Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

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Cris Whetstone
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#51 Post by Cris Whetstone »

Well I'm jealous Dan. Sounds fantastic. Do they make that bottling every year or does that fruit end up in a blend in some vintages?
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#52 Post by AlexS »

+1, sounds incredible Dan.
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#53 Post by Drew Goin »

Dan Kravitz wrote:Just revisited and reconfirmed the second best Carignan I've ever had. Sorry, it's not from California:

2011 Chateau Puech-Haut 'Reboussier' Saint-Drezery - the back label says 'Carignan' along with this French text, badly translated into English by me:

"de vieux carignans tortures et hirsutes nous reservant chacque annee l'elegance d'un vin que le nature a refuse a ce petit vignoble. Lorsqu'elle est genereuse, 1500 bouteilles sont extrait de cette vignoble centenaire."

Of old Carignan, tortured and hairy, we reserve every year the elegance of a wine that nature refuses to this little vineyard. When she is generous, 1500 bottles are extracted from this 100 year old vineyard.

Eric Solomon is the importer of this magnificent property. Between tiny production, high price, obscurity and underrated Parker score (94), he never brought in this specific bottling. I had 15 bottles purchased in France, now 14.

Medium black color. The aromas feature black raspberries and iron, with touches of oregano and fennel. The palate is incredible. It has a dense, finely grainy texture that I've only had in the very few great Carignans I've tasted. It is salty, sandy, awash in black fruit flavor. In the mid palate the texture is swamped by the flavors as if a humongous but gentle wave came farther inland than you ever could have expected. It is accompanied by granite along with the iron and little hints of roses, as if a very great Nebbiolo said 'excuse me, may I please come to play?'. But the power is unlike Nebbiolo or any varietals I know except Cabernet; maybe Syrah on its best day. This is very great wine. I am thinking of opening a bottle every year or two, depending on how things go. But this will probably take me well into dotage. This is unexplored territory, who knows how long this will last and improve? Who has experience with 20 - 30 year old great Carignan? Rated 98 tonight, up to two points of improvement possible.

Dan Kravitz

Thanks for spilling the beans, Dan!!

Have no fear, we have next to no chance of getting our hands on this treasure (Bad for the rest of us). Eric Solomon is the American importer for Chateau Puech-Haut but, shamefully, the varietal Carignan is not among the portfolio of available wines.

Chateau Puech-Haut website

To add to the mystique of this wine, it was featured in an article on a membership-only website that bears the name of a certain British wine expert*:


"LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON


"Ch Puech Haut, Reboussier 2011 Languedoc, St-Drézéry Old vines: 18 months' oak ageing.

"It has a very sweet nose, marmalade, sweet spices, prunes, sultana and oaky notes. Voluminous and rich palate, the wine is classic and mature. Not the best wine I have tasted from this well-regarded French domaine. 15% abv, Drink 2014-2016, score: 14.5.


"Gauby, La Foun 2010 Côtes du Roussillon-Villages: Magnificent pre-phylloxera Carignan vines planted in 1890. A very unique single-vineyard wine from this brave domaine that is so respectful of the environment. Fermented in concrete tanks and aged in used oak.

"Very leathery and farmyard nose, intriguing and reductive. It is wild in conception, disordered but stimulating. A bit wild in style. Soft, meaty and energetic, with little extraction. 13.5% abv, Drink 2014-2020, score: 16.


"Clos du Gravillas, Lo Vièlh Carignan 2013 IGP Côtes de Brian 100% Carignan: Very old vines (100-years-old) planted in the Minervois on calcareous-clay rocky soils. Because the wine is produced solely from Carignan it cannot be labelled as DOP. Very limited yields, 22 hl/ha,
indigenous yeast and 12 months' ageing in demi-muids. Production is limited to 2,800 bottles.

"Pure Carignan aromas displaying floral, peppery, fresh berries, touch of meatiness (paprika), ash and very well-placed oak underneath. Very expressive and classy. Elegantly tight on the palate, with an expressive and balancing acidity, chalky classic tannins. Very good wine and a superb example of the style and quality that old-vine Carignan is supposed to be. 13.5% abv, Drink 2016-2020, score: 17.5."



I searched Google for the winemaker's name, and he said this of the 2012 vintage in Langudoc:

"Mathieu Ciampi, the winemaker at Puech Haut, also comments that 'the lack of concentration in certain tanks is compensated by an elegance and finesse.'"

* "Heart Breakingly Pure Carignan" Link - PDF download

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#54 Post by Drew Goin »

As for what the ↑above↑ article writer thought the best Carignan traits in the line-up of wines from France and (predominantly) Spain...


From the Article:

"...In a broad perspective of the tasting I was happily surprised as the preconceived idea of Cariñena as a meaty, reductive and rustic wine was the exception rather than the rule. I found some very delicious and accessible Cariñenas where reduction was not a problem at all.

"Freshness and balance are also common factors throughout the tasting; this is one of the main factors differentiating Cariñena from other grapes varieties such as Garnacha (Grenache). Although Cariñena is a late-ripening cultivar, the total acidity ranges from 5.5 g/l to 6.3 g/l, a world away from the comparable average of 4.5 g/l to 5.3 g/l for Garnacha. Curiously, I found greater acidity in the wines produced in Empordà than in the examples I tasted from southern France."



The highest rated wines:


Dinastía Vivanco, 'Parcelas de Mazuelo' 2011 Rioja Mazuelo:

"Hand-harvested, cold maceration and selected through two sorting tables. Wild yeast and fermented in oak vats. Fermented in new French oak for 14 months. Lees stirring is practised during the first four months of ageing. No fining or filtering. Production limited to 1,500 bottles.

"Dark colour. The wine is very modern and has great ripeness. The nose has impact and intensity; it shows mint aromas, very ripe black fruit and touch of caramel. Rounded and concentrated palate but still easily drinkable. Charged with fruit, rounded tannins and integrated alcohol sensation. Technically immaculate, still a great future ahead. 14.5% abv, Drink 2018-2030, score: 17.



Edetària, ​Finca La Pedrissa 'Vinyes Velles de Samsó' 2012 Terra Alta, Cariñena:

"Single-vineyard wine coming from a very rocky and chalky soil. Aged for 12 months in French oak.

"The nose is clean and shows potential for evolution. Dynamic and changing, displaying violets, dark red fruits and savoury spices. Attractive aromas. The palate is fibrous, not broad, with a firm appealing acidity and elegantly restrained. It has a mineral expression with enough delicacy and length. Personally I think it is a very good example of what a Cariñena should be. Well done! 14% abv, Drink 2016-2025, score: 17."



Clos du Gravillas, 'Lo Vièlh' Carignan 2013 IGP Côtes de Brian: ↑Note above↑


L'Infernal Combier-Fischer-Gerin, Aguilera 'Viñas Viejas' 2010 Priorat (100% Samsó):

"Village wine from Torroja. Century-old vines planted on brown slate. 18 months' barrel ageing.

"Lots of impact on the nose. Very archetypal Priorat. Clean, spirit, sweet fruit, sweet spiciness and oak. The palate is juicy and superbly charged fruit showing smooth-grained tannins. Elegantly toasty on the back palate. Very good wine, well structured and deep. 14.5% abv, Drink 2016-2025, score: 17."



Cedo Anguera, Anexe 'Vinyes Velles' 2014 Montsant (Samsó):

"Very recently created winery. The grapes are sourced from a 70-year-old vineyard but it is produced as a young, unoaked wine. Fermented in stainless steel, stabilised and straight to bottling.

"Very ripe black cherries and adequate combination of fruit and reductive aromas. The reduction brings tightness to the wine. Ripe and friendly tannins. Quite complex for a young wine. Moderate body but very pleasurable. Adequate acidity and alcohol balance. Great surprise at a more than reasonable price. Bargain wine and VGV. 14% abv, Drink 2016-2020, score: 17."



