Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

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Drew Goin
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#151 Post by Drew Goin »

larry schaffer wrote: March 9th, 2019, 9:54 am
Drew Goin wrote: March 6th, 2019, 4:49 pm USDA NASS
"California Grape Acreage, 2017 Report"



Total Acres Planted to Carignane, 2016:

...Total Acreage for California, 2016: 2,500 acres


Source Link

https://fruitgrowersnews.com/news/usda- ... e-acreage/

USDA NASS California Grape Acreage Reports- Index 1970's-2017
And as usual, Santa Barbara County is no where to be seen [snort.gif]

Cheers!

Larry, I know only of the "Camp 4 Vineyard" as a Carignan-growing site in Santa Barbara County:

"...The vineyard is situated on the eastern most edge of Santa Ynez Valley and serves as the gateway into Happy Canyon. The vineyard is home to 19 varietals focusing on Rhone and Bordeaux grapes and provides an ideal microclimate for these varietals with a long growing season and maximum flavor development...."

EveryVine profile for "Camp 4 Vineyard"


Please let me know if you have any additional vineyards in mind! It's a difficult search sometimes.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#152 Post by Ken Zinns »

Not really much of an article (posted on the Wine Enthusiast website a few days ago), but some recognition of variety in any case:
Carignan is Working its Way into the Spotlight
ITB, Harrington Wines & Eno Wines, and Grape-Nutz.com

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#153 Post by larry schaffer »

Drew Goin wrote: March 9th, 2019, 12:57 pm
larry schaffer wrote: March 9th, 2019, 9:54 am
Drew Goin wrote: March 6th, 2019, 4:49 pm USDA NASS
"California Grape Acreage, 2017 Report"



Total Acres Planted to Carignane, 2016:

...Total Acreage for California, 2016: 2,500 acres


Source Link

https://fruitgrowersnews.com/news/usda- ... e-acreage/

USDA NASS California Grape Acreage Reports- Index 1970's-2017
And as usual, Santa Barbara County is no where to be seen [snort.gif]

Cheers!

Larry, I know only of the "Camp 4 Vineyard" as a Carignan-growing site in Santa Barbara County:

"...The vineyard is situated on the eastern most edge of Santa Ynez Valley and serves as the gateway into Happy Canyon. The vineyard is home to 19 varietals focusing on Rhone and Bordeaux grapes and provides an ideal microclimate for these varietals with a long growing season and maximum flavor development...."

EveryVine profile for "Camp 4 Vineyard"


Please let me know if you have any additional vineyards in mind! It's a difficult search sometimes.
Drew,

From what I understand, it is the only Vineyard in Santa Barbara County that has this variety. And i.could not be happier getting some of this fruit.
larry schaffer
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#154 Post by Miquel Hudin »

Drew, thanks for raising interest in this grape and posting two of my articles about it. I'd just kind of stumbled upon their posting today when scanning the forums and seeing "Carignan!" sticking out at me.

For anyone interesting, here are a couple of more articles.

This is a large tasting I did of many Carignan varietal wines for the Decanter article and others:
https://www.hudin.com/the-grand-carignan-tasting/

This second one is actually quite interesting as it is now allowed in Catalunya to use "Carinyena" on the label or in the rest of Spain to use "Cariñena". These names had both been banned due to the DO Cariñena's objections for years which have thankfully been overruled:
https://www.hudin.com/carinyena-the-ori ... be-itself/

Happy reading!
www.hudin.com

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#155 Post by Drew Goin »

Miquel Hudin wrote: March 31st, 2019, 8:17 am Drew, thanks for raising interest in this grape and posting two of my articles about it. I'd just kind of stumbled upon their posting today when scanning the forums and seeing "Carignan!" sticking out at me.

...This second one is actually quite interesting as it is now allowed in Catalunya to use "Carinyena" on the label or in the rest of Spain to use "Cariñena". These names had both been banned due to the DO Cariñena's objections for years which have thankfully been overruled:
https://www.hudin.com/carinyena-the-ori ... be-itself/

Happy reading!

Thanks for chiming in, Miquel!!!

I have loved reading your blog posts. There are not many wine-related websites that explore the Carignan regions of Spain and France in such depth.


I especially appreciate this second post, as I didn't know about the variety name being allowed.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#156 Post by Dan Kravitz »

to Drew & all:

I follow this thread sporadically, not more than that in part because it's very frustrating. I am a big fan of Carignan, but almost all of the Carignan I like best is wines I sell, so I won't post on them.

If anybody is interested in knowing about the Carignan wines I import, please e-mail or PM me. I will compile a list if there is interest and send out a (hopefully brief) report once or twice a year. I have added a couple of varietally labeled Carignans over the past few years and continue to work with a handful of blends that have significant percentages.

One caveat for those who might want to find the wines... I import some in quantities as small as 50 cases and only a few of the Carignan-heavy blends are imported in quantities of 500 cases or more.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#157 Post by Drew Goin »

What is the oldest bottle of Carignan anyone here has tasted (that was still sound)?

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#158 Post by Richard Albert »

From the respected Ponzo Vineyard(Ridge, Carlisle and many other buyers), comes a micro production of "Old Vine Red", a field blend of 46% Carignan, 35% Zin and 19% Petite Sirah, made by a gent with a literal lifetime of winemaking experience, having helped his grandfather starting at age 5 in the old country. The Carignane definitely dominates this blend.

If the following well made wine is of interest, please PM me is discount it to the low $30's.

