TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

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Mark B
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TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#1 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 2:37 pm

If you were anything like me, you’d never had a white Burgundy from south of the Côte de Beaune that really rocked your world. To me, these were always unassuming Chardonnays: component yet lacking any real depth or dinstinction. I’d always heard Pouilly-Fuissé was the top of the food chain down south, but Jadot, for me, was always marred by mediocrity. Those assumptions held true for the longest time.

Thankfully, that assumption was cosmically shattered yesterday by the most intriguing of bottles: a 2015 Eric Forest Pouilly-Fuissé. If this isn’t a lesson in the importance of competent and quality-focused production, I don’t know what is. This could stand as a dead ringer for village Meursault. It’s rich and powerful yet utterly delicate. White florals, lucious stone fruits, perfect balance. A lively blast of chalk and acid is held perfectly in check by the dense layers of fruit. A phenomenal effort. 92 pts.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#2 Post by Hank Victor » January 22nd, 2019, 2:42 pm

Thanks for the note. What was the price of the 2015 Eric Forrest PF?

I've always enjoyed Jadot PF for what it is and the price.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#3 Post by Corey N. » January 22nd, 2019, 2:42 pm

Thanks for the note -- I ended up grabbing a bottle (last one) from Binny's.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#4 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 2:52 pm

Corey N. wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 2:42 pm
Thanks for the note -- I ended up grabbing a bottle (last one) from Binny's.
Oh man, get at that. It’s mind-blowingly good for its modest status.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#5 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 2:54 pm

Hank Victor wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 2:42 pm
Thanks for the note. What was the price of the 2015 Eric Forrest PF?

I've always enjoyed Jadot PF for what it is and the price.
$30 full retail. I was able to scoop over a case for $16 each on clearance.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#6 Post by Peter Kleban » January 22nd, 2019, 3:03 pm

Thanks Mark! I've been looking for a good PF, I'll keep an eye out for this maker.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#7 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 4:46 pm

Found some great info on his website:
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#8 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 5:26 pm

Info on this specific bottling:
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#9 Post by Dan Kravitz » January 22nd, 2019, 5:37 pm

I've had Chateau de Fuisse bottlings that were far, far better than most 'Village' Meursaults at about the same price. I think that because it was such a ridiculous fashion a few decades ago, it lacks credibility despite some great terroirs being farmed to their potential.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#10 Post by William Kelley » January 22nd, 2019, 5:38 pm

So many great producers, and such a diversity of styles, to discover in the Mâconnais! Welcome to Chardonnay's secret garden.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#11 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 5:42 pm

Dan Kravitz wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:37 pm
I've had Chateau de Fuisse bottlings that were far, far better than most 'Village' Meursaults at about the same price. I think that because it was such a ridiculous fashion a few decades ago, it lacks credibility despite some great terroirs being farmed to their potential.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#12 Post by Peter Kleban » January 22nd, 2019, 5:43 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:38 pm
So many great producers, and such a diversity of styles, to discover in the Mâconnais! Welcome to Chardonnay's secret garden.
William, what else do you particularly like? TIA!
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#13 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 5:44 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:38 pm
So many great producers, and such a diversity of styles, to discover in the Mâconnais! Welcome to Chardonnay's secret garden.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#14 Post by AlexS » January 22nd, 2019, 5:44 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:38 pm
So many great producers, and such a diversity of styles, to discover in the Mâconnais! Welcome to Chardonnay's secret garden.
William, could you please recommend some of your favorite Mâconnais producers, maybe even a top 10? Very much respect your opinion and palate, would appreciate it!
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#15 Post by William Kelley » January 22nd, 2019, 6:03 pm

AlexS wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:44 pm
William Kelley wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:38 pm
So many great producers, and such a diversity of styles, to discover in the Mâconnais! Welcome to Chardonnay's secret garden.
William, could you please recommend some of your favorite Mâconnais producers, maybe even a top 10? Very much respect your opinion and palate, would appreciate it!
Thanks for your kind words.

