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Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
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M. Dildine
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#151 Post by M. Dildine » February 19th, 2018, 10:07 am

Good topic by Neal. I'm in my 60s and still buying some young reds that require age (Monte Bello; MacDonald, Montecillo Cabs from Bedrock, Turley and A-R; Pinots that demand age from Rhys, Copain, A-R and others; Petites and Zin blends that reward age like Geyserville and Bedrock Heritage ...).

So what is my plan?
1. I'm easing back, trying to buy less each month than I did in the prior year (Cellartracker is a good tool).
2. Trying to focus on wines that generally maintain or increase in value over time.
3. My son loves wine and generally shares my palate.

All that said ... Neal's "I'm done" approach makes most sense, I think.
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#152 Post by Anton D » February 19th, 2018, 10:57 am

I am planning to buy until age 65, then have enough stock for one bottle per day to 90.
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#153 Post by Craig G » February 19th, 2018, 10:58 am

Anton D wrote:I am planning to buy until age 65, then have enough stock for one bottle per day to 90.
Planning for failure?
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#154 Post by Kirk.Grant » February 19th, 2018, 11:10 am

Scott Fitzgerald wrote:Broad question, but what percentage of your wine $ do you think you could recoup if you had to sell it off? I know wine ties up disposable income for most of us, but unlike golf outings and vacation travel, it does have monetary value. My point is yes, it can be an expensive hobby, but if you had to sell, you could likely recoup 75%+ of your “investment”.
Some people may be able to recoup 75% but with selling premiums and low prices for wines under the $100 mark...I'm guessing most would be lucky to get 60%. Some will increase in value and others will surprise you in what they bring in...but the bulk are going to be well below what you paid. I've always loved auctions like winebid.com for the ability to get wines at super, super low prices. My guess is that we may be able to recoup a lot of the money...but most would likely cringe at the idea. Then there's what people pay for storage...that's most likely a total loss unless they have passive storage (less at auction for your wines then) or wine fridges...where we've seen people want to pay only 15-25% of the SSRP when sold.
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#155 Post by Bruce Leiser_owitz » February 19th, 2018, 11:34 am

My wine buying habits have altered radically over the past five years or so, but largely due to market forces. There are far too many wines these days that sell for nosebleed prices on release (First Growths, top-end Burgundy). I can't rationalize paying $$$$$ for something that I "shouldn't" even drink for anther 10+ years.

For those looking to cut back on purchases, the single best advice I can give is to eliminate (or substantially reduce) the number of winery mailing lists you are on. It is far too easy to just keep stockpiling Chateau So-and-so over the years when you get their offers twice or more a year.

Using Cellar Tracker also is very helpful. It allows to see what I've been buying versus what I've been drinking. If my cellar is burgeoning with Croatian sparkling Grk but I haven't opened one in years, then it's time to stop buying sparkling Grk.

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#156 Post by Anton D » February 19th, 2018, 12:03 pm

Craig G wrote:
Anton D wrote:I am planning to buy until age 65, then have enough stock for one bottle per day to 90.
Planning for failure?
Once I hit 90, I'll simply switch to using whatever the Wine Searcher or Winebid of the future will be.

Hmmm, perhaps I should buy until I am 75.
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#157 Post by Eric Ifune » February 19th, 2018, 1:11 pm

I thought I was done. I've been good for the past 4 years or so, but this morning I bought some new release, low production Rhone wine. pileon

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#158 Post by Karl F » February 19th, 2018, 3:22 pm

Do you mean to tell me that there is No Cure for this affliction?

I'm done too in that case.

I even have a case of a 2nd growth Bordeaux 2016 coming next year and the damn wine takes 10 to 15 years before i can even think about drinking it.

sigh...

I'm going to have some lasagna tonight and ponder this question over a glass or two of Rosso di Montalcino. Its a 2013, so I'm doing my part to drinking the younger wines so as to reduce the stockpile.

:P
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#159 Post by Christopher Dunn » February 19th, 2018, 4:48 pm

Ken V wrote:
Christopher Dunn wrote:I am done, too. ....
Was your father Dunn One?

[Sorry, couldn't resist.]

Yes, indeed he was! And when I was a lad and misbehaved at school, my schoolmates would say, "Dunn done what Dunn shouldn't have done"

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#160 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » February 19th, 2018, 4:59 pm

If I done had a pallet of Dunn, i’d be dunner than done. Done set for retirement.

