Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
Message
Author
Eric Lundblad
BerserkerBusiness
BerserkerBusiness
Posts: 1552
Joined: January 28th, 2009, 2:36 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#51 Post by Eric Lundblad » April 23rd, 2018, 7:34 pm

John Morris wrote:
Eric Lundblad wrote:
John Morris wrote:
Even without a pump, you've vastly increased the headspace so you can still lose aromas.
If you pour out half the bottle and insert a repour, it'll absorb all the oxygen...21% of the air, so it'll have a partial vacuum (21%).

Aromatics occur because of diffusion (within wine, and from the wine to air). Diffusion in a gas is extremely fast...repour depends on this to absorb the O2 quickly. But diffusion in a liquid is very very slow...years/decades slow. So you'd lose aromatics from the very top layer of the wine. And it's not a continious loss...it'll reach a steady state fairly quickly (same amt of aromatic molecules going into the air as are going back to the liquid). This fact, aromatics only comes from the surface, is why we like large wine glasses, and like to swirl them.

So loss of aromatics isn't an issue imo. I've tested this many times over 1+ year periods via my wine in partly filled kegs (used for topping barrels, head space in keg is nitrogen)...no loss of aromatics.
That's very interesting. I suppose what you're saying about rapid diffusion into a gas explains the burst of aromas when you first pop the cork.

What about changes in pressure? When you cork, does that put the air in the headspace under slight pressure? I've been curious about that.

Do you agree that the vacuums are a different story? I used to use the Vacuvin. I found they were OK if the bottle was, say, 3/4 full, but below that, and after multiple pumps, the wine lost all aroma; they were flatter than I would find just recorking the partially full bottle. (I always refrigerate opened bottles.)

The reason I challenged the idea of the Repour is that virtually all the discussions here about devices like this or Coravin, or about decanting, start from the assumpion that the only factor at play when you expose to wine to air is its interaction with oxygen. Some of Jamie Wolff's articles talk about factors affecting diffusion of aromatics, including alcohol and sugar levels. That made me aware that there's more going on than just oxygen.

Alan R's data in an earlier thread about how little oxygen diffuses into a liquid also suggested (to me, anyway) that something else is also going on in a decanter.
I agree that partial vacuums are a possible complicating matter wrt diffusion. I think this is an excellent question for Alan/Al! I'm assuming the 'normal' diffusion laws/rules apply here, and the diffusion is accelerated due to the small population of <insert here> molecules. But I'm just guessing/assuming here.

Jamie Wolff? Did you mean Jamie Goode? I've been spotty about keeping up lately, so I missed all/some of the discussions about aromatics and diffusion. I can certainly see that alcohol & sugar would change things, but mostly in the area of liquid to air transition. I wouldn't thing the diffusion in the liquid (wine) would change enough to have any material affect. Assuming that's true, my thoughts on the 'depletion' of aromatics being limited to the surface still seems reasonable (to me).
Ladd Cellars
Winemaker & Owner

User avatar
Chris Tyler
Posts: 157
Joined: December 20th, 2009, 2:01 pm
Location: SF Bay Area, CA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#52 Post by Chris Tyler » May 2nd, 2018, 8:25 pm

I bought a few of these based off this post. Six days ago I opened a 2011 Gonon St Joe. It was very much in the zone - the kind of bottle where I wouldn’t want to waste a drop.

I’ve tried most of the preservation systems out there: 1/2 bottle w/ screwcap, Vacuvin, Coravin, Pungo. I’d never been satisfied with any of them - sometimes Coravin/Pungo would work well, but it was never consistent.

The repour was head and shoulders above the rest. I didn’t observe any of the tightness or need to air the wine again - it was good to go right out of the bottle. The wine was in brilliant shape. It’s drinking as well as it did on the day I opened it.

This is only one data point, but it’s off to a strong start. Excited to keep trying these on different bottles.
CT: christyler

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 15269
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: New York City

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#53 Post by John Morris » May 2nd, 2018, 8:39 pm

Eric Lundblad wrote: Jamie Wolff? Did you mean Jamie Goode? I've been spotty about keeping up lately, so I missed all/some of the discussions about aromatics and diffusion. I can certainly see that alcohol & sugar would change things, but mostly in the area of liquid to air transition. I wouldn't thing the diffusion in the liquid (wine) would change enough to have any material affect. Assuming that's true, my thoughts on the 'depletion' of aromatics being limited to the surface still seems reasonable (to me).
Yes, Jamie Goode. My bad. (Jamie Wolfe is one of the owners of Chambers Street Wines.)

Goode had an article in Somm Journal (I think) that summarized research on the impact of sugar and alcohol on aromas. Bottom line: Sweet wines are more aromatic because the volatile aroma compounds evaporate more rapidly when there is a lot of dissolved sugar. That explains the huge difference between dry and sweet rieslings, which are hardly recognizable as coming from the same grape.

He also cited research showing that aromas drop off as alcohol increases. I found this a little counter-intuitive. As I recall, it's because the alcohol helps keep the aroma compounds dissolved in the wine. He described tests where the alcohol in a wine was manipulated to find the optimal alcohol level to maximize aromas. This varied with particular wine. Above and below that level, the aromas were less intense. In general, they optimal levels were relatively low. I think he cited examples where 11.5 or 12.5 yielded the best bouquet.

I think I clipped and filed the article. I'll have to see if I can dig it out. It was fascinating.
"More fiction is written in Excel than Word." -- @troyvosseller

"It's hard for a $35 zin to compete with a $100 cabernet that tastes the same." - Me

king-of-capital.com @SubwayTidbits

TimK
Posts: 62
Joined: October 8th, 2013, 4:07 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#54 Post by TimK » May 4th, 2018, 6:18 pm

Hi everyone,

Last night saw the conclusion to my first experiment with the Repour stopper, and the results were very interesting. I have no personal or commercial ties to the product, just wanted to report my findings in the hope it may be of interest to others.

