (now under DIAM10) are seriously good and well worth seeking out!
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Re: 09 Wine

#15 Post by Rauno E (NZ) » August 13th, 2019, 3:24 pm

FWIW I've had several vintages of the Egly and been thoroughly underwhelmed. Expensive, not really burgundian, and perhaps at the level of some of the better Village wines from the CdN. Obviously YMMV, as does William's! I would be more inclined to lump it in with German and Austrian PN, and it should be priced accordingly as a "fun" $50 wine...
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Re: 09 Wine

#16 Post by Brad England » August 13th, 2019, 3:49 pm

I was also guilty of under-rating the 2009 burgundy vintage after release. I've came to appreciate them and find they are generally drinking well early which is a plus (at my age). Editing to add I was referring to the reds.
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Re: 09 Wine

#17 Post by Howard Cooper » August 13th, 2019, 4:03 pm

Brady Daniels wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 9:14 am

For those of you nervous about ‘09, you’d better back fill other vintages now. 2017 was hot, and I’m told 2018 was the hottest year in burgundy ever, dwarfing 2003. Happily the growers seem to have learned a great deal since that candied vintage.

I have only had 2017s from barrel (a year ago and that was from producers I like), but it did not tasted like a really hot vintage in that the wines seemed to have adequate acidity. That is not to say the acidity was as high as in 2008, 2010 or 2014, but, to me, it seemed like around the acidity in 2007s (I am talking reds). I guess I will know better and from a larger range of wines next March at the next Paulee Grand Tasting.
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Re: 09 Wine

#18 Post by Jeremy Holmes » August 13th, 2019, 4:15 pm

The '09 whites are certainly ripe, a little tropical and low in acidity. There is some pleasure to be derived but I'd much rather be drinking the '11's.

I didn't buy a huge amount of '09 reds on release but quite like where they are now. They have calmed down and there is good perfume.

Doug, The Egly certainly held its own. It was browning a little and was more advanced than the other wines but it was certainly spicy and overt and a real crowd pleaser.
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Re: 09 Wine

#19 Post by Kent Comley » August 13th, 2019, 4:17 pm

It seemed to me at the time that the severe price escalation of Burgs really hit it straps with the '09 vintage and I did not buy heavily. I liked '08 and '10 and I was weary that the wines might be a bit tough. In hindsight they now look cheap and a couple of recent wines have developed nicely and as has been noted above been relatively approachable.
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Re: 09 Wine

#20 Post by William Kelley » August 13th, 2019, 4:33 pm

Howard Cooper wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:03 pm
Brady Daniels wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 9:14 am

For those of you nervous about ‘09, you’d better back fill other vintages now. 2017 was hot, and I’m told 2018 was the hottest year in burgundy ever, dwarfing 2003. Happily the growers seem to have learned a great deal since that candied vintage.

I have only had 2017s from barrel (a year ago and that was from producers I like), but it did not tasted like a really hot vintage in that the wines seemed to have adequate acidity. That is not to say the acidity was as high as in 2008, 2010 or 2014, but, to me, it seemed like around the acidity in 2007s (I am talking reds). I guess I will know better and from a larger range of wines next March at the next Paulee Grand Tasting.
Analytically, 2017 is definitely below-average in acidity, especially the reds. For reds, I really think the best analogy would be a cleaner, purer version of 2000. For white, for a variety of reasons, 1992 might be the best comparison, though the wines are probably a bit lower in acidity than the 1992s.
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Re: 09 Wine

#21 Post by William Kelley » August 13th, 2019, 4:35 pm

Jeremy Holmes wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:15 pm
The whites are certainly ripe, a little tropical and low in acidity. There is some pleasure to be derived but I'd much rather be drinking the '11's.

I didn't buy a huge amount of '09 reds on release but quite like where they are now. They have calmed down and there is good perfume.

Doug, The Egly certainly held its own. It was browning a little and was more advanced than the other wines but it was certainly spicy and overt and a real crowd pleaser.
I will have to try to persuade Francis to do a vertical of it some time. Drop me a note when you'll next be in Champagne, Jeremy!
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Re: 09 Wine

#22 Post by Jay Miller » August 13th, 2019, 4:45 pm

I'm also in the camp of people who thought the 09s overripe on release but thought they firmed up nicely after some time in the bottle.
Ripe fruit isn't necessarily a flaw.

