Decanting Young Cabs?

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Sh@n A
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Decanting Young Cabs?

#1 Post by Sh@n A » August 4th, 2019, 3:20 pm

What's the protocol for airing young cali cabs? Next week I have on tap, 2015 Robert Mondavi To Kalon, 2016 William & Mary Cabernet, and 2016 William & Mary Proprietary Red. I have a window to double decant them 14 hours before dinner, a window to possibly double decant an hour before, and can pop'n'pour as well (at a steakhouse).
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#2 Post by Chr!s G|@rn3r » August 4th, 2019, 4:44 pm

I had a 2016 W&M cab in February and Will’s advice was “pull the cork on it, maybe sample an oz or so, then let it sit at cellar temp for a few hours. When you get to the restaurant, throw it into a decanter or if they have good Cab stems, just pour some glasses and let it breathe at an arms length.”

Thats what we did and the wine was fantastic. The oz we sampled upon opening was also great so no matter what you do, that wine is going to be excellent.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#3 Post by Sh@n A » August 4th, 2019, 4:47 pm

Thanks Chris! Looking forward to the trio.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#4 Post by Chris T. » August 4th, 2019, 4:48 pm

Outside of sediment reduction - Young Cali cabs are the reason decanting exists
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#5 Post by NickRut » August 4th, 2019, 5:29 pm

That mondavi is a big young cab so I’d decant a while unless you want a big oaky fruit bomb. I’ve had it PnP and I do like big oaky fruit bombs at times so it was good for that.

Wills wines require less time in my experience.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#6 Post by Victor Hong » August 4th, 2019, 6:38 pm

Sh@n A wrote:
August 4th, 2019, 3:20 pm
What's the protocol for airing young cali cabs? ......
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#7 Post by Ian S » August 4th, 2019, 7:32 pm

Seeing a lot of notes on big young Cabs that say "even better the second day" makes me think double decanting 24 hours before drinking, and then maybe even a couple times the next afternoon to get more air into the wine, is a great idea.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#8 Post by Kris Patten » August 4th, 2019, 9:01 pm

I'd open each in AM, pour a bit off to get it to the shoulder, and leave uncorked on counter all day.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#9 Post by mattccheung » August 5th, 2019, 9:15 am

I decant 4 hours in advance, pour back into the bottle, re-cork, to the restaurant we go.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#10 Post by Cody S » August 5th, 2019, 11:10 am

I've had the 16 William & Mary several times and it really benefits from serious time in decanter. I have done everything from 4 -12 hrs and the more time the better. They are great wines.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#11 Post by Anton D » August 5th, 2019, 11:11 am

Chr!s G|@rn3r wrote:
August 4th, 2019, 4:44 pm
I had a 2016 W&M cab in February and Will’s advice was “pull the cork on it, maybe sample an oz or so, then let it sit at cellar temp for a few hours. When you get to the restaurant, throw it into a decanter or if they have good Cab stems, just pour some glasses and let it breathe at an arms length.”

Thats what we did and the wine was fantastic. The oz we sampled upon opening was also great so no matter what you do, that wine is going to be excellent.
Zactly!

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#12 Post by Nate Simon » August 5th, 2019, 11:51 am

I’d have no problem decanting 6 hrs ahead.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#13 Post by Nathan Smyth » August 5th, 2019, 12:21 pm

Ian S wrote:
August 4th, 2019, 7:32 pm
a lot of notes on big young Cabs that say "even better the second day"
Or the third day, or the fourth day, or the fifth day, or two weeks later.

Personally, if they are known to be monstrously overbearing Cal-Cabs, then I'd open the bottles at least five days ahead of time.

Each day, from each bottle, I'd pour a little one-ounce taste in the kitchen, and then immediately recork the bottle and put it in the bottom of the kitchen refrigerator, at about 35F-38F [and having some readily available rubber re-corking thingamabobs can help in case you break some of the real corks].