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#161 Post by Ian H » February 19th, 2018, 5:13 pm

Questions for those of you with large cellars and/or buying addictions (not mutually exclusive on this forum...). When you were in the earlier days of building up your cellar, when did your buying go from the random 1-2 bottle odd lots into bigger lots or cases (or was there another path you took)? What did you / do you do with bottles you own that you are no longer excited about ever opening? My cellar is still smallish but I'm already running into that latter issue a tiny bit (hi rando bottles of silver oak and caymus!).
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#162 Post by Richard T r i m p i » February 19th, 2018, 5:58 pm

Ian. After 20+ years of cellaring, 1 - 2 bottle odd lots are still what I buy the most. So much to explore. Rarely a case. I tend to lose interest in many bottles of the same thing. I've spent years culling wines...to the satisfaction of friends and family. There're lots of wine drinkers who'll love your Silver Oak and Caymus. Selling is also an option, just not my thing. I'd probably sing a different tune if my average bottle cost were closer to $400 than $40.

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#163 Post by Ian H » February 19th, 2018, 6:19 pm

Richard T r i m p i wrote:Ian. After 20+ years of cellaring, 1 - 2 bottle odd lots are still what I buy the most. So much to explore. Rarely a case. I tend to lose interest in many bottles of the same thing. I've spent years culling wines...to the satisfaction of friends and family. There're lots of wine drinkers who'll love your Silver Oak and Caymus. Selling is also an option, just not my thing. I'd probably sing a different tune if my average bottle cost were closer to $400 than $40.

RT
Thanks Richard, that is interesting. My buying has been similar to date - I enjoy the slow burn of the individual bottle hunt whether it's a new wine shop or this week's Winebid, or trying a glass I haven't had before at the restaurant that may lead to a bottle purchase. That said if I had a 5,000 bottle cellar at home I'd probably feel inclined to fill it up sooner than later with more cases but unfortunately (or fortunately for wallet) that's not a situation I find myself in.
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#164 Post by Anton D » February 19th, 2018, 6:27 pm

Ian H wrote:Questions for those of you with large cellars and/or buying addictions (not mutually exclusive on this forum...). When you were in the earlier days of building up your cellar, when did your buying go from the random 1-2 bottle odd lots into bigger lots or cases (or was there another path you took)? What did you / do you do with bottles you own that you are no longer excited about ever opening? My cellar is still smallish but I'm already running into that latter issue a tiny bit (hi random bottles of silver oak and caymus!).
My favorite buy number is 3. One to open with no concern regarding anything other than wanting to try it. One to check as I think it's time. One to open when I'm pretty sure it's time and the occasion fits.

I buy full cases of only a few specific wines: Dunn Napa and Howell Mountain cabs, Spottswoode cabs. The rest are all odd assortments, I think.
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#165 Post by Ian H » February 19th, 2018, 6:40 pm

Anton D wrote:
Ian H wrote:Questions for those of you with large cellars and/or buying addictions (not mutually exclusive on this forum...). When you were in the earlier days of building up your cellar, when did your buying go from the random 1-2 bottle odd lots into bigger lots or cases (or was there another path you took)? What did you / do you do with bottles you own that you are no longer excited about ever opening? My cellar is still smallish but I'm already running into that latter issue a tiny bit (hi random bottles of silver oak and caymus!).
My favorite buy number is 3. One to open with no concern regarding anything other than wanting to try it. One to check as I think it's time. One to open when I'm pretty sure it's time and the occasion fits.

I buy full cases of only a few specific wines: Dunn Napa and Howell Mountain cabs, Spottswoode cabs. The rest are all odd assortments, I think.

I like that logic. 2 or 3 gives some flexibility. I find I'll stare at my single bottles and feel less inclined to pull them.
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#166 Post by Ken V » February 19th, 2018, 7:43 pm

Ian H wrote:Questions for those of you with large cellars and/or buying addictions (not mutually exclusive on this forum...). When you were in the earlier days of building up your cellar, when did your buying go from the random 1-2 bottle odd lots into bigger lots or cases (or was there another path you took)? What did you / do you do with bottles you own that you are no longer excited about ever opening? My cellar is still smallish but I'm already running into that latter issue a tiny bit (hi rando bottles of silver oak and caymus!).
Mine is lost in the depths of time. My first case purchase was in 1985 or 1986, a case of 1983 Drouhin red Burgs. For a long time, I would only buy solid cases of every day drinkers. I would buy 4 or 6 of the wines I bought to cellar. Unless it was such a screaming deal, like 1982 Leoville Poyferre for $9 a bottle, then I bought 3 cases (and wish I had bought the other 2 they had). For producers I really like, I would buy 6, then try one. If I thought it was really special, I'd buy more.
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#167 Post by Neal.Mollen » February 20th, 2018, 4:35 am

