2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

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Steven Miller
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2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#1 Post by Steven Miller » July 29th, 2019, 7:06 pm

Look for tasting notes from attendees in the coming days.

If you would like to explore the wines tasted today at Archery Summit, check out our event presentation on SlideShare. A special thanks to Ian Burch and the team at Archery Summit for their wonderful hospitality. And to Paul Willenberg for pitching in with flight design and emceeing the event today.

Vineyard details were mostly sourced from EveryVine, winery/vineyard websites, and in a few cases industry articles and Wikipedia.

Next year we will be holding the 10th annual Throwdown at Cristom in the Eola-Hills. As always the Monday immediately following IPNC.

-Steve


-----

For those new to the Throwdown you can follow our history here.

1st Annual - The shitty 2007 vintage retrospective, August 1st, 2011 held at Patty Green hosted by Jim Anderson
The thread that started it all. The Bob Wood (RIP) defense of the 2007 vintage.
Another Shitty '07 Oregon Pinot Noir

2nd Annual - 2005 vintage retrospective, July 30th 2012 held at Biggio Hamina hosted by Todd Hamina
Post IPNC Oregon 2005 Tasting

3rd Annual - 2004 vintage retrospective, July 29th 2013 held at Matello hosted by Marcus Goodfellow
2013 Post IPNC Tasting of 2004 OR Pinot at Matello

4th Annual - 2002 vintage retrospective, July 28th 2014 held at Björnson Vineyard hosted by John Grochau
Post IPNC 2002 Oregon Pinot Noir Throwdown! Björnson Vineyard, Eola-Hills July 28th

5th Annual - 2008 vintage retrospective, July 27th 2015 held at Walter Scott hosted by Andy Steinman
Post-IPNC Oregon Pinot Noir Blind Tasting, 2008 Vintage, 7/27/15

6th Annual - 2010 vintage retrospective, August 1st 2016 held at Scott Paul hosted by Ian Burch
Post-IPNC Oregon Pinot Noir Blind Tasting, 2010 Vintage, 8/01/16

7th Annual - 2011 vintage retrospective, July 31st 2017 held at Anne Amie hosted by Thomas Houseman
Post-IPNC Oregon Pinot Noir Blind Tasting, 2010 Vintage, 7/31/17

8th Annual - Revisit the 2007 vintage, July 31st 2017 held at Lingua Franca hosted by Thomas Savre
8th Annual Post-IPNC Bob Wood Memorial Throwdown, July 30th 2018, Salem OR

9th Annual - (2012 vintage) This thread - Hosted by Ian Burch at Archery Summit Winery, Dayton OR

Future Throwdown Planning

10th Annual - (vintage TBD) - July 27th, 2020 - Hosted by Gaironn Poole at Cristom Vineyards, Salem OR

11th Annual - (vintage TBD) - July 26th, 2021 - Hosted by Todd Stewart at Elk Cove Vineyards, Gaston OR
Last edited by Steven Miller on July 31st, 2019, 5:19 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#2 Post by Mark Stevens » July 29th, 2019, 7:15 pm

Hi Steve,

Sorry again that I was unable to attend today-I hope that it was an excellent tasting as is tradition!

What is the password for your Slideshare link? Anxious to see the pix/notes!

Thanks!

Mark

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#3 Post by Steven Miller » July 29th, 2019, 7:17 pm

Mark Stevens wrote:
July 29th, 2019, 7:15 pm
Hi Steve,

Sorry again that I was unable to attend today-I hope that it was an excellent tasting as is tradition!

What is the password for your Slideshare link? Anxious to see the pix/notes!

Thanks!

Mark
I just turned off the password requirement. Didn't intend for that to be enabled.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#4 Post by Mark Stevens » July 29th, 2019, 7:32 pm

Thanks Steve- the link is now working. That flight with the three Annie Amie wines must have been especially interesting. Also, it is my understanding that Andy Humphrey was the vineyard manager for Weber in 2012- no?

Can’t wait to see some tasting notes!

Best,

Mark

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#5 Post by Todd F r e n c h » July 29th, 2019, 7:39 pm

Wow. 1) I had no idea this was an annual thing - how freakin' cool! 2) I also didn't know that the original 'another shitty' phrase came from none other than one of the best Pinots from the US, Belle Pente Murto. Amazing.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#6 Post by ToddHansen » July 29th, 2019, 8:14 pm

All wines 2012, pinot noir, Willamette Valley appellation (or nested AVA), tasted blind with reveal at the end of each flight. Each flight had a theme, so not random.
PANO.jpg
All notes my own numb, very unskilled palate after tasting about 500 wines at IPNC and averaging three hours sleep over the past four nights, so take them with a grain of salt and definitely do not use them for your purchasing decisions. (I take no responsibility.)

We had some beautiful Champers and other wines during the warm-up. I didn't take any notes on those. I normally don't take notes when I taste because I find it detracts from the joy, but I always take notes at these throwdowns.

Flight One
A nice flight to start the day
Flight1.jpg
Goodfellow Whistling Ridge - Classic Oregon nose, ruby red color, nice texture, cherry pastille, loong finish with notes of earth and coffee **
Goodfellow Whistling Ridge Heritage - Fresh nose, hint of eucalyptus, lighter body, whisper of sherry/soy sauce but very subtle, nice grippiness **1/2
Art & Science Armstrong Vineyard - Stewed plums on the nose, deep garnet color, a bit flat on the mid-palate with some slight bitter notes on the finish **
Seven of Hearts Armstrong Vineyard - A bit quiet on the nose, some coffee, not alot of fruit, a bit soapy (whole cluster?), nice grip, some nice freshness on the finish (again, wc?)
Seven of Hearts Curmudgeon Cuvee (100 pct whole cluster, 2 neutral barrels) - Nose seemed a bit tired with a hint of heat, but really nice attack, wet stone texture (wc?), much prettier than it smells **1/2

Flight Two

A really, really nice flight
Flight2.jpg
Grochau Bjornson Vineyard - Floral nose, with a hint of orange peel, nice raspberry and red fruit, cherries, tea, broad, expansive on the palate ***
Seven of Hearts Bjornson Vineyard - Fresh stemmy nose (exhibits some whole cluster) citrus notes, wet stone, nice texture with a fresh finish ***
St Innocent Temperance Hill - Floral nose, a bit of oak on the nose, coffee and oak on the palate mask some of the fruit, nice grip **1/2
Walter Scott Temperance Hill - Gentle nose, a bit muted, nice texture, round and fleshy on the palate with pleasant cranberry notes ***
Vincent Bjornson - Not my favorite ... deep purple color, stewed prune on the nose and palate, riiiipe, a bit flabby, oak notes, some grip helps to balance and redeem it *1/2

Flight Three
A wild ride
Flight3.jpg
Anne Amie - Anne Amie Vineyard Cube Series - Expressive nose with exuberant fruit, rich, red fruit, cherry pastille, pleasant grip, really nice texture (note: closed under screwcap)***1/2
Bouchaine - Anne Amie Vineyard Cube Series - Nose is a bit off, a bit bitter and tight, a touch too grippy (even for me), decent-ish *
Lincourt - Anne Amie Vineyard Cube Series - High-toned floral notes on the nose, a bit flat on the tongue, but pleasant flavors ***
Shea Vineyard - Classic Oregon nose, but a lot of bitterness on the attack. Ripe in an unpleasant way *1/2
Belle Pente Reserve (from magnum) - Pretty nose with lavender and rose petal, deep purple color, big oak, big fruit, big, huuuge ... but pleasant ***