If, after a few days, a bottle seemed like it might be peaking, then I wouldn't open it again until the dinner - I'd just let the bottle continue to sit in the bottom of the fridge at 35F-38F.

On the day of the dinner, I'd get the bottles out of the fridge no more than maybe two hours prior to the beginning of the tasting - and if you're dealing with heat like we get in August, then I'd keep them in the fridge right up until I was heading to the car to leave - grabbing the bottles from the fridge would be the very last thing I did before walking out the door [in August].

PS: I have no experience whatsoever with any of the wines in question, and it's possible that some of your wines might peak as early as Day Two - but I wouldn't worry at all about them sitting recorked in the fridge at 38F for another three days until the tasting.

PPS: I push my corks back in HARD - so hard that I often need to get out the corkscrew to remove the corks again.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#14 Post by Brandon R » August 5th, 2019, 12:55 pm

Five days ahead of time?!? To me (and, I've not purposely done this), that's just crazy talk. The wine would most likely taste oxidized by day five, wouldn't it?

I've had the W&M Cab and we did a pop-and-pour and it was best toward the last glass. I've give it the (as Matt indicated above) 4-hour decant at home and then re-bottle.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#15 Post by Nathan Smyth » August 5th, 2019, 1:24 pm

Brandon R wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 12:55 pm
Five days ahead of time?!? To me (and, I've not purposely done this), that's just crazy talk. The wine would most likely taste oxidized by day five, wouldn't it?
Not in my personal experience with Big Reds - if well made, then they just keep going & going & going.

Although, admittedly, putting them to the test of multi-day oxygenation will allow you to learn very quickly whether or not they were well made in the first place.

And, again, if you like where the wine is a few days before the tasting, then shove the cork back in hard, keep it at 35F, and don't pull the cork out again until all the glasses are sitting in front of you at the dinner table [and everyone's ready to start tasting].
Brandon R wrote:
August 5th, 2019, 12:55 pm
I've had the W&M Cab and we did a pop-and-pour and it was best toward the last glass. I've give it the (as Matt indicated above) 4-hour decant at home and then re-bottle.
I've never had William & Mary, so I have no idea how it shows upon opening.

But it's possible that you prefer your reds to show big ETOH & big oak & big residual sugar & big fruit esters, in which case pop-and-pour might be the best approach for you.

Still, though, I'd strongly urge you [and anyone else reading this thread] to start experimenting with slow & leisurely week-long tastings of your young wines.

You'll stumble upon all sorts of knowledge of the wines which you never realized was there for the stumbling upon.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#16 Post by Brandon R » August 6th, 2019, 10:07 am

No, as a matter of fact, I don't enjoy wines that show, "....ETOH & big oak & big residual sugar & big fruit esters..." Not decanting a young Cab for five days doesn't mean it's going to show that way. This wine is a great example of that. I think I'll stick with the "knowledge" I've gained from decanting and enjoying as opposed to what you say I'll glean from drinking a week-long bottle sojourn. I admire your deeper understanding of the wine world though.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#17 Post by GregT » August 6th, 2019, 12:29 pm

Sh@n A wrote:
August 4th, 2019, 3:20 pm
What's the protocol for airing young cali cabs? Next week I have on tap, 2015 Robert Mondavi To Kalon, 2016 William & Mary Cabernet, and 2016 William & Mary Proprietary Red. I have a window to double decant them 14 hours before dinner, a window to possibly double decant an hour before, and can pop'n'pour as well (at a steakhouse).
Why do you decant?

1. The original reason was to pour the wine off the sediment. Older Port would be the classic example of this. That is of course irrelevant if you are taking the wines to a restaurant, since they will be shaken up quite nicely and the sediment thoroughly dispersed.