THE VINEYARD:
Ponzo Vineyard is located just
south of Healdsburg between Old Redwood
Highway and the Russian River. It was planted in
the early 1920’s with a couple of old blocks
planted even earlier, and it’s predominately Zin
with some blocks interplanted with Carignane and
Petite Sirah vines.
WINEMAKING:
The grapes were harvested by hand
the early morning of September 14th, 2016.
Technically a field blend all three varieties were
harvested and weighted separately but blended
and fermented together. The fruit was handled in
the gentlest way possible, hand sorted and
fermented in small open top fermenters with
minimum three hand punch-downs per day. As
usual, the most effort was in extracting as much of
the beautiful fruity aromas without the harsh
tannins. The malolactic fermentation was done in
barrels. The wine was aged in 21% new French
oak, the rest in older other European oak barrels
for about 16 months
TASTING NOTES:
This wine is deep ruby in color, with purple at the
heart of the wine glass. Ponzo Vineyard had a
distinct aromatic character that comes through
clear as a bell with scents of wildfowers, Morello
cherries, ripe plums and a suggestion of black tea
with cream. The first sip has a lively acidity that
quickly mellows in your mouth to disclose
appetizing plum and dark cherry favors accented
with wild berries, toasty pie crust, and an evenly
interlaced tannin and black pepper finish. A
mouthwatering melting quality makes each
successive mouthful more velvety and delicious.
This wine is fun to explore since it has so many
layers of complexity.
ITB

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#159 Post by Wes Barton »

Drew Goin wrote: April 4th, 2019, 11:24 pm What is the oldest bottle of Carignan anyone here has tasted (that was still sound)?
'70.

I've had a few Carignane-dominant field blends slightly older that were still doing fine. (Like around 60-30 Carig/Zin, with up to 10% other stuff, like maybe 5% PS.)
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#160 Post by Mike Schieffer »

Drew Goin wrote: April 4th, 2019, 11:24 pm What is the oldest bottle of Carignan anyone here has tasted (that was still sound)?
Had a 1954 Simi Carignane with Tegan and Morgan a few years ago that was stunning. Probably one of the greatest wines I've ever had.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#161 Post by Drew Goin »

Thanks for the input!


I would like to think that many Spanish Car/Gre blends would go the distance, as well as a few Californian bottlings.

I have not had an "old" bottle, only about 8 years old. It was the Wild Hog 2002 "Porter-Bass Vineyard" Carignan, and it was all oak. [head-bang.gif]

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#162 Post by Drew Goin »

A great post that features several Californian Carignan wines:


"The Fourth Brumaire Grand Tasting – March 10, 2019"
by Mr Ken Zinns


Grape-Nutz full report: link



Absentee Winery - 2017 “NMWD Private Stash” Carignan

Clos Saron - 2015 “A Pleasant Peasant

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BDSponsor Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#163 Post by Drew Goin »

The following article, published in 2015, provides a vague overview of Carignan as a wine grape, as well as a few recommended producers of varietal bottlings (Liocco, Marr Cellars, and Broc):


Davis Enterprise
"Wineaux: Carignan — an old grape with a new following"

by Susan Leonardi

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#164 Post by Drew Goin »

Carignan_Vincent_Bondi_1920x1280_R2-700x461.jpg

Wine Enthusiast Magazine
"Carignan is Working its Way into the Spotlight"

by Kelly Magyarics
March 25, 2019


"Carignan looks perfect on paper. Late buds offer protection from spring frosts, while late ripening allows for a long maturation period. That means grapes that exhibit their most ideal characteristics—medium tannins, fresh acidity, red fruit tones and earthy spice—are way more possible. High yields and susceptibility to mildew and rot, however, have led to a past glut of mediocre bottles...".


Search Results for "Carignan": Link
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#165 Post by Drew Goin »

I have not had much luck in finding specific information about the old Carignan vineyards of Lodi, California. Fortunately, some creative Google searches have yielded these results:


Birichino has bottled a couple of single-vineyard Carignan wines, as well as a blend or two, involving the following sites...



· "Mule Plane Vineyard"


"Mule Plane Vineyard shares many features with Montague. John Shinn, Matt Shinn’s cousin, farms this small plot, right across the street to the east of Montague. As far as we can tell, like Montague, it is 100% carignane, unlike many of the 'mixed black' vineyards one finds in Sonoma or Mendocino. And it also dates to the late 1920s. (The vineyard is part of the original land homesteaded by the Shinn Family in the early 1850s.) John’s grandfather’s uncle leveled out the site before planting with and mule and plow, and thus the name.

"Though marginally closer to the Mokelumne River 1300 feet to the east, the soil is a bit sandier, the vines are tad more wizened, the skins a touch thicker, the and the tannins a bit firmer than Montague. However, the vineyard yields an equally luscious and perhaps even higher toned wine...".

2017 Mule Plane Front 3x4.5.jpg


· "Montague Vineyard"

"Matt Shinn, who tends this very old vineyard planted in the late 1920s, wed a very charming women from the Bechthold Family - Bechthold as in the celebrated Bechthold Vineyard around the corner. She described their union as a bit of a Romeo and Juliet story. In as much as this very old site never enjoyed a formal name, we suggested that a likely candidate had just presented itself, and thus we present the first wine from this plot bearing the name Montague Vineyard. Most of this wine, and most of the Mule Plane Vineyard Carignane, finds its way in our Scylla bottling. We sequestered just a barrel of each to monitor how they differ and evolve on their own. The vines themselves are impressive, and not just because morning glories weave their way in and out of the canopy. They are large, and produce quite large clusters and vividly scented wine.

"The vines easily shrugged off the blistering heat of late August and early September, choosing to enter a period of absolute stasis for three weeks, before starting up the photosynthetic engine again towards a harvest on September 28. The Montague bottling occupies the middle tones, slightly richer than the Mule Plane, with a touch less tannin on the bottom, and crunch on the top. Like our new couch, lots of velvet, and very swanky...".