Flight Four
A good flight, but not great for me
Flight4.jpg
Walter Scott Dumb Ox - Pretty nose, roses and a hint of oak and hibiscus, nice grip, good finish - very fresh and pretty **1/2
Medici Vineyard - flawed
Bethel Heights Casteel - smells like whole cluster (cue guitar riff), very fresh and broad with a whisper of bitter green notes and a touch of sourness that is actually kind of pleasant, Complex, could age longer for sure. **1/2
Longplay Lia's Vineyard Jory Bench Reserve - Pretty nose, a bit green in spots, black tea, nice fruit, some breadth but not much focus, nice finish **1/2 (Full disclosure, my wine)
Beckham Estate Sophia - Big grippy and rich on the palate. A bit extracted but with some nice citrus peel notes **

Flight Five
Pretty Classy Stuff - Worden Hill Road
Flight5.jpg
Alexana Revana - Cherry compote on the nose and palate. Bigger, kind of simple **1/2
Scott Paul La Paulee - pretty, bright, refreshing. Very pleasant fruit and texture. (note: screw cap) ***1/2
Scott Paul Audrey - Pretty, fresh, but a bit too sweet and lacking in texture, no tannin, veering toward fruit juice rather than wine **
Arterberry Maresh, Maresh Vineyard - exhibits characteristics of whole cluster, a bit alkaline, but very pretty red fruit and nice texture and freshness ***1/2
Arterberry Maresh Weber Vineyard - Fresh on the nose and palate, a bit of oak, coffee, getting in the way of the fruit, oak grip, nice wine ***

Flight Six
Another up and down flight
Flight6.jpg
Johan Nils - High toned fruit on the nose, really nice texture, nice finish ***
Johan 3 barrel - Pretty, floral nose, but a bit flat. Not much there for me. *1/2
Vincent Crowley Station (Silvershot) - "The good brett" - strawberry preserves, looong finish, a bit hot (volatile? perhaps decant), very nice ***
Cristom Louise - Big EA on the nose, a bit of tomato & tomato leaf on the palate, bitter notes on the finish, can't get past the nose which doesn't go away *
Cristom Sommers Reserve - Tight nose, choco-coffee, got a whole lotta oak, high impact oak, oak grip *1/2 (note: oak was 53%)
(Note: normally a huge fan of Cristom so not sure what happened here)


Flight Seven
Oh boy ... I usually love these wines, but ...
Flight7.jpg
Westry Oracle Vineyard - Floral nose but nothing there except a glass of astringency 1/2
Westry Abbey Ridge Vineyard - Brett and coffee on the nose, but a step up *
Cameron Abbey Ridge - Nasty nose (the bad brett?), not so bad on the palate, but still a chore to drink 1/2
Cameron Reserve - Rough on the nose, rough on the palate and rough on the finish 1/2
Archery Summit Arcus Vineyard - A bit poopy on toasty oak, not much fruit, hint of bitterness *
(Note after this flight I went and revisited some of the wines from the earlier flights to check if my palate was completely off, but the earlier wines actually tasted better with a bit of air.)

Again, I almost never publish my notes because I don't take good notes and I'm not good at it. My stars were probably influenced by the flight and the food between flights.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#7 Post by Todd F r e n c h » July 29th, 2019, 8:37 pm

DEFINITELY have to reference this thread next BerserkerDay, as there are quite a few producers represented here who sell that day! People always want notes...this is a perfect opportunity, given it's a bit of a comparative with so many options
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#8 Post by DurstinS » July 29th, 2019, 9:34 pm

I think it was St Innocent Montazi that started the “another shitty Oregon vintage” thread, not BP Murto.

The tasting awesome and humbling as usual. Convinced me 2012 wasn't the awesome vintage that was hyped.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#9 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » July 29th, 2019, 10:40 pm

DurstinS wrote:
July 29th, 2019, 9:34 pm
I think it was St Innocent Montazi that started the “another shitty Oregon vintage” thread, not BP Murto.

The tasting awesome and humbling as usual. Convinced me 2012 wasn't the awesome vintage that was hyped.
No? I am lucky enough to be sitting with the remnants of the Walter Scott Temperance Hill and the Goodfellow Heritage wines. Both are in great shape and are really drinking well now.

I’d love to know a bit more about where the wines as a vintage fell short? (Sorry to put you on the spot, but inquisitive minds want to know more).

To be fair, I really dislike the heavy hype of a “great” vintage. It’s usually well beyond
any actual difference and too often gets attached to fruit forward years. But I also think the well made 2012s crafted by winemakers with an eye to balance should be beautiful wines around the 10 year mark. The two I tried tonight both seem like that’s the trajectory I would expect? The Temperance Hill from Walter Scott is delicious, like silk with layered fruit and soft tannins(especially for Temperance), plush without overplaying it, and with a “just right” feel to the acidity.

The Heritage, we’ve poured at a recent dinner and Megan brought it today. While one of the bottles sent today had a touch of an oxidative note on opening, I am not getting any here, and the bottles at the dinner spent 3 hours in a decanter to be palatable but still young. I think Chas Stiltner had the wine both times, so hopefully he can also add to how the wine differed between the two events?
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#10 Post by Richard T r i m p i » July 30th, 2019, 6:50 am

Sorry to sit out another one. The quality of the people and their generosity are unsurpassed. I miss you guys!

That said, 2012 was not a favorite vintage of mine.
Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
July 29th, 2019, 10:40 pm
....plush without overplaying it, and with a “just right” feel to the acidity.
There are a number of Winemakers who's style preferences, experience and execution continue to impress me. Every year a few more pop up....and this Post-IPNC annual tasting always dishes up unexpected surprises.

Many producers rise to meet the challenges of warm vintages. Yet overall, a vintage like 2012 is generally going be "plush", especially on the heels of 2011. Balancing these wines with "just right" acidity is no small feat. Always fun to challenge preconceptions...which is exactly what happens at this tasting every year.

Pinot is a moving target. Very enjoyable and educational to follow up with them along their aging curve.

Steven, nicely done helping to coordinate yet another Throwdown.

A la prochaine.

RT

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#11 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » July 30th, 2019, 8:45 am

Always nice to hear from you Rich, and sorry not to see you on the list of attendees.

My use of plush wasn’t intended to evoke the idea of an overstuffed chair, or the type of thickness that hot vintage PN can achieve. Rather an effortless-ness that comes with silk as a fabric. Both wines last night were excellent for their balance and expressiveness.

While the wines at the 2011 Berserker tasting reminded me of cool Loire valley-esque wines, the two 2012s last night were every bit as good. The Walter Scott was sleek, nuanced, and showed the delicious balance that makes their wines so popular. As the Heritage opened up over time, it reminded me of a baby Clos de Lambrays. And I was pretty happy with that. Neither was stewed, fat, or alcoholic.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#12 Post by Will Hamilton » July 30th, 2019, 10:45 am

Pleasure to participate, thanks again for including me. Almost all examples were in tact and worthy examples (Medici was flawed), 12 being a very dry vintage of exceptionally clean fruit. Some wines delivered nuance and subtlety, but many were still fruit driven, on the richer/sweeter side for OR. Generally speaking, wines that are only approaching the next phase/chapter of their aging potential.