2. To aerate the wine. This does two things. First is evaporation - you get rid of some of the odors caused by the more volatile compounds such as the hydrogen sulfide and alcohol that you may get from a freshly-opened bottle. Of course, you don't know what else took off with those, but that's life. Second thing is oxidation and that's a little more contentious. One reason the aromatics change is because in the presence of all that new air, some smaller molecules combine with oxygen and thereby become less volatile. The stuff is still in the wine but the heavier molecules don't get carried up to your nostril so you don't notice them. And some other things combine with oxygen and maybe become less likely to react with the compounds in your mouth, so the wine may seem "smoother". This is also what is called "opening up".

So you need to think about which wines benefit from these things. One way of eliminating the sediment issue is to decant your wine carefully at home, clean out the bottle, then pour the wine back in w/out the sediment. That of course will also aerate your wine considerably, no matter how gentle you are.

In your case, the wines are really young. I don't know the W&M but my guess is that at this point, the wines are unlikely to have thrown a lot of sediment. So you're more interested in the aeration. You can do that a few hours ahead and probably suffer no harm. That doesn't mean just take the cork out - it means pour the wine into another container like a decanter and put it back into the bottle for travel. And if you're doing that anyway, it wouldn't hurt to check for sediment at the same time, just in case.

Alternatively, just decant it at the restaurant.

There's pretty much no way I'd open it multiple days in advance, particularly if I didn't know the wine first hand. In my experience, since it's what I did for a time, having bottles around for several days, even in the fridge, resulted in degradation of the wine far more often than improvement.

Regarding multi-day decanting - some people say that Barolo is improved that way. I don't believe it, but they're entitled to their opinions. Some people say that wines that have been oxygenated before bottling, like classic Rioja, can also improve. I know that's not true. Some people say that big young tannic wines will improve because the tannins become oxygenated. They're entitled to their opinions.

Remember that ANY perceived improvement will depend on the wine, on the temperature of the wine, and on the taster. That's why it's hard to generate much consensus regarding the issue - the only thing that you can say for certain is "it depends".

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#18 Post by Otto Forsberg » August 6th, 2019, 10:57 pm

GregT wrote:
August 6th, 2019, 12:29 pm
Sh@n A wrote:
August 4th, 2019, 3:20 pm
What's the protocol for airing young cali cabs? Next week I have on tap, 2015 Robert Mondavi To Kalon, 2016 William & Mary Cabernet, and 2016 William & Mary Proprietary Red. I have a window to double decant them 14 hours before dinner, a window to possibly double decant an hour before, and can pop'n'pour as well (at a steakhouse).
Why do you decant?

1. The original reason was to pour the wine off the sediment. Older Port would be the classic example of this. That is of course irrelevant if you are taking the wines to a restaurant, since they will be shaken up quite nicely and the sediment thoroughly dispersed.

2. To aerate the wine. This does two things. First is evaporation - you get rid of some of the odors caused by the more volatile compounds such as the hydrogen sulfide and alcohol that you may get from a freshly-opened bottle. Of course, you don't know what else took off with those, but that's life. Second thing is oxidation and that's a little more contentious. One reason the aromatics change is because in the presence of all that new air, some smaller molecules combine with oxygen and thereby become less volatile. The stuff is still in the wine but the heavier molecules don't get carried up to your nostril so you don't notice them. And some other things combine with oxygen and maybe become less likely to react with the compounds in your mouth, so the wine may seem "smoother". This is also what is called "opening up".

So you need to think about which wines benefit from these things. One way of eliminating the sediment issue is to decant your wine carefully at home, clean out the bottle, then pour the wine back in w/out the sediment. That of course will also aerate your wine considerably, no matter how gentle you are.

In your case, the wines are really young. I don't know the W&M but my guess is that at this point, the wines are unlikely to have thrown a lot of sediment. So you're more interested in the aeration. You can do that a few hours ahead and probably suffer no harm. That doesn't mean just take the cork out - it means pour the wine into another container like a decanter and put it back into the bottle for travel. And if you're doing that anyway, it wouldn't hurt to check for sediment at the same time, just in case.