2017 Montague Carignane Front 3x4.5.jpg

Birichino website: http://www.birichino.com/
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#166 Post by Drew Goin »

Dirty & Rowdy Family Wines began offering their first Carignan varietal bottling last year from Mendocino County:


Dirty & Rowdy Family Wines
YouTube Video: "Carignan Sampling / Shake Ridge Pressing"







Dirty & Rowdy Family Wines
YouTube Video: "2018 Mendocino Carignan Harvest"






Dirty & Rowdy Family Wines website: https://www.dirtyandrowdy.com/

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#167 Post by Drew Goin »

I was informed via email last year by Mr Bradley Brown of Big Basin Vineyards that a "Wirz Vineyard" Carignan was in the works.

The wine is now available!
[cheers.gif]



Big Basin Vineyards 2017 "Wirz Vineyard" Carignan

"WINEMAKER NOTES

"Vineyard and Region Information:

"The Wirz Vineyard is located in the Cienega Valley - part of the San Andreas Rift zone. This high valley is located at about 1,000 ft elevation on the East side of the Gabilan Mountains. The valley is filled with alluvial deposits of granite and limestone from the mountains. This high valley traps the cold mountain air at night, so large diurnal swings in temperature are the norm. We have been working with the beautiful old vine vineyard for years and the Carignane has been an important component of our Homestead. Typically, we had been splitting the Carignane with another winery, but I had told Pat Wirz that we would be interested in getting all of it should it become available. Sure enough, in 2017 he offered all of the Carignane to us and hence, we were able to make enough to make both a single vineyard bottling, and have a substantial portion be whole cluster pressed for our rosé. We have also made a few vintages of the Wirz Riesling as well and have been very impressed with the quality of fruit from this vineyard.


"Vintage Notes:

"2017 was an excellent vintage in virtually all respects. A good set during Spring flowering set us up for good yields. Temperatures remained fairly moderate all year until just before harvest when a substantial heat spike impacted some vineyards. The old Carignane vines usually hold up pretty well, but in this vintage we did see substantial desiccation. As a result of the desiccation, we decided to destem all of the fruit which allowed us to remove a substantial portion of desiccated berries.


"Wine Notes:

"Dark red and black fruits including raspberries, blackberries, and plums waft out of the glass, while a distinct crushed rock minerality is underneath. The fruit is explosive on the palate carried as it is by dusty tannins and bright acidity. The desiccation no doubt concentrated the grapes and it shows in a wine that is concentrated and intense. The amazing thing is that despite the ripeness, the wine is neither jammy or flabby, but intense has tremendous verve to balance the intense fruit.


"WINE INFORMATION

"Varietal: 100% Carignane
Harvested: October 1st, 2017
Vine Age: 90+ years
Winemaking: Whole berry, cold soak, hand punched, indigenous yeast
Barrel aged 17 months in neutral barrels
Bottled unfined and unfiltered
Alcohol: 14.8@
110 cases produced "


Big Basin Vineyards website: https://www.bigbasinvineyards.com/

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#168 Post by Chris.C. »

I wonder whether the California experts here are very familiar with the Carignano del Sulcis wines from southwestern Sardinia. It’s arguably the island’s most important red grape and usually used in monovarietal wines. As everywhere, quality varies but top examples are excellent. A recent flight:

2012 Cantina Santadi ‘Terre Brune’ Carignano del Sulcis. Terre Brune is, I would argue, one of the two iconic red wines of Sardinia (alongside Turriga from Argiolas), made at the fantastic cooperative Cantina Santadi. Among cooperatives, maybe only Produttori del Barbaresco achieves such a position of prominence as a top-quality producer in its appellation. It is a bit of a modern style, raised in new French oak barriques, and I usually find it needs at least a decade to shed the oaky sweetness and drink well. It will reach age 20 in stride (I just had my last bottle of the 1999, drinking wonderfully) but I wanted to try a young one with the other wines tonight.

Red fruit, coffee, a meaty note. Very fragrant. Youthful, but not primary like the others in the flight. Oak is subdued. Powerful attack, bright acid, deep minerally finish, excellent length. It’s the first time I try this vintage and somehow they seem to have dialed down the barrique influence, to excellent effect. Minerally, bit wild finish. Really drinking well, getting even more fragrant and complex as it sits in the glass. Striking wine. A superb showing.

2016 6 Mura Carignano del Sulcis Riserva. I have enjoyed this wine (almost 100-year-old vines, no barriques) in previous vintages, but not tried one in some time. I expected an infant and found one. Very fragrant, billowing fresh sweet jammy raspberry. Thick in the mouth, sweet attack, dark fruit, coffee, licorice. Carries the impression of a lot of sweetness, very ripe, but not over-the-top – there is acid and tannin. Needs a couple of years to settle down but will be very nice.

2016 Cantina Mesa ‘Buio Buio’ Carignano del Sulcis Riserva. Another bottling that I’ve liked previously but not had lately. Old vines, no new oak; I would regard as a direct peer of 6 Mura. Darker register licorice, floral, sweet jammy berry nose. No shrinking violet but this is a bit more subdued than the 6 Mura, not the same intensity and not quite at the level of the first two on the evening.

Nice wines all. You can enjoy the 2016s if you like primary fruit, these are lick-your-face friendly wines. But the standout here was the Terre Brune, really delivering more than I expected. Beautiful wine, has the wow factor.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#169 Post by Drew Goin »

Thanks for the tasting notes, Chris!! I have not had a Sardinian Carignan in a looping time.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#170 Post by Drew Goin »

Vine & Wine Open Access
"Terroir and Typicity of Carignan from Maule Valley (Chile): The Resurgence of a Minority Variety"

by Gastón Gutiérrez-Gamboa, Yerko Moreno-Simunovic
March 10, 2019


From the Introduction:

"...This review exposes the collective efforts of the Chilean academia, government, and grape and wine industry in the recovery of a minority grapevine variety, namely Carignan, which improved the economic and social conditions of one of the most vulnerable areas of the country. Knowledge of the chemical composition can provide opportunities for the adaptation of the characteristics of this minority grape variety to the winemaking processes defined by the consumerʼs preferences. In this way, this review summarizes the effects of terroir on the typicity of the Carignan grapevine variety."