- Domaine Daniel et Julien Barraud - artisanal winemaking (one of a number of top estates in Vergisson which seems to retain a serious winemaking culture) that pretty much defines classicism in the Mâconnais.
- Domaine Guffens-Heynen - virtuosic stuff that, at its best, can embarrass the Côte de Beaune's finest in blind tastings: not all cuvées are created equal, as for each appellation there is an entry level cuvée that uses the lower acid and higher sugar press juice, vs the more serious cuvées which use the free run and first press juice, which is where the magic happens. Happy to supply more specific advice.
- Domaine de la Bongran - the Thevenet family's pioneering organically farmed estate, late picked, vinified and matured for a long time in epoxy, and comparatively late released: broad shouldered wines that often carry residual sugar, but which age amazingly. They also embrace botrytis, which their part of Viré-Clessé (called Quintaine) is prone to. Not for everyone but a window into how white Burgundy tasted 100 years ago (and until recently DRC Montrachet had residual sugar and botrytis).... For less extreme interpretations of the area, look at Guillemot-Michel (which is still classic, musky Quintaine) and Michel Bonhomme (from further north, more textbook Viré-Clessé).
- Domaine Jules Desjourneys - long-time distributor of Coche, Ente turns winemaker and does an incredible job: not cheap, but worth it, especially for the more ambitious bottlings where there are truly fireworks.
- Domaine Valette - late-picked, low-sulfur, insanely long barrel maturation (as in, 84 months for one of their 2004 Pouilly-Fuissés), but wines that respond incredibly to oxygen (sometimes I decant for six hours), deliver immense pleasure with food and are simply quite striking. Another universe of wine.
- Château des Rontets - a top producer where you can taste a wine from granite ("Pierrefolle"), which makes occasional appearances in the southern Mâconnais, vs one from limestone ("Birbettes")
- Denis Jeandeau - a serious micro-négociant who works in a leaner, more reductive / contemporary style, making very serious wines
- Domaine des Vignes du Maynes - best reds in the Mâconnais, which used to have a serious reputation for red until all the old, low-yielding selections of Gamay were grubbed up and replaced with clones
- Domaine J-A Ferret - you were skeptical about Jadot, but they own this estate and Audrey, their winemaker, is one of the most passionate and dedicated people in the region. The style is fresher and less unctuous than the late-picked style that made the estate's reputation under the Ferret family, but they are very serious wines that I rate very highly.
- Dominque Cornin - another source of very classic, artisanal wines, along the lines of Barraud, but somewhat less well known so likely cheaper
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#16 Post by AlexS » January 22nd, 2019, 6:08 pm

Well sheesh, just amazing...will devote a portion of 2019 to discovering some of these wines.

Thx so much William!

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#17 Post by jon leifer » January 22nd, 2019, 6:21 pm

Well done, William..am familiar with a few of your gems but also a bunch of new guys to check out. thank you
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#18 Post by Peter Kleban » January 22nd, 2019, 6:35 pm

Thanks so much, William, very generous and informative. IIRC the only one of these I've had is the Barraud which I liked a lot. But now there is a whole world to explore!
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#19 Post by Mark B » January 22nd, 2019, 7:14 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 6:03 pm
AlexS wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:44 pm
William Kelley wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 5:38 pm
So many great producers, and such a diversity of styles, to discover in the Mâconnais! Welcome to Chardonnay's secret garden.
William, could you please recommend some of your favorite Mâconnais producers, maybe even a top 10? Very much respect your opinion and palate, would appreciate it!
Thanks for your kind words.

