2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

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joz€f p1nxten
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#51 Post by joz€f p1nxten » January 9th, 2019, 3:57 am

Thank you Howard, so this seems to confirm that the 2014 vintage was still relatively good in Verduno, a northern region of Barolo, compared to certain other villages.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#52 Post by Mike Grammer » January 9th, 2019, 3:37 pm

and thank you for continuing your notes, which allowed me the chance to not miss this magnificent thread, Howard. Bravissimo! Keep 'em coming.

Haere ra,

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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#53 Post by Brian King » January 10th, 2019, 8:14 am

Tom Taylor wrote:
January 9th, 2019, 3:01 am
Great notes Howard! Regarding Brovia, I thought Alex’s wife was the winemaker?
Definitely Alex is the winemaker. His wife's family are the historic owners, but Alex is winemakers. I've tasted with him several times - truly wonderful guy and some fantastic wines!

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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#54 Post by Marcus Dean » January 10th, 2019, 7:40 pm

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Burgundy baby

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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#55 Post by alan weinberg » January 10th, 2019, 8:08 pm

retitle this! There’s no Burgundy.

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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#56 Post by John Morris » January 10th, 2019, 8:23 pm

Brian King wrote:
January 10th, 2019, 8:14 am
Tom Taylor wrote:
January 9th, 2019, 3:01 am
Great notes Howard! Regarding Brovia, I thought Alex’s wife was the winemaker?
Definitely Alex is the winemaker. His wife's family are the historic owners, but Alex is winemakers. I've tasted with him several times - truly wonderful guy and some fantastic wines!
I don't think that's right. I think Alex is on the marketing and business end, and I think he's the most comfortable working in English. This came up once before here and the suggestion that Alex was making the wine was rebutted.

Rosenthal, the importer, says on its website:
Sadly, Raffaele passed away in 2011 but two of Giacinto’s daughters, Cristina and Elena, are now completely engaged as the fourth generation, in the affairs of this family-run estate. Marina, Giacinto’s wife and mother of their children, is a brilliant cook and provider of wise counsel, and Alex Sanchez, husband of Elena, has joined the family enterprise.

Likewise, Kerin O'Keefe in Barolo and Barbaresco (p. 112) says that Elena is the enologist and Cristina is the agronomist.

That squares with my recollection from a visit in 2002 with an Italian ITB friend. Alex led the tasting but I recall that Elena (who dropped by) was making the wine.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#57 Post by Brian King » January 11th, 2019, 7:44 pm

John Morris wrote:
January 10th, 2019, 8:23 pm
Brian King wrote:
January 10th, 2019, 8:14 am
Tom Taylor wrote:
January 9th, 2019, 3:01 am
Great notes Howard! Regarding Brovia, I thought Alex’s wife was the winemaker?
Definitely Alex is the winemaker. His wife's family are the historic owners, but Alex is winemakers. I've tasted with him several times - truly wonderful guy and some fantastic wines!
I don't think that's right. I think Alex is on the marketing and business end, and I think he's the most comfortable working in English. This came up once before here and the suggestion that Alex was making the wine was rebutted.

Rosenthal, the importer, says on its website:
Sadly, Raffaele passed away in 2011 but two of Giacinto’s daughters, Cristina and Elena, are now completely engaged as the fourth generation, in the affairs of this family-run estate. Marina, Giacinto’s wife and mother of their children, is a brilliant cook and provider of wise counsel, and Alex Sanchez, husband of Elena, has joined the family enterprise.

Likewise, Kerin O'Keefe in Barolo and Barbaresco (p. 112) says that Elena is the enologist and Cristina is the agronomist.

That squares with my recollection from a visit in 2002 with an Italian ITB friend. Alex led the tasting but I recall that Elena (who dropped by) was making the wine.
Wow thank you for clarifying! I guess he markets well! champagne.gif

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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#58 Post by Howard Davis » January 11th, 2019, 11:09 pm

Thanks Mike and others.

John and Brian, I've visited twice in recent years and I'd be surprised if Alex wasn't involved in the winemaking process, given how he talks about it. On our last visit we spent half an hour waiting with an assistant while he was working in the winery. It's a small family operation so I wouldn't be surprised if the three of them did most things ...