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#171 Post by Drew Goin »

There is an event scheduled for February 23, 2020, called "For the Love of Carignan":


https://www.eventbrite.com/e/for-the-lo ... 3596107477

"...Vinca Minor and Las Jaras Wines present to you an exciting tasting that will get you well acquainted with a variety that we love so much!


"This tasting will feature many different styles of Carignan based wines made from California's top minimal intervention wine producers. The featured wineries will be pouring sparkling wine, rosés, light red wines, traditional red wines and selections from the library. We will also have Maria Martinson (Testa Vineyards) and Pete Johnson talk about the history and farming of Carignan in Mendocino County.

"Featured Wineries:

Blue Ox
Broc Cellars
Donkey and Goat
Emme Wines
Fine Disregard
Guthrie Family Wines
Las Jaras Wines
Les Lunes
Martha Stoumen Wines
Precedent
Ramos Torres Winery
Ridge Vineyards
Sandlands
Source and Sink
Subject to Change
Testa Vineyards
Vinca Minor"

https___cdn.evbuc.com_images_91489237_401229963139_1_original.jpeg

Date And Time

Sun, February 23, 2020
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM PST

Location

Vinca Minor Winery
1335 Fourth Street
Berkeley, CA 94710
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#172 Post by Drew Goin »

From the original Carignan Renaissance website:


Carignan Renaissance
"SCHISTES VS CALCAIRE, CARIGNAN Edition"
by Miquel Hudin
December 24, 2019


"...Wines from limestone soils appeared to be softer overall with longer finishes and anyone brought up on Burgundy being the pinnacle of winemaking (such as in the UK) would easily gravitate towards these wines a bit more. Overall the slate wines were more ready to drink, better fleshed out, and with a more sinewy structure...."


Full original article link:
https://www.hudin.com/schiste-vs-calcai ... 5hAuX4#nav

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#173 Post by markjchambers »

I posted this on the Bedrock thread and got no response. Then as a separate thread, I got a couple of responses. Since you are cataloging Carignan producers, you should not leave out Bedrock. Here is my note for 2015 Vineyard Under the Mountain Carignan:

Nice wine. Reminds me of a young Chianti with bright acidity and grippy tannins. Cedar nose with currant and sour cherry on the palate. A good match for pasta with red sauce. I'm sure it would keep for a few years, but it's pretty nice now.

I noted that there are no CT notes for this wine and no mention of it on the Bedrock website. They make a Heritage zin blend from this vineyard, but I can't find any mention of
a carignan cuvee.

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#174 Post by Wes Barton »

markjchambers wrote: March 1st, 2020, 6:50 pm I posted this on the Bedrock thread and got no response. Then as a separate thread, I got a couple of responses. Since you are cataloging Carignan producers, you should not leave out Bedrock. Here is my note for 2015 Vineyard Under the Mountain Carignan:

Nice wine. Reminds me of a young Chianti with bright acidity and grippy tannins. Cedar nose with currant and sour cherry on the palate. A good match for pasta with red sauce. I'm sure it would keep for a few years, but it's pretty nice now.

I noted that there are no CT notes for this wine and no mention of it on the Bedrock website. They make a Heritage zin blend from this vineyard, but I can't find any mention of
a carignan cuvee.
The pic under the "Carignan" entries is the same as the regular "Red Wine" entries. Are you sure it's two wines? If so, can you get a proper pic up?
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#175 Post by markjchambers »

IMG_3209.jpeg
The back label says "Vineyard Under the Mountain"
"Beautiful Old Vine Carignan from forgotten times"
"Tended and preserved by the Gregory family"
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#176 Post by Wes Barton »

Thanks! Would love to try that.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#177 Post by Drew Goin »

Thanks for the note, Mark!


There's some info about the vineyard on the "Santa Clara & San Benito Counties Wine Heritage" thread:

· Email from Mr Gregory

· Wes Barton with more info

· Morgan Twain-Peterson with more info

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#178 Post by Drew Goin »

I previously discussed the proliferation of Lodi old-vine Carignan wines on the market. The Lodi Winegrape Commission's blog featured this article a few days ago....



Lodi Winegrape Commission
"Precedent's Latest Vineyard-Designate Lodi Carignans and Zinfandels are the Essence of Transparency"

by Randy Caparoso
February 29, 2020


"...The beauty of the 2018 Spenker Ranch Carignane by Precedent Wine, on the other hand, is that its fruit profile is as fresh and pristine as any wine, made in any fashion anywhere in the world. More significantly, it tastes exactly like a red wine crafted from the Carignan grapes coming off of the Spenker Ranch, known locally as Jessie's Grove's Block 4. To be more precise, 8 acres of own-rooted Carignan vines (a block that, up until the mid-1990s, used to total over 40 acres) originally planted by Joseph Spenker in 1900 and earlier. This growth has a long, established history of yielding red wines with the bounciest black cherry fruit qualities, yet always high enough in acidity to give the zestiest flavors which mingle with loamy earth toned qualities typical of many red wines grown on the west side of Lodi's Mokelumne River appellation.