Mas Igneus, Costers de Carignan 2013 Priorat (Cariñena):*

"First vintage of this top cuvée produced from old vines. Steep slopes and llicorella (slate) soils. It will only be produced in great vintages. It is the great opera prima of the promising Mireia Pujol-Busuqets.

"Slightly reduced but very intense on aromatics. Great creamy and ripe black-fruit expression, very good winemaking. Full and rich but still fresh, voluminous with clay-textured tannins. The alcohol is warm but still integrated. Very consistent wine that lets you see the precise winemaking. 14.5% abv, Drink 2016-2026, score: 17.5."



* No Data on this NEW PRODUCT, the "Coster del Ermita/Coastal of the Hermitage" is listed on WineSearcher or the producer's website, however. It is also 100% Carignan.

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#55 Post by Drew Goin »

Mr Brian Ojalvo of West of Temperance emailed me his responses to my "Carignan Renaissance" questions. Here are some of his thoughts:

IMG_3589.jpg
• What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Carignan a viable grape for the Hopland area of Mendocino County?


BO: "Hopland gets very hot. Poor Ranch Carignane is grown and harvested at an elevation of 2000 feet well off the valley floor. The diurnal shifts experienced are specific to the mountain region of Hopland and temps are almost certainly inverted.

"This clime is perfect for fruit that can get mature and still retain its natural acidity.

IMG_0655.JPG
"The vineyard sits adjacent to the Hopland Pomo Indian Reservation and has been since 1888. St. George rootstock on alluvial soils produce super low yielding Carignane. We average about 1.3 ton per acre off of our block called The Knoll which is dry farmed, head pruned and organically farmed since 1942."[/i][/b]


• Do you believe that old-vine Carignan is
necessary for the production of top-quality fruit, or can younger vines also yield superior wines?


BO: "I have not worked with any young Carignane at all so I have no dogmas in this race. I can tell you though without hesitation that the old vine Carignane vineyards which I have made wine from have been nothing less than spectacular and it all starts with the fruit."


WoT has worked with Carignan fruit from the "Poor Ranch Vineyard". Have you had experience with other Carignan vineyards? If so, which ones, and why have you chosen the "Poor Ranch" in particular?


BO: "I have produced some Carignane from the Borra Vineyard in Lodi many years ago which was also some very old heritage vines.

"I have remained with the Poor Ranch Carignane due to many things but the main reason is simple. I really like the Poor Family. They are old guard and do not care about trends or the new hot shit 'big city' winery. These are true, honest, salt of the earth folk who have been there for over 100 years farming naturally, organically, stewards of the land. They have a great love and respect for their vines as well as for the heritage of farming it . Straight shooters and no B.S., whats not to like??

"It also helps that their fruit is perfectly suited for the region they are farming. Carignane and Mendocino/Hopland fit together like a hand in a well oiled glove, perfect in my opinion."

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• Why do you think Carignan commonly proves to be more challenging to farm and produce than other Rhône-style varieties?


BO: "Carignane is a tedious grape to grow. Given its large, tight clusters and extremely long maturation cycle,its prone to powdery mildew and bunch rot.

"Carignane vines can carry a heavy crop load and tend to produce pretty pedestrian wines if not farmed correctly. Fortunately for us these 75 plus year old vines are farmed with a deft touch and they can also self regulate which in turn keeps yields ridiculously low. Our 2016 Poor Ranch Carignane is at once savory with a beautiful acid cut."

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• Have you noticed any special qualities of Mendocino Carignan compared with Carignan from other areas?


BO: "We get a very herbal, gamey, garrigue, savory-type of thing going in Mendocino Carignane that I have tasted in many of the great bottles that I have had from the Languedoc-Roussillon region. Not really heavy or clumsy but lithe and sleek."


• What special considerations have you discovered in producing a Carignan-dominant wine?


BO: "I am a big proponent in using whole cluster with about 50% of the Poor Ranch Carignane fruit when it arrives at the winery. The stems are electric green and taste fabulous! The clusters sit on the bottom of my fermenter while the rest of the destemmed fruit goes on top. This creates a semi-carbonic effect as the whole clusters slowly ferment under the weight of the other berries.

"The primary fermentation usually tops out after about 14-17 days. After that I like to keep things under wraps and extend the maceration for upwards of 60 days after primary is finished. Then off to the press and pumped into neutral french oak barrels where it remains unracked for 14-18 months until bottling."



• What thoughts do you have regarding the recent increase in the public's general awareness of Carignan's potential to create delicious varietal wines?


BO: "It is a small battered bunch of us who carry the torch for Carignane in California. This is usually not a wine made for the marketplace per se. It is a wine made BY winegeeks FOR winegeeks pure and simple. I’ve seen the eyes of some Somms at prestigious Michelin starred restaurants light up when I mention 'the C-word' to them! If it catches on so be it but I wouldn’t hold my breath!"
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#56 Post by Drew Goin »

Additional "Poor Ranch" photos sent by Mr Brian Ojalvo of West of Temperance:

Work on the "Poor Ranch" (from Mr Brian Ojalvo of West of Temperance:
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Soils of the "Poor Ranch" (from Mr Brian Ojalvo of West of Temperance:

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#57 Post by Drew Goin »

Yup, even MORE "Poor Ranch" photos sent by Mr Brian Ojalvo of West of Temperance:

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#58 Post by Drew Goin »

The original Carignan Renaissance movement began over 10-years-ago with a handful of French winemakers, led by Mr John Bojanowski of Clos du Gravillas. The name of this thread is a nod to the efforts of that community.

For those who question my adoption of the qualifier "...Part Deux", it is in recognition of the passion and dedication exemplified by the predominently French group, which still exists. Their work almost exclusively has been limited to the South of France - gaining a special place in the annual tasting events and such of the region.

There are several interesting links and resources available on the Carignan Renaissance website. There's even a Facebook page for them!


One possible effect the Carignan Renaissance and the wines of Mr Bojanowski have had is a turn-around in opinion from the variety's biggest critic:

"Over the years I have come to appreciate that old vines can produce serious wines. And I have enjoyed many a Carignano del Sulcis from Sardinia. And in the Languedoc the rasping produce of over-produced Carignan has become much rarer, I'm delighted to say."

No, I am not speaking of a certain Wine Berserkers forum member who refers to winemakers' efforts to bottle drinkable Carignan wines as akin to "making a silk purse of a sow's ear".

The above statement was from Ms Jancis Robinson, the very same professional whose contributions to the Oxford Companion to Wine include, year-after-year, disparaging comments on the entry for Carignan: "Its wine is high in everything – acidity, tannins, colour, bitterness – but finesse and charm."

Here is fairly good article was written about the Carignan Renaissance movement:

DeLong Blog
"Carignan: Hipster Wine"
June 30, 2006

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#59 Post by Drew Goin »

Les 5 du Vin blog

https://les5duvin.wordpress.com/?s=cari ... =Recherche


This "French-language" website includes an impressive number of entries dedicated to winery visits, wine tastings, and ruminations on the Carignan grape.

My cellphone automatically translates many foreign-language sites into English, which makes webpages like this one a lot easier to enjoy.

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#60 Post by Jeff Vaughan »

Interesting thread Drew. Thanks. I went back through CT and only found 3 notes from me on Carignane. This was the most recent:
  • 2007 Carlisle Carignane Papera Ranch - USA, California, Sonoma County, Russian River Valley (8/23/2012)
    I didn't know what to expect with this one as I'm not familiar with Carignane as the main variety. Right off the bat you get classic Carlisle aromas and flavours. Lots of fruit, more black and darker at first that turned to red fruits as it opened. I love the lighter body and the healthy dose of acidity in the wine. I would buy this every year. I see I paid 17 bucks - are you kidding me?!
CT: outplaying
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#61 Post by Drew Goin »

Thanks, Jeff!