Alternatively, just decant it at the restaurant.

There's pretty much no way I'd open it multiple days in advance, particularly if I didn't know the wine first hand. In my experience, since it's what I did for a time, having bottles around for several days, even in the fridge, resulted in degradation of the wine far more often than improvement.

Regarding multi-day decanting - some people say that Barolo is improved that way. I don't believe it, but they're entitled to their opinions. Some people say that wines that have been oxygenated before bottling, like classic Rioja, can also improve. I know that's not true. Some people say that big young tannic wines will improve because the tannins become oxygenated. They're entitled to their opinions.

Remember that ANY perceived improvement will depend on the wine, on the temperature of the wine, and on the taster. That's why it's hard to generate much consensus regarding the issue - the only thing that you can say for certain is "it depends".

[cheers.gif]
Exactly what I would say.

Big red wines that need some time to "open up" usually do it in an hour or two after a quick double decant, i.e. giving the wine some aeration by decanting it to another container and immediately back to the bottle. The only wines that could actually benefit from really long decanting are those that suffer from reduction, because the reduction masks away most of the aromatics and makes the wine appear dull and stuffy. Decanting them for several hours or letting the wait for 12-24 hours after a double decant usually does the trick.

However, I'd never let a wine stay open for multiple days before a tasting (unless it was a sweet wine or an off-dry Riesling) and even with double-decanting that 24 hours feels rather extreme. I've certainly had wines that have been great even after a week of being open, but I can't remember an instance where they have been better then than soon after opening.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#19 Post by Brandon R » August 7th, 2019, 9:32 am

But, Otto and Greg, "....you'll stumble upon all sorts of knowledge of the wines which you never realized was there for the stumbling upon."
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#20 Post by Sarah Kirschbaum » August 7th, 2019, 10:34 am

Otto Forsberg wrote:
August 6th, 2019, 10:57 pm
Exactly what I would say.

Big red wines that need some time to "open up" usually do it in an hour or two after a quick double decant, i.e. giving the wine some aeration by decanting it to another container and immediately back to the bottle. The only wines that could actually benefit from really long decanting are those that suffer from reduction, because the reduction masks away most of the aromatics and makes the wine appear dull and stuffy. Decanting them for several hours or letting the wait for 12-24 hours after a double decant usually does the trick.

However, I'd never let a wine stay open for multiple days before a tasting (unless it was a sweet wine or an off-dry Riesling) and even with double-decanting that 24 hours feels rather extreme. I've certainly had wines that have been great even after a week of being open, but I can't remember an instance where they have been better then than soon after opening.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#21 Post by Otto Forsberg » August 7th, 2019, 12:49 pm

Sarah Kirschbaum wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 10:34 am
Only old Madeira. A day in the decanter for every decade in the bottle.
Basically yes. Older ones can be quite closed and even rather stinky before some proper aeration.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#22 Post by John Morris » August 7th, 2019, 12:50 pm

Sh@n A wrote:
August 4th, 2019, 3:20 pm
What's the protocol for airing young cali cabs? Next week I have on tap, 2015 Robert Mondavi To Kalon, 2016 William & Mary Cabernet, and 2016 William & Mary Proprietary Red. I have a window to double decant them 14 hours before dinner, a window to possibly double decant an hour before, and can pop'n'pour as well (at a steakhouse).
By my tally, your question has elicited the following recommendations:

- Pull the cork some hours ahead, then decant immediately before pouring.
- Decant
- Decant 4 hours ahead
- Decant 6 hours ahead
- Decant 4-12 hours ahead
- Double decant 24 hours ahead
- Open five days ahead

Aren't you glad you asked?
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#23 Post by Brandon R » August 7th, 2019, 2:31 pm

Haha...that's funny, John. I now realize that I actually forgot the original question! [headbang.gif]
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#24 Post by Sh@n A » August 7th, 2019, 2:45 pm