I have rarely bought more than 3-4 bottles of a particular wine/vintage. I approach it much the way Anton does. I have almost never bought a case of single wine (although I just did buy a case of halves; I don't recall if this is the first wooden OWC bdx case I have ever purchased but it may be)
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#168 Post by James Dennis » February 20th, 2018, 5:16 am

Interesting dialogue and one that it seems many of us struggle with as we are 50+ in age. I have always viewed my wine purchases much like any other retirement-type savings. Not necessarily as an asset, although clearly some of the better bottles have appreciated in value, but more as a preparation for when I no longer have active income. So for me as long as I am hitting my annual targets for retirement plans and 529 contributions and keep the mortgage on pace to be paid off prior to retirement, I don't stress the wine purchases too much from a financial standpoint. The age issue that Neal raises is slowly becoming a bigger issue though as I'm eventually going to run out of space in the cellar for storage. I've never been a huge Bordeaux or Burgundy drinker, but do have a problem with Barolo and Barbaresco now. I think 2015 and 2016 look to be my last years with a year of reflection when the 2014's are released. Hopefully the kids develop a taste for it.

An issue that I don't think has been raised is future downsizing. I hope to travel in my retirement years and will probably want/need to move out of the suburban home when the kids are gone. I guess a two bedroom with one temperature controlled room is an option.

Envoyer is a whole separate problem. Too many emails, too much temptation and too many long conference calls has made for a significant addiction problem. Not sure how to get that monkey off my back short of unsubscribing. This is your fault Howard although you probably aren't even aware of it.

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#169 Post by Howard Cooper » February 20th, 2018, 5:26 am

I also rarely buy more than 3-4 bottles of a wine in a single vintage. However, I do buy a lot of Burgundy and have on occasion bought a mixed case (or close to it) of various wines by a producer in a single vintage. For example, I bought several cases of Truchot in 2003, 2004 and 2005, but not a case of any one wine. More recently, I bought close to a case of Dublere 2015s, going from Bourgogne and Chorey les Beaune for everyday drinkers up to premier crus for aging.
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#170 Post by Howard Cooper » February 20th, 2018, 5:29 am

James Dennis wrote:Interesting dialogue and one that it seems many of us struggle with as we are 50+ in age. I have always viewed my wine purchases much like any other retirement-type savings. Not necessarily as an asset, although clearly some of the better bottles have appreciated in value, but more as a preparation for when I no longer have active income. So for me as long as I am hitting my annual targets for retirement plans and 529 contributions and keep the mortgage on pace to be paid off prior to retirement, I don't stress the wine purchases too much from a financial standpoint. The age issue that Neal raises is slowly becoming a bigger issue though as I'm eventually going to run out of space in the cellar for storage. I've never been a huge Bordeaux or Burgundy drinker, but do have a problem with Barolo and Barbaresco now. I think 2015 and 2016 look to be my last years with a year of reflection when the 2014's are released. Hopefully the kids develop a taste for it.

An issue that I don't think has been raised is future downsizing. I hope to travel in my retirement years and will probably want/need to move out of the suburban home when the kids are gone. I guess a two bedroom with one temperature controlled room is an option.

Envoyer is a whole separate problem. Too many emails, too much temptation and too many long conference calls has made for a significant addiction problem. Not sure how to get that monkey off my back short of unsubscribing. This is your fault Howard although you probably aren't even aware of it.

James
Two shocks in this post. One, I had no idea I influenced your buying. Are you buying Oregon Pinots from Envoyer or have you branched into other things.

But, more significantly, I have always thought of you as very young. I cannot believe that you are 50+. Boy, I am getting old.

Hope to see you again soon.
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#171 Post by Neal.Mollen » February 20th, 2018, 5:37 am

Downsizing is an issue to which I have given some thought, but our house is paid off and it seems unlikely at this point that we would move unless/until infirmity requires it. That (I hope!) is a long way off. We are both still in robust good health and very active.
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#172 Post by Jay Miller » February 20th, 2018, 7:08 am

James Dennis wrote: Envoyer is a whole separate problem. Too many emails, too much temptation and too many long conference calls has made for a significant addiction problem. Not sure how to get that monkey off my back short of unsubscribing.