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Re: 09 Wine

#23 Post by Doug Schulman » August 14th, 2019, 8:48 am

William Kelley wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 2:26 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 9:18 am
Jeremy, how do you think the Egly-Ouriet compared to some of the Burgundies in terms of quality?
Not Jeremy, and I haven't had the 2009 recently, but it can be right up there. It has its own style, but if you had to place it in Burgundy you might think of higher-altitude Chambolle I guess. The 2015 and 2012 that I drank a couple of months ago were brilliant.

The plot is right in the heart of Ambonnay, in a gentle depression where the soil is a bit deeper and the mesclimate a bit warmer. The vines are very old but Francis still does a green harvest to keep the yields down. He has tried making still wines elsewhere in his holdings and says it just doesn't work.
Thanks, William. I have tasted the wine before, although I forget which vintage. I thought it was very impressive and that it would be interested to try the wine alongside some nice Burgundies for context. Of course, you have that context in your head, so I appreciate your comments.
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Re: 09 Wine

#24 Post by Keith Levenberg » August 14th, 2019, 10:45 am

I agree the issue with 2009 is far more often a certain listlessness than overripeness - the EEG remark is funny. But if the 1959s came out fine, hard to imagine the 2009s won't.

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Re: 09 Wine

#25 Post by alan weinberg » August 14th, 2019, 3:05 pm

funny to realize that 09 is already 10 years on. Clive Coates annually did a 10 year retrospective in The Vine that I enjoyed; this thread was helpful. I think I’d have trouble with Tuesday if I ever did Monday table. It’d likely be Tuesday bed until Wednesday.

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Re: 09 Wine

#26 Post by Fred C » August 14th, 2019, 3:17 pm

William Kelley wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:33 pm
Howard Cooper wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:03 pm
Brady Daniels wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 9:14 am

For those of you nervous about ‘09, you’d better back fill other vintages now. 2017 was hot, and I’m told 2018 was the hottest year in burgundy ever, dwarfing 2003. Happily the growers seem to have learned a great deal since that candied vintage.

I have only had 2017s from barrel (a year ago and that was from producers I like), but it did not tasted like a really hot vintage in that the wines seemed to have adequate acidity. That is not to say the acidity was as high as in 2008, 2010 or 2014, but, to me, it seemed like around the acidity in 2007s (I am talking reds). I guess I will know better and from a larger range of wines next March at the next Paulee Grand Tasting.
Analytically, 2017 is definitely below-average in acidity, especially the reds. For reds, I really think the best analogy would be a cleaner, purer version of 2000. For white, for a variety of reasons, 1992 might be the best comparison, though the wines are probably a bit lower in acidity than the 1992s.
Does that mean you’re noticing some botrytis in 2017 whites given the 1992 comparison?
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Re: 09 Wine

#27 Post by William Kelley » August 14th, 2019, 3:21 pm

Keith Levenberg wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 10:45 am
I agree the issue with 2009 is far more often a certain listlessness than overripeness - the EEG remark is funny. But if the 1959s came out fine, hard to imagine the 2009s won't.
A lot changed, as I don't need to remind you, between 1959 and 2009: fertilizers and other agrochemicals, clones, etc etc. As did the idea of what constituted a generous yield. 1959 was considered to be a big crop at the time but was nothing compared to 2009. So I think that 2009s with a flat EEG likely also signed a waiver saying "do not resuscitate". FWIW, I think 1959 may find a better analogy with the 2015 vintage.