The wine in question was a Punt Road Emperor’s Prize Yarra Valley Chardonnay 2016, under screwcap. Around the $20AU mark, I believe the wine is a decent example of an everyday modern Australian chardonnay which I think punches a little bit above its price point.

Three bottles, same wine, purchased at same time from the same retailer.

Bottle A was opened on 25th April around 4pm, half the contents poured out, immediately tightly resealed with its original screwcap, and put into the fridge at around 4C.

Bottle B was opened on 25th April around 4pm, half the contents poured out, immediately tightly resealed with a new Repour stopper, and put into the fridge at around 4C.

Bottle C was not opened, and was put into the fridge at around 4C at the same time. Then an hour before leaving the house last night, this bottle was opened, poured into a decanter for a brief 10 minute decant, poured back into the bottle, screwcap back on, back into the fridge until I took the three bottles to dinner, 9 days after the first two were originally opened.

I ensured the wines were carefully masked and presented blind, both to myself and my three dinner companions, all experienced tasters with palates I respect. Of course I knew what they were, but not what order they were served in, my dinner companions just knew I was presenting three blind white wines, nothing else. Let’s now call the three blind, mixed up wines, 1, 2 and 3.

Number 3 immediately stood out as the most vibrant and high quality on the nose and palate. There were murmurs of approval.
Number 1 was quite good, yet not as vibrant, lifted or exciting as Number 3, and on the palate was a touch dull in comparison to 3 as well. But still a fairly good wine.
Number 2 was a bit tired and lacking energy, acid line and drive. Not terrible, just paled in comparison to the others.

After this initial round of tasting and discussion, I announced that all wines were the same, and what the test was all about.

Everyone soon agreed that the favourite (Wine 3) was probably the freshly opened wine, Wine 1 was likely the 9 day old Repour and Wine 2 the 9 day old Screwcap sealed wine.

Wrong. We unveiled and found that the favourite wine was the Repour stoppered one!

I am now convinced the Repour device works very well at keeping a half full bottle of wine very fresh and vibrant for over a week in the fridge. There were zero signs of any oxidation at all, the wine showed extremely well, both on the nose and palate. Wine 2 was not showing much in the way of oxidation either, which did surprise me a little, nonetheless Wine 2 was fairly lifeless. Also, I suspect the newly opened wine (1) may have shown better with a few more hours of air, but the difference between the Repour stoppered wine and the screwcap stoppered wine after 9 days was dramatic. In theory the bottle should last much longer than 9 days while retaining excellent aromas and freshness, a month or more would not surprise me based on this result.

Prior to this experiment, I’ve been using a single Repour across a couple of bottles for a couple of weeks, taking a good glass sized pour from the bottle each night or two until the bottle is finished, then transferring the same Repour stopper to a different bottle and repeating over 3 or 4 glasses. In this case a (different) Australian Chardonnay and a young Village Red Burgundy. Both bottles showed no signs of deterioration across a week or so and drank as well on day 6 or 7 as they did on day 1 or 2. Not sure exactly how long the oxygen absorbing properties of the Repour would last when used like this, but I certainly got 8 or so ‘open and restopper’ events across two bottles across 2 weeks out of a single RePour. (Of course they recommend disposing after a single bottle, to ensure each bottle is correctly preserved. Hmm....)

Here in Australia, the price ranges from around $2.40 to $4 per Repour stopper, depending on how many you buy, shipping etc. For leftovers after tasting events, and for spreading a bottle or two across a week or three, this device is perfect for me. I’ve just ordered a bunch more!

Cheers
Tim
(K 1 t t o)

User avatar
A. So
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2713
Joined: July 19th, 2011, 7:58 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#55 Post by A. So » May 4th, 2018, 8:22 pm

I tried this on a 1961 LdH (I think it's more interesting to test on an old wine to see if it can keep it from falling off). Took out just short of a half of the bottle and popped in a Repour. The next day, I found the wine just as fresh and alive. Obviously anecdotal but I was pleased by the results.

I'm disappointed it's single use and you have to throw it out (seems like the Keurig problem). Still, I think I can find a use case for keeping a few of these around.
エaイdドrリiアaンn (93 pts.)

User avatar
David Glasser
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 5105
Joined: August 16th, 2009, 6:03 pm
Location: Maryland

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#56 Post by David Glasser » May 5th, 2018, 6:10 am

With respect to the single use issue, from the Repour website:

Repour keeps one bottle of wine fresh until the last glass. Each stopper is designed to save a full bottle of wine, even take glass by glass over days, weeks or months. If used on a second bottle, Repour may lose its oxygen-absorbing capacity before you are done with the bottle. So start with a new Repour stopper with each new bottle.

So there’s enough O2 absorbing material to keep a bottle fresh even if you pour a single glass a day over days or weeks? That suggests enough for 4-6 openings of the bottle. If you finish a bottle in 2 or 3 goes, it sounds like the Repour would still have capacity to work on a second bottle. But you'd need to either re-seal the Repour or open the second bottle at the same time you finished the first.

OTOH, they’re not that expensive unless you’re using them on every bottle.

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16321
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#57 Post by Alan Rath » May 5th, 2018, 9:28 am

How do they come packaged? If you just leave one on the counter, doesn't that ruin it?

User avatar
A. So
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2713
Joined: July 19th, 2011, 7:58 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#58 Post by A. So » May 5th, 2018, 9:34 am

Alan Rath wrote:How do they come packaged? If you just leave one on the counter, doesn't that ruin it?
There's a piece of foil on the bottom of the stopper. You peel it off before use.
エaイdドrリiアaンn (93 pts.)

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16321
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#59 Post by Alan Rath » May 5th, 2018, 10:01 am

So no way to take it out of one bottle, leave it lying around, then use for another bottle. Truly single use.