James
Unsubscribing is the way to do it. Fortunately I figured that out very early on. Far too tempting otherwise.

re selling - it's comforting to know that if it ever became necessary I could sell off all my wine both cutting monthly expenses (storage) and generate money for expenses in retirement. Or if my palate eventually dies I can use the money for something else fun such as a few vacations. Hopefully it won't ever be necessary but it's nice to have the option.
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#173 Post by David Glasser » February 20th, 2018, 8:15 am

How much you'd recoup if you decide to sell is entirely dependent on what you’re selling. I've almost never bought wine with the intention to sell, but I’ve sent wine to auction three times.

First was many years ago, and was mostly cultish Napa cabs I’d over-bought that weren’t aging to my expectations. Made a tidy profit.

Second was when irrational exuberance for first growth Bordeaux peaked, and I found it difficult to open these or to resist the siren call from Asia, so a bunch of firsts went off to auction. Made a tidy profit.

Most recently (fall 2017) was part of a downsizing move. This time I kept the special bottles and sold off a lot of 1s to 4s of solid but far from trophy bottles. So this is probably more typical of the average collector. I recovered about 70% of my costs overall, but Bordeaux seemed to retain more value than Rhone or Napa.

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#174 Post by Neal.Mollen » February 20th, 2018, 8:19 am

I have never bought a wine with investment potential in mind, but I am certainly aware that it could be an asset of some little value to my estate. My goal, of course, is to die with just one bottle left in the cellar -- 2007 CdP en magnum, of course -- but my likely heirs are aware of whom to call to liquidate the liquids if my timing is off in death as much as it has been in life.
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#175 Post by Alan Rath » February 20th, 2018, 9:24 am

Neal.Mollen wrote:Downsizing is an issue to which I have given some thought, but our house is paid off and it seems unlikely at this point that we would move unless/until infirmity requires it. That (I hope!) is a long way off. We are both still in robust good health and very active.
Thread drift, but do think about it. Especially if you live in a multi-story house where it wouldn't be simple to restrict yourself to just one floor if necessary. That's the situation with my in-laws, and it sure would have been nice if they had moved into a smaller, more manageable place earlier on when they could handle it. Now too late, one of them has already had to move to a care facility, and the other is recovering from broken hip, restricted to the ground floor with no shower or kitchen.
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#176 Post by Mike Grammer » February 20th, 2018, 9:34 am

I will note, Neal, that you were already contemplating this last August---I looked up Tran's thread on the same subject and you stated it there. So kudos for following through on your plans. I am sure you have much now in your cellar that you will be able to enjoy for many years to come.

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#177 Post by Jeff Vaughan » February 20th, 2018, 9:46 am

James Dennis wrote:Interesting dialogue and one that it seems many of us struggle with as we are 50+ in age. I have always viewed my wine purchases much like any other retirement-type savings. Not necessarily as an asset, although clearly some of the better bottles have appreciated in value, but more as a preparation for when I no longer have active income. So for me as long as I am hitting my annual targets for retirement plans and 529 contributions and keep the mortgage on pace to be paid off prior to retirement, I don't stress the wine purchases too much from a financial standpoint. The age issue that Neal raises is slowly becoming a bigger issue though as I'm eventually going to run out of space in the cellar for storage.

An issue that I don't think has been raised is future downsizing. I hope to travel in my retirement years and will probably want/need to move out of the suburban home when the kids are gone. I guess a two bedroom with one temperature controlled room is an option.

James
I am 50 and this is the way I think of it as well. Downsizing, both house and cellar, may be an issue for me someday, but I will worry about that when, or if, we move. Ask me again in 6 to 8 years and my answer may be different. I am trying to be much more particular, and it is a daily struggle to fight off impulse purchases.
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#178 Post by Neal.Mollen » February 20th, 2018, 9:49 am

Alan Rath wrote:
Neal.Mollen wrote:Downsizing is an issue to which I have given some thought, but our house is paid off and it seems unlikely at this point that we would move unless/until infirmity requires it. That (I hope!) is a long way off. We are both still in robust good health and very active.
Thread drift, but do think about it. Especially if you live in a multi-story house where it wouldn't be simple to restrict yourself to just one floor if necessary. That's the situation with my in-laws, and it sure would have been nice if they had moved into a smaller, more manageable place earlier on when they could handle it. Now too late, one of them has already had to move to a care facility, and the other is recovering from broken hip, restricted to the ground floor with no shower or kitchen.
We've had this conversation. The very idea of moving is just so exhausting . . . .