Of course, anyone wanting to dump their 2009 Coche-Dury wines at below-market prices should feel free to get in touch.
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Re: 09 Wine

#28 Post by William Kelley » August 14th, 2019, 3:26 pm

Fred C wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 3:17 pm
William Kelley wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:33 pm
Howard Cooper wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 4:03 pm


I have only had 2017s from barrel (a year ago and that was from producers I like), but it did not tasted like a really hot vintage in that the wines seemed to have adequate acidity. That is not to say the acidity was as high as in 2008, 2010 or 2014, but, to me, it seemed like around the acidity in 2007s (I am talking reds). I guess I will know better and from a larger range of wines next March at the next Paulee Grand Tasting.
Analytically, 2017 is definitely below-average in acidity, especially the reds. For reds, I really think the best analogy would be a cleaner, purer version of 2000. For white, for a variety of reasons, 1992 might be the best comparison, though the wines are probably a bit lower in acidity than the 1992s.
Does that mean you’re noticing some botrytis in 2017 whites given the 1992 comparison?
Interesting question! I drank the 1992 Leflaive Chevalier with Michel Bettane recently, and I remarked on what—to me—were the clearly botryized aromas of the wine. He insisted he had seen the harvest chez Leflaive and that there was no botrytis: the grapes were clean and golden. This tallies with observations from a couple of winemakers I have discussed the 1992s with. Having spent the 2017 harvest in Burgundy, I can testify that there was very little botrytis. Yet many of the wines have quite exotic floral/fruit tones, redolent of citrus blossom, that I can certainly see developing into the kind of expression one finds in lots of 1992s. Perhaps it's because I spend a lot of time in the Mâconnais, but I find myself increasingly open to appreciating more musky expressions of Chardonnay that I once rejected. But in any case, if one comes to think that terroir is expressed largely by a wine's structure and balance and less by its aromas (as I do), one's mind broadens.
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Re: 09 Wine

#29 Post by Brad England » August 14th, 2019, 4:52 pm

As a side note, and slightly off topic. This thread has two of my favorite contributors - Jeremy and William. Really appreciate both of your posts and notes.
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Re: 09 Wine

#30 Post by William Kelley » August 14th, 2019, 5:17 pm

Brad England wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 4:52 pm
As a side note, and slightly off topic. This thread has two of my favorite contributors - Jeremy and William. Really appreciate both of your posts and notes.
Very kind of you to say. Cheers!
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Re: 09 Wine

#31 Post by L e o F r o k i c » August 14th, 2019, 5:25 pm

Keith Levenberg wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 10:45 am
I agree the issue with 2009 is far more often a certain listlessness than overripeness - the EEG remark is funny. But if the 1959s came out fine, hard to imagine the 2009s won't.

This!!!! 1959 is my favorite vintage of all time, Burgundy and Bordeaux. Lab numbers for 1959 were almost the same, patience will be required but patient ones will be rewarded!
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Re: 09 Wine

#32 Post by Jerry Hey » August 14th, 2019, 6:40 pm

2009 Roulot Meursault Perrieres and 2009 Rousseau Clos St Jacques were both outstanding last year at Epicure in Paris.

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Re: 09 Wine

#33 Post by alan weinberg » August 14th, 2019, 7:55 pm

Jerry Hey wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 6:40 pm
2009 Roulot Meursault Perrieres and 2009 Rousseau Clos St Jacques were both outstanding last year at Epicure in Paris.
food wasn’t bad either, I bet.

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Re: 09 Wine

#34 Post by Jerry Hey » August 14th, 2019, 8:05 pm

alan weinberg wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 7:55 pm
Jerry Hey wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 6:40 pm
2009 Roulot Meursault Perrieres and 2009 Rousseau Clos St Jacques were both outstanding last year at Epicure in Paris.
food wasn’t bad either, I bet.
The food at Epicure is near classic perfection.

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Re: 09 Wine

#35 Post by Andrew Hamilton » August 14th, 2019, 8:36 pm

Jerry Hey wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 6:40 pm
2009 Roulot Meursault Perrieres and 2009 Rousseau Clos St Jacques were both outstanding last year at Epicure in Paris.
Thanks Jerry, I've got a single of the 09 Rousseau CSJ. Open sooner or later? I was expecting to give it at least another decade but I could be tempted to open earlier if warranted.
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John Bashford
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Re: 09 Wine

#36 Post by John Bashford » August 15th, 2019, 3:38 am

Thanks Jeremy for the great notes that keep to your usual high standard ! Sounds a great evening.
Our Wednesday group here in Brisbane have 2 dinners this year looking at 09 Grand Crus from Gevrey and Vosne. The Gevrey dinner was held 2 weeks ago and certainly we had no real sense of over-ripeness or lack of structure. Indeed the overall impact was of purity, classical if open fruit characters and underlying structure. In short they were delicious !
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We look forward to the next instalment !