Flight 1 (Ribbon Ridge) .
-GoodFellow Whistling Ridge: slightly developed color, dried fruit, flower petal, very elegant palate. Lovely style. My best of flight
-Goodfellow Heritage #1 (Whistling Ridge): Good focus, edge of sour and some alcohol in nose. Bigger wine, more mature fruit, very integrated oak tannin
-Art and Science Armstrong Vnyd: Sweet Fruit, Cakey, oak above wine. Yogurty. Nice palate weight, sweet core--redder fruits. Elegant tannins, nice balance overall
-Seven of Hearts Armstrong: Lifted VA, microbial edge, orance peel, lacking focus. Better palate, round, darker fruit, falls off a bit. Feels "corrected"
-Seven of Hearts Armstrong "Curmudgeon Cuvee": blueberry, ripe strawberries, crushed ripe berries in general--jammy to an extent. Okay balance on palate but some heat toward the back. Tannin still unresolved, but at 100% WC still a youthful example

Flight 2 (Eola-Amity)--In general one of two top flights
-Grochau Bjornson Vnyd: slight boozy, very spiced, some cinnamon, red fruit, laffy taffy, Silky mid palate, great tannin integration. Sweet Fruited but restrained and fresh
-Seven of Hearts Bjornson Vnyd:Fresh cut, marmalade, decent power, straw, dried earth, very pretty fruit profile. Great overall balance. high marks
-St. Innocent Temperance Hill Vnyd: Funky, deep, wide fruit array, very ripe fruit tone. Well balance, but round and rich. Sweet Fruited
-Walter Scott Temperance Hill Vnyd: Subtle oak and a touch thin in nose. Nice juiciness, medium weight. Good grip toward back, very persistent finish. High marks
-Vincent Bjornson: Chalky, fat, ripe, high VA, feels warm. Grippy and sappy. Hot.

Flight 3 (Yamhill Carlton)
-Anne Amie Block 7.1 (Cube): Lushy Fruit, candied, very sweet toned, strong tannins on attack, finishes with some heat and substantial grip--sweet.
-Bouchaine Anne Amie B7.1: Burnt, edge or Reduction or something else? Plastic like tone--falls off on palate, finishes with very little
-Lincourt Anne Amie B7.1: Almost tropical, reductive, meaty, earthy. Plenty of wood, round and generous but good precision. Dirty nose in a good way
-Shea Shea: Tired, odd, opens withg lots of palate oak, not much wine underneath. Hot dog (aromas).
-Belle Pente Reserve: heat, oak. Took a while for any fruit to push through the oak. This was the most oak dominated wine I tasted, but still quite youthful so time should allow for the other components in this wine to shine (I hope).

Flight #4 (EAH and Chehalem---Maybe all Volcanic? Although Dumb Ox may be low enough in Eola Springs it is on Willakenzie).
-Walter Scott "Dumb OX" Eola Springs Vnyd: Lovely perfume, spicy, dark edged. Very Oregon tone
-Medici Estate: flawed bottles. Ketchup, pickles
-Bethel Heights Casteel: I think this wine had low level TCA. Still lots of quality aspects on palate
-Long Play Lia's: Pretty, good focus and drive, sweet fruit, good acid balance. Disjointed a bit toward the back, unravelled in an odd way, but complex and tightly coiled. I thought high WC % but it was in fact zero.
-Beckham 115 : Really pretty, red, menthol/tea leaf. Nice sweet core, very round and generous but good balance

Flight #5 (Dundee Hills except Paulee had other sites blended) . These are all mostly crowd pleasers--the other top flight for me
-Alexana Estate: OR nose, black and red fruit, good power. Smoked meat, some prickliness toward the back, a bit disjointed palate/oak balance.
-Scott Paul Paulee: open, pretty, strawberry, red fruit generally. Lovely, "natural" feel on palate. A touch hot, but good persistence on finish . high marks
-Scott Paul Audrey Maresh Vnyd: Salinity, mineral edge, reductive, lovely weight, energy, movement, like the balance. Persistent, some subtlety!
-Arterberry Maresh Maresh: Great focus of fruit, purity. Very OR Dundee. Lovely curve. Very elegant, "not over the top, but all the way to the brim!" high marks
-Arterberry Weber: Very similar to #4, chalkier body, decent dimension. A bit more muscle but quite like the Maresh.

Flight #6 (Polk County!)
-Johan Nils: fresh, good "up", very red, well integrated, youthful and fresh, good wine. High marks
-Johan 3 barrel: high pH, more open, nice juicy, round attack, finishes with some energy. Better palate than nose
-Vincent Silvershot: Dark, smoked meat, saline, Gartner's Country Meat Market, high pH, stewy fruit. worcestershire sauce
-Cristom Louise--EA, nail polish. Could not get past. Ok palate, acid disjointed.
-Cristom Sommers: Ripe, chalky, lushy fruit, some VA. Falls apart, heat.

Flight #7 (Dundee)
-Westrey Oracle: dried Nebbiolo? Rich and ripe but seems Piedmonte.
-Westrey Abbey Ridge: Red Fruit, slightly jammy, lushy but juicy and generous
-Cameron Abbey Ridge: Reductive and high tones. Lovely palate weigh
-Cameron "Reserve": Spicey, sweaty, more finesse. Elegant tannin and weight
-Archery Summit Arcus: Sulfides but I like it. Fat and lactone, but dense and dirty also

My personal standouts no particular order: GoodFellow Whistling Ridge, Seven of Hearts Bjornson, Walter Scott Temperance, Beckham Estate, Scott Paul "Paulee", Arterberry Maresh Maresh, Johan Nils

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#13 Post by Brandon J. » July 30th, 2019, 11:55 am

I'll add some more notes later this evening hopefully but here's a high-level overview of my thoughts:

The 2012 vintage has yet to peak my interest. There were only a handful of wines that I'd want in my cellar. That's not to say that these wines won't come around and be beautiful in 5-10 years, but as of now they're too fruit forward and alcohol driven.

Flight 2 - Great start here, I really liked both Goodfellow and found the contrast between 1.1 and 1.2 very interesting.

WOTF - Goodfellow Whistling Ridge Heritage - Great structure, while still being nimble. Lovely bright red fruits, mixed in with umami. Lovely long finish as well.

Flight 2 - Another great flight here and very fun to see the comparisons for specific vineyards

WOTF - Walter Scott Temperance Hill - On the first pass, I wasn't that excited about this wine, but after 10 minutes, it started to open up in the glass more and showed serious promise. Lots of red fruits again, with hints of whole cluster? This wine seemed to have a lot of built up tension and I'm curious to see where it goes in a few years.

Flight 3 - This was also VERY fun! Hopefully someone can explain the Cube project better than I can, essentially three different winemakers produced the exact same bottling using same fruit picked on the same day. It's always fun to see what different winemaking does to the juice.

WOTF - Anne Amie - Anne Amie Vineyard Cube Series

I really liked how much tension was in this wine. Learning that it was under screw cap made sense. Loads of expressive fruit that still felt wound up but was getting better by the minute. Loads of structure while still being in balance.

Flight 4 -

This flight had a lot more diversity and not necessarily in a good way. I REALLY loved these two:

Bethel Heights Casteel - BIG nose, allspice, clove, reminds me a bit of Cristom and had a delayed bitter finish (presumably from stems). There's ample red and black fruits to compliment the green notes that come through. This will be really pretty in 5 years.
Beckham Estate - Sophia's - VERY BRIGHT, high-toned fruits. It reminded me of candied cherries/raspberries with some spice that's hard to pinpoint. Almost hibiscus/black tea like. The nose almost leads you to believe the palate will be really delicate and almost thin, but it has ample fruit and structure on the nose. I think it's in a lovely place right now and curious to try it in a few more years.

Flight 5 - By far my favorite flight of the tasting. Everything showed really nice balance and finesse considering the bigger vintage.

WOTF - Scott Paul La Paulee (This might have been my wine of the tasting) - I thought this was so pretty, delicate and not really representing a "bigger" vintage in a good way. This was everything I'd hope a pinot to be for my palate. Delicate red fruits, with subtle spice while still having nice weight to it on the body. The acid really continued to lift this wine up. Everything was in perfect balance here for me. Lovely lovely wine.

Flight 6 - Three of my favorite producers but I didn't care for this flight as much.

WOTF - Johan Nils - I normally LOVE this bottling but this was not all there for me. I got a bit of orange pith, spice and cherries on the nose, with a nice round mouth feel. Well structured wine, but just not as interesting as I know this wine can be. Still a nice wine though.