User avatar
A. So
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2713
Joined: July 19th, 2011, 7:58 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#60 Post by A. So » May 5th, 2018, 10:19 am

Alan Rath wrote:So no way to take it out of one bottle, leave it lying around, then use for another bottle. Truly single use.
I suppose if you opened the second bottle immediately after the first, poured some out, and plugged it in right away... But that's a bit of an edge use case indeed.
エaイdドrリiアaンn (93 pts.)

User avatar
Robert Grenley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 968
Joined: November 23rd, 2009, 8:41 pm
Location: Seattle, WA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#61 Post by Robert Grenley » May 5th, 2018, 10:20 am

Has anyone tried the Repour with a bottle that has been opened and decanted earlier in the evening, and now with some wine remaining you wish to save it for the next day or two?
It is not uncommon after our tastings that there is some left of some very special wines. I have tried pouring them to the brim of small 1/2 or 1/4 bottles and inserting the screw cap, I have tried WineSave argon after pouring into a half bottle, etc. But they always seem to deteriorate and lose freshness compared to where they were at the end of the previous evening.
I do not know whether the Repour would work better, not to restore these wines that have been exposed to air for hours, but to at least keep them at the same level for a time.

Also, I have never put my red wines in the fridge after any previously used method of preservation...whether it was Vacuvin years ago, placing them into smaller bottles, WineSave argon, etc...simply because it seemed that bringing them up to serving temperature would take so long. I would imagine that any method of preservation might work better if the wines were refrigerated, even if the Repour was the best.

I would love to see the previously described experiment done with wines that been open and decanted for hours, both in and out of the fridge.
I suppose I could buy some Repours and try it myself...unless someone who has them wants to try their hand at this experiment.
I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff.
-Bob Dylan

"...what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I've ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response was there anything that could even be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it."

User avatar
Stan Y.
Posts: 536
Joined: March 13th, 2013, 4:47 am

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#62 Post by Stan Y. » May 5th, 2018, 10:21 am

Seems like you could potentially get extended life when used in conjunction with gas in a can e.g. private preserve.
David Glasser wrote:With respect to the single use issue, from the Repour website:

Repour keeps one bottle of wine fresh until the last glass. Each stopper is designed to save a full bottle of wine, even take glass by glass over days, weeks or months. If used on a second bottle, Repour may lose its oxygen-absorbing capacity before you are done with the bottle. So start with a new Repour stopper with each new bottle.

So there’s enough O2 absorbing material to keep a bottle fresh even if you pour a single glass a day over days or weeks? That suggests enough for 4-6 openings of the bottle. If you finish a bottle in 2 or 3 goes, it sounds like the Repour would still have capacity to work on a second bottle. But you'd need to either re-seal the Repour or open the second bottle at the same time you finished the first.

OTOH, they’re not that expensive unless you’re using them on every bottle.
S. Y @ t € s

Eric Lundblad
BerserkerBusiness
BerserkerBusiness
Posts: 1552
Joined: January 28th, 2009, 2:36 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#63 Post by Eric Lundblad » May 5th, 2018, 11:07 am

A. So wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:So no way to take it out of one bottle, leave it lying around, then use for another bottle. Truly single use.
I suppose if you opened the second bottle immediately after the first, poured some out, and plugged it in right away... But that's a bit of an edge use case indeed.
You can 'reseal' a used repour with a bit of duct tape (on the bottom, in place of the original foil that sealed it).
Ladd Cellars
Winemaker & Owner

User avatar
Cris Whetstone
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 10584
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 1:09 pm
Location: OC, CA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#64 Post by Cris Whetstone » May 5th, 2018, 11:31 am

Eric Lundblad wrote:
A. So wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:So no way to take it out of one bottle, leave it lying around, then use for another bottle. Truly single use.
I suppose if you opened the second bottle immediately after the first, poured some out, and plugged it in right away... But that's a bit of an edge use case indeed.
You can 'reseal' a used repour with a bit of duct tape (on the bottom, in place of the original foil that sealed it).
Duct tape. Will it's wonders never cease?
WetRock

"Man prefers to believe what he prefers to be true." - Francis Bacon

"I had taken two finger-bowls of champagne and the scene had changed before my eyes into something significant, elemental, and profound." - F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

User avatar
Larry Link
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 417
Joined: August 13th, 2010, 10:42 am

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#65 Post by Larry Link » May 5th, 2018, 11:39 am

All the positive feedback has me intrigued, so even though I don't need another wine preservation gadget I've ordered a few of these to test them out. I can see where they are so much more convenient than the coravin. I like the duct tape idea, although you have no way to determine if the oxygen absorption material is saturated or not. It sure would cut down the cost if you could reuse it over 2-3 bottles vs. just a single bottle.

User avatar
David Glasser
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 5105
Joined: August 16th, 2009, 6:03 pm
Location: Maryland

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#66 Post by David Glasser » May 5th, 2018, 11:50 am

A. So wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:How do they come packaged? If you just leave one on the counter, doesn't that ruin it?
There's a piece of foil on the bottom of the stopper. You peel it off before use.
Does the foil remain sticky enough to reseal the Repour after use?

TimK
Posts: 62
Joined: October 8th, 2013, 4:07 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#67 Post by TimK » May 5th, 2018, 6:09 pm

Robert Grenley wrote:Has anyone tried the Repour with a bottle that has been opened and decanted earlier in the evening, and now with some wine remaining you wish to save it for the next day or two?
It is not uncommon after our tastings that there is some left of some very special wines. I have tried pouring them to the brim of small 1/2 or 1/4 bottles and inserting the screw cap, I have tried WineSave argon after pouring into a half bottle, etc. But they always seem to deteriorate and lose freshness compared to where they were at the end of the previous evening.
I do not know whether the Repour would work better, not to restore these wines that have been exposed to air for hours, but to at least keep them at the same level for a time.

Also, I have never put my red wines in the fridge after any previously used method of preservation...whether it was Vacuvin years ago, placing them into smaller bottles, WineSave argon, etc...simply because it seemed that bringing them up to serving temperature would take so long. I would imagine that any method of preservation might work better if the wines were refrigerated, even if the Repour was the best.