It isn't about a smaller house. Our house is small. Not Victor's-apartment-small, but it would probably fit in the servants' quarters or the "summer kitchen" at the Viscount's place. But it is a split, built into the side of a hill, so the mobility issue is real, if a long way off
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#179 Post by David Glasser » February 20th, 2018, 10:43 am

Neal.Mollen wrote:
Alan Rath wrote:
Neal.Mollen wrote:Downsizing is an issue to which I have given some thought, but our house is paid off and it seems unlikely at this point that we would move unless/until infirmity requires it. That (I hope!) is a long way off. We are both still in robust good health and very active.
Thread drift, but do think about it. Especially if you live in a multi-story house where it wouldn't be simple to restrict yourself to just one floor if necessary. That's the situation with my in-laws, and it sure would have been nice if they had moved into a smaller, more manageable place earlier on when they could handle it. Now too late, one of them has already had to move to a care facility, and the other is recovering from broken hip, restricted to the ground floor with no shower or kitchen.
We've had this conversation. The very idea of moving is just so exhausting . . . .

It isn't about a smaller house. Our house is small. Not Victor's-apartment-small, but it would probably fit in the servants' quarters or the "summer kitchen" at the Viscount's place. But it is a split, built into the side of a hill, so the mobility issue is real, if a long way off
It’s wise to at least look at options ahead of time for those potential mobility issues, even though odds are they are a long way off. Problems don’t always announce themselves long before they become limiting. Would it be practical to remodel to a first-floor master or install an elevator? What about a stair lift? Not good for luggage or cases of wine. We figure we’ll still travel even if we end up needing a wheelchair to get on and off the plane. Even if you have a plan, it can take time to complete it, especially if distracted by a significant new physical limitation.

We recently bought a townhouse with this in mind. Still multilevel and not that much smaller than our current place but a perfect floor plan for installing an elevator if necessary without ruining any of the rooms or having to move out during installation. And much less maintenance. We’re making the physical move in about a month, once the renovations are done.

While there is room in the basement for storing 30+ years worth of accumulated stuff, we were relentless about selling, donating or throwing away vast amounts of it. It was difficult and took almost 2 years in planning and execution, but easier to do in stages than all at once. It was harder for my wife than for me, but got easier with each round and ultimately very liberating for both of us. Like dropping off of winery mailing lists.

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#180 Post by Brian G r a f s t r o m » February 20th, 2018, 10:50 am

James Dennis wrote: Envoyer is a whole separate problem. Too many emails, too much temptation and too many long conference calls has made for a significant addiction problem. Not sure how to get that monkey off my back short of unsubscribing. This is your fault Howard although you probably aren't even aware of it.

James
Without knowing if you have already done this ... if you go to Envoyer's website and login to your account, you can see there are multiple different categories of offers, largely organized by region or type. Folks can select the categories for which they want to receive offers. The default setting is probably to receive all offers, so this could be a way to cut back a bit --- you could select only those categories you most want/need and deselect those categories you're not interested in and/or are now trying to avoid.
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#181 Post by Alan Rath » February 20th, 2018, 10:52 am

Neal.Mollen wrote:The very idea of moving is just so exhausting . .
Ha, that's the sign you're past the point of dealing with it in time.

Don't worry, as you consume your wine, you'll eventually get to a point where you can convert your wine cellar into a proper studio, and just live there [wow.gif]
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#182 Post by Bruce Leiser_owitz » February 20th, 2018, 11:12 am

David Glasser wrote: First was many years ago, and was mostly cultish Napa cabs I’d over-bought that weren’t aging to my expectations. Made a tidy profit.
Just out of curiosity, what does an untidy profit look like....?

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#183 Post by Neal.Mollen » February 20th, 2018, 11:13 am

Bruce Leiser_owitz wrote:
David Glasser wrote: First was many years ago, and was mostly cultish Napa cabs I’d over-bought that weren’t aging to my expectations. Made a tidy profit.
Just out of curiosity, what does an untidy profit look like....?