Vincent was a close second here but the "Sexy Brett" was just enough to distract me from picking up the fruit. I have a lower tolerance than most for brett so don't take my aversion as a bad thing. I think this wine showed nice structure and had hints of great fruit under it.

I think I have more Cristom in my cellar than any other Oregon producer and I didn't care for either of these. I don't know if they're just in an awkward place or what? Luckily I don't have a 2012.

Flight 7 - Oh dear

I didn't care for any of these wines at all.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#14 Post by Dave McIsaac » July 30th, 2019, 12:42 pm

Piqued my interest

Piqued my interest

Piqued my interest!!!!!

Off to the curmudgeon thread.........

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#15 Post by ShelbyPerkins » July 30th, 2019, 1:53 pm

First, I would like to thank the hosts of this event for so kindly including me. I have been focused on Chardonnay these past few years, so for me this was a great perspective on vintage, style, and aging of Pinot Noir given my recent purchase of an Eola vineyard with Pinot. I focused my tasting on the more notable aromatics and palate flavors for ID profiling, not as much on quality level or preferences on style/AVA/geology. That said, I have indicated my preferred wines wine an asterisk. Ultimately - the svelte complexity of the wines from the Dundee Hills is marked. At times I confused Yamhill-Carlton initially due to what I perceived to be a monolithic flight, but in Y-C the acid and oak do not headline as prevalently, and were not as high-sparkle polished. Ribbon Ridge seems to provide more space (less density) and less spice than Dundee. For me, bright salinity and spice definitely be more prevalent in EAH and Polk County, but with varying tannin textures/loads and spice profiles. Thank you again!


Flight 1 – Ribbon Ridge

Wine 1: Goodfellow, Whistling Ridge*
Aroma: Salinity, floral, savory ham and seaweed (noting some browning)
Palate: Warm with slightly grippy earthy tannin, but freshness and acid balance.

Wine 2: Goodfellow, Heritage Whistling Ridge*
Aroma: Dusty, cherry lozenge, ripe, oak
Palate: Warm alcohol, ellagitannin apparent in texture, finishes nicely at front of palate.

Wine 3: Art + Science Armstrong
Aroma: Stony, orange peel, bright cherry, oak.
Palate: Luscious acid, stony, long finish, slightly warm (alc.), but otherwise balanced.

Wine 4: Seven of Hearts Armstrong
Aroma: Cola, licorice, balsamic.
Palate: Rich, herb/dried rose petal. Warm alc., big but short finish.

Wine 5: Seven of Hearts Cuvee
Aroma: Muted, airy, saline but ripe.
Palate: Spacious, slight bitter – needs more time to settle down.


Flight 2: Greater Density overall – Eola Amity

Wine 6: Grochau Bjornson*
Aromas: Umami, soy, spice.
Palate: Full, warming alc, front palate tannin descends into a good finish. Interesting wine.

Wine 7: Seven of Hearts Bjornson*
Aroma: Light Soy, herbaceous, saline, elegant pretty aromatic profile for me.
Palate: Light entry, saline , bright acid, front to mid palate tannin. Palate delivers on promise of aromatics.

Wine 8: St. Innocent Temperance Hill
Aroma: Oak, vanilla, ripe, heavy.
Palate: Oak, vanilla, cherry lozenge, long finish, as expected.

Wine 9: Walter Scott Temperance Hill*
Aroma: Mint, river rock, slender aromatics.
Palate: Mid-warmth, with lean crunchy palate acidity and long finish, slender wine style consistent with aromatics.

Wine 10: Vincent Bjornson
Aroma: Glass issue? (River rock slime funk).
Palate: Ripe, grippy


Flight 3: Yamhill Carlton.

Wine 11: Anne Amie Cube*
Aroma: Toast, smoke, meats, mint, eucalyptus.
Palate: Intense, dense, candied, warm, complex with notable grip on exit.

Wine 12: Bouchaine/Anne Amie Cube
Aroma: Hot red brick.
Palate: Intense, dense, warm and grippy.

Wine 13: Lincourt/Anne Amie Cube
Aroma: Vinous cherry, warm alc, dense, monolithic.
Palate: High acid and alc apparent.

Wine 14: Shea
Aroma: Light cherry and oak.
Palate: Loose palate resulting in a feeling that the wine will never resolve itself. Has harsh texture and space but they are just not working together as they theoretically should be.

Wine 15: Belle Pente
Aroma: Slime, river rock again > bad glass > glass change.
Palate: Oak notable, heat notable, texturally not integrated.


Flight 4: Mixed

Wine 16: Walter Scott Dumb Ox (Eola Springs)*
Aroma: Bright, saline, spicy > bay leaf and floral notes.
Palate: Loose, good acid balance, lean, focused palate (well structured).

Wine 17: Medici
Aroma: Oxidized, prune funk.
Palate: Did not taste.

Wine 18: Bethel Heights Casteel*
Aroma: Gingerbread (Sojo?) – dense, slight paper/cardboard scalping.
Palate: Tannin load is marked, slightly bitter.
*I liked this wine because I’m trying to needle down on what is similar to my site (Bracken), neighboring Sojo, and other sites in EAH on similar geology. Our geo shows some of those pie spices v. the Dumb Ox went more leafy bay spice and floral. Looking to see if I can find other correlating wines.

Wine 19: Longplay Jory Bench*
Aroma: Vinous, spicy, pretty.
Palate: Tight, silky tannin, luscious acid level.

Wine 20: Beckham Estate*
Aroma: Stony and fresh.
Palate: Raspberry leaf and rasbberry v. cherry fruit made this wine an outlier on the fruit profile, warm alc, slightly bitter finish > high/warm location? (ultimately I think we were told these were also younger vines).


Flight 5: Dundee Hills

Wine 21: Alexana*
Aroma: Svelte, some dark umami aromatics.
Palate: Dense, cocoa powder, liqueur, meat, monolithic. This is a nuclear shelter wine. It’s going to take some time for things to soften and shake out.

Wine 22: Scott Paul Paulee*
Aroma: Violet, pretty floral nose.
Palate: Dense, hot, cherry cough syrup. Really interesting juxtaposition of aroma/body.

Wine 23: Scott Paul Audrey*
Aroma: Iris, pretty floral nose once again.
Palate: Seaweed freshness, red apple peel/firm but fine tannin.

Wine 24: Arterberrry Maresh*
Aroma: Dense.
Palate: Dense, floral, fruit, spice, coconut, red plum. Full package.

Wine 25: Arterberry Maresh Weber*
Aroma: Dust, stone.
Palate: Stoney, lush acid, bright fruit.


Group 6: EAH and Van Duzer

Wine 26: Johan Nils*
Aroma: Stone dust.
Palate: Light fresh fruit but also some spice, appealing mouth feel and exit.

Wine 27: Johan 3 Barrel
Aroma: Bright, rubber.
Palate: A bit fleshy.

Wine 28: Vincent Crowley Station/Silvershot
Aroma: Brett. Figgy, stewed, baked, basalmic – but not offensively so.
Palate: Also fleshy, but cooked fruit character.

Wine 29: Cristom Louise
Aroma: Flawed / EA.
Palate: Flawed – did not taste.

Wine 30: Cristom Sommers
Aroma: VA lifted.
Palate: Oak and Bitterness.


Flight 7: Dundee Hills

Wine 31: Westerly Oracle
Aroma: Bright, light, milk chocolate, hot, oak.
Palate: Elegant but hot.

Wine 32: Westerly Abbey Ridge
Aroma: Ripe red fruit but some aroma of pickle juice, dill.
Palate: Bright acid, good texture to fruit.