I would love to see the previously described experiment done with wines that been open and decanted for hours, both in and out of the fridge.
I suppose I could buy some Repours and try it myself...unless someone who has them wants to try their hand at this experiment.
I've now done this with a few wines, stoppered with Repour at the end of a tasting, usually where the bottle was only around 20% full, and the results were encouraging. I do always put the wines into the fridge as well though, be they red or white. Yes, a red needs 30-60 mins to warm up a bit but I'm sure it keeps it fresher so the tradeoff is worth it. Haven't tested with a wine not put back into the fridge as I want to give the wine the best chance of staying alive, and a fridge helps with that.

Of course it's not going to improve a wine from the state it was in when you stopper it, but the wine doesn't seem to get any worse based on my experience so far. Albeit mostly younger wines so a test on an older, more fragile wine would indeed be interesting.

The idea was suggested on a forum over here that you could put an opened repour into a small airtight container, or sealable small plastic bag to keep its absorbing properties alive before you get around to opening another bottle. I also just had the idea that you could fill a wine bottle with water and insert the repour into that. I would estimate you could stretch it out to 3 or 4 bottles quite easily, but you do run the risk of its effectiveness eventually being lost. Experience will no doubt shed more light on this.

Cheers
Tim
(K 1 t t o)

User avatar
Al Osterheld
Posts: 4738
Joined: March 15th, 2009, 5:47 am
Location: SF Bay

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#68 Post by Al Osterheld » May 5th, 2018, 6:38 pm

I was also curious how well it worked with older wines.

-Al

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16321
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#69 Post by Alan Rath » May 5th, 2018, 9:01 pm

A. So wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:So no way to take it out of one bottle, leave it lying around, then use for another bottle. Truly single use.
I suppose if you opened the second bottle immediately after the first, poured some out, and plugged it in right away... But that's a bit of an edge use case indeed.
Just to be clear, I'm not being critical, just looking for better understanding. I there's something that can help preserve a half consumed wine for a few days, and costs a couple bucks, that seems like a win-win.

User avatar
A. So
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2713
Joined: July 19th, 2011, 7:58 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#70 Post by A. So » May 5th, 2018, 9:30 pm

Alan Rath wrote:
A. So wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:So no way to take it out of one bottle, leave it lying around, then use for another bottle. Truly single use.
I suppose if you opened the second bottle immediately after the first, poured some out, and plugged it in right away... But that's a bit of an edge use case indeed.
Just to be clear, I'm not being critical, just looking for better understanding. I there's something that can help preserve a half consumed wine for a few days, and costs a couple bucks, that seems like a win-win.
I think that this does fit the bill. Even if you use one stopper per bottle, I think it's worth it. The quality at which it has kept my 1961 LdH is outstanding. I intentionally tried it on an older wine to see if it would hold up and to my palate, it was very successful. I'm certainly convinced and I'm probably gonna put in an order for a few more.
エaイdドrリiアaンn (93 pts.)

Steve Brickley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1083
Joined: April 16th, 2011, 9:31 am
Location: SF Bay Area and Nice France

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#71 Post by Steve Brickley » May 6th, 2018, 9:37 am

I ordered a box of 72 to see how it goes. This would be especially good for a restaurant where you bring a bottle or two with the expectation they won’t be emptied there. I have thought of bringing my Pungo (which I like plenty) to the restaurant but the geek and equipment factor would be over the top for most everyone.
Steve

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16321
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#72 Post by Alan Rath » May 6th, 2018, 9:56 am

I could see something like this being incorporated into an actual cork seal for long term storage and protection against premox. There's a marketing opportunity.

User avatar
A. So
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2713
Joined: July 19th, 2011, 7:58 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#73 Post by A. So » May 6th, 2018, 10:04 am

Alan Rath wrote:I could see something like this being incorporated into an actual cork seal for long term storage and protection against premox. There's a marketing opportunity.
I've thrown out my instructions but I remember that there was a warning or somesuch to not store the bottle on its side. Whatever oxygen absorber is being used probably doesn't play nice once it comes in contact with liquid...
エaイdドrリiアaンn (93 pts.)

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16321
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#74 Post by Alan Rath » May 6th, 2018, 10:24 am

I was thinking of embedding a layer in the middle of the cork, so that it wouldn't be in contact with liquid, but would be there to intercept any oxygen that gets through an otherwise good seal. Or it could be an add-on seal you place on an unopened bottle for long term storage.

User avatar
Larry Link
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 417
Joined: August 13th, 2010, 10:42 am

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#75 Post by Larry Link » May 6th, 2018, 12:41 pm

Alan Rath wrote:I was thinking of embedding a layer in the middle of the cork, so that it wouldn't be in contact with liquid, but would be there to intercept any oxygen that gets through an otherwise good seal. Or it could be an add-on seal you place on an unopened bottle for long term storage.
Alan,

I take it by your comments that the chemist in you believes in the science behind the Repour? I'm dubious that it can actually extract O2 that is dissolved in the wine itself once you open a bottle and pour out a glass or 2. However as you know I'm a drinker not a chemist, so your opinion matters to me! In particular we all know how sensitive Burgundy is to air, so if this works on a delicate wine like Burgundy then I am all in.

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16321
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#76 Post by Alan Rath » May 6th, 2018, 2:10 pm

Well, I don't actually know exactly what it's doing, but let's assume it does work (and there is some anecdotal evidence here that appears to say it does).

So let's take the example of a half drunk bottle. At 100% saturation, oxygen content in water is on the order of 10 mg/l. In 375ml, that would be only about 4mg of dissolved oxygen. At STP (not far off from normal air temp/pressure), there are about 22.4L of gas per mole, or about 0.017 moles of gas in 375ml, 20% of which is O2; about 100mg of oxygen, or 25 times what could possibly be dissolved in the liquid wine.