MulePlane-Carignanvinewithclusters.jpg

"...In similar yet disintinctively different fashion for a west side Lodi red, the 2017 Precedent Mule Plane Vineyard Mokelumne River-Lodi Carignane ($22), grown by J & J Shinn Ranch, veers more into the strawberryish/cherry spectrum of the Carignan grape profile — absolutely teeming in this luscious character — manifested in silky, airy, almost ethereal qualities not unlike a classic Pinot noir, while retaining an even zestier edginess of natural acidity than the 2018 Carignan from Spenker Ranch.

"...'The Shinn family planted Mule Plane in the late 1920s and have been farming it for four generations. These are classic Lodi, own-rooted vines growing in the fine sandy loam soil of Mokelumne River which gives this particular Carignan its crunchy, fresh red fruit expression. I strive to keep this sense of place by fermenting and aging naturally, using very little sulfur when bottling, which is done unfined and unfiltered.'..."



Precedent Wine website:
http://precedentwine.com/
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#179 Post by Drew Goin »

Alquimista Cellars is the single-vineyard project of Mr Greg La Follette. Most of the wines are Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, but he has also bottled a Zinfandel/field blend from the "Jessie's Grove Vineyard" in Lodi. Now, with the unveiling of futures from 2019, a Carignan is being offered.


Alquimista March 2020 Newsletter



"...The '1900 Block' Carignane, also from Greg Burns, is just 12 years younger than the Carignane that represents about 8% of our Ancient Vines Jessie’s Grove Zinfandel and also on its own roots in sandy soils. 4% Fontainebleau Golden Chasselas, an ancient table grape originating in eastern Turkey and the birthplace of Vitis vinifera, contributes a forward fruitiness with its whole-cluster semi-carbonic voice to the overall presentation of charcuterie forwardness to this wine."



"2019 Spenker Ranch Ancient Vine Carignane

"Purchase early to receive your discount for these sought-after vintages.

"Tasting Notes: Bayberry and quince combine with bay laurel and citronella aromas carried right into full mouth feel full of flavors and already showing complexity. At 120 years of age and with six percent Fontainebleau Golden Chasselas grapes, this wine will live long in the bottle.

"Production Notes
70 Cases to be produced"

Alquimista Cellars website:
https://alquimistacellars.com/

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#180 Post by Drew Goin »

Ramos Torres bottled a unique interpretation of old-vine Carignan from a Kingsberg vineyard I had not heard of prior to today...


Your Central Valley News
"A New Spin on an Old Wine"

by Alex Backus


Video:
https://w3.cdn.anvato.net/player/prod/v ... fQ==#amp=1

rsz_pegallin_1080x.jpg

Ramos Torres 2019 Pegallin

"With knock-your-socks-off fruit, this Carignan-based whole-cluster-fermented wine has a floral essence, rich baked rhubarb and hints of raspberry. The tangy finish is perfectly balanced and lightly textured. Monkey see, monkey do Carbonic Maceration! Best enjoyed chilled.

"Aspesi Ranch | AVA: California

"100% Old Vine Carignan | Alc. 11.6% by vol."


Ramos Torres website:
https://shop.ramostorres.com/
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#181 Post by Ken Zinns »

This is cheating somewhat since it’s only 25% Carignan, but this is the best canned wine I’ve tried yet. 2019 “Bucking Luna” from Two Shepherds is a lightly sparkling wine made from 75% Cinsault and 25% Carignan, both organically farmed. The name of the wine was inspired by the baby miniature donkey named Luna that was born on their farm four days before the Covid shelter-in-place began. The Cinsault was being made as a Rosé and Two Shepherds winemaker William Allen found it worked better with the addition of some carbonic Carignan. The earthy Carignan component really comes through in this wine. Light (only 10.5% alcohol), delicious, and fun. I’m usually not much of a fan of sparkling reds, but this one’s a winner.

7F155AA3-B88C-4711-BF90-B5A756C9C268.jpeg
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#182 Post by Drew Goin »

Thanks, Ken! Does he still get Carignan from the "Trimble Vineyard" in Mendocino?

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#183 Post by Patrick T a y l o r »

Drew Goin wrote: April 4th, 2019, 11:24 pm What is the oldest bottle of Carignan anyone here has tasted (that was still sound)?
I also haven't had anything terribly old. In 2013-14, I drank several bottles of 2006 Domaine Gilles Troullier Vin de Pays des Côtes Catalanes L'Indigène. One of my all time favorite Last Bottle Wine QPRs. Gilles only made 2 vintages, but wine-searcher shows the 2007 still available - if you happen to be passing through Slovakia any time soon.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#184 Post by Ken Zinns »

Drew Goin wrote: September 13th, 2020, 9:18 pm Thanks, Ken! Does he still get Carignan from the "Trimble Vineyard" in Mendocino?
Yes, I believe that’s where the Carignan component of this wine is from. And I think the Cinsault is from Windmill Vineyard in Yolo County - Steve Matthiasson consulted in planting this vineyard.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#185 Post by Drew Goin »

Amy Butler has been featured on this thread previously. As she remains the "Queen of Carignan", I thought it appropriate to provide an update of her work with the grape...

img_20190625_185059_305.jpg

Stephen McConnell's Wine 1% Blog
"Tether This"

June 25, 2019


"...Staining ruby with an abrupt edge. THE most amazeballs wet charcoal sagebrush eucalyptus 80% Cacao green tea buttered peach and sharp grimy rubber glove in the nose. Clean and bright but at the same time roiled in all the curves and cut that make a dark red wine exemplary. Soft yeast and a butterfly’s wing of alcohol grind the stony charisma of this grape into your soul, setting you up for taste-buddal-orgasms.

"Clean, brilliant and awe-inspiring over the tongue, black cherry on heroin and THE most direct and stalwart focus of structure and briar and harshness and edge and black tar and rose hips and rain on steel roofing and curry-comb and did I mention ridiculous black cherry–EVERYTHING you expect from a Carignan: NOT an edgy weird haphazard compilation of the grape’s idiosyncrasies, but a true-to-life homage to the Italian heritage of Sonoma vineyards and the absolutely STUNNING wines they can make...".