John Morris wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 12:50 pm
Aren't you glad you asked?
I've enjoyed and appreciated the answers. But the windows I gave don't work for the most popular answer (decant 4-6 hours ahead) as I will on a flight 14 hours prior till 30 minutes prior to dinner. I will most likely pull the corks ahead of my flight on all 3 (i.e. pull the corks and pour out a little 14 hours prior to dinner) and then simultaneously decant all 3 at dinner (if they have the decanters). Based on some commentary that the W&M will show better young, I was considering double-decanting the Mondavi in the AM (and only the Mondavi), but will pass doing that. It also sounds like a frantic double decant 30 minutes prior to dinner is workable. All-in-all... I will be looking forward to the three wines, the good friends, and food - and knowing that I can't possibly screw up the wine given the range of answers!
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#25 Post by Sarah Kirschbaum » August 7th, 2019, 4:36 pm

For what it's worth, my two cents is that the only reason to open a very young, but age worthy, wine, unless you know that's the way you like it, is to see where it is RIGHT NOW and get a reference point. Pour it, swirl it, give it time, tasting along the way....if, after an hour or more, it still isn't even pleasant, I may cork it and put it in the fridge overnight. Tasting a young wine after extended decanting teaches you less about the wine, and you won't ever know if you chose the best point, for all your agonizing, because you didn't experience it before or after. Nor will it show you where the wine will be in 10+ years. If that's what you want to know, leave it in the cellar. I get it that many people feel like opening something and want to try for the best experience they can have, according to their palates. That is totally legitimate, I can't say it's wrong. For me, though, I would much rather watch the wine develop in the glass over a few hours and be with it every step of the way. Then when I drink another bottle in a year or two or ten, I have a detailed back story.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#26 Post by Blair Ridley » August 7th, 2019, 4:50 pm

Right on Sarah. Very thoughtful post!

(PS - So nice to see you on here as a regular contributor!)

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#27 Post by Sc0tt F!tzger@ld » August 7th, 2019, 5:02 pm

1-3 hours, vigorous decant and at cellar temp. That’s all I’ve ever needed for a young cab.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#28 Post by Sarah Kirschbaum » August 7th, 2019, 6:10 pm

Blair Ridley wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 4:50 pm
Right on Sarah. Very thoughtful post!

(PS - So nice to see you on here as a regular contributor!)
Thanks Blair. It's been a while, no? Hope all is well.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#29 Post by Nathan Smyth » August 7th, 2019, 6:31 pm

Sh@n A wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 2:45 pm
I will on a flight 14 hours prior till 30 minutes prior to dinner.
Your wines are gonna be suffering from so much travel shock that when you get to the restaurant, you might as well give them The Sparky* Shuffle - pop the corks, pour out a little wine to draw the fill level back down from the neck, stick your thumb in the opening of the bottle, and shake the wine as hard as you can, until you feel like you're gonna pass out.

Then take your thumb out of the bottle, leave the [open] bottle on the countertop, wait for all the bubbles to rise to the top, and serve.

Instead of doing it by hand, you can also simply pour the wine into a blender, turn the blender on high for 10 or 15 seconds, and add a nice frothy bead to the wine.

*That's how Sparky Marquis used to prep his big young Shirazes when he was on the road doing commercial tastings.
Sh@n A wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 2:45 pm
pull the corks and pour out a little 14 hours prior to dinner
Trying to board [or deboard] a plane with opened containers of alcohol sounds like something which could get you in all sorts of trouble with the authorities - both the security officers & the customs officers.

I can easily imagine someone in an official capacity grabbing those opened bottles and pouring them right down an airport sink [although, if they're devious, then they'll simply seize the bottles & take them home to drink for themselves].