Anyway, some Burgundy notes ...
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#59 Post by Howard Davis » January 11th, 2019, 11:12 pm

BURGUNDY TRIP: WHITE BURGS AT THE BAR, LE BISTRO DE L’HÔTEL, BEAUNE

I am belatedly typing up some notes from my last Burgundy trip ...

Mark, Andrew and I said goodbye to Thierry and headed from Castiglione Falletto to Beaune. On arrival we were in a mood to broach a couple of nice white Burgundies …
  • 2015 Les Héritiers du Comte Lafon Mâcon-Milly-Lamartine Clos du Four - France, Burgundy, Mâconnais, Mâcon-Milly-Lamartine
    Pale gold. A bouquet with prominent creamy oak, poached pear, nectarine, almond paste and mandarin. On palate, a rich, opulent 2015-typical white Burgundy. White peach, blanched almonds and cashews, apricots with a creamy, lactic element. Big and bold. However, acceptable acidity. Hedonistic. I don’t expect this Clos du Four to be long-lived. Drink in the next 5-6 years.
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  • 2015 Etienne Sauzet Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Champ-Canet - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru
    A better 2015 white Burgundy. Fairly gold coloured. After the initial reduction on opening, a Puligny-typical nose of lemons and limes, chalky minerals, pear, spices and gentle white meadow flowers. On palate, more Meursault than Puligny (not surprisingly, perhaps, for a climat on the Meursault border, in a warmer year). Decent acidity, the citrus here more mandarin or orange than lemon or lime. Real volume and power but a touch broader than I would, ideally, have liked. Also, prominent vanillin oak yet to integrate. Perhaps hold for 2-3 years, but I would not expect this Sauzet to be very long-lived.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#60 Post by Howard Davis » January 11th, 2019, 11:21 pm

DINNER AT AUPRÈS DU CLOCHER, POMMARD
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We had a great meal – as usual – at Auprès du Clocher, particularly my Coquilles St.-Jacques entrée and the restaurant’s signature Époisses dish. We also had an excellent Coche-Dury to accompany. When I went to double down and order another Coche – in a surprise development – I was out-voted 2-1 to make way for a modest Pommard …
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Coquilles St.-Jacques entrée
  • 2013 Coche-Dury Meursault Les Chevalières - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Meursault
    Pale gold. On bouquet, “more lemons and limes than stone fruit” (as Mark said). I thought more limes than lemons, with touches of greengage and green and yellow apple. Also cinnamon and other baking spices and minerals with breath of vanillin oak. On palate, that signature rich, fully ripe fruit, with sparkling acidity. It was surprisingly rich and opulent for a 2013. The tensile acidity cut through the fat in the cuisine. Lemon and lime citrus, green apple, pear and chalky minerals. Layered and complex. Brilliant! Drink or hold.
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    Langoustine main
  • 2009 Domaine Cyrot Buthiau Pommard 1er Cru Les Arvelets - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Pommard 1er Cru
    A Pommard nose of red cherry, dry clay and a little iron. Also the smallest hint of rose florals. On palate, red cherry, earth and a suggestion of Rugiens rusty iron. Generous fruit. Lighter, more limited 2009, acidity. Reasonable volume and length. A fruit forward, uncomplicated Pommard. Ready now.
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    Dessert!
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#61 Post by Howard Davis » January 11th, 2019, 11:35 pm

CHABLIS SUNDAY: VISIT TO LA CHABLISIENNE, CHABLIS
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So you’re in Burgundy on a Sunday and most of the wineries are closed, what to do for the day? Visit Chablis for the day …
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Old vine in Montée de Tonnerre
After the 139kms drive from Beaune to Chablis, we began the day with a scramble around Montée de Tonnerre vineyard trying to figure out why it is so close in quality to a Grand Cru? (A possible answer: the south-west facing aspect is not much different Blanchot, and the Kimmeridgean soil is similar).