So, assuming that O2 is responsible for some degradation in wine (I think we have to make that assumption), whatever is already dissolved will do its damage - and maybe there's initially enough SO2 to handle that. But if you can prevent the 25x more O2 from ultimately interacting, that seems like a good thing.

Now, I would still make my diffusion argument, that a bottle just sitting there will take a long time for O2 in the head space to dissolve and move through the wine, but I still like the idea of eliminating the potential for further harm.

User avatar
c fu
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 29204
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 1:26 pm
Location: Pasadena

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#77 Post by c fu » May 6th, 2018, 7:52 pm

Update from myself as the OP. Great to see all the positive results.

Ironically my results weren’t amazing. Ha.

Opened a 2010 Bartolo. Drank 1/4th the bottle then put a repour on it. Kept it in my bag with an ice pack overnight. Had it 16 hours later, about 3oz and put the repour immediately back on. Delicious and fresh.

Put it in the fridge. About half a bottle left. Tried it five days later and it was pretty much flat and oxidized. Lots of bricking in color.
Ch@rlie F|_|
"Roulot is Roulot"©

Instagram: @clayfu.wine

Justin S
Posts: 146
Joined: November 30th, 2017, 9:38 am

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#78 Post by Justin S » May 6th, 2018, 8:20 pm

That's a bummer, especially with that nice of a bottle. For the sake of science. On the second opening, did you feel there was a vaccuum when you popped off the repour? Wonder if it ran out of ability to absorb oxygen from the prior use or the seal was bad.
$ ! n g h

User avatar
PeterJ
Posts: 1704
Joined: June 25th, 2009, 1:24 pm
Location: Mission Viejo, CA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#79 Post by PeterJ » May 6th, 2018, 9:07 pm

Sorry if it’s covered earlier but I’m wondering how long (how many bottles/uses) each if these is said to last. If it’s a viable alternative to Coravin, there’s a cost comparison to be made.

Note: I’m now involved with a Coravin hooked up to a tank of Argon (per a poster here) and we’re working through just a few days of that.
Peter J@ckel

User avatar
c fu
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 29204
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 1:26 pm
Location: Pasadena

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#80 Post by c fu » May 6th, 2018, 9:21 pm

Justin S wrote:That's a bummer, especially with that nice of a bottle. For the sake of science. On the second opening, did you feel there was a vaccuum when you popped off the repour? Wonder if it ran out of ability to absorb oxygen from the prior use or the seal was bad.
there was a pop each time. What's odd is the second day, the wine had browned already, but the palate profile and nose was fine.
Ch@rlie F|_|
"Roulot is Roulot"©

Instagram: @clayfu.wine

User avatar
Stan Y.
Posts: 536
Joined: March 13th, 2013, 4:47 am

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#81 Post by Stan Y. » May 7th, 2018, 4:11 am

Steve Brickley wrote:I ordered a box of 72 to see how it goes. This would be especially good for a restaurant where you bring a bottle or two with the expectation they won’t be emptied there.
It looks like there was a period of time where these were a dollar each in a 72-pack, but the price per device now is much closer to the 10-pack. Are you seeing a deal on these anywhere?
S. Y @ t € s

User avatar
Robert Grenley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 968
Joined: November 23rd, 2009, 8:41 pm
Location: Seattle, WA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#82 Post by Robert Grenley » May 7th, 2018, 7:11 am

Alan Rath wrote:Well, I don't actually know exactly what it's doing, but let's assume it does work (and there is some anecdotal evidence here that appears to say it does).

So let's take the example of a half drunk bottle. At 100% saturation, oxygen content in water is on the order of 10 mg/l. In 375ml, that would be only about 4mg of dissolved oxygen. At STP (not far off from normal air temp/pressure), there are about 22.4L of gas per mole, or about 0.017 moles of gas in 375ml, 20% of which is O2; about 100mg of oxygen, or 25 times what could possibly be dissolved in the liquid wine.

So, assuming that O2 is responsible for some degradation in wine (I think we have to make that assumption), whatever is already dissolved will do its damage - and maybe there's initially enough SO2 to handle that. But if you can prevent the 25x more O2 from ultimately interacting, that seems like a good thing.

Now, I would still make my diffusion argument, that a bottle just sitting there will take a long time for O2 in the head space to dissolve and move through the wine, but I still like the idea of eliminating the potential for further harm.
Whenever you say it will take a long time for the O2 in the head space to dissolve into the wine, do you mean hours or days? Because of course a half consumed bottle of wine stoppered up but not “preserved” in some way does not fare so well by the next morning, and even with most methods of “preservation” may not either.

I continue to wonder whether, in my scenario where you are trying to preserve the wines left over after a tasting, the wines exposed to air in a decanter over several hours will, if placed into bottles capped with a Repour, stop their further oxidation and degradation at that point, or whether the O2 already dissolved in the wine will continue to degrade the wine further. My experience with those wines placed into a 1/2 or 1/4 bottle filled to the brim and capped with no airspace left taste less fresh the next day (though I have not placed them into the fridge), and so I would imagine they are suffering further degradation from O2 already dissolved in the wine, unless some additional process is accounting for it.
I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff.
-Bob Dylan

"...what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I've ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response was there anything that could even be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it."

User avatar
Bryan Price
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 316
Joined: April 9th, 2017, 2:10 pm
Location: Lake Forest, CA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#83 Post by Bryan Price » May 7th, 2018, 9:18 pm

Based on the price, expecting a wine to stay fresh after 3-4 days is asking too much. If you're paying $1 per device to preserve a $50 bottle, you should probably drink it by day 3. Drinking an older, expensive wine seems too risky to not drink the entire bottle in one night IMO.
Life's too short to drink bad wine.