Wine 33: Cameron Abbey Ridge
Aroma: Reductive.
Palate: Acid is awkward, did not revisit.

Wine 34: Cameron Reserve
Aroma: Reductive, dill pickle
Palate: Warm, did not revisit.

Wine 35: Archery Summit
Aroma: Soy, umami.
Palate: Ellagitannin, black tea, cardamom grip.

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#16 Post by Vincent Fritzsche » July 30th, 2019, 3:25 pm

Ok, here are my notes, warts and all. Overall some lovely wines, more than I expected. But many including my Bjornson are just too marked by the hot dry winds at harvest. 2012 wasn't a hot growing season, it was slightly "behind schedule" throughout the summer, but east winds at the end of September into early October changed things in a hurry. Lots of dehydration and I think heavy adjustments in many cellars. The jangly acid in several wines helped the balance but seemed generally out of step with the fruit profile. Some wines were assertively hot. I remember really feeling like I should have picked some things earlier, much like that feeling of taking the meat off the grill a minute or even two too late. But still we ate well.

2012 Vintage smack down

Flight 1

1. Goodfellow Whistling Ridge
Pretty red fruits, cherries, soft aroma
Soft texture, powdery acid, pretty wan but flavory and gentle

2. Goodfellow Heritage 1 Whistling Ridge
Similar ruddy look and aroma, forest notes, mixed fruits, wood,
Finely tannic, bit jangly acid, tart red fruits, better aromatically but nice

3. Art + Science Armstrong
Darker color
Bit stewed, vegetal note, seemed more extracted
Intense jammy fruit, seems hot, tart acid, better on retaste

4. Seven of Hearts Armstrong
Red fruits, more delicate presentation
Cool well knit finely tannic, gently gripping wine,

5. Seven of Hearts Curmudgeon Cuvée
Spicy pretty red fruits, similar to the last
Sweet red fruit with some green, ripe unripe, jangly and a bit vegetal

Flight 2

1. Grochau Bjornson
Deep color in this flight
Minty sappy aroma
Like old CA Pinot, hot and intense, candied cinnamon red fruit, soft slightly powdery texture, finishes hot

2. Seven of Hearts Bjornson
Pretty deep red fruits, more dimension or lift if not terribly complex
Pretty enough, one bottle was corked so a light pour

3. St innocent Temperance Hill
Deep fruit, smells like Bjornson, bit vegetal
CA like bit syrupy jangly red raspberries, not as hot as 1.

4. Walter Scott Temperance Hill
Very raspberry, cola
More rhubarb in the mouth, I like this for its elegance, for the vintage/flight

5. Vincent Bjornson
Dense hard to read
Bit advanced, prune just starting to creep in to the big deep fruit and shoe polish darkness, some heat, eh, now I’m thinking my Bjornson, there was too much wood on 3 to be mine

Flight 3

1. Anne Amie Block 7.1 Cube Project
Ruby port, candied fruits, fresh nuts and spice
Light ruby port sweet berry fruit, mouth filling fruit, just so nut and tobacco sweet fruited. No water back on this.

2. Bouchaine Block 7.1 Cube Project Anne Amie vineyard
Pretty red fruit,
Finely tannic, super grippy mineral, reductive

3. Lincourt winemaker Leslie Renaud, Same Fruit as 1 and 2
Cinnamon red fruits
Strawberry, good energy but tart finish, I like the relative delicacy here.

4. Shea Estate
Nicely fresh and delineated aroma, toasty, fruit and spice notes
Fancy wine, worsted sweet, wooden strawberry fruit, finely tannic, this is good “fancy” wine.

5. Belle Pente Reserve
Dense but not too much so, ripe red fruits
Bit volatile and loose in the mouth, good texture but just a little VA marked,

Flight 4

1. Walter Scott Dumb Ox
Pretty, spice integrates into red fruits
Sweet fruit, candied, some spice

2. Medici
Some green dill like notes, aldehydes
Oxidized, bit raisiny, not dead but clearly off

3. Bethel Heights Casteel
Pretty red fruits, classic
Very suave, finely tannic texture, classic oregon Pinot

4. Lia’s Jory Bench
Lighter color
Broader aroma, touch of va though
Broad red fruit flavor, lovely red fruits, gentle but nice

5. Beckham Chehalem Mountain
Raspberry jelly doughnut, butter milk, smells like my Lemelson barrels
Cola, charry red fruit, definitely marked by the vintage

Flight 5

1. Alexana Estate Revanna
Deep raspberry aroma, some port notes, nuts, ham smells
Dense nuts and thick fruit, a bit hot, minty, very ripe profile

2. Scott Paul La Paulee mix of soil types, more Maresh
Deep raspberry, touch green olive aldehyde, I cleaned this glass out from last flight though
Powdery deep fruit, tart acid, hmm

3. Scott Paul Audrey All Maresh
Gentle broad pretty wine if lacking great focus
Redder, bit cola, broad soft but fine textured, good wine

4. Arterberry Maresh Maresh Vineyard
Smells a little advanced, not sure what to make of this
Some greenness, whole cluster?

5. Arterberry Maresh Weber
Bit brushy greenish note,
Rich touch of VA flavor, wide profile, grippy tannin, heavy and dense, almost cab franc like

Flight 6

1. Johan Nils Reserve
Lemelson like toast, suave red fruit
Lovely delicate wine

2. Johan Three Barrel
Muted, looks a bit older but smells closed
Seems a bit older but good, beet root, classic Pinot

3. Vincent Crowley Station
Wild, sweet berry fruit, seems familiar
Lovely resolution in the mouth, leesy, Christmas spice, I like. People thought it was bretty, maybe a little but I loved it. [editor - House palate!!]

4. Cristom Louise
Broad aroma, some VA
Lovely broad savory red fruit, more VA poking out, good though

5. Cristom Somers Reserve
Similar aroma
Broad red fruit, lovely middle with fine tannin and length, good!

Flight 7

1. Westry Oracle
Stalky intense cherry raspberry, peppery
Kind of loose? some volatility, then a nice gun flint, white pepper, tighter finish, I ended up really liking this

2. Westry Abbey Ridge
Powdery red fruit
Lovely texture but a bit reduced. Gentle and lovely.

3. Cameron Abbey Ridge
Reductive and intense
Nice dark berry fruit, nice texture, denser than 1 or 2, good wine

4. Cameron Reserve
Reduced, smells reduced Chardonnay
Tastes reductive, eh, is this Cameron?

5. Archery Summit Arcus
Black cherry, intense
Intense cherry, sappy oak, like a rich cake that didn’t rise, a bit over the top, fancy wine for sure but not my thing
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#17 Post by Scott Tallman » July 30th, 2019, 4:23 pm

Interesting notes, especially as I don’t think I’ve drank any 2012s since release. Think I’ll continue to sit on mine, not that I have much. Went deep in 2013.

Curious that PGC was not included, esp considering the high praise Jim had for the vintage upon release.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#18 Post by Steven Miller » July 30th, 2019, 6:23 pm

The 2012 vintage isn’t one of my favorites. Regardless, tasting a broad selection of wines selected by attendees, mostly from their personal cellars, was a lot of fun. There were a few duds here and there, along with a few surprises. Paul Willenberg’s fun fresh take on flight design added to the fun.

Flight 1 – Ribbon Ridge

What a great way to start. My wine of the flight was the Seven of Hearts Curmudgeon Cuvee. A gorgeous wine and one I should have had in my personal cellar.

Both of Marcus’s Whistling Ridge wines were right behind the Curmudgeon the first having a nice spicy note and the second a lot depth. The Art & Science Armstrong was pretty tasty too.

Flight 2 – Björnson vs. Temperance Hill.