After visiting the Chablis Sunday market, we next went for a bottle tasting at La Chablisienne.
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La Chablisienne was established in 1923 is the biggest grower collective within Chablis (with nearly 300 growers). It produces about one quarter of all Chablis, over 730,000 cases per annum. They produce 30 different wines including 13 1ers and seven Grand Crus.
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They have an ultra-modern facility with a good range of wines for public tasting. Prices at the winery.
  • 2016 La Chablisienne Petit Chablis Pas Si Petit - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Petit Chablis
    A precise bouquet of fresh green apple, greengage and wet river boulder. Good fruit weight for this level of Chablis. In fact, the palate a little heavy and coarse. contrasting with the finer bouquet. A reasonable Petit Chablis. Euros 9.50.
  • 2014 La Chablisienne Chablis La Sereine - France, Burgundy, Chablis
    A step up from the Petit Chablis but not a stereotypical Chablis. More like a New World Chardonnay than a Chablis with only a hint chalkiness on the finish. Malic and citric perfumes and flavours. A good, basic, everyday unoaked (I would guess) Chardonnay. Vines 30 years old. Drink in the next 3-4 years. Euros 13.
  • 2015 La Chablisienne Chablis Les Vénérables - France, Burgundy, Chablis
    Not the Vieilles Vignes version. A villages level Chablis, the name refers to a plot of at least 35 year old vines. More Chablis typicity on bouquet. Lemon, minerals, seashell and pear perfumes. Richer and fuller on palate than anticipated from the nose. Lacking in chalky minerality and some acid cut. A decent, ripe and full Chardonnay. I’d drink in the next 3-5 years. Euros 15.
  • 2014 La Chablisienne Chablis 1er Cru Côte de Léchet - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    Clearly the best Chablis so far. Limes, chalk, wet granite, pears and a touch of seaspray on bouquet. Complex and expressive on palate. Chablis typicity with a nice chalkiness to support the good fruit volume. Citric and mineral. Precise and linear with a touch of salinity on the finish. Euros 20, a good buy.
  • 2016 La Chablisienne Chablis 1er Cru Montmains - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    On bouquet green apples, limes, nectarines and florals (“Geraniums”, said Andrew). Pleasant Chardonnay on palate. Limited Chablis typicity and minerality. Pear, yellow apple and nectarine. A pass for me. Euros 19.
  • 2016 La Chablisienne Chablis 1er Cru Fourchaume - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    Green, rather than yellow fruit on bouquet: greengages, green apples and limes. Hints of oyster shell and chalk. In the mouth, well balanced. Good body with nice freshness, acidity and minerality. The green fruit character continued to the palate with some yellow orchard fruit. The best Chablis so far. Euros 19.
  • 2015 La Chablisienne Chablis 1er Cru Mont de Milieu - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    An improvement, again, from the Fourchaume. A relatively complex, expressive bouquet mingling spice, citrus fruit, mineral and meadow flower nuances. Also a good interplay of citric, orchard fruit and mineral elements in the mouth. Good concentration and decent acidity. Euros 25.
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  • 2014 La Chablisienne Chablis Grand Cru Les Clos - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    By some margin, the wine of the tasting. Very good Grand Cru Chablis. A detailed, ethereal but Chablis specific bouquet of minerals, chalk, spices, soil and lemon. On palate, it’s all power and precision. Excellent fruit weight, volume and power. Sparkling but not over-prominent acidity. Mineral. Complex, layered and long. Drink over the next 10 or so years, I’d guess. Euros 50.
  • 2015 La Chablisienne Chablis Grand Cru Les Preuses - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    A more subtle set of lifted aromas, more floral with delicate citrus. On palate, earth, blanched cashews and pears, powerful and substantial. Substantial Grand Cru matière. However, it lacked the cut, verticality and laser-like precision of the Les Clos.
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  • 2008 La Chablisienne Chablis 1er Cru Fourchaume - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    La Chablisienne also had an older bottle open for tasting. On bouquet, slightly caramelised with lemon toffee apple, honey and some Turkish Delight. On palate, clearly oxidised but appropriately so for a 10 year old 1er. Not at all cheesy. Lemon meringue, preserved citrus and lemon toffee. Bone dry though. Good weight and drive. Serious 2008 acidity. Enjoyable. Drink soon.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#62 Post by Howard Davis » January 11th, 2019, 11:42 pm

LUNCH AT LE BISTROT DES GRAND CRUS, CHABLIS

A good meal of Foie Gras and a Trout main accompanied by:
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  • 2015 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Les Clos - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    Overall, a disappointing Les Clos, quite a way inferior to the 2014 La Chablisienne Les Clos. Pale gold. An attractive nose of gentle spices, pears and lemons, with a slightly off-putting creamy, lactic element. This element was reduced on the second pour. Not a lot of Chablis typicity on palate … in fact, before the food, I was not at all impressed. It seemed overly broad and lacking in focus, minerality and acid cut. The second pour was again better on palate and the acidity seemed to improve when matched with the fat in the Foie Gras. It also paired reasonably well with the trout. Only, in my view, an average Grand Cru Chablis.
    DSC04387A.JPG
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#63 Post by Howard Davis » January 12th, 2019, 12:02 am