The following blog entry details Ms Butler's approach to crafting Carignan wines, as well as how she became transfixed with the grape variety...


Pull That Cork Blog
"Ranchero Cellars: Fearless Winemaking by Amy Butler"

by Nancy (CSW)
May 31, 2019


Ranchero Cellars homepage:
https://www.rancherocellars.com/
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#186 Post by Drew Goin »

October 29th is "National Carignan Day", and the Rhône Rangers organization is coordinating a tasting online to celebrate...


October 29th - Carignan Day On Zoom With The Rhone Rangers!



"Open a bottle and toast Carignan with the Rhone Rangers! Join us for the third in our virtual tasting series, on 'National Carignan Day', Thursday, October 29th @ 4pm Pacific. Moderator Fred Swan will lead our panelists through a discussion on the incredible nuances and characteristics of each of their wines!

"Featured Winery Panelists:

° Bodega de Edgar - Edgar Torres
2016 Priorato (60% Carignan, 15% Garnacha, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Syrah)

° Cline Family Cellars - Charlie Tsegeletos
2018 Ancient Vines Carignane (100% Carignane)

° Ridge Vineyards – David Gates
2018 Buchignani Ranch Carignane

° Two Shepherds – William Allen
2018 Two Shepherds Carignan

"Advance registration via Zoom required;
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwsc- ... itosf5DCsJ

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#187 Post by Drew Goin »

123335608_10157560297245924_3735011061292976353_n.jpg

Wine Predator Blog
"Curious About Carignan?"

by Gwendolyn Alley
October 29, 2020


"...According to Gates in a Carignan Day webinar today, Oct. 29, 2020 led by Fred Swan, Carignan brightens acidity, brings out aromas, and pushes fruit flavors forward.

"Curious about Carignan? Or is it Carignane? Maybe Cariñena?

"Either way you spell it, this 'bistro style wine with good tannins but not too much' says Gates, works on its own or blended– and it should show up more often in your glass and mine!

"...With climate change, we may be seeing more Carignan grown in California because, according to Gates, it handles heat, including night time heat, well. In fact, the warmer the wether, the better the yield. It’s also a great mildew indicator– 'the Carignan in the coal mine,' someone joked.

"Edgar Torres of Bodega de Edgar in Paso Robles says Carignan brings color, structure, and acidity; he finds Carignan to be broody, a bully at a punk rock show, that can elbow others aside. He loves the fresh earth flavors and the aromas of petrochor.

"...2018 TerraNoble Gran Reserva Carignan
ABV 13.5%; SRP $19; sample for my ZOOM participation

"...Palate: Plum up front, cherry on the finish, super fruit forward, lots of acidity, sweet tart, big surprising overwhelming acidity. This wine needs to lay down a bit. It is young tart and vivacious. If that is your thing, than this is the wine for your. Sue recommends that it lay down for a few years to be truly enjoyed, but I really loved it!

"...2017 Longboard Carignan
tasted in the Longboard tasting room

"Vicenzo Vineyard has 90 years old Carignan! In 2017, Longboard sourced Old-Vine Carignane from Mendocino County where the Grazziano family had farmed this vineyard for 90 years and these truly ancient vines produce a great wine chock-full of cherry and plum flavors and a well-balanced structure.

"...2007 Storrs Carignane, Santa Clara County CA
purchased in their Santa Cruz tasting room long ago

"With so much development in Santa Clara County, I wondered aloud in the chat whether these grapes are still above ground, and Ridge’s David Gates assured me 'Yes' — he even knows where they are. Not sure who is making wine from those grapes– Carignan (no matter how you spell it) doesn’t show up on the Storrs website.

"Honestly, I didn’t expect much from this wine at 13 years old but WOW. Super enjoyable. I’d definltly buy it again if I could. I’m also a fan of their Rusty Ridge Petite Sirah.

"Color: Garnet, medium plus density

"Nose: Earthy funk, red fruit, herbs.

"Palate: Plenty of tart cherry fruit, acidity, earthy complexity....".


Read the full piece at the Predator Wine blog: Link
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#188 Post by D@vid Bu3ker »

Drinking the 2015 Bedrock Vineyard Under the Mountain Carignan right now. Very good stuff.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#189 Post by Drew Goin »

Every now and then, I perform a few Google searches for Carignan-based wines from unusual regions. Part of it stems from simple curiosity, part from an interest in climate change-driven replantings, and (most of all) a love for the grape itself!


Grosgrain Cellars is a Washington State winery that just released its first 100% Carignan...



"Carignan 2019

"100% Carignan
'Old Milton Vineyard', Walla Walla Valley

"Our first estate Carignan, from young vines at the eastern side of our winery property in Walla Walla's Southside district.

"Light and fresh with bright, crunchy raspberry and red currant notes, as well as baking spices and freshly tilled earth.

"10 months in neutral French oak barrels
12% alc."


Grosgrain Cellars website:
https://grosgrainvineyards.com/

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#190 Post by PFMay »

Dirt cheap and good value is 3C, named after the grape Cariñena (i.e Carignan), from the region of Cariñena and the PDO Cariñena.