If you paid only $17 for the Carlisle "Papera Ranch" RRV Carignan, then you got quite a deal!!! I posted a TN on CellarTracker for the same wine, and thoroughly enjoyed it. :)


"January 15, 2016 - Carlisle Papera Ranch Carignan 2007: the rim of bottle around the cork had a white, crystalline lining, which I wiped off with a towel. The cork was 'squishy' and semi-saturated with wine. Nevertheless, this 8-year-old wine was a good, if not great, showing for Carlisle. Color was very deep purple. One guest declared that it was the best Carlisle she'd tasted so far (previous experience of 4 others). I tasted a pleasant 'tart cherries stomped on by muddle work boots' flavor, with a long, slightly alcoholic finish. I bought the bottle from an online auction about six-months-ago. I would guess that my Carlisle bottle probably saw a little rough handling in its lifetime, but it performed better than many wines on the market today."


For the record, Carignan is higher in acidity than a lot of red grapes, thus making it a valuable contributor to the Zinfandel-dominant old-vine "field blends". Some of the Bedrock reds consist of large proportions of Carignan ("Papera", "Bedrock", some vintages of "Evangelho"...); I am not sure which Carlisle reds - if any - have +30% Carignan in them, as Mr Officer's wines often possess less than 10% of non-Zinfandel grapes.

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#62 Post by Drew Goin »

Mr Michael Klouda of MK Wines responded to my email about his experiences with Carignan in the vineyard and the winery:


• What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Carignan a viable grape for your area of California?


MK: "Here in Lodi we have extremely sandy soils that are also rich in loam. Carignan used to be planted all over the place and produced big crops with yields of 8-10 ton per acre or more I have heard. now there are very few Carignan vineyards left in Lodi but the ones that are still in the ground can throw a good crop with out proper thinning. We have hot days and cool nights in Lodi so it helps with the ripening of the grape."
ChrisStormdaughter.jpg
• Do you believe that old-vine Carignan is necessary for the production of top-quality fruit, or can younger vines also yield superior wines?


MK: "To be honest, I have never seen a Carignan vine younger than 40 years. I would not know."


• MK Wines has worked with Carignan fruit from the "Storm Vineyard". Have you had experience with other Lodi Carignan vineyards? If so, which ones, and why have you chosen the Storm (and others) in particular?


MK: "I work for Michael David Winery as the viniculturist full time and over see all out vineyards. We have one block of Carignan that we get and it is a whole mother animal. The 'Storm Vineyard' is low-yielding and has tiny berry size, where the 'Bishofberger Vineyard' has large bunches and berry size and grows like crazy. It is also surrounded on 2 sides by irrigation canals. One of my projects this year is to hone in on that field to control the vigor and get better fruit out of it."
BishofbergerVineyardCarignan.jpg
• Why do you think Carignan commonly proves to be more challenging to farm and produce than other Rhône-style varieties?


MK: "I don’t think in Lodi Carignan is a challenge compared to other Rhône-style wines."


• Have you noticed any special qualities of Lodi Carignan compared with Carignan from other areas?


MK: "I only have had very few Lodi Carignans - maybe 5 in total. Seems to me the are all different depending on the vineyard and the winemaker.

"I try and have a light touch to let the grape express itself while others put Petite Sirah and Cab in theirs."

email-img_carignane.jpg
• What special considerations have you discovered in producing a Carignan-dominant wine?


MK: "Pick at the right time! It is a hard one to get right. if you pick to soon even if the bris are 24-ish you get under ripe flavors but if you wait to long 26° brix, plus you might get jammy flavors and no acid. Also Carignan ripens late around here so you got to get it in before any rain."


• What thoughts do you have regarding the recent increase in the public's general awareness of Carignan's potential to create delicious varietal wines?


MK: "I think a lot of the farmers I know who ripped out 40 acres of Carignan at a time a few years ago are kicking themselves in the ass when smaller wineries started offering them 4 times more than the district average for their grapes they no longer have."


MK Wines website

Lodi Winegrape Commission blog
"MK's Lodi Carignan is a Phenomenal Expression of this Underappreciated Varietal"
by Randy Caparoso
September 15, 2016
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#63 Post by Jorge Henriquez »

Drew Goin wrote:One of the big hits this past Berserker Day was a Carignan from a small winery sourcing old-vine fruit from Mendocino County's "Poor Ranch".



Here is a tasting note from the GrapeLive website:
2015PrincessCarignan.jpg
"2015 The Princess & The Peasant, Carignan, Poor Ranch Vineyard, Mendocino County.

"The Poor Ranch Carignan 2015 by Stephanie Rivin, winemaker of Signal Ridge Vineyard, under her Princess & Peasant label is made from 74 year old vines and shows rich detail and ripe juiciness making for an interesting and flavorful wine of joyous California fruit as well as playing homage to the wines of Corbieres. The vintage gave unique concentration and sweet tannins, the tiny berries old these old vines made for a high skin to juicy ratio which adds to the dark nature of this Carignan, while a talented touch in the crafting of this red allows it to be forward and lush, while also delivering balance and graceful depth. Rivin’s Carignan joins a host of other great Carignan based wines that have come out in recent years like Broc Cellars, Pax and Skylark as well as classics like Ridge, and Carignan or Carignane is a grape that has seen a world wide revival, especially in it’s historical sweet spot of Corbieres in France’s Languedoc with the wines of Maxim Magnon and Domaine de Fontsainte standing out in particular! The Princess & The Peasant Poor Ranch Carignan starts with a touch of floral/spicy incense and black fruit and prunes leading to a lively palate of fresh crushed blackberry, sweet black cherry, tangy currant and pomegranate fruits along with mineral/flint, earth, minty notes and wild briar spices. At 13.4% this is not a flabby wine, but medium full on the palate with a silky round mouth feel, while still vibrant and fresh, best to serve slightly chilled so it highlights it’s dry/crisp acidity and especially with hard cheeses, BBQ and Asian/Spicy dishes. Drink this unfined and unfiltered Carignan over the next 2 or 3 years, I love it’s youthful expression, openness and vitality, I highly recommend this wine as well The Princess & The Peasant Pinot Noir, all these new releases from Mendocino’s Signal Ridge Vineyard are seriously fun offerings.
($22 Est.) 92 Points, GrapeLive"


The Princess and The Peasant homepage

Mercury News
"Behind Mendocino’s New Princess & the Peasant Wine"
by Mary Orlin
January 4, 2017


The Poor Ranch:

Mendocino County Wine & Winegrapes website, "Great Wines": "Poor Ranch" profile

Mendocino County Wine & Winegrapes website, "Grape Marketplace": "Poor Ranch" profile

California Ag Water Stewardship Initiative: "Poor Ranch" profile


Other Producers of Carignan from the "Poor Ranch":

Absentee Winery
Forlorn Hope
La Onda
Maître de Chai
Sans Wine Company
Subject to Change Wine Company
Vinca Minor
Just tasted the P&P Carignan and Pinot with Dan and Stephanie a few hours ago at Joe Webb’s beautiful spot, Foursight, in Boonville.

The wine is indeed delicious with a brambly bite complementing the juicy, lip-smackingly bright cherry/blackberry notes on the mouth.

Do yourselves a favor and order some of this wine.
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#64 Post by Drew Goin »

Thanks for your impressions on the wines of The Princess & The Peasant, Jorge!!!

Their "Poor Ranch" Carignan blew me away!

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#65 Post by JonF »

Just opened a berserkerday P&P Carignan the other day, a delicious wine indeed!