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Kent Comley
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Re: 09 Wine

#37 Post by Kent Comley » August 15th, 2019, 4:50 am

Great notes John on a lovely dinner.
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Martin Buchanan
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Re: 09 Wine

#38 Post by Martin Buchanan » August 15th, 2019, 10:32 am

Interesting to hear the comments on 2009.

For the reds, I think it is a tough vintage to read right now. I loved them from barrel, finding them fresh and clean despite not having tons of acid. I also found them very complex with plenty of ripe tannin. There seemed to be a lot to resolve and I'm not surprised that they remain awkward. I hold out extremely high hopes for them. It's worth noting that my tastings were focussed more on small domaines and that that there are no doubt soft, over-cropped wines across the region.

2009 whites remain a total mystery to me. They were difficult to taste young and have remained so. Wines that one would expect to be overblown are fresh and bright and bottlings from acid lovers are loose. With the terrors of ageing white burgundy it is not a vintage that I'm looking to collect. It may well offer some wonderful surprises down the line though.

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Jeremy Holmes
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Re: 09 Wine

#39 Post by Jeremy Holmes » August 15th, 2019, 4:52 pm

Thank you for the kind comments Brad.

Thank you for the excellent notes John.
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Jürgen Steinke
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Re: 09 Wine

#40 Post by Jürgen Steinke » August 16th, 2019, 5:29 am

I like the 09 vintage in Burgundy and Bordeaux. The wines are indeed a bit lower in acid but the vintage provided a flood of delicious wines even at Bourgogne and Cru Bourgeoise level.IMHO. Wouldn't it be boring if vintages are all the same? I drink my 09 with a lot of pleasure while waiting for the 2010. And I am happy that I have plenty of 09 in my cellar.

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Anthony Hall
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Re: 09 Wine

#41 Post by Anthony Hall » August 16th, 2019, 2:56 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 8:48 am
William Kelley wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 2:26 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 9:18 am
Jeremy, how do you think the Egly-Ouriet compared to some of the Burgundies in terms of quality?
Not Jeremy, and I haven't had the 2009 recently, but it can be right up there. It has its own style, but if you had to place it in Burgundy you might think of higher-altitude Chambolle I guess. The 2015 and 2012 that I drank a couple of months ago were brilliant.

The plot is right in the heart of Ambonnay, in a gentle depression where the soil is a bit deeper and the mesclimate a bit warmer. The vines are very old but Francis still does a green harvest to keep the yields down. He has tried making still wines elsewhere in his holdings and says it just doesn't work.
Thanks, William. I have tasted the wine before, although I forget which vintage. I thought it was very impressive and that it would be interested to try the wine alongside some nice Burgundies for context. Of course, you have that context in your head, so I appreciate your comments.
On the night half the table scored it the highest of its flight of 4. Polarised views on whether you liked its old school Leroy style character or not.
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Re: 09 Wine

#42 Post by Doug Schulman » August 16th, 2019, 3:26 pm

Anthony Hall wrote:
August 16th, 2019, 2:56 pm
Doug Schulman wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 8:48 am
William Kelley wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 2:26 pm


Not Jeremy, and I haven't had the 2009 recently, but it can be right up there. It has its own style, but if you had to place it in Burgundy you might think of higher-altitude Chambolle I guess. The 2015 and 2012 that I drank a couple of months ago were brilliant.

The plot is right in the heart of Ambonnay, in a gentle depression where the soil is a bit deeper and the mesclimate a bit warmer. The vines are very old but Francis still does a green harvest to keep the yields down. He has tried making still wines elsewhere in his holdings and says it just doesn't work.
Thanks, William. I have tasted the wine before, although I forget which vintage. I thought it was very impressive and that it would be interested to try the wine alongside some nice Burgundies for context. Of course, you have that context in your head, so I appreciate your comments.
On the night half the table scored it the highest of its flight of 4. Polarised views on whether you liked its old school Leroy style character or not.
Very interesting. Thanks.
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