- Domaine Daniel et Julien Barraud - artisanal winemaking (one of a number of top estates in Vergisson which seems to retain a serious winemaking culture) that pretty much defines classicism in the Mâconnais.
- Domaine Guffens-Heynen - virtuosic stuff that, at its best, can embarrass the Côte de Beaune's finest in blind tastings: not all cuvées are created equal, as for each appellation there is an entry level cuvée that uses the lower acid and higher sugar press juice, vs the more serious cuvées which use the free run and first press juice, which is where the magic happens. Happy to supply more specific advice.
- Domaine de la Bongran - the Thevenet family's pioneering organically farmed estate, late picked, vinified and matured for a long time in epoxy, and comparatively late released: broad shouldered wines that often carry residual sugar, but which age amazingly. They also embrace botrytis, which their part of Viré-Clessé (called Quintaine) is prone to. Not for everyone but a window into how white Burgundy tasted 100 years ago (and until recently DRC Montrachet had residual sugar and botrytis).... For less extreme interpretations of the area, look at Guillemot-Michel (which is still classic, musky Quintaine) and Michel Bonhomme (from further north, more textbook Viré-Clessé).
- Domaine Jules Desjourneys - long-time distributor of Coche, Ente turns winemaker and does an incredible job: not cheap, but worth it, especially for the more ambitious bottlings where there are truly fireworks.
- Domaine Valette - late-picked, low-sulfur, insanely long barrel maturation (as in, 84 months for one of their 2004 Pouilly-Fuissés), but wines that respond incredibly to oxygen (sometimes I decant for six hours), deliver immense pleasure with food and are simply quite striking. Another universe of wine.
- Château des Rontets - a top producer where you can taste a wine from granite ("Pierrefolle"), which makes occasional appearances in the southern Mâconnais, vs one from limestone ("Birbettes")
- Denis Jeandeau - a serious micro-négociant who works in a leaner, more reductive / contemporary style, making very serious wines
- Domaine des Vignes du Maynes - best reds in the Mâconnais, which used to have a serious reputation for red until all the old, low-yielding selections of Gamay were grubbed up and replaced with clones
- Domaine J-A Ferret - you were skeptical about Jadot, but they own this estate and Audrey, their winemaker, is one of the most passionate and dedicated people in the region. The style is fresher and less unctuous than the late-picked style that made the estate's reputation under the Ferret family, but they are very serious wines that I rate very highly.
- Dominque Cornin - another source of very classic, artisanal wines, along the lines of Barraud, but somewhat less well known so likely cheaper

A million thanks for the treasure trove, William. I can’t wait to drink through the producers on your list.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#20 Post by Sean_S » January 22nd, 2019, 7:27 pm

Mark B wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 2:54 pm
Hank Victor wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 2:42 pm
Thanks for the note. What was the price of the 2015 Eric Forrest PF?

I've always enjoyed Jadot PF for what it is and the price.
$30 full retail. I was able to scoop over a case for $16 each on clearance.

grouphug
Thanks Mark for the note.... Surprising since Burgundy is dead at retail and this came from Binny's no less

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#21 Post by Ron Erickson » January 22nd, 2019, 8:05 pm