Another really solid flight. My wine of the flight was the Walter Scott Temperance Hill. My note was one word. “Yummy”. Another attendee highlighted “savory” which is also a great single-word descriptor. The St. Innocent Temperance Hill was a nice wine but didn’t stand out in the flight.

Moving on to the 3 wines from the Björnson vineyard the battle here was between the Vincent and the Seven of Hearts. Vincent’s had outstanding flavors and length. The Seven of Hearts was “pretty” and was more in my personal wheelhouse.

Flight 3 – Yamhill-Carlton

The flight started off with 3 wines from the Cube Project at Anne Amie. All from the same pick from the same vineyard block. It was real proof of how HUGE the impact the individual winemaker can have on the final project. My wine of the flight was as Tom put it… clearly watered back as the tech sheet had the ABV below 13%. But that’s right in my wheelhouse.

Attendee comments on the Shea spoke to it as a luxury Cuvee from one of a handful of producers in the valley. A big lush wine.

Flight 4 – Eola Hills vs. Chehalem Mountains

The clear wine of the flight for me was the Walter Scott Dumb Ox made from mostly own-rooted Pommard planted in the late 70s. (this particular vineyard block succumbed to Phylloxera since and has been replanted).

The Bethel Heights Casteel was another lovely pinot a worth h2h competitor with the Dumb Ox.

Flight 5 – Worden Hill Road

2 of the wines in this flight were screw-capped Scott Paul wines. (For those who may not know Scott Paul Winery closed earlier this year, therefore I won’t be building on my vertical of La Paulée. At least it has more depth than the vertical I had started of St. I Seven Springs 2002-2017).

That said… I have grown frustrated that the Scott Paul wines don’t age fast enough under screwcap. I’m wondering if I should find someone to help me remove the screwcaps and cork the bottles then put them back in the cellar. Has anyone tried that?

Back to wines. My wine of the flight was the Alexana Revana. The tannins need some time to resolve, but this wine was a knockout.

Both Scott Paul’s showed very well enough, but as I noted above development isn’t happening under screwcap. The Audrey (100% Maresh vineyard) was the winner between the Scott Paul’s as it is most years but at twice the price.

I thought the Arterberry-Maresh Maresh Vineyard came off a bit sweet on the palate. The right food pairing would help with that. I preferred the Weber vineyard which had more fun flavors and complexity.

Flight 6 – Salem Whole Cluster

This was an interesting flight as I found several of the wines too big, and one was simply hard to drink, another “too spicy”. Which is a comment I rarely make on an Oregon pinot.

The battle for the wine of the flights came down to the Cristom Sommers Reserve and the Johan Nils. The Sommers Reserve is actually a Willamette Valley blend with grapes sourced from multiple AVAs… So I’ll disqualify it and award wine of the flight to the Nils. Pretty sure I heard a # of others voting up the Nils.

Flight 7 – Dundee Hills

It’s entirely possible my palate was done by the time we got here. Several wines from a vineyard that usually knocks my socks off were meh. (Abbey Ridge). Wine of the flight for me and many of the attendees was the Westry Oracle. This was a lovely expression for a warmer vintage. The Archery Summit Arcus showed well too.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#19 Post by Steven Miller » July 30th, 2019, 6:53 pm

Scott Tallman wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 4:23 pm
Interesting notes, especially as I don’t think I’ve drank any 2012s since release. Think I’ll continue to sit on mine, not that I have much. Went deep in 2013.

Curious that PGC was not included, esp considering the high praise Jim had for the vintage upon release.
One comment I heard from a few attendees put a few different ways, is that perhaps we should always have a flight that's made up of wines from the likes of :

Beaux Frères
Brickhouse
Eyrie
Patricia Green
Thomas
...

Note that we had none of these this year!
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#20 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » July 30th, 2019, 7:12 pm

Scott Tallman wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 4:23 pm
Interesting notes, especially as I don’t think I’ve drank any 2012s since release. Think I’ll continue to sit on mine, not that I have much. Went deep in 2013.

Curious that PGC was not included, esp considering the high praise Jim had for the vintage upon release.
I had a similar thought, and also with Jim putting 2012 forward as the one of the very best vintages in the Willamette Valley on a thread recently.

Also a bit surprised not to see Evesham Wood or Brickhouse represented.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#21 Post by Scott Tallman » July 30th, 2019, 7:48 pm

Steven Miller wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 6:53 pm
Scott Tallman wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 4:23 pm
Interesting notes, especially as I don’t think I’ve drank any 2012s since release. Think I’ll continue to sit on mine, not that I have much. Went deep in 2013.

Curious that PGC was not included, esp considering the high praise Jim had for the vintage upon release.
One comment I heard from a few attendees put a few different ways, is that perhaps we should always have a flight that's made up of wines from the likes of :

Beaux Frères
Brickhouse
Eyrie
Patricia Green
Thomas
...

Note that we had none of these this year!
Yeah, pretty big omissions IMO.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#22 Post by Eric Sch » July 30th, 2019, 10:14 pm

Had a great time this year, I always love to the opportunity to compare my palate with others across a large double blind tasting and it's awesome to hear directly from producers about how they approach their specific sites and the vintage. 2012s were quite floral and vibrant when primary but really haven't matured in line with my palate. Definitely a few omissions (I offered Eyrie!) but I enjoyed having some wines that I wouldn't normally taste included in the mix.

I'm not a huge notes person so I will spare the scribbles, but overall my favorite was the Walter Scott Temperance Hill - it just displayed a little more finesse than other wines were able to pull off at this point in time. The Walter Scott Dumb Ox, Bethel Heights, Scott Paul, and Longplay Lia's wines also showed quite nicely. Some of the producers that regularly grace my table did not show so well, but alas that's the fun of the format.

Overall a wonderful day with some nice palate cleanser wines, tasty snacks, and lots of great conversation. Huge thanks to Ian and Archery Summit for hosting! champagne.gif
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#23 Post by PeterH » July 30th, 2019, 10:30 pm

Scott Tallman wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 7:48 pm
Steven Miller wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 6:53 pm
Scott Tallman wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 4:23 pm
Interesting notes, especially as I don’t think I’ve drank any 2012s since release. Think I’ll continue to sit on mine, not that I have much. Went deep in 2013.

Curious that PGC was not included, esp considering the high praise Jim had for the vintage upon release.
One comment I heard from a few attendees put a few different ways, is that perhaps we should always have a flight that's made up of wines from the likes of :

Beaux Frères
Brickhouse
Eyrie
Patricia Green
Thomas
...

Note that we had none of these this year!
Yeah, pretty big omissions IMO.
I was thinking that exact thing earlier today, with the exception of Thomas which has failed in past events to earn another slot. I purposely did not offer to bring a PG wine, because I assumed it would be well represented.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#24 Post by Megan Joy » July 31st, 2019, 1:16 am

Really happy to have been able to attend this year. Thanks to everyone who planned, hosted, and contributed.

Overall I felt less that the vintage was "overhyped" and more that I would hold off on opening any more 2012s a few years at least. Most everything was in a fairly primary stage with regards to fruit character. Some were quite pretty, some tightly wound and showing little nuance, but everything I tried again after the initial flights was continuing to improve in texture and complexity as well. For the winery we have opened a few '12s for dinners recently. In each case they have been tight, taken decanting and a bit of time to start opening up, and still been much better day 2. I did bring an '08 Matello Whistling Ridge as a starter wine, and also a suggestion as a vintage to revisit at a future tasting. It was another year that the group tasted right around the 7 year mark, and only now past the 10 year mark has really seemed to open up and start to live up to the possibilities of the vintage.

There were certainly plenty that was big and a little awkward/blockish, the vintage was obviously relatively warm, but really not exceptionally so. Mostly I seem to remember that yields were quite small, and after two cool vintages back to back maybe some producers were either really happy to have a year where they could get a little riper style, or were caught off guard by how quickly the fruit moved ahead.