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#184 Post by Ken V » February 20th, 2018, 11:54 am

Alan Rath wrote:
Neal.Mollen wrote:The very idea of moving is just so exhausting . .
Ha, that's the sign you're past the point of dealing with it in time.

Don't worry, as you consume your wine, you'll eventually get to a point where you can convert your wine cellar into a proper studio, and just live there [wow.gif]
We downsized several years ago and didn't consider mobility. We love our current house, but when my wife had foot surgery, we realized this could be an issue. Turns out that in our area, ranch houses have jumped in price per sq ft compared to any other style of house. I guess a lot of baby boomers got the idea before we did. Oh well. Our next move will be to assisted living. Or Italy.
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#185 Post by Bdklein » February 20th, 2018, 12:09 pm

I also think that a part of the equation is you have any heirs, and if they are interested in wine. If not, you are potentially adding a burden to them upon your demise .
Just sayin'.
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#186 Post by jon leifer » February 20th, 2018, 2:04 pm

I have been drinking down my cellar for several years, not replacing any of my cru classe wines or high end rhones,not buying anything that needs even 3-5 yrs aging(Think Bedrock and Carlisle)..Once predominantly red, cellar now about 50-50, probably a combination of drinking down the reds, palate shift and dietary changes......I drink about 3-4 bottles/week, so even if I never buy another bottle(unlikely as i still buy some everyday whites and roses from time to time) I have enough to last about 2-3 yrs..I am closer to 80 yrs of age than I am to 65 so this approach works for me..Neither my wife nor our daughters or our son in law are really into wine. Mortgage was paid off in 2004..
Jon

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#187 Post by James Dennis » February 20th, 2018, 8:36 pm

Howard Cooper wrote:
James Dennis wrote:Interesting dialogue and one that it seems many of us struggle with as we are 50+ in age. I have always viewed my wine purchases much like any other retirement-type savings. Not necessarily as an asset, although clearly some of the better bottles have appreciated in value, but more as a preparation for when I no longer have active income. So for me as long as I am hitting my annual targets for retirement plans and 529 contributions and keep the mortgage on pace to be paid off prior to retirement, I don't stress the wine purchases too much from a financial standpoint. The age issue that Neal raises is slowly becoming a bigger issue though as I'm eventually going to run out of space in the cellar for storage. I've never been a huge Bordeaux or Burgundy drinker, but do have a problem with Barolo and Barbaresco now. I think 2015 and 2016 look to be my last years with a year of reflection when the 2014's are released. Hopefully the kids develop a taste for it.

An issue that I don't think has been raised is future downsizing. I hope to travel in my retirement years and will probably want/need to move out of the suburban home when the kids are gone. I guess a two bedroom with one temperature controlled room is an option.

Envoyer is a whole separate problem. Too many emails, too much temptation and too many long conference calls has made for a significant addiction problem. Not sure how to get that monkey off my back short of unsubscribing. This is your fault Howard although you probably aren't even aware of it.

James
Two shocks in this post. One, I had no idea I influenced your buying. Are you buying Oregon Pinots from Envoyer or have you branched into other things.

But, more significantly, I have always thought of you as very young. I cannot believe that you are 50+. Boy, I am getting old.

Hope to see you again soon.
You probably don't recall it, but after a work meeting you mentioned Envoyer to me in passing. I thank you and curse you at the same time. Perhaps we should grab Neal and do lunch/dinner when time allows and unburden ourselves from some wine. And yes, my palate has evolved quite significantly in the past decade. I think I even have some stuff that you would enjoy.

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#188 Post by James Dennis » February 20th, 2018, 8:38 pm

Brian G r a f s t r o m wrote:
James Dennis wrote: Envoyer is a whole separate problem. Too many emails, too much temptation and too many long conference calls has made for a significant addiction problem. Not sure how to get that monkey off my back short of unsubscribing. This is your fault Howard although you probably aren't even aware of it.

James
Without knowing if you have already done this ... if you go to Envoyer's website and login to your account, you can see there are multiple different categories of offers, largely organized by region or type. Folks can select the categories for which they want to receive offers. The default setting is probably to receive all offers, so this could be a way to cut back a bit --- you could select only those categories you most want/need and deselect those categories you're not interested in and/or are now trying to avoid.
Trust me, I want to do it. Badly want to do it. But just one more week. That's it. After that, I will get off the list forever.