I recall seeing a lot of Guffens-Heynen negociant line Verget a decade ago, but it's kind of disappeared.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#22 Post by Alan Rath » January 22nd, 2019, 9:55 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 6:03 pm
- Domaine Daniel et Julien Barraud - artisanal winemaking (one of a number of top estates in Vergisson which seems to retain a serious winemaking culture) that pretty much defines classicism in the Mâconnais.
- Domaine Guffens-Heynen - virtuosic stuff that, at its best, can embarrass the Côte de Beaune's finest in blind tastings: not all cuvées are created equal, as for each appellation there is an entry level cuvée that uses the lower acid and higher sugar press juice, vs the more serious cuvées which use the free run and first press juice, which is where the magic happens. Happy to supply more specific advice.
- Domaine de la Bongran - the Thevenet family's pioneering organically farmed estate, late picked, vinified and matured for a long time in epoxy, and comparatively late released: broad shouldered wines that often carry residual sugar, but which age amazingly. They also embrace botrytis, which their part of Viré-Clessé (called Quintaine) is prone to. Not for everyone but a window into how white Burgundy tasted 100 years ago (and until recently DRC Montrachet had residual sugar and botrytis).... For less extreme interpretations of the area, look at Guillemot-Michel (which is still classic, musky Quintaine) and Michel Bonhomme (from further north, more textbook Viré-Clessé).
- Domaine Jules Desjourneys - long-time distributor of Coche, Ente turns winemaker and does an incredible job: not cheap, but worth it, especially for the more ambitious bottlings where there are truly fireworks.
- Domaine Valette - late-picked, low-sulfur, insanely long barrel maturation (as in, 84 months for one of their 2004 Pouilly-Fuissés), but wines that respond incredibly to oxygen (sometimes I decant for six hours), deliver immense pleasure with food and are simply quite striking. Another universe of wine.
- Château des Rontets - a top producer where you can taste a wine from granite ("Pierrefolle"), which makes occasional appearances in the southern Mâconnais, vs one from limestone ("Birbettes")
- Denis Jeandeau - a serious micro-négociant who works in a leaner, more reductive / contemporary style, making very serious wines
- Domaine des Vignes du Maynes - best reds in the Mâconnais, which used to have a serious reputation for red until all the old, low-yielding selections of Gamay were grubbed up and replaced with clones
- Domaine J-A Ferret - you were skeptical about Jadot, but they own this estate and Audrey, their winemaker, is one of the most passionate and dedicated people in the region. The style is fresher and less unctuous than the late-picked style that made the estate's reputation under the Ferret family, but they are very serious wines that I rate very highly.
- Dominque Cornin - another source of very classic, artisanal wines, along the lines of Barraud, but somewhat less well known so likely cheaper
William, that's a great list, thanks for contributing. Have you had Soufrandiere, and how would they compare?
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#23 Post by James Billy » January 23rd, 2019, 12:24 am

Unlike red Burgundy, white Burgundy has many serious rivals around the world, like South Africa, New Zealand and Australia.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#24 Post by Mark B » January 23rd, 2019, 4:52 am

James Billy wrote:
January 23rd, 2019, 12:24 am
Unlike red Burgundy, white Burgundy has many serious rivals around the world, like South Africa, New Zealand and Australia.
I might be talking out my butt here, but, to me, good new world Chardonnay that rivals its white Burg counterparts ain't cheap. I could be off, but I'm guessing $30-$40 is about the norm for substantial quality. With the ocean of entry level white Burgs under $25 (many under $20), I can't justify buying low-end new world Chards. However, I'm all ears when it comes to suggestions for new world Chards that meet or exceed their Burgundy counterparts at the same price points.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#25 Post by James Billy » January 23rd, 2019, 5:29 am

I'm not talking wines to compete at the bottom of the scale. How much is top end WB? A lot more than $30-40.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#26 Post by William Kelley » January 23rd, 2019, 5:36 am

Alan Rath wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 9:55 pm
William, that's a great list, thanks for contributing. Have you had Soufrandiere, and how would they compare?
Absolutely. They could easily have made the list. They have figured out the formula that works—both for Soufrandière and Brett Bros—which is used barrels and demi-muids for quite long sur lie élevage without stirring. But they are better known and their prices are higher than some of the others I listed, hence not including them. Incidentally, they worked with Guffens, and couldn't be nicer guys.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#27 Post by William Kelley » January 23rd, 2019, 5:40 am

Ron Erickson wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 8:05 pm
I recall seeing a lot of Guffens-Heynen negociant line Verget a decade ago, but it's kind of disappeared.
No US representation, but I think that is in the process of changing. Verget has effectively become the 'value range' from Guffens, as he is concentrating on the Mâconnais, only making a couple of bottlings from the Côte de Beaune and Chablis. Everything is under screw cap and prices are very keen indeed. And the wines can be terrific, with the best cuvées among the best wines in the region - but not on the level of Guffens-Heynen.
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#28 Post by Ron Erickson » January 23rd, 2019, 6:00 am

William Kelley wrote:
January 23rd, 2019, 5:40 am
Ron Erickson wrote:
January 22nd, 2019, 8:05 pm
I recall seeing a lot of Guffens-Heynen negociant line Verget a decade ago, but it's kind of disappeared.
No US representation, but I think that is in the process of changing. Verget has effectively become the 'value range' from Guffens, as he is concentrating on the Mâconnais, only making a couple of bottlings from the Côte de Beaune and Chablis. Everything is under screw cap and prices are very keen indeed. And the wines can be terrific, with the best cuvées among the best wines in the region - but not on the level of Guffens-Heynen.
Thanks for the details. I thought it was something along that line. The cuvee's were a poolside go to for the warm summer afternoons.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#29 Post by Mark B » January 23rd, 2019, 6:44 am