2018 VISIT TO DOMAINE WILLIAM FÈVRE WITH ALAIN MARCUELLO - Chablis

Domaine William Fèvre is my third favourite Chablis house – after Raveneau and Vincent Dauvissat – and is a good place to visit to get a good perspective on current Chablis vintages and the climats. Fèvre is one of the biggest land owners in Chablis with 78 ha of vineyards, of which 15.9 ha are 1ers and 15.2 ha are Grand Cru. They have at least 18 labels including seven of the eight Grand Crus.
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We talked with Alain about recent Fèvre vintages with me saying that 2008, 2010, 2012 and 2014 were my recent favourites. Alain did not seem to disagree with my view saying that he thought 2017 might make my list once the 2017s are released.

Alain talked about recent Fèvre vintages, in the context of the 2016 vintage:

- 2012: “Riper, fuller bodied than 2016. Better acidity. A little lighter in 2016”.

- 2013: “Tropical fruit, very different from 2016”.

- 2014: A “perfect vintage” for Fèvre.

- 2015 and 2016: “Non-typical Chablis vintages”, said Alain, wondering if “2018 might be the same?”. He noted that, in his view, “2016 is a more balanced vintage than 2015”, although volumes were down due to frost, two lots of hail and diseases. He stated however that there was “no botrytis at all” in 2016.

- 2017: “a classical vintage”. “The best stylistic comparison for 2017 is 2014 not [my suggestion of] 2007”, said Alain.

When I raised the issue of premox with Alain he just said “Since 2010 we have used diam for all of our wines.”

Alain said that the oak used by Fèvre is all older (1-8 years of age) barrels.

Alain mentioned that global warming had really benefited Fèvre’s Valmur site but unfortunately we did not get the chance to try a Valmur.

After the tasting, I would not add 2016 to my list of top, recent Chablis vintages although, overall, I’d rate it as better than 2015. The couple of minor 2017s we had made me hopeful about the vintage.