But how do you pronounce it (or does that depend on where you're from)?

ka-REE-nin

-or-

KA-ra-nin

??
Futej

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#66 Post by Chris Seiber »

JonF wrote:Just opened a berserkerday P&P Carignan the other day, a delicious wine indeed!

But how do you pronounce it (or does that depend on where you're from)?

ka-REE-nin

-or-

KA-ra-nin

??
It’s a French word. I think a French speaker would say “ka-hree-nyah”. Being French, there is no accented syllable, but I guess if you placed a slight accent, it might be the middle syllable.

Outside of France, I’ve always assumed it was “care-in-yawn,” but someone please correct me if I’m wrong.

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#67 Post by Jerry Rodrigues »

Hi all,
I couldn't help but notice the following statement (in post 54) about the preconceived idea of Cariñena (pronounced 'car-i-NYEN-ah'): "... a meaty, reductive and rustic wine was the exception rather than the rule".

Cariñena as you probably already know is a Spanish Denominación de Origen (DO) for wines located in Cariñena in the province of Zaragoza (Aragón, Spain).
Carignane (pronounced 'karrin-YAAN') is the identical cultivar found in Southern France and also in California.

The above statement about Carignane is interesting to me because I have reported previously on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.31177.65123) that the American hybrid cultivar, known as Jacquez (a.k.a. Black Spanish or Lenoir), was the result of hybridization between a wild Vitis aestivalis and one or more Vitis vinifera cultivars. This hybridization event likely took place on the southeast coast of the American colonies, sometime in the 18th century.

The microsatellite DNA fingerprint (simple sequence repeats or SSRs) of Jacquez shows that Jacquez was likely the result of hybridization between the wild aestivalis and the Vitis
vinifera cultivars Cabernet franc plus a second vinifera candidate identified as Carignan noir (both making up approximately 60% - 70% of the Jacquez genome).

It is common knowledge (at least in Texas) that dry red wine made from the Jacquez grape needs to be exposed to the air for a period of time before one should drink it. This is because the Jacquez wine is 'reductive' and 'rustic' in character and needs to be somewhat oxidized to improve the palate feel. Jacquez is also high in acidity and it reminds me of Cariñena.

Go well... ;-)

Dr Jerry Rodrigues

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#68 Post by Drew Goin »

Jerry Rodrigues wrote:Hi all,
I couldn't help but notice the following statement (in post 54) about the preconceived idea of Cariñena (pronounced 'car-i-NYEN-ah'): "... a meaty, reductive and rustic wine was the exception rather than the rule"...

The above statement about Carignane is interesting to me because I have reported previously on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.31177.65123) that the American hybrid cultivar, known as Jacquez (a.k.a. Black Spanish or Lenoir), was the result of hybridization between a wild Vitis aestivalis and one or more Vitis vinifera cultivars. This hybridization event likely took place on the southeast coast of the American colonies, sometime in the 18th century.

The microsatellite DNA fingerprint (simple sequence repeats or SSRs) of Jacquez shows that Jacquez was likely the result of hybridization between the wild aestivalis and the Vitis vinifera cultivars Cabernet franc plus a second vinifera candidate identified as Carignan noir (both making up approximately 60% - 70% of the Jacquez genome).

It is common knowledge (at least in Texas) that dry red wine made from the Jacquez grape needs to be exposed to the air for a period of time before one should drink it. This is because the Jacquez wine is 'reductive' and 'rustic' in character and needs to be somewhat oxidized to improve the palate feel. Jacquez is also high in acidity and it reminds me of Cariñena.

Go well... ;-)

Dr Jerry Rodrigues

Thanks for your thoughtful contribution, Dr Rodrigues!!!

As a resident of Louisiana, I have tasted a "Black Spanish" red from Dry Comal Creek - it definitely needed a good amount of aeration prior to drinking!!!

Kaz Winery in California used to bottle a varietal "Lenior" from the "Pagani Ranch" in Sonoma Valley, but I never got my hands on a bottle.



I previously exchanged emails with Elina Coneva, PhD, of Auburn's Department of Horticulture, as well as Jim Kamas, the
Asst. Professor & Extension Fruit Specialist for Texas A&M's Agrilife Extension Viticulture & Fruit Lab.

My interest was related to their collaboration with Andy Walker (of UC Davis) to develop Pierce's Disease-resistant winegrape selections that could be cultivated in the South. If my memory serves, Carignan contributed some genetics to the high-percentage-vinifera grapevine test materials for the fieldwork in Texas. It's been a while since I have looked into any of this, however. :|


Jim Kamas stated (in an email to me) back in January of 2016:

"We have worked extensively with the 88% material and will have our first full crop of four of his 94% selections. Our winemakers here really like some of the 88% [vinifera] stuff and we are anticipating that at some point, U.C. Davis will release them into the public domain."


UC Davis BFTV Cluster News
"Research Spot Light on Dr. Andy Walker: Classical Breeding is Conquering Pierce's Disease"
August 15, 2017


Growing Alabama
"Development and Productivity of Pierce's Disease Resistant Vitis Vinifera Grape Selections in Central Alabama"
January 19, 2016


Alabama Agricultural Experimental Station
"Specialty Crops to Boost Rural Economies"
by Dr Elina Coneva
October 28, 2015

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#69 Post by Drew Goin »

Jeff Cohn Cellars has offered the varietally-bottled "Broken Compass" Carignane for several years. The grapes come from the old-vine "Saitone Vineyard" in Sonoma County's Russian River Valley.
15BROKFT.jpg
From the website:

2015 Broken Compass Carignane

"Amazing deep purple color, with a cranberry nose and touches of sweet oak and bramble and salted black licorice. Lush on the front palate, it shows a more rustic midpalate that screams for charcuterie and other dried aged beef, then rounds out with a savory finish.

- Alcohol: 15.2%
- 100% Carignane
- Aged 16 mos in all neutral 350L to 600L French oak barrels"

Saitonevin65pic3.jpg
"We have sourced from the Saitone Vineyard's head-trained 130-year-old Carignane vines for 4 years now. The Huchica loam soil brings depth to this variety without being overly heavy. It seems to tame the Carignane and bring a zen-like component to the grapes through higher acid levels. Flavors of cranberry, and raspberry shine through with a very spicy bramble component. and layered complexity.

"Why do we source here? For the love of Old Vine Carignane."[/i]



The recent release of the Jeff Cohn Cellars 2015 "Broken Compass" Carignane has received the praise of two critics:

"91 Pts Jeb Dunnuck: The 2015 Broken Compass is all old vine Carignane sourced from Sonoma County. It offers loads of black fruits, beetroot, violets, and resinous herbs in a medium to full-bodied, juicy, vibrant style. It has good acidity, fine tannin, classic Carignane character and is going to drink nicely for 5-6 years."


"90+ Pts Wine Advocate: Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2015 Carignane Old Vine Broken Compass opens with baked blackberries and preserved plums notes with hints of pencil lead, fertile soil and dried herbs. Big, full-bodied, rich and firmly textured with chewy tannins, it has a tart, refreshing acid line and long, earthy finish."




Jeff Cohn Cellars website: https://www.jeffcohncellars.com
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#70 Post by Drew Goin »

Since 1999, the Buchignani Ranch, located in the North-West corner of the Alexander Valley AVA, has provided fruit for vineyard-designated Carignan wines for Ridge Vineyards.
2410-RDG-Sonoma-Cty-Map_Buchignani-Ranch.jpg
Buchignani Ranch profile on the Ridge Vineyards website:

History: "Stan Buchignani’s ranch is located on Dutcher Creek Road, in the hills on the far western edge of the Alexander Valley appellation. The majority of the vineyard’s carignane was planted in the 1940s. Stan’s grandfather, Dominico Cerruti, planted the first block in 1927; his father, Dino, planted the last in the early 1950s. The vineyard’s climate bears a strong resemblance to that of upper Dry Creek Valley three miles to the south, where days are warm. Fog, which tends to hang low in the valley, burns off sooner in the hills. Carignane from Buchignani is complex, its fine structure much like that of a field-blend zinfandel."