James Billy wrote:
January 23rd, 2019, 5:29 am
I'm not talking wines to compete at the bottom of the scale. How much is top end WB? A lot more than $30-40.
But does top end WB really have a counterpart? I don't think decent Corton Charlemagne, top-tier producer Puligny 1ers, and the hyphenated Montrachets Grand Crus have non-Burgundy equivalents. Again, just my humble opinion. Wish I had a chance to double blind a ton of these wines to confirm or dismiss my preconceived notions. Who's with me?

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#30 Post by James Billy » January 23rd, 2019, 9:29 am

Plenty of blind tastings can confirm this.

Keith Prothero did exactly this last year with around a hundred wines. 1er cru/GC Burgundy from good producers against new world Chardonnays with a bunch of hard core Burgundy nuts tasting blind. champagne.gif


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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#32 Post by Dan Kravitz » January 23rd, 2019, 5:37 pm

to Mark B,

I'm in for that kind of tasting. IMO there are New World wines as great as the best white Burgundy, but in my experience they are extremely rare. Mount Eden of course comes to mind. Although I've had fewer bottlings, so does Ridge Monte Bello. Less sure about Mayacamas, Stony Hill, Hanzell. It's been a long time since I've had any Chalone, but decades ago they might have qualified. I have far less experience with great Chardonnay from places other than Burgundy or California. I would be glad to participate in such a tasting.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#33 Post by Dan Kravitz » January 23rd, 2019, 5:39 pm

PS: I did not list Rhys although I think they might belong, but for this exercise I am focused on wines with a reasonably long track record.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#34 Post by David Henry » January 23rd, 2019, 6:03 pm

The Guffens-Heynen single vineyard Pouilly Fuisses are generally excellent, but the prices have gone sky high and they are very hard to find. I have had better luck finding and affording the Guffens-Heynen Macon Pierreclos and the Macon Pierreclos En Crazy. While still not cheap, they run significantly less than his PF's and at their best they are not just an outstanding Macon, they are excellent White Burgundies. I hope they get their marketing issues in the U.S. worked out and become more available once again in this country. In addition, some of the best every day drinker White Burgundies I have had came from the Verget negociant line. I'd love to see Verget readily available once again as well.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#35 Post by R. Frankel » January 23rd, 2019, 7:58 pm

+1 on William’s post. I’ve had some lovely Ferret and Barraud PF. I’d add Saumaize-Michelin if you can find it!
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#36 Post by G. Shields » January 23rd, 2019, 11:01 pm

Fully on board with William’s list and responses and the OP’s passionate opening.

I’ve really enjoyed Soufrandiere in the past but agree that it seems to be becoming an outlier in terms of pricing. Another name to throw out there is Chateau de Lavernette: we invited the vigneron to our wine group dinner last year and we had a superb evening. The PFs were fantastic, especially a wonderfully complex 2010 PF ‘Vers Chane’, and he came across as a very thoughtful and dedicated wine maker... And even among lower appellations you can find wonderul wines in hands of excellent vignerons: picked up a 2012 straight Macon Milly-Lamartine from héritiers Lafon and it was rocking! So much wine there all for less than €20, what’s not to like!

I’ve been trying to work through some of the names mentioned here but for some puzzling reason good Mâconnais domaines are not so easy to find in Lyon cavistes... but happy to continue the hunt!
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#37 Post by James Billy » January 24th, 2019, 12:13 am

Dan Kravitz wrote:
January 23rd, 2019, 5:37 pm
to Mark B,

I'm in for that kind of tasting. IMO there are New World wines as great as the best white Burgundy, but in my experience they are extremely rare. Mount Eden of course comes to mind. Although I've had fewer bottlings, so does Ridge Monte Bello. Less sure about Mayacamas, Stony Hill, Hanzell. It's been a long time since I've had any Chalone, but decades ago they might have qualified. I have far less experience with great Chardonnay from places other than Burgundy or California. I would be glad to participate in such a tasting.