The prices noted were the cellar prices.
  • 2016 William Fèvre Petit Chablis - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Petit Chablis
    Only raised in stainless steel, said Alain. A crisp green apple, greengage and citrus bouquet. On palate, a nice entry level Chablis. Citrus, pear and some minerality. Good concentration and fruit density for a Petit Chablis. “More balanced than the 2015 Petit Chablis”, noted Alain. Euros 11.90.
  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis - France, Burgundy, Chablis
    Oak barrels 10%. A richer, sweeter nose of mandarin and grapefruit citrus, pear and nectarine. A richer, ripe-seeming palate. A little citric but with more orchard fruit. Good body, concentration and power for this level. Euros 16.
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  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis 1er Cru Côte de Léchet - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    Alain said that this 1er was purchased fruit, not a Domaine wine. From a steep vineyard facing south-east. A clear step up from the earlier wines. Limes, chalky minerals and iodine on the pungent bouquet. Lovely mouthfeel. Attractive gravelly minerals. Mainly green fruit: green apples, greengage plums and lime juice. Refreshing acidity. Euros 23.
  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis 1er Cru Vaillons - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    South-eastern exposure, 50 year old vines. An attractive bouquet packed full of fully ripe orchard fruit – peaches, apricot and pears – and a dash of tropical fruit. Also cream and meadow flowers with a honeycomb touch. Better again than the Léchet. Good fruit volume on palate. Clean and mineral. Acceptable acidity. Citric and stone fruit, with pineapple and some other exotic fruit. Alain emphasised that there was no botrytis here. Euros 23.
  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis 1er Cru Les Lys - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    A north-east-facing exposure, pure Kimmeridgian soil and 65+ year old vines. New oak 30%. The best wine yet with real Chablis typicity. Crunchy green apple acidity with lime citrus, wet limestone and chalk. Taut and focused, racy acidity. Malic with chalky minerality, pears, limes and iodine. A dry, long finish. A very good 1er. Value at Euros 29.90.
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  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis 1er Cru Vaulorent - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis 1er Cru
    Better again. “Touching Les Preuses – a declassified Grand Cru”, said Alain. Barrel fermented 50%. A Chablis-typical bouquet of lemon zest, Granny Smith apple, oyster shell and tide pool. In the mouth, fine acidity. More depth and power than the Les Lys. Grand Cru-like structure and length. Long, dry finish. “Great ageing potential”, said Alain. Euros 37.
  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Blanchot - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    Not Domaine, purchased grapes, noted Alain. Again, 50% oak fermented. A nose of yellow spices, citrus, pears and yellow apples. On palate, good weight and complexity. A fine acid structure. Tensile and flinty. Quite mineral. Good Grand Cru Chablis. Euros 47.50.
  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Bougros - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    “From a larger vineyard, richer soil, more sun”, said Alain. Again, 50% oak fermented. Aromas of baking spices, poached pear, grapefruit citrus and clotted cream. In the mouth, Grand Cru weight and power. “Seamless build on the palate, quite elegant”, said Andrew. However, I thought that the Bougros was too broad, lacking Chablis typicity, minerality and nuance. Perhaps it needs more time? Euros 49.50.
  • 2016 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Bougros Cote de Bouguerots - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    “Here the soil is limited, shallow, the site is close to the river”, noted Alain. Élevage 70% in oak. A breezy, fine bouquet of citrus, slate, chalk and flint. Also finer and more precise on palate. “Tighter, and more focussed than the Bougros”, said Mark. Racy, sparkling acidity. Plenty of dry extract, minerality and drive. The second best wine of the day. Hold for 5-6 years and it will, if it survives premox, last 20+ years. Euros 62.
  • 2015 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Bougros - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    An obviously richer, riper bouquet. I did not like this Chablis very much. I found it too full and broad and lacking in acidity, focus and definition. Euros 49.50.
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  • 2014 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Les Preuses - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    Wine of the day. Élevage 70% in oak. A lovely bouquet of meadow flowers, newly fallen yellow apples, pears, limes, oyster shell and subtle spices. On palate, complex, detailed and layered. Laser-like precise acidity and excellent fully ripe fruit. Serious fruit volume and concentration. Clean and fresh without a hint of oxidation. Drinking beautifully now but it is a cellar wine with a long potential life, again if it escapes premox. Value at Euros 47.50.
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  • 2012 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Grand Cru Bougros - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru
    After some reduction and sulphides, mealy, lactic aromas. That mealy, reduced nature was reflected in the palate. Grapefruit, pears and soil. A strange wine or, perhaps, at a strange point in its development? I liked it on a previous tasting at the Domaine four years ago. Any way, for me, a pass at this stage. Euros 49.50.
  • 2017 William Fèvre Petit Chablis - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Petit Chablis
    Back down the range to the new 2017s … A fresh, clean, steely and flinty bouquet, also suggesting some fruit richness. On palate, fresh and lively. A good Chablis at this level, better than the 2016 version, I thought. Euros 11.90.
  • 2017 Domaine William Fèvre Chablis - France, Burgundy, Chablis
    Also Chablis typicity here. Green apple, limestone, oyster shell, citrus and chalk. À point. Refreshing acidity. A good little entry level Chablis, better than the 2016 equivalent. Euros 13.
  • 2017 William Fèvre Saint-Bris - France, Burgundy, Côtes d'Auxerre, Saint-Bris
    Served blind by Alain. Clear sauvignon blanc typicity. Grapefruit, passionfruit, lemon, dried herbs and pineapple. Not as herbaceous as a NZ sauvignon blanc. Good crisp acidity. Nice and dry. Euros 8.90.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#64 Post by Gus Siokis » April 11th, 2019, 5:06 pm