Here are the producer notes for the Ridge Vineyards "Buchignani Ranch" 2016 Carignan.






In 2011, Geyserville's "Triangle Vineyard" also provided fruit for a vineyard-designated Ridge Carignan wine:

History: "Carignane is such an important part of our Geyserville that it is rare to have enough for a separate bottling. This is the first separate bottling from the hundred and ten-year-old Triangle block on the same stretch of gravelly soil that defines the entire Geyserville vineyard."





I emailed questions to the staff at Ridge Vineyards in hopes of gaining better insight into the growing and production of Carignan wines. I am awaiting a response at this time.
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#71 Post by Sean_S »

On a side note after a concert saturday we ended up in Sabastapol on Sunday getting coffee across from PAX. So I had to stop in and taste.....

My favorite of the flight was this Gem. Brought a few home for the cellar....

https://paxwine.com/detail?item=2016-pa ... ino-county

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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#72 Post by Dan Kravitz »

Best approximation I can do of French pronunciation is:
Cah rih NYON. There is a very slight accent on the first syllable and a touch more of one on the last syllable.

Carinena [sorry, don't know how to put a tilde on the first 'n'], as pointed out, is both the Spanish name of the variety and the name of a D.O. Ironically, there is almost no Carinena grown in Carinena... it is maybe 2% of the vineyard. I am a great lover of this grape as I've stated. With the exception of the superb albeit oaky Puech Haut I mentioned before, the best Carignans I've had have come from Catalonia, both Spanish and French. The only better pure Carignan I have had than the Puech Haut was from Emporda, Spain, just over the border from France. I am the importer for the producer but did not bring the wine in. There were less than 100 cases and it had five strikes against it.
1) pure Carignan
2) almost unknown DO
3) vintage with mediocre reputation in Catalonia (2011)
4) one hundred bucks retail
5) snake on the label
Succeeding vintages have not been as good, but I will keep hoping.

As soon as it either cools down or I can get out there, I will try some of these California bottlings.

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#73 Post by Drew Goin »

Dan, I look forward to reading your additional information on Spanish & French Carignan/Carignane/Cariñena!

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#74 Post by Robert M yers »

Had a 2015 Lioco Carignan that was very fun and fresh and only 12.5%. At $25bucks I think I’m going back for more.

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#75 Post by jnbrown »

Larry @ Tercero is doing 100% Carignan. It is light and elegant and somewhat floral. Nice for warm weather. Can’t think of another winery in SB or Paso doing this as usual Larry is pushing the boundaries and not satisfied with doing the just the typical. Not to mention the clear bottles that make wine look awesome.
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#76 Post by Drew Goin »

jnbrown wrote:Larry @ Tercero is doing 100% Carignan. It is light and elegant and somewhat floral. Nice for warm weather. Can’t think of another winery in SB or Paso doing this as usual Larry is pushing the boundaries and not satisfied with doing the just the typical. Not to mention the clear bottles that make wine look awesome.

Perhaps I should send an email "interview" to this guy.

Tercero sounds like a great winery - Mourvèdre and Carignan?!!? :)

_20180716_180047.JPG
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#77 Post by Drew Goin »

Lodi's Carignan vineyards seem to be getting more attention from various wineries as of late, and I am searching for the identity of as many of them as possible.


J&J Shinn Ranch:
Beautiful-Fall-Color-in-the-Carignan-400x267.jpg
"Mule Plane” Carrignane (really Carignan) – 5.25 acres (1930's)

"As the story goes, when John’s grandfather (Grandpa Jack) was a child he remembered seeing his uncle planning this field with a mule before planting it to the Carignan vines that are still there now. Given this story, we estimate the vineyards planting to be sometime in the late 1920’s to early 1930’s making it one of the oldest in the Lodi area. These vines look every bit of their 80+ years being large and gnarly. However, they are still going super strong producing 7 to 8 tons consistently every year. We are very proud of this vineyard and it is finally getting some recognition. The M2 winery in Lodi and Holman Cellars in Napa have started sourcing fruit from here, and it is continuing to draw attention from other winemakers for quality and character. A majority of the fruit from this block is packed and shipped, by S&L Vineyards, back east for smaller winemakers and wineries to enjoy."

Nathan Kandler also has purchased fruit from the "Mule Plain Vineyard" for his upcoming Precedent Lodi Carignan:

"The 2017 Carignan from John Shinn’s vineyard is beautifully aromatic, zesty, rich and intense in red cherry, even at just 12.1% alcohol... When you compare that wine to the Carignan from the old vines at 'Jessie's Grove' (planted in 1900), you find a contrast of deeper, rounder, more layered fruit, with a richer strawberry character – distinct qualities from two vineyards that are not too far from each other...."


Besides the Lodi Wine Commission Blog, a valuable resource in locating Carignan vineyards of Lodi is the Lodi Growers directory search results for "Carignane":

Gill Creek Ranch:
Borra/Markus Vineyards
1301 E Armstrong Rd, Lodi, CA 95242
Clements Hills AVA

Graffigna Fruit Company
PO Box 388, Lodi, CA 95241
Jahant AVA

J & J Shinn Ranch
PO Box 1051, Woodbridge, CA 95258
Mokelumne River AVA

Lock L Ranches, Lauchland Vineyards & Lauchland Ranch
5271 W Turner Rd, Lodi, CA 95242
https://www.lodinews.com/news/article_3 ... l?mode=jqm

Manna Ranch
775 E. Acampo Rd, Acampo, CA 95220
http://mannaranch.com/

Mark Mayer

Rauser Ranch
19102 N Bruella Rd, Lodi, CA 95240
RauserVineyardtrunks.jpg
http://www.lodiwine.com/index.cfm?metho ... 93248321FB

Steven Shinn
21700 N Davis Rd, Lodi, CA 95242

Villinger Ranch
4926 W Turner Rd, Lodi, CA 95242


The Lodi Growers directory makes no mention of a couple of old-vine Carignan sites, including the oldest operating vineyard in the area:

Jessie's Grove
1973 West Turner Road, Lodi, CA 95242
CarignanJessiesGrove.jpg
Bishofberger Vineyard

Vino Farms


http://www.lodiwine.com/index.cfm?metho ... 8BD0797609


If you know of any other Carignan vineyards in Lodi that I have failed to identify, please point them out!!!
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#78 Post by Drew Goin »

Guild Somm
"Cariñena: Guild of Sommeliers Report 2014"


"The Guild of Sommeliers sent six members to Cariñena DO/DOP in the spring of 2014 to discover this unexplored region in northeastern Spain, and report back on its wines, culture, and potential. Following is their story:
IMG_0335.JPG
"... Miranda Elliot:

"...Our next day took us up a long, winding road high up into the Sistema Ibérico mountains, where we arrived at Bodegas Paniza, and where we began our love affair with Cariñena. While Bodegas Paniza, like most of the producers in Cariñena, is a co-op (essentially groups of locals selling their grapes to the central winery), we were struck by the high quality of fruit—something we might not ordinarily associate with a co-op. This was, for most of us, our first intimate experience with the Cariñena grape from the Cariñena region. As a grape, Cariñena tended to show more red fruit along with an underlying—but not overpowering—gaminess. In fact, my favorite food-and-wine pairing of the trip was grilled Ternasco lamb (it’s actually a PGI itself, for lamb with a certain weight and age from this region) with Cariñena: The gaminess of each complemented each other while the bright red fruit offset the meat’s richness.