Recently I have been enjoying (French) Born to be Wine - a pun on the Steppenwolf song Born to be Wild. The pun doesn't work for me, but they have a really nice brief video of their vineyards and people



(though the sharp eyed will spot they appear to be making red Carignan from green grapes
.
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#191 Post by Drew Goin »

Mildew remains a challenge in cultivating Carignan vines. Below is a video revealing the interventions Bedrock Wine Company implements in its "Evangehlo Vineyard", as explained by Mr Jake Neustadt:


Bedrock Wine Company YouTube video:
"Old Vine Mildew Control"
May 5, 2020


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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#192 Post by Drew Goin »

Saucelito Canyon is home to the oldest commercial Zinfandel vineyard in San Luis Obispo County, dating back to the 1880's, but this Arroyo Grande Valley winery also bottles an ancient-vine Carignan:


Saucelito Canyon 2018 Carignan "Old Vines"

The website unfortunately does not include specific data about this product; according to the winery's Instagram account, the Carignan fruit for the 2018 vintage was sourced from a 100-year-old vineyard...in Contra Costa County.
[scratch.gif]

DSC7609-TOPPICK_edited.jpg

The Wine Write blog
"The Jewel That Is Saucelito Canyon"

by Randy Smith
February , 2020

"...Other than vines that are almost one hundred forty years old, what distinguishes the wines of Saucelito Canyon? It's that back of beyond site. The nights are cold. The soils are sandy and well drained. The pH levels are very low and atypical of most Zinfandels. The wines are prized for their balance, complexity, reasonable alcohol levels, elegance, and ability to age.

"...The Wine Write: 'At what point did you realize the enormity of the work your father did in revitalizing this vineyard?'

"Tom (Greenaugh): 'That happened after I started working here after graduating from college...Once I started getting an appreciation for wine and took some viticulture and oenology classes, I began to understand. Getting my share of manual labor on the ranch helped, too. The work is quite daunting.

"'We are only the second family to own the property. My dad purchased it from the great-granddaughters of Henry Ditmas, who planted those Zinfandel vines in 1880. Mrs. Ditmas took over management of the ranch after they divorced, which was pretty remarkable for a woman in that day.

"'Farming ceased on the property in the late Thirties because of labor shortages. It was being used as cattle land. It was really overgrown. When my dad bought it you could see dark clumps where the old vines are located. All the top wood of the plants was dead, but the root system was still alive. New growth was being pushed out each spring. My dad cut all the old wood back and then dug down to the root head. He then selected a shoot on each plant and trained it upward. It took him two years just to clear that field. He did it all by hand. It took quite an imagination to think that far ahead in terms of reestablishing this old vineyard'...".


Wine Berserkers forum
"California's Great Old Zinfandel Vineyards" thread (12/3/20); discussion about Saucelito Canyon: link


Saucelito Canyon Winery website:
https://saucelitocanyon.com
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#193 Post by Drew Goin »

The old entries for 4488: A Ridge Blog can still be accessed via the Wayback Machine on the Internet Archives.


4488: A Ridge Blog (archived)
"Another Carignane Evangelical Goes On A Mission!"
by Christopher Watkins
February 8, 2011


"Eric Asimov & The Pour: Welcome To The Fight! -or- Carignane Wins Again!"
November 9, 2009


"A Carignane Confluence! -or- A Conversion Conversation! -or- Monroe On Carignane!"
July 13, 2009


"More On Carignane -or- Carignane, Tom Hill, And Me -or- How The Ridge Vineyards 1992 Whitten Ranch Carignane Changed Everything For Me"
June 18, 2009


"Carignane Redux -or- Don’t Blame The Varietal For The Method? -or- Finding Time For An Oft-Maligned Vine"
June 16, 2009

"...So, this is the beginning of my multi-part treatise on Carignane. The point here is that I don’t believe Carignane deserves to be maligned to the extent it often is, and I don’t believe it’s a 'lesser' varietal per se; it may be a more demanding varietal, with an admittedly narrower spectrum of potential (hello Pinot Noir!), and I’ll concede it may be an acquired taste for most (hello solo-varietal Cabernet Franc!), but I don’t think it should be written off. And no, I’m not necessarily putting Carignane on the same level as the two afore-mentioned varietals, I’m just interested in giving Carignane a reputational chance…".

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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#194 Post by Drew Goin »

The original Carignan Renaissance website has seen little activity lately. Nevertheless, a blog excerpt from Carignan aficionado Miquel Hudin recently was featured...


Carignan Renaissance
"Schistes vs Calcaire, Carignan Edition"

by Miquel Hudin
posted on January 6, 2020

"...The idea had been in the works for some time by the associations of Carignan Renaissance to work with Terroirs de Schistes to have a Carignan throw down and show the differences between wines produced from schiste or 'slate' soils, versus calcaire or 'limestone' soils. One wine from each soil was submitted by the cellars who participated and they were matched up by year. Wines had to be unoaked so as to allow full varietal and soil character to come out.

"...Wines from limestone soils appeared to be softer overall with longer finishes and anyone brought up on Burgundy being the pinnacle of winemaking (such as in the UK) would easily gravitate towards these wines a bit more. Overall the slate wines were more ready to drink, better fleshed out, and with a more sinewy structure...".

capture_d_e_cran_2020-01-06_a_16.31.15-fda42.png

Original post, featuring the wine roster & tasting notes:

Miguel Hudin blog
"Schiste vs. Calcaire, Carignan Edition"
by Miquel Hudin
December 24, 2019


Terroirs de Schistes website:
http://www.terroirsdeschistes.com/
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#195 Post by Drew Goin »

My interest in the Terroirs de Schistes collaboration with Carignan folks in Southern France (and beyond), led me to discover a prior event.

In 2017, Terroirs De Schistes conducted a survey of 20 red and white wines grown on schist soils from across Europe. I believe that the 2018 collaboration with red wine producers (^mentioned above^) was a step in the right direction. Southern European Carignan-dominant wines appear to reinforce arguments for the existence of terroir.