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#189 Post by Jay Miller » February 21st, 2018, 9:16 am

James Dennis wrote:
Trust me, I want to do it. Badly want to do it. But just one more week. That's it. After that, I will get off the list forever.
Very Augustinian of you.
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#190 Post by Dennis Borczon » February 21st, 2018, 9:52 am

You know, every once in awhile WB has a thread that transcends juvenile topics and digs deeper. Sounds like many of us should book a cruise, bring our "end of life" wines while we can still enjoy them, and have discussions about eternity. Now THAT would be something....

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#191 Post by Al Osterheld » February 21st, 2018, 11:55 am

A cruise with all y'all would drive me to drink.

-Al

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#192 Post by Ken V » February 21st, 2018, 12:39 pm

Bdklein wrote:I also think that a part of the equation is you have any heirs, and if they are interested in wine. If not, you are potentially adding a burden to them upon your demise .
Just sayin'.
Yeah! I want to be a burden to my heirs while I'm still alive and can enjoy it!

But seriously, my wife knows who to call to take care of the wine. Getting my fat dead ass out the door might be a bigger burden.
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#193 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » February 21st, 2018, 1:59 pm

Ken V wrote:
Bdklein wrote:I also think that a part of the equation is you have any heirs, and if they are interested in wine. If not, you are potentially adding a burden to them upon your demise .
Just sayin'.
Yeah! I want to be a burden to my heirs while I'm still alive and can enjoy it!

But seriously, my wife knows who to call to take care of the wine. Getting my fat dead ass out the door might be a bigger burden.
That's why there are incinerators.

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#194 Post by Merrill Lindquist » February 21st, 2018, 2:34 pm

I had not checked in here much, but just did so. Wow - let's all get in line for the cemetery!

Just kidding...this week is a beauty for me. Checked in today at the eye surgeon. With 2 glaucoma laser surgeries and 2 cataract surgeries, after all that dilation and measuring today, I am seeing 20/20 in the distance, and confirmed I need reading glasses (which I have). Eye pressures normal now for 6 months. Eye problems seem to have "disappeared," though of course they want to continue to monitor more regularly than I think is necessary (every 3 months?).

But I digress...I must go take the first of my pre-colonoscopy treasures. Tomorrow at 10:00 am I get to pass that hurdle. What a blast!

I don't think about "downsizing" much. I think much more about what I want to do and where and when.
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#195 Post by Merrill Lindquist » February 21st, 2018, 2:38 pm

alan weinberg wrote:
Robert Grenley wrote:63 years old and have lots of Burgundy in the cellar. Some Piemonte, some Northern Rhône, but mostly Burgundy. Some select domestic PN and that keeps my hands off the Burgundy. But drinking the 93’s and 96’s and still waiting for the 99’s, 01’s, and 02’s to come around, let alone the tons of 2005’s and 2010’s. Finally decided that it just makes no sense to keep buying wines at this point. My hobby for so long has been chasing the top wines in the top vintages that it is an adjustment. But I can tell that my outlook is changing. I get so many offers, for 2015 red Burgs for example, that I would have sprung for in the past but that I am deleting. The higher prices are helping me tire of the chase...so many of my favorite producers are absurdly priced now. Ok, I might backfill if I see a good offer at a reasonable price, but that is a bottle here and there.
that62 and same philosophy. Still buying whites but only backfilling reds. The chase is over . . . for the most part.
Because of how I fell into the wine business, and when, I think I never really got the fever to "chase." My cellar is modest, and I buy not to age the wines but to enjoy them. I have enough aged red stuff, but Champagne seems to just disappear here.
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#196 Post by Chris Freemott » February 21st, 2018, 5:59 pm

You just tee this shit up for me don't you Merrill?

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#197 Post by Bill Tex Landreth » February 21st, 2018, 6:02 pm

Chris Freemott wrote:You just tee this shit up for me don't you Merrill?
Just don’t come over the top and skull it like a 2-iron.
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#198 Post by Larry Chmel » February 28th, 2018, 2:19 pm

Anybody else find this thread a little depressing?

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#199 Post by Neal.Mollen » February 28th, 2018, 2:43 pm

Not me!
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#200 Post by ky1em!ttskus » February 28th, 2018, 2:48 pm

Larry Chmel wrote:Anybody else find this thread a little depressing?
You’re welcome here, friend:

https://www.wineberserkers.com/forum/vi ... 1&t=149150

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