And if you irritate them, or if they're already in a bad mood, then they might try to charge you with some sort of a crime.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#30 Post by Sh@n A » August 7th, 2019, 6:48 pm

Nathan Smyth wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 6:31 pm
Your wines are gonna be suffering from so much travel shock
No travel shock. Day trip out and back.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#31 Post by GregT » August 7th, 2019, 7:03 pm

Nathan Myrvold popularized the blender aeration. He is a smart guy so I imagine there's something to it but I haven't had the guts to do it myself. OTOH, he has the billions to do whatever he wants to do to his first growths!

Here's the Mollydooker Shake, although if you're just getting off a flight, it doesn't seem like it would really be necessary:

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#32 Post by Nathan Smyth » August 7th, 2019, 7:47 pm

Sh@n A wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 6:48 pm
No travel shock. Day trip out and back.
You're taking a 14-hour day trip, you're gonna get back home 30 minutes before the tasting, you'll grab the wines, and then turn right around and head for the restaurant?

Can you sleep-in the next morning? Or for the next two days?

Cause you're gonna be one tired camper if you try to swallow Big Young Cal Cabs on a schedule like that.

And after the tasting, be sure not to fall asleep at the wheel.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#33 Post by Nathan Smyth » August 8th, 2019, 1:30 pm

You know, you could Audouze these wines for fourteen or fifteen hours: Open all three of them before you leave, keep the corks out, and let them sit there opened, on the countertop, breathing your house air until you get back home.

You'd only be exposing about a square centimeter of surface area to oxidation, and that might get them in a really nice place [for guys who like Big Young Cal Cabs] and ready to be poured immediately upon arriving at the restaurant.

Plus you wouldn't have to worry about a decanter or a blender or funnels or refrigeration or any of that nonsense.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#34 Post by Alan Rath » August 8th, 2019, 1:38 pm

Nathan Smyth wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 6:31 pm
Sh@n A wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 2:45 pm
I will on a flight 14 hours prior till 30 minutes prior to dinner.
Your wines are gonna be suffering from so much travel shock that when you get to the restaurant, you might as well give them The Sparky* Shuffle - pop the corks, pour out a little wine to draw the fill level back down from the neck, stick your thumb in the opening of the bottle, and shake the wine as hard as you can, until you feel like you're gonna pass out.
Just to make sure I understand: your cure for the mythical travel shock is to shake the crap out of the wine rolleyes
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GregT
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#35 Post by GregT » August 8th, 2019, 1:54 pm

Mythical?

Did you say mythical?

!

[stirthepothal.gif]
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[i]"the incorrect overuse of apostrophes is staggering these days. I wonder if half the adults these days have any idea what they are for." Chris Seiber, 5/14/19[/i]

Nathan Smyth
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#36 Post by Nathan Smyth » August 8th, 2019, 1:58 pm

Alan Rath wrote:
August 8th, 2019, 1:38 pm
Just to make sure I understand: your cure for the mythical travel shock is to shake the crap out of the wine rolleyes
No, the idea would have been that since the wines would have already been shaken, you might as well have gone ahead and followed Sparky Marquis's advice and shaken some fresh oxygen into them [because it's silly to obsess about whether or not you should further shake a wine which is already freshly shaken - meaning your OCPD can just shut its damned mouth and go sit in the corner of the room and pout for the rest of the evening].

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#37 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » August 8th, 2019, 2:05 pm

Otto Forsberg wrote:
August 6th, 2019, 10:57 pm


Exactly what I would say.

Big red wines that need some time to "open up" usually do it in an hour or two after a quick double decant, i.e. giving the wine some aeration by decanting it to another container and immediately back to the bottle. The only wines that could actually benefit from really long decanting are those that suffer from reduction, because the reduction masks away most of the aromatics and makes the wine appear dull and stuffy. Decanting them for several hours or letting the wait for 12-24 hours after a double decant usually does the trick.