Decanter
"Jefford on Monday: Of Schist and Schists"

by Andrew Jefford
March 17, 2017

"...A couple of weeks ago, I attended a tasting organised by ‘Terroirs de Schiste’ – a grouping of mainly French wine producers (though there are members in Priorat and the Valais too) working with distinctive schist vineyards. Faugères growers are prominent (the group’s President is Bernard Vidal of Ch la Liquière) and there are other members from Collioure, Maury, Fitou, St Chinian, Cap Corse, Savennières and Alsace. After an introduction to the subject of schist from geology Professor Jean-Claude Bousquet (who, by the way, has written an excellent introduction to the geology of Languedoc vineyards called Terroirs Viticoles: Paysage et géologie en Languedoc, available here), we then tasted ten white wines and ten red, all grown in schist zones, in an attempt to find some sort of common sensorial thread between them.

"The group verdict, based on the discussions among the attending sommeliers and growers afterwards, was that there was indeed a common thread to the white wines, but that various levels of fruit maturity and contrasting winemaking processes made it difficult to generalise about the reds. The whites were said (by various interlocutors) to have 'freshness … attractive bitterness … elegance … aniseed or fennel notes … salty edges'; some tasters felt that their varietal notes were subdued and that there was a 'mineral-bitter' spectrum in place of those varietal notes.

jefford-schist.jpg

"The growers pointed out that schist soils, usually acid in themselves, tend to give high pH wines (and that conversely high pH limestone soils tended to give lower pH wines) — but that, despite this, schist soils seem to bring freshness. They also pointed out that vines struggle and die more quickly on schist soils than on limestone soils, hence that growers on schist need to be very attentive to their plants. The Languedoc AOC’s technical director, Jean-Philippe Granier, said that 30 years of experience suggested to him that there was a fundamental difference between wines made from vines grown on limestone and schist, and felt sure that most consumers would be able to recognise this.

"...I’m … not so sure. In this tasting, and in the few similar tastings I have done of this sort, the principal sensorial differences between the wines seem to be overwhelmingly derived from climate zone, variety and winemaking strategy.

"...The best place, in fact, to organise such a comparison would be St Chinian, an appellation with both limestone- and schist-derived soils in close proximity. Identical blends made identically in the same cellar from schist and limestone vineyards lying at the same altitude and with the same exposure in the same vintage might provide a valid comparison and enable tentative conclusions about the effects of each soil type to be drawn...".


I thought it was interesting that this critic suggested that a more specific set of parameters be established in order to ascertain the impact of vineyard soil type on finished wines. The most recent tasting organized by the Terroirs De Schistes succeeded in reducing variables in last year's event - not to a level that would satisfy any scientist, but enough for many wine lovers!

Here is Mr Jefford's opinion piece on the



Decanter
"Jefford on Monday: Schist versus Limestone"

by Andrew Jefford
March 19, 2018


If you are fascinated by detailed maps of Carignan-growing areas in France, the Terroirs De Schistes website offers several great examples!
synclinalmaury-1024x443.jpg
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Re: Carignan Renaissance, Part Deux

#196 Post by Drew Goin »

The "Angeli Ranch", now the home vineyard for Healdsburg-based Marietta Cellars, is an old planting of Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Carignan, and other grapes.

When the winery's lineup underwent significant changes a few years ago, an "Angeli" Zinfandel replaced what had once been a Zin/PS/Carignan blend - "Angeli Cuvee".

The "Angeli Cuvee" wines from the late 1990's-early 2000's, to my recollection, were full-bodied beasts right out of the bottle. However, these rich and tannic wines would slowly open up days after popping the cork and reveal gorgeous Alexander Valley fruit and amazing depth of flavor. I imagine any surviving bottles will continue to improve in cellars for decades to come!

While Marietta initially produced blends from the "Angeli Ranch", a few other wineries sold single-vineyard varietal wines from this property. Ravenswood and Porter Creek released "Angeli" Carignan wines for a time. Thumbprint Cellars, a tiny winery in Healdsburg, more recently offered a Carignan from (presumably) the same old-vine site.


According to the notes for Thumbprint's 2017 "Angeli Vineyard" Carignan:

"The 107 year old vineyard which produce these grapes has producing spectacular varietal character for many amazing winemakers for a century, plus. To my knowledge, Thumbprint Cellars is the only Single Vineyard production of these grapes. Unfortunately, after an incredible streak of sensational vintages these vines have been removed. It is a sad reality, however the multiple years of bottled wines will continue to live on.

"This 2017 vintage - marred with a long wet winter, an extremely hot growing season and devastating fires is actually showing spectacular quality for the wines thumbprint crafted; including this offering - the last from the 107 year old Angeli Vineyard."


Is this information wrong? Did Thumbprint source Carignan from a different +100-year-old vineyard?

I found this "Angeli Vineyard" on an unfamiliar winery's website.


Marietta Cellars bottled a 2018 "Angeli" Zinfandel, according to their sales data on VINTUS, a new partner for distribution. Why would the company only uproot its Carignan vines?


The Grapevine Magazine
"Marietta Cellars: Spinning Magic in Sonoma County"

January 5, 2021
by Nan McCreary, Sr.


History & Overview of Marietta Cellars' "Angeli Ranch":

Underground Wine Letter blog
"Marietta Cellars: Consistently Wonderful Red Wines At Great Prices & A Great American Success Story!"

by John Gilson
March 20, 2015

"...Geyserville, CA: Alexander Valley, Sonoma County:
· Purchased in 1990 from Viola Angeli
· 35 acres of river land and hillside terraced vineyards
Zinfandel, Cabernet, Petite Sirah
· Viola’s house is now our main office and Chris still lives on the property."

"...Having known our dad since he was a boy, Viola Angeli sold him the ranch where our winery now sits. Viola lived in her house until she passed away 14 years later. This wine honors her."


Can anybody clear up this mystery for me?

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