Nick Ryan
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2779
Joined: October 7th, 2009, 3:24 pm
Location: NorCal

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#84 Post by Nick Ryan » May 7th, 2018, 10:24 pm

Got my three-pack, giving it a try on a young Cali Pinot Noir overnight (a genre of wine that for some reason is highly vulnerable to second-day "flatness" even with Coravin.) Specifically a Roar Rosella's 2013, which right now on day one is an easy 94 points. The gauntlet has been thrown.
http://sites.google.com/site/nryan4242/CellarPlannerV11.zip

Steve Brickley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1083
Joined: April 16th, 2011, 9:31 am
Location: SF Bay Area and Nice France

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#85 Post by Steve Brickley » May 8th, 2018, 12:11 am

Stan Y. wrote:
Steve Brickley wrote:I ordered a box of 72 to see how it goes. This would be especially good for a restaurant where you bring a bottle or two with the expectation they won’t be emptied there.
It looks like there was a period of time where these were a dollar each in a 72-pack, but the price per device now is much closer to the 10-pack. Are you seeing a deal on these anywhere?
Stan,

No deal. Just ordered direct from mfg. site. I can imagine that competition, depending on patent, may cause price pressure.

Steve
Steve

User avatar
Robert Grenley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 968
Joined: November 23rd, 2009, 8:41 pm
Location: Seattle, WA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#86 Post by Robert Grenley » May 8th, 2018, 12:33 am

Bryan Price wrote:Based on the price, expecting a wine to stay fresh after 3-4 days is asking too much. If you're paying $1 per device to preserve a $50 bottle, you should probably drink it by day 3. Drinking an older, expensive wine seems too risky to not drink the entire bottle in one night IMO.
Yes, I agree, overnight is what I would like. It sounds like the Repour would work well when used as most would...put it in a fresh bottle and remove and replace it as you pour glass by glass over a few days. But also when we have tastings we might have 6 bottles open 4-5 people and not all of them get finished, and the wines are nice enough to not just dump. But they have been open for hours, and in some cases double decanted a few hours before the tasting as well. I didn’t know whether the Repour would arrest further degradation overnight better than some other methods I have tried, because the wines never taste as good the next day...but perhaps the O2 dissolved in the wine over hours is going to do its stuff regardless of what method is used. (But I have not tried refrigerating them as well.)
I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff.
-Bob Dylan

"...what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I've ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response was there anything that could even be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it."

James Billy
Posts: 619
Joined: November 10th, 2016, 6:53 pm

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#87 Post by James Billy » May 8th, 2018, 12:59 am

Robert Grenley wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:Well, I don't actually know exactly what it's doing, but let's assume it does work (and there is some anecdotal evidence here that appears to say it does).

So let's take the example of a half drunk bottle. At 100% saturation, oxygen content in water is on the order of 10 mg/l. In 375ml, that would be only about 4mg of dissolved oxygen. At STP (not far off from normal air temp/pressure), there are about 22.4L of gas per mole, or about 0.017 moles of gas in 375ml, 20% of which is O2; about 100mg of oxygen, or 25 times what could possibly be dissolved in the liquid wine.

So, assuming that O2 is responsible for some degradation in wine (I think we have to make that assumption), whatever is already dissolved will do its damage - and maybe there's initially enough SO2 to handle that. But if you can prevent the 25x more O2 from ultimately interacting, that seems like a good thing.

Now, I would still make my diffusion argument, that a bottle just sitting there will take a long time for O2 in the head space to dissolve and move through the wine, but I still like the idea of eliminating the potential for further harm.
Whenever you say it will take a long time for the O2 in the head space to dissolve into the wine, do you mean hours or days? Because of course a half consumed bottle of wine stoppered up but not “preserved” in some way does not fare so well by the next morning, and even with most methods of “preservation” may not either.

I continue to wonder whether, in my scenario where you are trying to preserve the wines left over after a tasting, the wines exposed to air in a decanter over several hours will, if placed into bottles capped with a Repour, stop their further oxidation and degradation at that point, or whether the O2 already dissolved in the wine will continue to degrade the wine further. My experience with those wines placed into a 1/2 or 1/4 bottle filled to the brim and capped with no airspace left taste less fresh the next day (though I have not placed them into the fridge), and so I would imagine they are suffering further degradation from O2 already dissolved in the wine, unless some additional process is accounting for it.
Filling 375s to the brim and refrigerating them works well for me (as well as with this device? Maybe, but I haven't tested this theory.)

BTW Why not refrigerate them? Higher temperature means higher chemical reaction rates.

User avatar
Robert Grenley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 968
Joined: November 23rd, 2009, 8:41 pm
Location: Seattle, WA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#88 Post by Robert Grenley » May 8th, 2018, 7:40 am

James Billy wrote:
Robert Grenley wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:Well, I don't actually know exactly what it's doing, but let's assume it does work (and there is some anecdotal evidence here that appears to say it does).

So let's take the example of a half drunk bottle. At 100% saturation, oxygen content in water is on the order of 10 mg/l. In 375ml, that would be only about 4mg of dissolved oxygen. At STP (not far off from normal air temp/pressure), there are about 22.4L of gas per mole, or about 0.017 moles of gas in 375ml, 20% of which is O2; about 100mg of oxygen, or 25 times what could possibly be dissolved in the liquid wine.

So, assuming that O2 is responsible for some degradation in wine (I think we have to make that assumption), whatever is already dissolved will do its damage - and maybe there's initially enough SO2 to handle that. But if you can prevent the 25x more O2 from ultimately interacting, that seems like a good thing.

Now, I would still make my diffusion argument, that a bottle just sitting there will take a long time for O2 in the head space to dissolve and move through the wine, but I still like the idea of eliminating the potential for further harm.
Whenever you say it will take a long time for the O2 in the head space to dissolve into the wine, do you mean hours or days? Because of course a half consumed bottle of wine stoppered up but not “preserved” in some way does not fare so well by the next morning, and even with most methods of “preservation” may not either.