Flight 1, Ribbon Ridge: I felt both the Goodfellow wines showed quite well, though the room seemed split on the first (Goodfellow Whistling Ridge Vineyard). Definitely showing more bright strawberry and spice and less of the depth of the Heritage (wine #2). (In the interest of full disclosure I do work with Marcus at Goodfellow, although I was not involved with the '12 vintage beyond a little cellar labor and helping to bottle.)
The Art & Science Armstrong Vineyard was quite a bit weightier but with a really fascinating blueberry olive mixture of fruit and savory. The two Seven of Hearts to round it out were also quite nice, both from Armstrong Vineyard, and both toward bright red fruit and spice.
I understand the idea behind comparing multiple bottlings from the same vineyard, but I would have happily swapped with someone to get a little more diversity in this flight. Brick House, PGC, Ayres, Beaux Freres....

Flight 2, Eola-Amity: For me the Walter Scott Temperance Hill was a pretty clear stand out. Initially a bit of a funky note that moved to blue floral and umami tones, then juicy red fruit and continuing a distinct savory note on the palate. There were interesting notes to the rest of the wines, and of the bigger style I preferred these as a whole to the wines in the Dundee Hills, and certainly to the Yamhill-Carlton flights. On a whole they seemed to have more structure to hold up to the fruit, and had more savory or non-fruit characteristics included.

Flight 3, Yamhill-Carlton: This flight was a little hard for me. Again, the wines are young, but the ripeness was hard for me to get over. My favorite of the cube project was the one from Lincourt (winemaker Leslie Renaud) that had the supposed water add (lower ABV with identical fruit). Still presented as big and rich aromatically, but was significantly juicier in the palate.

Flight 4, Eola-Amity & Chehalem AVAs: I thought both the Walter Scott and the Bethel Heights showed well, just dense and wound up. Discussion at the table as to whether the Bethel Heights might be corked, which I did not get aromatically but would account for the harsher tannins on the finish. I thought the Longplay and the Beckham Estate were both a little more available, with Longplay showing strawberry, spice and dry extract, and Beckham distinctly darker notes of black current and gingerbread. As has been mentioned, the Medici was flawed, both bottles completely oxidized (apparently under glass stopper, found out later).

Flight 5, Dundee pt.1: All big and sweet fruited, the Scott Paul Le Paulee stood out for its liveliness, juicy strawberry dust and spice. It turned out this was a Willamette Valley bottling and not specific to the Dundee Hills, at this point in the tasting it was a refreshing break. All the wines in the flight seemed well made, firm tannins and capsicum on the Arterberry Maresh, Marsh Vineyard, but overall a great deal of rich red fruit throughout the line up.

Flight 6, Eola-Amity 2 & Johan: The first three wines, while still having weight and richness, were for me a return to more interesting savory aromas in with the fruit. I got tobacco and cigar on the two Johans, and seem to be the only one to prefer the 3 Barrel to the the Nils? To me the 3 Barrel seemed substantially more elegant , especially as the two started to open up. The Vincent, Crowley Station maybe did have just a hint of either reduction or brett, but it added a savory intrigue to the purple fruit and floral aspects. Seemed much more dialed back than many from the day. Hoping the Cristom Louise was just an off bottle, Cristom Sommers Reserve was pretty monolithic, but I didn't get a chance to come back to it later to see if it had evolved at all.

Flight 7, Dundee pt. 2: Thought both Westrey's showed well. Simple, spice, strawberry and mineral for the Oracle, weightier, denser and more serious for the Abby Ridge. The Cameron wines for a bit both showed really only reduction. The Abby Ridge started to evolve into aromas of oyster shell and strawberry with time, the Reserve not as much (though I didn't get to try it again after the initial flight). The Archery Summit was chewy, dried strawberry and tobacco, hard to taste right after both the Cameron wines.



Again, I also would have loved to have seen more producers represented. While interesting as a separate thing, I don't think that doubling up producers on a single vineyard, or using things like the cube project is more valuable for a vintage retrospective than a wide swath of Oregon wines from different producers. It can be interesting to see two completely different sites from one producer for sure, but not at the expense of something from one of the other great producers of Oregon. Not sure how much this can be shifted in a blind tasting where the wines were volunteered, but I am happy to do what I can to search out and trade for wines in the future.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#25 Post by Steven Miller » July 31st, 2019, 9:34 am

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Memory from a past Throwdown.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#26 Post by John Peacock » July 31st, 2019, 10:40 am

The thing that has always stood out to me with these tastings is that the wines don't necessarily showcase a complete view of a vintage, since the producers tend to be the ones that fall within a certain taste profile, which is to be expected when the wines are brought from the participant's personal cellars. I'd be curious to see how views of a vintage overall would shift if more of the "commercial" wineries were included (read Sokol Blosser, Erath, Rex Hill, Willakenzie, etc). Then again, it could also reinforce some of the issues with the warmer vintages.

I guess I'm just echoing Megan's point about looking for a bit more diversity in the producers included. Then again, will you ever have enough diversity when you can only taste so many wines and there are so many wineries in the valley? And who am I to say anything when I haven't participated in a few years?

If nothing else, kudos to those that have been keeping this annual tasting going for so long. Who knew it would become what it is when we just got together to see if '07s really were shitty or not.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#27 Post by rfelthoven » July 31st, 2019, 11:08 am

Glad the tasting worked out well for you all. I miss attending but it always falls on my anniversary. I was not a fan of '12 on release. Looking over recent notes my best bottles from the vintage have been DDO, Eyrie, and Matello Souris. I think if you have any of those you can open them and expect something very, very good with a little air.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#28 Post by Jim Anderson » July 31st, 2019, 11:51 am

Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 7:12 pm
Scott Tallman wrote:
July 30th, 2019, 4:23 pm
Interesting notes, especially as I don’t think I’ve drank any 2012s since release. Think I’ll continue to sit on mine, not that I have much. Went deep in 2013.

Curious that PGC was not included, esp considering the high praise Jim had for the vintage upon release.
I had a similar thought, and also with Jim putting 2012 forward as the one of the very best vintages in the Willamette Valley on a thread recently.

Also a bit surprised not to see Evesham Wood or Brickhouse represented.
Sorry I could not make it (I believe for the 5th consecutive year). As the winery has evolved and what I do here has changed my time has become basically either utterly consumed or highly unpredictable right at this very time of year. We bottled all day Monday, I worked all weekend on bottling and moving shit around projects and there wasn't going to be any way for me to take the day off. This is the time of year where we bottle our largest bottling (5-6,000 cases) and with what we currently work with and the space limitations we currently face the project is onerous. Hopefully next year both are alleviated to an extent. Working on it at present! I do think our 2012s were as good as any vintage we had produced with maybe the 2016s (and 2017s and 2018s) sneaking past it. Again, would not characterize it as a warm vintage but that's me.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#29 Post by Richard T r i m p i » July 31st, 2019, 1:41 pm

John Peacock wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 10:40 am
The thing that has always stood out to me with these tastings is that the wines don't necessarily showcase a complete view of a vintage, since the producers tend to be the ones that fall within a certain taste profile, which is to be expected when the wines are brought from the participant's personal cellars. I'd be curious to see how views of a vintage overall would shift if more of the "commercial" wineries were included (read Sokol Blosser, Erath, Rex Hill, Willakenzie, etc). Then again, it could also reinforce some of the issues with the warmer vintages.
IPNC will give you a broader look at a given vintage...typically younger vintages (2 - 3 years). And yes, the attendees are serious Pinot geeks...so their wines tend to be a little more "AFWE" than average. Nevertheless, I've found these "Throwdowns" yield impressions that are indicative of general vintage characteristics...with plenty of individual surprises. What you don't often (or ever) see at IPNC is such a broad swath of Pinots....several years out. All in all it's a great way to celebrate Oregon Pinots, the memory of Bob Wood and the passion that these wines/winemakers generate.