"Most wineries here have turned their attention toward Garnacha, as Cariñena is much more difficult to grow. But many of us agreed that Cariñena has more depth of flavor here, especially when it’s from old vines. As we were told more about the area, about how almost everyone there grows grapes for money, and about how the region has become pretty impoverished, it became clear that the switch from Cariñena to Garnacha is economically driven. Asking them to switch back to Cariñena is asking them to grow something that may taste better (to us) but that produces less quantity and therefore less income. It’s a tricky equation—and a sensitive topic—but we discussed the possibility of charging more for Cariñena: The quality is high coming from old vines, and it could be marketed as a unique grape from its ancestral home... It will be interesting to see where this region goes in the coming years as it undergoes this renovation period, modernizes its style and tries to find a new market and its own niche.
dink.jpg-600x0.jpg
"...Jeremy Campbell:

"...As for the Cariñena grape itself, this seems like a marketing no-brainer, given that there’s almost no other single-variety examples coming from anywhere else in the world. While this grape, which is most often used as blending agent to add acidity, did have a lot of acidity, that high acid is exactly what kept me coming back for more. Up against the ripe black fruit flavors and streak of savory dried herbs with iron at the core, that acid was like a cold glass of lemonade on a summer day—so refreshing and quaffable.[/i]
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Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#79 Post by Drew Goin »

I received an email from Janell Dusi, president of J Dusi Wines in Paso Robles, with answers to my Carignan-centric interview questions:
Screen-Shot-2013-08-22-at-9.28.52-AM-300x183.png
• What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Carignan a viable grape for the Templeton area of Paso Robles County?


JD: "The old-vine Carignane we have on the 'Dusi Vineyard' was planted in 1945 so it has endured the heat and droughts of our warm climate and is still thriving. It is dry-farmed and I think that helps intensify the fruit because it is later to ripen than the Zinfandel."


• Do you believe that old-vine Carignan is necessary for the production of top-quality fruit, or can younger vines also yield superior wines?


JD: "Hmmmm, not sure. I do love my old-vine Carignane more than the young vines, but I am not sold that older vines are better. But since I only have two vineyards to compare on this particular varietal, yes I like the old vines better."
home-slide3.jpg
J.Dusi has worked with Carignan fruit from the "Dante Dusi Vineyard". What advantages and challenges have you experienced with growing/farming Carignan in your area, compared to Zinfandel and other grape varieties?


JD: "Carignane comes off the vine much later than the Zinfandel if picking for optimal ripeness. Carignane is more susceptible to bunch rot because the clusters are so tight."


• Why do you think Carignan commonly proves to be more challenging to farm and produce than other Rhône-style varieties?


JD: "Large vines, big berries and tight tight clusters invite problems."


• What special considerations have you discovered in producing a Carignan-dominant wine?


JD: "How people yearn to learn more about a varietal they have not heard much about..."


• What thoughts do you have regarding the recent increase in the public's general awareness of Carignan's potential to create delicious varietal wines?


JD: "I think it's great... problem is that there still is not much planted in California!


"Janell Dusi
President & Winemaker
J Dusi Wines
Winery: (805) 226-2034
Cell: (805) 451-7944
"

old vine carignan.jpg
The Wine Write
"J Dusi's New Perspective on Family Tradition"
by Randy Smith
June 22, 2015


"Tradition is one thing. Breaking from tradition is quite another.

"'Dusi Vineyard' in Paso Robles has been an acclaimed producer of old vine Zinfandel fruit for decades. But until recently, four generations of the Dusi family were solely farmers, not winemakers. It took a determined, headstrong young woman named Janell Dusi to break that tradition.

"...The Wine Write: I've read that your grandfather showed you the ropes of winemaking. Tell me about that.

Janell: I grew up on a one hundred acre vineyard of old vine Zinfandel...it was our backyard, our playground, everything. I'm in the fourth generation of farmers of those grapes. As I got older, I began asking why we didn't make wine. The only response I got was, 'Because we're farmers.' The older I got, the more I began to question. It's hard work farming all year long; why wouldn't we want to take some of our finished product and make some wine from it?

"I had prodded my grandfather when I was younger to show me the basics. I told him, 'You have to know how to do this. Show me.' So he taught me the fundamentals of winemaking.

dusi sunset.jpg
"...The Wine Write: The Dusi name is synonymous with quality Zinfandel in Paso Robles. What is it about 'Dusi Vineyard' that produces such good fruit?

"Janell: They say great wine starts in the vineyard, and that's right. 80%-90% of the quality of the wine is in the fruit. For us, it's the soil, the terroir, the location, the sun exposure, spacing, and drainage. The 'Dusi Vineyard' was planted to Zinfandel in 1925, and is still producing great fruit today. That's a testament to my great-grandfather, and shows that the vineyard is just a perfect combination of all those factors.

"The Wine Write: The J Dusi label expands the lineup well past Zinfandel to include Rhones, Pinot Grigio, Carignan, Petite Sirah, and even even Port. Is that a market driven decision, something you just wanted to do, or what?

Janell: I'm passionate about Zinfandel, so I started there. But as a winemaker, I was always wanting to play with other varietals. Kinda like a kid in a candy store, you know? It's sort of addicting, trying new things. It's fun for me.'..."[/i]



Paso Robles Daily News
"J Dusi Tasting Room Now Open"
by Scott Brennan
August 30th, 2013


"...The tasting room is located on Highway 46 West at the former Edward Sellers Vineyards and Wines property, which closed recently.

“'Finally, I am opening up a tasting room with my own production facility in Paso Robles,' says Dusi. She is a local farmer and winemaker with deep family roots in the local wine region. Her specialty is Zinfandel. Previously Dusi had offered tastings at events around Paso Robles.

"...The new J Dusi Wines tasting room is located at 1401 Hwy 46 West, Paso Robles, CA 93446.

"...About Janell Dusi

"Janell Dusi was born and raised on the 'Dusi Vineyard' where her grandfather Dante taught her the old world Italian style of winemaking.

"Dusi’s family’s heritage dates back to the early 1920’s, where grape growing has been a craft that has deep roots in the Dusi family. The farming practices that were implemented by her great-grandparents eighty-years-ago, are still the standard that they follow today. The unique, hand crafted quality of J Dusi Wines results from her intimate involvement in every step of the process: working in the vineyard, driving the tractor, hand picking my own fruit, crushing the grapes and fermenting the juice from the bins to the barrels to the bottle.

“'One thing that I know for sure; winemaking is part science, part art and 100% passion,' Dusi says.'..."
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#80 Post by Arv R »

I had a rather tired bottle of 2007 Terre d'Ardoise Carignan VV [VdP Cotes Catalanes] over the weekend. It was faded at the edges, and rather leathery/sweaty/saddley on the nose. Pruney notes too. Should have been consumed younger, but was still sort of interesting. I remember having some raspy Corbieres in the 90's that were like this. I'd give this a C+ or so.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#81 Post by Drew Goin »

Thanks for the tasting note, Arv!!

Is ↓this↓ the same wine?

https://www.wine-searcher.com/find/mas+ ... e/-/usa#t2


Also, can you tell me if this wine showed better in its youth?

The Côtes Catalanes reds are growing in popularity these days, if my memory serves me correctly...

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#82 Post by Drew Goin »

Mr. Morgan Twain-Peterson posted this photo on Facebook of old "Bedrock Vineyard" Carignan vines in the foreground (new plantings of Grenache and Cinsault in the background).
FB_IMG_1534349620185.jpg
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#83 Post by Drew Goin »

This is another FB photo from Bedrock Wine Company's MTP: "Evangelho Vineyard" Carignan in Contra Costa County.
FB_IMG_1534350702857.jpg
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#84 Post by Arv R »

Drew Goin wrote: August 15th, 2018, 9:24 am Thanks for the tasting note, Arv!!