Howard Davis wrote:
September 23rd, 2018, 1:14 am
A COUPLE OF WINES IN BARBARESCO
  • 2015 La Ca' Nova Barbaresco Montestefano - Italy, Piedmont, Langhe, Barbaresco
    After lunch we dropped into the excellent Enoteca Regionale del Barbaresco. The Enoteca has the current release of virtually every Barbaresco produced on sale with several to taste. We tried the La Ca’ Nova as we planned to visit there tomorrow … Deep colour. A bouquet of black fruit, liquorice, minerals and black spices. As you would expect from a wine from perhaps the most Barolo-like of all Barbaresco vineyards, and a warm year, a big structured, serious, tannic wine. A lot of generous black fruit, but also mineral with an iron core. Quite taut and closed. I thought I detected a slight alcohol burn on the finish. However, I also thought the Montestefano showed great potential but needed another 5-7+ years in the cellar.
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  • 2017 Bruno Giacosa Roero Arneis - Italy, Piedmont, Alba, Roero
    It was a warm day, so we got a bottle of this Arneis to share at the very good Nonsolovino wine shop in Barbaresco. I like good Arneis, including most recent vintages of Vietti and some previous Bruno Giacosa versions. Here, however, I wasn’t impressed … Pale colour. A typical Arneis bouquet: lemon zest, chalk, cut straw and a touch of lanolin. In the mouth, seemingly lower acid and quite fleshy. Viscous and oily. Pear, lemon, lime and straw. Lacking energy and precision. “The sweetness is not well balanced”, said Thierry. The wine is young, but I’m not sure that a year or two in the cellar will transform this Arneis into something better.
    DSC03557A.JPG
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Howard,

You helped me with advice for Burgundy a few weeks ago and I have one more question for you - If you were to go to once place in Barbaresco to visit/taste which place would it be from places you visited?

Thanks,

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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#65 Post by James Billy » April 12th, 2019, 1:21 am

In guessing PdB!

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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#66 Post by Gus Siokis » April 12th, 2019, 4:09 am

James Billy wrote:
April 12th, 2019, 1:21 am
In guessing PdB!
I was thinking the same. I have heard mixed comments if all you do is stop in their tasting room....
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#67 Post by Jeff Vaughan » April 12th, 2019, 5:55 am

We enjoyed our stop in the PdB tasting room, and I'd recommend it, but not if that is the one and only place you are going to stop and visit. If you can get a more personal visit and tour there, that would be different.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#68 Post by Gus Siokis » April 12th, 2019, 6:08 am

Thanks, Jeff. We have three other visits planned (Scavino, Burlotto, & G. Conterno) and wanted to visit one Barbaresco specific cantina. How recent was your visit? How many of their wines did you taste?
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#69 Post by Jeff Vaughan » April 12th, 2019, 8:42 am

We were there in late October, early November. If you can't set up a full tour/visit with PdB (I was unable to due to the timing of our visit), it is a simple and quick stop to swing in their tasting room. We tasted the 14 and 15 Barbaresco Classico. It is also worth climbing the tower in Barbaresco while you are there.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#70 Post by Gus Siokis » April 12th, 2019, 3:32 pm

Thanks, Jeff.
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Re: 2018 Visit to Piemonte, Burgundy and Condrieu

#71 Post by Tim Heaton » April 15th, 2019, 10:43 am

John Morris wrote:
January 10th, 2019, 8:23 pm
Brian King wrote:
January 10th, 2019, 8:14 am
Tom Taylor wrote:
January 9th, 2019, 3:01 am
Great notes Howard! Regarding Brovia, I thought Alex’s wife was the winemaker?
Definitely Alex is the winemaker. His wife's family are the historic owners, but Alex is winemakers. I've tasted with him several times - truly wonderful guy and some fantastic wines!
I don't think that's right. I think Alex is on the marketing and business end, and I think he's the most comfortable working in English. This came up once before here and the suggestion that Alex was making the wine was rebutted.

Rosenthal, the importer, says on its website:
Sadly, Raffaele passed away in 2011 but two of Giacinto’s daughters, Cristina and Elena, are now completely engaged as the fourth generation, in the affairs of this family-run estate. Marina, Giacinto’s wife and mother of their children, is a brilliant cook and provider of wise counsel, and Alex Sanchez, husband of Elena, has joined the family enterprise.

Likewise, Kerin O'Keefe in Barolo and Barbaresco (p. 112) says that Elena is the enologist and Cristina is the agronomist.

That squares with my recollection from a visit in 2002 with an Italian ITB friend. Alex led the tasting but I recall that Elena (who dropped by) was making the wine.
Brian, you are correct, Àlex is the winemaker, now and for the past several years. At times, e. g. blending certain wines/vintages, the team will decide, otherwise, it's all him. Plus all of the marketing; was with him in Dusseldorf, and again last week at VinItaly.
ITB, www.italianwinereviews.com
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