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#30 Post by Brandon J. » July 31st, 2019, 6:03 pm

I don't know how feasible it would be, but it'd be fun to have 3-5 "control" wines that could always be in every tasting. Pick 3-5 different wineries that have been around for 20+ years and have library wines and always have the same 5 bottlings in each event every year.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#31 Post by Megan Joy » July 31st, 2019, 7:09 pm

Brandon J. wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 6:03 pm
I don't know how feasible it would be, but it'd be fun to have 3-5 "control" wines that could always be in every tasting. Pick 3-5 different wineries that have been around for 20+ years and have library wines and always have the same 5 bottlings in each event every year.
I don’t really think there is such thing as a control wine. Or if there is I hope to never be involved with making it.
There are lots of great producers in Oregon, I listed a few that I thought should have been included. Not because I think one or the other producer always has to be included (if you think one producer always should be, you should probably just step up and buy a case of wine from them each vintage and set a few aside for the tasting), but because in a tasting that is trying to showcase an entire vintage I would like to see as much range as possible. The same producer from a maximum of two vineyards is great if there is the room, (especially spreading out early/late in the tasting) but I don’t think two wines made by the same person from one site is a good use of available spots. (Or three wines made from a single pick from 3 producers..... pick dates are a huge deal.) Multiple wines from one winemaker/pick in a flight just seemed to dominate the conversation on any given flight. Just my take on it.

Also, can you imagine the debate that would ensue to pick just 5!! [cheers.gif]
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#32 Post by Tom P avlik » July 31st, 2019, 11:42 pm

Although I was never a fan of the 2012 vintage I did enjoy the tasting . I actually had to buy a few bottles for this event as I only had some solo 2012 bottles in my cellar. Having said that, I enjoyed the event and though many of the wines weren't to my preference there were several I felt showed rather well. Instead of a deep dive on each specific wine, which I feel better qualified palettes have already done, I will note the wines that I would currently buy if they were available.

Considering the vintage I feel most of the wines would have benefitted from decanting or just by using bigger glasses. That's not a knock on the stemware, I really appreciate Ian and his crew hosting; I just think most of the wines would have shown better in Burgundy glasses. I tried to make each pouring last for three tastings and was surprised at how much difference I tasted during those three samples even over such a short period of time.

I'll also echo the sentiment of preferring a broader representation of wineries over the deeper sampling of fewer wineries. Then again everything is subjective, including the following notes of my favorite wines from each flight.

Flight 1
My preference was for both the Goodfellow wines with a slight edge to the Whistling Ridge over the Heritage. This preference may have changed with more time as I felt the Heritage was much tighter than the Whistling Ridge and found myself liking the Heritage more with each sampling. My third choice was Seven of Hearts Armstrong which I initially preferred over the Heritage, but by the end of the flight I preferred the Heritage.

Flight 2
By far my favorite flight with 4 wines I would gladly purchase today: Grouchau and Seven of Hearts Bjornson plus the St Innocent and Walter Scott Temperance Hill. If only allowed to buy one of these four it would be the Walter Scott.

Flight 3
This and the next two flights were my three least favorite flights. There was only two wines I liked, but doubt I would currently buy either. My favorite was the Lincourt Anne Amie with the Shea being my second choice.

Flight 4
The Longplay was the only wine I would seek out to purchase at this point.

Flight 5
Not sure if I was suffering some palette fatigue, but I found most of these too big and lush. The one wine I would possibly buy was the Arterberry Maresh Weber

Flight 6
After a bunch of bread between the flights I enjoyed this more than the previous three flights. I didn't mind the brett in the Vincent Crowley as it was my favorite wine of this flight. The Cristom Summers was my other preferred wine in this flight

Flight 7
My order of preference was Westrey Oracle followed by the Archery Summit with the Westrey Abbey Ridge being a distant third. Having brought the Westrey Oracle I found it easy to pick from these five wines as I knew it had to be one of them and felt it was the prettiest and softest of the five. I appreciated Ian's comment about Archery making softer and prettier wines than what is often perceived in the market, as I found the Archery to be very much to my liking. From the previous notes it appears I'm an outlier with my Archery opinion, but I'm wondering if tasting it after both Cameron wines (the first which I felt had too much brett and the second seemed to have VA issues) hurt its showing in this lineup.

Thanks again for all the effort put in by the hosts and organizers!!!

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#33 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » August 1st, 2019, 12:18 am

Wait...you weren’t tasting out of Burgundy glasses(or OPN glasses)?

Are you kidding me?
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#34 Post by John Peacock » August 1st, 2019, 9:44 am

Tom P avlik wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 11:42 pm
Thanks again for all the effort put in by the hosts and organizers!!!
Hi Tom, welcome to Wine Berserkers!!!! Good to see you around here!
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#35 Post by John Peacock » August 1st, 2019, 9:56 am

Megan Joy wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 7:09 pm
Brandon J. wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 6:03 pm
I don't know how feasible it would be, but it'd be fun to have 3-5 "control" wines that could always be in every tasting. Pick 3-5 different wineries that have been around for 20+ years and have library wines and always have the same 5 bottlings in each event every year.
I don’t really think there is such thing as a control wine. Or if there is I hope to never be involved with making it.
There are lots of great producers in Oregon, I listed a few that I thought should have been included. Not because I think one or the other producer always has to be included (if you think one producer always should be, you should probably just step up and buy a case of wine from them each vintage and set a few aside for the tasting), but because in a tasting that is trying to showcase an entire vintage I would like to see as much range as possible. The same producer from a maximum of two vineyards is great if there is the room, (especially spreading out early/late in the tasting) but I don’t think two wines made by the same person from one site is a good use of available spots. (Or three wines made from a single pick from 3 producers..... pick dates are a huge deal.) Multiple wines from one winemaker/pick in a flight just seemed to dominate the conversation on any given flight. Just my take on it.

Also, can you imagine the debate that would ensue to pick just 5!! [cheers.gif]
I agree, my earlier comment was just about getting a bit more diversity than the "normal" general flavor/taste profile that is self selected by the participants, if the goal is to get a broad overview of a vintage. It is hard to do without having 100 wines though, as a person can only taste so much in a day. I also agree that there isn't a standard set of "control" wines, though now I want to start the debate! :) How would we define "control"? Most consistent (no vintage variation), least consistent (most variation year to year), certain profile (Eyrie vs Domaine Serene). I think we could spend as much time debating actual producers as debating how to define "control"!
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#36 Post by Tom P avlik » August 1st, 2019, 10:27 am

John Peacock wrote:
August 1st, 2019, 9:44 am
Tom P avlik wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 11:42 pm
Thanks again for all the effort put in by the hosts and organizers!!!
Hi Tom, welcome to Wine Berserkers!!!! Good to see you around here!
Thanks John, I actually signed up a year ago with the intent of posting my notes from the 2007 tasting, but never did get around to posting. Say hi to Sirpa, we are overdue to share some laughs over wine and eats...

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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#37 Post by Steven Miller » August 1st, 2019, 10:36 am


Thanks John, I actually signed up a year ago with the intent of posting my notes from the 2007 tasting, but never did get around to posting.
You can still go back and do that.
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Re: 2012 Bob Wood Memorial Pinot Noir Throwdown Tasting Notes

#38 Post by Mike Grammer » August 1st, 2019, 11:01 am

These are a splendid spectrum of notes and bookmarking for a fine take on the vintage in OR. Special welcome to the board to Shelby and Wil, and belated to Tom P. From these notes, we need to see more posts from you lot!

Kwa heri,

Mike
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