Is ↓this↓ the same wine?

https://www.wine-searcher.com/find/mas+ ... e/-/usa#t2


Also, can you tell me if this wine showed better in its youth?

The Côtes Catalanes reds are growing in popularity these days, if my memory serves me correctly...
Yes that appears to be the right one. I mislabeled my comment on it, being unfamiliar with it.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#85 Post by Steve Gautier »

Drew Goin wrote: August 15th, 2018, 9:57 am This is another FB photo from Bedrock Wine Company's MTP: "Evangelho Vineyard" Carignan in Contra Costa County.

FB_IMG_1534350702857.jpg
I am pretty sure Cody is making a Evangelho Carignan under his Desire Lines brand this year.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#86 Post by Drew Goin »

Steve Gautier wrote: August 15th, 2018, 12:54 pm I am pretty sure Cody is making a Evangelho Carignan under his Desire Lines brand this year.
Thanks for the news, Steve!! That's very exciting!! :)

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#87 Post by Drew Goin »

I have had a few misfortunes in the past wherein I misplaced certain Carignan-centric web links. I would like to take a moment to post a few here, in case they otherwise meet a similar fate! [scratch.gif]


Conservatoire du Carignan:

This group was established in 2013 "on the initiative of Sebastian Nickel, communicating oenologist, helped by a few friends: Michel Smith and André Dominé, both journalists, and Benoit Roger, oenologist."

carignanday7-d4bf1.jpg

The group has taken up the Bojanowski's "Carignan Renaissance" mantle in an effort to rejuvenate the mission to promote the variety in the public's eye. I cannot speak to the success they have experienced, as the website was last updated in October of 2017.



i-WineReview
"The Emergence of Carignan in Chile's Maule Valley"
by Mike Potashnik and Don Winkler
April 14, 2013

This article reviews about 20 different Chilean Carignan wines from the VIGNO project!!!


Wine Anorak
"Vigno: Old vine Carignan wine from Maule, Chile"
by Jamie Goode
January, 2012 (?)

"The rules for Vigno is that the wines must be made from at least 65% old, dry-farmed Carignan vines from Maule, with any balance being also old vine Maule fruit. The vines have to be unirrigated and head pruned bush vines (gobelet).

This sounds like an exciting, authentic sort of project, so I was pleased to be able to taste through wines from all 12 members with one of the producers, Derek Mossman of the Garage Wine Company."


Jamie Goode's consistently awesome website includes a brief overview of the VIGNO program and a dozen tasting notes, almost exclusively from the 2008 vintage.


Susie & Peter: Masters of Wine
"VIGNO: Chile's New Name"

I was unfamiliar with the website prior to reading this article. It provides the most thorough exploration of the history, the background leading up to the formation of VIGNO, and is very detailed, yet concise.


Les 5 du Vin
"Carignan from Chile"
December 11, 2015

This website usually focuses on Carignan in France (the whole thing is in French, so it's helpful to have an auto-translate feature on your computer or phone when visiting the site!), but this article focuses on the Chilean wine scene. 11 wines are tasted, predominantly from the 2012 vintage.

There is another entry on Chile's Carignan growing regions: https://les5duvin.wordpress.com/2013/06 ... ermission/


Image


• Other Les 5 du Vin Articles on "Carignan":
https://les5duvin.wordpress.com/?s=Carignan
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#88 Post by Drew Goin »

The Wine Economics Research Center in Australia has some fascinating data on the statistics for top varieties by nation, as well as other reports.

"Database of Regional, National and Global Winegrape Bearing Areas by Variety, 2000 and 2010":

https://www.adelaide.edu.au/wine-econ/d ... inegrapes/


Most nations' top 45 wine grape varieties are listed in the downloadable content. Carignan is referred to as "Mazuelo". Zinfandel is called..."Tribidrag"!

Carignan...er, Mazuelo had 3,088 acres planted in 2000 and was the 13th most planted grape in the US. The area has diminished over the years, of course.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#89 Post by Drew Goin »

In the south of France, there is a commune within the canton of La Vallée de l'Agly (an administrative division of the Pyrénées-Orientales department) called
Vingrau
.

While I can show you a map of the region...

Image

...nothing can compare with a photograph like this one:

p6200015.jpg

According to the following article from Les 5 du Vin, Vingrau is a hidden valley, home to wineries that tap the vineyards found in the limestone-rich hillsides and fields surrounding the village.

Les 5 du Vin
"Wine Heritage: Vingrau, but What a Circus!"
August 20, 2015

Some of the wineries found in the Vingrau neighborhood:

Clos des Fees

Domaine du Bac

Domaine des Chênes

Domaine de l’Edre

Domaine de l’Éléphant

Les Vents du Sud

Les Vignerons de Tautavel Vingrau Co-op


So, which of these producers bottle Carignan or Carignan-dominant wines?

Domaine de l’Edre and Les Vignerons de Tautavel Vingrau Co-op produce wines from Carignan. To the benefit of the American Berserkers, these are found in the portfolio of Hand Picked Selections (Mr Dan Kravitz's operation)!


More can be read about the Vingrau "circus" in the following website:

Wine on Six
"A Wine Excursion in Viens à Vingrau"
July 25, 2015
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#90 Post by Drew Goin »

Larry Schaffer of Santa Barbara County-based Tercero Wines has bottled many different red and white wines composed of grape varieties classically associated with Southern France: Mourvèdre, Grenache, Syrah, Marsanne, Roussanne, Grenache Blanc, Viognier, etc.

This past year, he went a little wild, releasing a new version of the "abberration" wine, Cab Franc-based in its second vintage, a Cinsaut, and...a Carignane!!!




Briscoe Bites
"Tercero Wines 2016 Carignane"
October 25, 2017


The author states that Larry harvests his fruit a little earlier than typical, and ferments it whole-cluster (foot-treading the fruit personally) before aging it for 10 months in 100% used French oak.

"...This wine is certainly age-able — I’d say for up to 10 years. However, in my humble opinion, I’d argue that in order to truly appreciate the affects of age on this wine, one would have to wait the full 10 years. Luckily (for me) this is the kind of wine I enjoy in its youth...."

Tercero-2016-Carignane-e1508196916220.jpg

It should be mentioned that the winemaker encourages drinkers to save a little bit of their opened bottles for the second day to experience the evolution of the Carignane's flavors over time.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#91 Post by PFMay »

Here in the UK one of the popular (and inexpensive) wines sold by The Wine Society is 3C - which is an unoaked Cariñena (Carignan) from the village of Cariñena in the DOC of Cariñena (hence 3C). They also do a 3C Reserve which is oaked. https://www.thewinesociety.com/shop/Pro ... pd=SP13121
and several other Carignans including one from the Carignan Blanc variety.
.
Peter F May
.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#92 Post by larry schaffer »

Drew Goin wrote: August 19th, 2018, 4:38 am Larry Schaffer of Santa Barbara County-based Tercero Wines has bottled many different red and white wines composed of grape varieties classically associated with Southern France: Mourvèdre, Grenache, Syrah, Marsanne, Roussanne, Grenache Blanc, Viognier, etc.

This past year, he went a little wild, releasing a new version of the "abberration" wine, Cab Franc-based in its second vintage, a Cinsaut, and...a Carignane!!!




Briscoe Bites
"Tercero Wines 2016 Carignane"
October 25, 2017


The author states that Larry harvests his fruit a little earlier than typical, and ferments it whole-cluster (foot-treading the fruit personally) before aging it for 10 months in 100% used French oak.