I continue to wonder whether, in my scenario where you are trying to preserve the wines left over after a tasting, the wines exposed to air in a decanter over several hours will, if placed into bottles capped with a Repour, stop their further oxidation and degradation at that point, or whether the O2 already dissolved in the wine will continue to degrade the wine further. My experience with those wines placed into a 1/2 or 1/4 bottle filled to the brim and capped with no airspace left taste less fresh the next day (though I have not placed them into the fridge), and so I would imagine they are suffering further degradation from O2 already dissolved in the wine, unless some additional process is accounting for it.
Filling 375s to the brim and refrigerating them works well for me (as well as with this device? Maybe, but I haven't tested this theory.)

BTW Why not refrigerate them? Higher temperature means higher chemical reaction rates.
Your point is well taken...I just never thought of putting a red in the fridge. I will do so, and just plan for the time to get it up to temp. I have an assortment of screw capped 375’s and smaller bottles just for this purpose...to hopefully arrest the process of the wine’s degradation overnight after a tasting, but have been surprised how the wines filled to the brim and capped with no airspace still lost freshness overnight...I assume from O2 already in solution from the wine being exposed for so long. I may need to do an experiment with these wines that have been open for hours in a decanter and compare them poured into smaller bottles with no airspace vs a Repour vs the WineSave argon and compare them the next day.
I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff.
-Bob Dylan

"...what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I've ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response was there anything that could even be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it."

User avatar
Alan Rath
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 16321
Joined: April 24th, 2009, 12:45 am
Location: Bay Area, CA. Sometimes out to lunch.

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#89 Post by Alan Rath » May 8th, 2018, 9:08 am

Robert Grenley wrote:Whenever you say it will take a long time for the O2 in the head space to dissolve into the wine, do you mean hours or days? Because of course a half consumed bottle of wine stoppered up but not “preserved” in some way does not fare so well by the next morning, and even with most methods of “preservation” may not either.
Days, weeks, even months, depending on how full the bottle is. I don't really know what goes on in a bottle after opening, but we all assume oxygen has something to do with it. My point was that there is far more O2 in the air space above the wine than there is dissolved in the wine itself (and that assumes the liquid is rapidly saturated after just pouring out a couple of glasses, which is probably not the case). So if this (or any) device can scavenge O2 from the air in a bottle (which should happen much more rapidly than diffusion into the liquid, because gas diffusion is much faster), I can see that preventing further degradation beyond the small amount of oxygen that's already entered the wine - and is hopefully countered by SO2.

Lots of posts re wine deteriorating overnight, or over several days. My own experience is that most (young) wines do just fine for a day or two or three, even without removing oxygen. We routinely - meaning almost daily - keep wines overnight or longer, and they are almost always just as good, and sometimes better, at the bottom of the bottle. In cool weather, I usually just leave reds on the counter. In warmer summer, I'll stick the bottle in the fridge, then pour a glass to warm up (or even microwave a few seconds to take the chill off).

User avatar
Cris Whetstone
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 10584
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 1:09 pm
Location: OC, CA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#90 Post by Cris Whetstone » May 8th, 2018, 12:25 pm

Alan Rath wrote:Lots of posts re wine deteriorating overnight, or over several days. My own experience is that most (young) wines do just fine for a day or two or three, even without removing oxygen. We routinely - meaning almost daily - keep wines overnight or longer, and they are almost always just as good, and sometimes better, at the bottom of the bottle. In cool weather, I usually just leave reds on the counter. In warmer summer, I'll stick the bottle in the fridge, then pour a glass to warm up (or even microwave a few seconds to take the chill off).
My experience with young wines is the same as yours. I also like to see how they might change overnight if they will at all. I feel like it can give me a hint of what aging could do to them. But it's the minority of wines that change much overnight.

I will buy a few of these repours but it will only be for older wines that I think would give up the ghost overnight.
WetRock

"Man prefers to believe what he prefers to be true." - Francis Bacon

"I had taken two finger-bowls of champagne and the scene had changed before my eyes into something significant, elemental, and profound." - F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Nick Ryan
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2779
Joined: October 7th, 2009, 3:24 pm
Location: NorCal

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#91 Post by Nick Ryan » May 8th, 2018, 8:42 pm

Nick Ryan wrote:Got my three-pack, giving it a try on a young Cali Pinot Noir overnight (a genre of wine that for some reason is highly vulnerable to second-day "flatness" even with Coravin.) Specifically a Roar Rosella's 2013, which right now on day one is an easy 94 points. The gauntlet has been thrown.
Verdict: Noticeable amount of deterioration, and oxidation notes (sherry). (I'm sure I used the product correctly.) With Coravin there would be some flatness but no sign of oxidation. Thumbs down. I'm sticking with Coravin. Clearly I should have anticipated this since I had an equal lack of success with the "375" method -- pouring a half bottle into a 375 container with no headspace. Repour obviously did nothing to counteract the non-trivial amount of oxygen already dissolved in the wine.
http://sites.google.com/site/nryan4242/CellarPlannerV11.zip

User avatar
Scott Fitzgerald
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2536
Joined: March 12th, 2013, 7:32 am

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#92 Post by Scott Fitzgerald » June 15th, 2018, 6:00 pm

Another vote of confidence on this product. Used for the first time last night on a half filled bottle of 2012 Bedrock Kamen Vineyard cabernet. Left the rest of the bottle in my wine fridge, and then opened 24 hours later. Wine tastes fantastic and like it was just opened. No difference tonight from 24 hours ago whatsoever. This is a game changer for our household.
CT: BigTex22

User avatar
Yao C
Posts: 360
Joined: February 1st, 2017, 10:53 pm
Location: San Francisco

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#93 Post by Yao C » June 15th, 2018, 6:04 pm

I tried it with a 2016 A & P de Villaine Bouzeron and found that it helped substantially prolong the life of the wine in the fridge. The wine was nearly as good when I poured a second glass 3 days from first opening the bottle, although it had faded a bit the next time after that, 6-7 days in
C h 0 o n 6

User avatar
Robert Grenley
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 968
Joined: November 23rd, 2009, 8:41 pm
Location: Seattle, WA

Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#94 Post by Robert Grenley » June 15th, 2018, 10:55 pm

Nick Ryan wrote:
Nick Ryan wrote:Got my three-pack, giving it a try on a young Cali Pinot Noir overnight (a genre of wine that for some reason is highly vulnerable to second-day "flatness" even with Coravin.) Specifically a Roar Rosella's 2013, which right now on day one is an easy 94 points. The gauntlet has been thrown.
Verdict: Noticeable amount of deterioration, and oxidation notes (sherry). (I'm sure I used the product correctly.) With Coravin there would be some flatness but no sign of oxidation. Thumbs down. I'm sticking with Coravin. Clearly I should have anticipated this since I had an equal lack of success with the "375" method -- pouring a half bottle into a 375 container with no headspace. Repour obviously did nothing to counteract the non-trivial amount of oxygen already dissolved in the wine.
I have not yet tried the Repour, but as to the Coravin, I have not purchased it as I could not imagine in my life much use to tap a bottle for a glass of wine. It someone does that on a frequent basis, I would think it would be a good investment. For me and my usage pattern, I need something to save the 1/3 of a second bottle left after a dinner, or the 1/4 of a bottle left after a tasting where the wines were double decanted 3 hours before and enjoyed over the course of an evening. And I would be interested in what serves those needs better...a Repour or a WineSave argon gas canister, with or without sticking the red wine in the refrigerator as well.
I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff.
-Bob Dylan

"...what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I've ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response was there anything that could even be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it."

User avatar
Warren Taranow
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2058
Joined: June 30th, 2009, 8:24 pm
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#95 Post by Warren Taranow » August 17th, 2018, 12:24 pm

This device performed remarkably on a half full .375 bottle of Louis Michel Montée de Tonnerre that I poured a glass, corked and refrigerated, then forgot for weeks.
I’m a believer.

Cheers,
Warren
"If the only prayer you ever uttered was thank you, it would suffice."
Meister Eckhart c. 1260 – c. 1328

CT - WST

User avatar
Karen Troisi
BerserkerBusiness
BerserkerBusiness
Posts: 1669
Joined: August 1st, 2009, 4:35 am
Location: Napa, Sonoma, 74-41

Re: Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#96 Post by Karen Troisi » August 17th, 2018, 1:43 pm

We have use these in our tasting room since mid-May on all our red wines. We were very impressed with the results and I just placed a reordered. Wholesale pricing makes it a no brainer - much cheaper than argon and just as effective. Our staff loves them.
ITB - You should only make wines you love to drink.

User avatar
c fu
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 29204
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 1:26 pm
Location: Pasadena

Re: Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#97 Post by c fu » August 17th, 2018, 2:44 pm

Karen Troisi wrote:
August 17th, 2018, 1:43 pm
We have use these in our tasting room since mid-May on all our red wines. We were very impressed with the results and I just placed a reordered. Wholesale pricing makes it a no brainer - much cheaper than argon and just as effective. Our staff loves them.
Have you used multiple bottles with one Repour?
Ch@rlie F|_|
"Roulot is Roulot"©

Instagram: @clayfu.wine

User avatar
Warren Taranow
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2058
Joined: June 30th, 2009, 8:24 pm
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#98 Post by Warren Taranow » August 17th, 2018, 3:40 pm

c fu wrote:
August 17th, 2018, 2:44 pm
Karen Troisi wrote:
August 17th, 2018, 1:43 pm
We have use these in our tasting room since mid-May on all our red wines. We were very impressed with the results and I just placed a reordered. Wholesale pricing makes it a no brainer - much cheaper than argon and just as effective. Our staff loves them.
Have you used multiple bottles with one Repour?
No; one time use, then into the trash. It would not be as effective once it’s been exposed to enough oxygen. Just like oxygen absorbers for food, these are non reusable. Definitely an ecological waste, but I don’t leave bottles unfinished very often.

Cheers,
Warren
"If the only prayer you ever uttered was thank you, it would suffice."
Meister Eckhart c. 1260 – c. 1328

CT - WST

User avatar
c fu
Moderator
<dfn>Moderator</dfn>
Posts: 29204
Joined: January 27th, 2009, 1:26 pm
Location: Pasadena

Re: Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#99 Post by c fu » August 17th, 2018, 3:50 pm

Warren Taranow wrote:
August 17th, 2018, 3:40 pm
c fu wrote:
August 17th, 2018, 2:44 pm
Karen Troisi wrote:
August 17th, 2018, 1:43 pm
We have use these in our tasting room since mid-May on all our red wines. We were very impressed with the results and I just placed a reordered. Wholesale pricing makes it a no brainer - much cheaper than argon and just as effective. Our staff loves them.
Have you used multiple bottles with one Repour?
No; one time use, then into the trash. It would not be as effective once it’s been exposed to enough oxygen. Just like oxygen absorbers for food, these are non reusable. Definitely an ecological waste, but I don’t leave bottles unfinished very often.

Cheers,
Warren
I was under the impression you can use it for multiple pours over time with the same bottle. So thinking might be able to use it for a second bottle if you use the first one for the initial bottle quickly?
Ch@rlie F|_|
"Roulot is Roulot"©

Instagram: @clayfu.wine

User avatar
Warren Taranow
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2058
Joined: June 30th, 2009, 8:24 pm
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: Repour wine saver - anyone use this?

#100 Post by Warren Taranow » August 17th, 2018, 5:10 pm

I checked the website, and it suggests it can be used multiple times with one bottle. "Repour was carefully designed to absorb the oxygen of one bottle of wine, savored over several glasses, over an extended period of time. If used on a second bottle, it may lose its oxygen-absorbing capacity before you are done with your bottle." It depends on how much ferrous carbonate is in them, and how much oxygen it's exposed to with each time it's used and removed.
"If the only prayer you ever uttered was thank you, it would suffice."
Meister Eckhart c. 1260 – c. 1328

CT - WST

Post Reply

Return to “Wine Talk”