However, I'd never let a wine stay open for multiple days before a tasting (unless it was a sweet wine or an off-dry Riesling) and even with double-decanting that 24 hours feels rather extreme. I've certainly had wines that have been great even after a week of being open, but I can't remember an instance where they have been better then than soon after opening.
+1 on this

whatever happens after multiple days of leaving a wine open on your kitchen counter, it's not anything like the normal aging process and it's not what the wine was intended to taste like.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#38 Post by John Morris » August 8th, 2019, 2:33 pm

John Morris wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 12:50 pm
By my tally, your question has elicited the following recommendations:

- Pull the cork some hours ahead, then decant immediately before pouring.
- Decant
- Decant 4 hours ahead
- Decant 6 hours ahead
- Decant 4-12 hours ahead
- Double decant 24 hours ahead
- Open five days ahead

Aren't you glad you asked?
Sc0tt F!tzger@ld wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 5:02 pm
1-3 hours, vigorous decant and at cellar temp. That’s all I’ve ever needed for a young cab.
I guess I need to update my tally.
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Sc0tt F!tzger@ld
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#39 Post by Sc0tt F!tzger@ld » August 8th, 2019, 3:42 pm

John Morris wrote:
August 8th, 2019, 2:33 pm
John Morris wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 12:50 pm
By my tally, your question has elicited the following recommendations:

- Pull the cork some hours ahead, then decant immediately before pouring.
- Decant
- Decant 4 hours ahead
- Decant 6 hours ahead
- Decant 4-12 hours ahead
- Double decant 24 hours ahead
- Open five days ahead

Aren't you glad you asked?
Sc0tt F!tzger@ld wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 5:02 pm
1-3 hours, vigorous decant and at cellar temp. That’s all I’ve ever needed for a young cab.
I guess I need to update my tally.
Just delete the rest. Mine is the correct choice.

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#40 Post by John Morris » August 8th, 2019, 7:55 pm

Is there a Berserkers equivalent of an interpleader action, where you sue, saying, in essence, "I don't have a dog in this fight. You guys duke it out"?

Come to think of it ... there's an emoji: [popcorn.gif]
"I'm a Frisbeetarian. We worship frisbees. We believe when you die your soul goes up on the roof and you can't get it down." – Jim Stafford

"The Internet has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of instances in which humor must be explained." - me, 2019

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#41 Post by Sh@n A » August 14th, 2019, 8:13 am

Thank you all for the thoughts. Had the two W&Ms last night, and not the Mondavi To Kalon. Much preferred the Proprietary Red, finding it to be less forward, less vanilla, and more complex. Felt like baby killing the cab, while Proprietary Red was a better showing young (even if it felt less open).
/ @ g r @ \

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#42 Post by Sebastian C. » August 14th, 2019, 5:03 pm

I guess you were the one who did not like the W&M yet gave a whopping 93 score.
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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#43 Post by Sh@n A » August 14th, 2019, 5:27 pm

Sebastian C. wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 5:03 pm
I guess you were the one who did not like the W&M yet gave a whopping 93 score.
Shouldn't have to be a guess given it is the same handle. I try to score objectively, even if the style of wine is not my my favorite wine; otherwise I would be scoring certain regions much higher than others. FWIW, I gave it a 92 today with higher potential over time (per my note), and the 92 is 2 points below the CT average and I see another similar score with similar commentary (so I don't think it is a "whopper").
/ @ g r @ \

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Re: Decanting Young Cabs?

#44 Post by Sebastian C. » August 14th, 2019, 6:49 pm

Sh@n A wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 5:27 pm
Sebastian C. wrote:
August 14th, 2019, 5:03 pm
I guess you were the one who did not like the W&M yet gave a whopping 93 score.
Shouldn't have to be a guess given it is the same handle. I try to score objectively, even if the style of wine is not my my favorite wine; otherwise I would be scoring certain regions much higher than others. FWIW, I gave it a 92 today with higher potential over time (per my note), and the 92 is 2 points below the CT average and I see another similar score with similar commentary (so I don't think it is a "whopper").

You can score them however you like but I dont have to like it! [snort.gif]
C0rr3@

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