"...This wine is certainly age-able — I’d say for up to 10 years. However, in my humble opinion, I’d argue that in order to truly appreciate the affects of age on this wine, one would have to wait the full 10 years. Luckily (for me) this is the kind of wine I enjoy in its youth...."


Tercero-2016-Carignane-e1508196916220.jpg


It should be mentioned that the winemaker encourages drinkers to save a little bit of their opened bottles for the second day to experience the evolution of the Carignane's flavors over time.
Thanks for posting this. 2016 was my first year working with the variety for my label, and I'm really excited about it. The variety certainly is distinct and different than all others that I work with, generally offering up more beefy, smoky, earthy and unripe cherry elements than the other Rhones I work with.

The notes above are from awhile ago - and this wine is getting more and more interesting. Relatively light on its feet at 12% ABV, the 100% whole clusters definitely give it some extra intrigue and structure.

Cheers.
larry schaffer
tercero wines

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#93 Post by Dave McCloskey »

Want to blow your mind? Pair a good Carignan with roasted or whole chicken cooked over wood. Match made in heaven.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#94 Post by Drew Goin »

I really enjoy Carignan with food. In this way, I address it as I do most Rioja and Chianti wines: best ar the table, but also delicious on its own.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#95 Post by Drew Goin »

I received an email from Fernando Ananía, Head of Communications & PR for Chilean producer Undurraga. Unfortunately, he simply referred me to the VIGNO website and attached two data sheets of the winery's Carignan wines:


Undurraga 2016 VIGNO "Old Vines Dry-Farmed" DO Maule Carignan

The fruit for this single-vineyard Carignan comes from Sauzal, about 20km NE from the town of Cauquenes in the warm, granite-rich soils of the Maule Valley, Chile. The fruit (88% Carignan, 12% Cinsault) is gently fermented with native yeasts at cool temperatures before aging in French oak for 16 months.


Undurraga 2014 "Terroir Hunter" DO Maule Carignan

The "Terroir Hunter" Carignan is sourced from two dry-farmed Maule Valley vineyards. 65% of the grapes are from a Loncomilla vineyard (~40-years-old), in Melozal, Chile, about 60km East of Cauquenes. This site is slightly cooler than the second vineyard, which is located 20km NE of Cauquenes (~60-years-old). The Loncomilla vineyard provides firmness and fresher fruit elements, while the other source (possibly the "Sauzal vineyard" used for Undurraga's VIGNO bottling) fills the wine with rich fruit flavors and body.

_20180823_171448.JPG

Undurraga's website: http://www.undurraga.cl
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#96 Post by Drew Goin »

The VIGNO program in Chile is fascinating to me. Carignan does not have an incredibly long history of growing this grape.

According to the "History" page of the official VIGNO website, the devastating earthquake of 1939 nearly wrecked the Maule Valley's grape-growing economy of Chile:

"...The Department of Enology of the Ministry of Agriculture of Chile decided to import French stakes (sic) from Carignan to improve the characteristics of the wines of the area and add value to the agricultural activity that, up to the present day, has a strong peasant root. The Carignan would bring color, body and, above all, freshness to the traditional Mauline red blends."


Today, most of the Maule Valley's remaining Carignan vineyards have become a hot commodity, attracting numerous wine producers from across the country.





VIGNO website
"VIGNO in Wine Advocate: April, 2017"[/url]

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#97 Post by Dan Kravitz »

Hi Drew,

Just saw your post on Vingrau. Many thanks for putting in the article, which I had not seen (it's in French, I can sorta read it).

FYI: Domaine de l'Edre makes a pure Carignan, 'Forcement Carignan'. It's small production (usually 600 - 800 six-packs a year) and retails in the low $20s. I am offered 60 - 100 six-packs a year and take whatever they can give me.

I import the wines of les Vignerons de Tautavel Vingrau (VTV). I am also a member of the Cooperative. The wine from my own vineyard is made there, the grapes fermented and aged separately. VTV is, IMO, a really excellent Cooperative, even the larger lots are made in more of an artisanal than industrial manner. Four years ago the Cooperative made a big investment in small stainless steel tanks, which has helped quality tremendously. The Cooperative does not produce any pure Carignan wines at this time, but some of the separate bottlings from older vines have heft percentages... 20 - 40%. Starting this year, a few parcels of my Carignan will be fermented separately. A pure Carignan bottling is not out of the question.

Best regards,

Dan Kravitz
swillmaster - ITB

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#98 Post by Drew Goin »

Dan Kravitz wrote: August 24th, 2018, 4:48 am Hi Drew,

Just saw your post on Vingrau. Many thanks for putting in the article, which I had not seen (it's in French, I can sorta read it).

FYI: Domaine de l'Edre makes a pure Carignan, 'Forcement Carignan'. It's small production (usually 600 - 800 six-packs a year) and retails in the low $20s. I am offered 60 - 100 six-packs a year and take whatever they can give me.

I import the wines of les Vignerons de Tautavel Vingrau (VTV). I am also a member of the Cooperative. The wine from my own vineyard is made there, the grapes fermented and aged separately. VTV is, IMO, a really excellent Cooperative, even the larger lots are made in more of an artisanal than industrial manner. Four years ago the Cooperative made a big investment in small stainless steel tanks, which has helped quality tremendously. The Cooperative does not produce any pure Carignan wines at this time, but some of the separate bottlings from older vines have heft percentages... 20 - 40%. Starting this year, a few parcels of my Carignan will be fermented separately. A pure Carignan bottling is not out of the question.

Best regards,

Dan Kravitz

Thanks for the additional information, Dan!!!


I actually sent emails to Domaine de l'Edre as well as the VTV Co-op. As I wrote in English, we'll see if I get a response from either!

I am excited by the prospect of what you can get from your vineyard holdings in the South of France! :)


I don't think anyone would shame you for promoting your products as long as they are relevant to the thread's topic, personally.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#99 Post by Drew Goin »

The following article is a French piece on the Carignan's resurgence in France, the original "Carignan Renaissance", and journalist Michel Smith's "Les 5 du Vin" blog.


Terre de Vins
"Carignan, an Incognito Star of Millésime Bio"
by Mathieu Doumenge
January 28, 2014

carignanmillesimebio-320x241-c-center.jpeg
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#100 Post by Drew Goin »

The following article was composed before VIGNO existed in Chile, I assume. There are some good quotes from different wine industry folks in the piece:


Palate Press
"Champions of Carignan: Overlooked Grape Gets an Upgrade in Chile"
by Michelle Locke
February 16, 2011


"...Old bush, head-pruned vines and traditional dry-farming in the Maule Valley, where much of Chile’s carignan grows, further checks growth, producing more intense berries with softer tannins.

“'Carignan from old vines is something very wonderful. Carignan from young vines is coarse and simple,' says Derek Mossman-Knapp, founder of Garage Wine Co. in Sausal, Chile.

"...'Carignan really does speak for itself,' says Mossman-Knapp. Old-vine carignan, made in the traditional style and not smothered in oak, is a table-friendly wine that evokes an Italian style, he says. 'If you have different bottles of wine with food, the carignan will be the first one people finish—and then, uncannily, someone will ask: "What the heck is carignan?"'


Carignan-002.jpg

"...Chile isn’t the only site of the carignan comeback. There are a handful of old vineyards in California, including the 'Evangelho Vineyard' in Contra Costa County and 'Garzini Ranch' in Mendocino County.

"Those vines have been getting more attention, says Artezin winemaker Randle Johnson, who makes two carignans (which is often spelled 'carignane' in California), one from each vineyard.

"Carignan has 'kind of ridden the coattails for the black fruit wave, where we have let California fruit hang on the vine longer,' Johnson says. Ripe carignan migrates from the red fruit to black fruit camp and 'we get more fruit expression, more complexity and we get better tannins.'"
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