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Dan, you talk about US Chardonnays. But there's so much more, like South African, Australian and New Zealand. If you can get them, they can be astonishing value. Also, they tend to be much more Burgundian than many American version.

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#38 Post by William Kelley » January 24th, 2019, 3:36 am

G. Shields wrote:
January 23rd, 2019, 11:01 pm
Fully on board with William’s list and responses and the OP’s passionate opening.

I’ve really enjoyed Soufrandiere in the past but agree that it seems to be becoming an outlier in terms of pricing. Another name to throw out there is Chateau de Lavernette: we invited the vigneron to our wine group dinner last year and we had a superb evening. The PFs were fantastic, especially a wonderfully complex 2010 PF ‘Vers Chane’, and he came across as a very thoughtful and dedicated wine maker... And even among lower appellations you can find wonderul wines in hands of excellent vignerons: picked up a 2012 straight Macon Milly-Lamartine from héritiers Lafon and it was rocking! So much wine there all for less than €20, what’s not to like!

I’ve been trying to work through some of the names mentioned here but for some puzzling reason good Mâconnais domaines are not so easy to find in Lyon cavistes... but happy to continue the hunt!
Robert Denogent has a reasonable presence in Lyon, I think, and those wines are worth tasting! But from Lyon it's a short drive, just go visit some of the domaines. There are a few quite nice rustic places to eat in the southern Mâconnais, and of course the amazing Aux Terrasses if you go as far north as Tournus (I met the chef for the first time when I was exploring the abandoned monastic enclosed vineyards in the woods above Mâcon-Cruzeille, and I bumped into him gathering wild strawberries - which appeared in the desert I had that evening!).
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#39 Post by G. Shields » January 24th, 2019, 9:57 am

Thanks William, yes I seem to recognize the denogent label, will try a bottle soon.
And yes, mâconnais is not far and best bet would be to get up there and visit! That being said, have already made a couple of family days out to walk up the roche de solutre and vergisson for picnics. Stunning views and scenery of the vines and countryside but due to aforementioned family constraints wasn’t able to combine with visit... sigh..! However, the producers really do not seem set up to easily welcome walk ins: the villages are totally deserted and there is an absence of the degustation/vente à la propriété signs you can get elsewhere. Without an appointment you don’t get much love! Oh well, there’s always the co-op, and some of them are actually ok, thinking Cave de Lugny...
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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#40 Post by Bob Hughes » January 24th, 2019, 10:10 am

I will echo William's recommendation of Barraud, and also mention that at least IMO, while their single vineyard PF's are clearly the top of the qualitative hierarchy, I also enjoy their releases from St. Veran (especially Les Pommard) and Macon (especially their Vergisson). [cheers.gif]

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Re: TN: My Pouilly-Fuissé epiphany

#41 Post by Alan Rath » January 24th, 2019, 10:42 am

G. Shields wrote:
January 24th, 2019, 9:57 am
Thanks William, yes I seem to recognize the denogent label, will try a bottle soon.
And yes, mâconnais is not far and best bet would be to get up there and visit! That being said, have already made a couple of family days out to walk up the roche de solutre and vergisson for picnics. Stunning views and scenery of the vines and countryside but due to aforementioned family constraints wasn’t able to combine with visit... sigh..! However, the producers really do not seem set up to easily welcome walk ins: the villages are totally deserted and there is an absence of the degustation/vente à la propriété signs you can get elsewhere. Without an appointment you don’t get much love! Oh well, there’s always the co-op, and some of them are actually ok, thinking Cave de Lugny...
G., it's under an hour away! Get it in gear, make some appointments, and get up there! You cannot be a Berserker with this attitude ;)
I'm just one lost soul, swimming in a fish bowl, year after year

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