It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
Message
Author
User avatar
RichardFlack
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1620
Joined: June 4th, 2012, 10:41 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#951 Post by RichardFlack » May 24th, 2020, 4:52 pm

David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:27 am
Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:04 am
David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:19 am


That's surely distinctly repulsive?
Yes, it is right up there with moist for words that make me cringe... Mercifully moist doesnt come up much in tasting notes
Rory,

I'll remind both my readers in my next note that the wine was "Excitingly moist", just for you!

D.
Struggling to think of a wine that is not moist

User avatar
RichardFlack
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1620
Joined: June 4th, 2012, 10:41 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#952 Post by RichardFlack » May 24th, 2020, 4:56 pm

crickey wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 11:13 am
The one I thought you would flag is the review for the 2018 Wayfarer The Traveler:

"The 2018 Pinot Noir The Traveler is made from a blend of suitcase clones. It is also the most understated of the Pinots in this range. Sweet floral notes, spice, mint, earthiness, anise and blood orange all run through this super-expressive Pinot."

It's both understated and super-expressive.
The others in this range are super duper extra super expressive.

No inconsistency at all. When parsed literally. But taken impressionistically yes contradictory.

Should we have to parse notes super carefully?

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#953 Post by John Morris » May 26th, 2020, 11:37 am

Buns of steel entering the mouth backward and clinging to the palate! Yum! (Click on image to read.)
Attachments
Tanzer  Montebello note.jpg
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#954 Post by John Morris » June 9th, 2020, 4:47 pm

My apologies for falling behind in my posting. In isolation in the wilds, a backlog has accumulated from my favorite sources.

In the "duh" department:
2018 Gilbert Picq - Chablis
"The 2018 Chablis is a gorgeous wine. Floral, bright and delineated with terrific precision, the 2018 is an absolutely village-level wine. Apricot, spice and floral notes are beautifully perfumed in this mid-weight, gracious Chablis. There is so much to like here.” -- Antonio Galloni
Well, yeah. It's, uh, a village Chablis.

(Apricot in a Chablis? Doesn't sound "absolutely" Chablis.)
Last edited by John Morris on June 9th, 2020, 4:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#955 Post by John Morris » June 9th, 2020, 4:55 pm

And, in the expand-your-vocabulary category, there's this from Decanter's Jane Anson. I'm informed (for I certainly didn't know) that "sarments" is French for vine clippings. I guess this is used by people who prefer "pain grille" to "toast." I wonder if James Molesworth can distinguish sarments from his various "singed" woods. And are grilled sarments different from singed sarments? So many questions.
2019 Leoville Poyferre
“A rich and highly charged Poyferré, with creamy damson and vanilla pod spice expanding through the mid palate. Hugely impressive, with velvety tannins and plenty of charcoal, grilled sarments and slate impact. Higher tension through the core would take the score up even further. 4% Cabernet Franc completes the blend.... " -- 96 Points Decanter (Jane Anson)
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#956 Post by John Morris » June 9th, 2020, 5:02 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 4:55 pm
And, in the expand-your-vocabulary category, there's this from Decanter's Jane Anson. I'm informed (for I certainly didn't know) that "sarments" is French for vine clippings. I guess this is used by people who prefer "pain grille" to "toast." I wonder if James Molesworth can distinguish sarments from his various "singed" woods. And are grilled sarments different from singed sarments? So many questions.
2019 Leoville Poyferre
“A rich and highly charged Poyferré, with creamy damson and vanilla pod spice expanding through the mid palate. Hugely impressive, with velvety tannins and plenty of charcoal, grilled sarments and slate impact. Higher tension through the core would take the score up even further. 4% Cabernet Franc completes the blend.... " -- 96 Points, Decanter (Jane Anson)
"Slate impact" is a bit of a puzzler, too.

I've suspected that I could use more tension through my core, but the idea of going to the gym has never appealed to me. And, besides, they're closed now. The thought of doing sit-ups at home is too depressing.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
Tomás Costa
Posts: 200
Joined: April 22nd, 2020, 11:43 am

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#957 Post by Tomás Costa » June 9th, 2020, 5:11 pm

My dad is a wine critic and I think 90% of his reviews of wines he liked have the words 'beautiful acidity' written in (closer to 100% in whites).

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#958 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 9th, 2020, 5:13 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 4:55 pm
2019 Leoville Poyferre
“A rich and highly charged (uber-ripe and toasty) Poyferré, with creamy damson (low avoid, over-ripe jammy plums) and vanilla pod (toasted, smoky oak) spice expanding through the mid palate. Hugely impressive, with velvety tannins and plenty of charcoal (burnt or toasted something), grilled sarments (more wood toast?) and slate impact. Higher tension through the core would take the score up even further (meaning, it’s low acid now?). 4% Cabernet Franc completes the blend.... " -- 96 Points Decanter (Jane Anson)
Alfert interpretation.
Last edited by Robert.A.Jr. on June 9th, 2020, 5:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#959 Post by John Morris » June 9th, 2020, 5:15 pm

Tomás Costa wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 5:11 pm
My dad is a wine critic and I think 90% of his reviews of wines he liked have the words 'beautiful acidity' written in (closer to 100% in whites).
I don't have a problem with that. Some things need to be said of many, many wines. Better to keep it simple like that than to use overly florid phrases.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#960 Post by John Morris » June 9th, 2020, 5:18 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 5:13 pm
John Morris wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 4:55 pm
2019 Leoville Poyferre
“A rich and highly charged (uber-ripe and toasty) Poyferré, with creamy damson (low avoid, over-ripe jammy plums) and vanilla pod (toasted, smoky oak) spice expanding through the mid palate. Hugely impressive, with velvety tannins and plenty of charcoal (burnt or tasted something), grilled sarments (more wood toast?) and slate impact. Higher tension through the core would take the score up even further (meaning, it’s low acid now?). 4% Cabernet Franc completes the blend.... " -- 96 Points Decanter (Jane Anson)
Alfert interpretation.
What, do you have the Decanter decoder ring, or something?
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#961 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 9th, 2020, 5:20 pm

Doesn’t the interpretation make total sense?

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#962 Post by John Morris » June 9th, 2020, 5:34 pm

Hence my comment. You cracked the code!
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#963 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 9th, 2020, 5:38 pm

I am in touch with my inner-Rolland.

He’s like the devil on my shoulder from that classic Animal House scene.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

crickey
Posts: 516
Joined: August 3rd, 2009, 2:59 pm

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#964 Post by crickey » June 9th, 2020, 6:22 pm

I was trying in another thread to call your attention to this gem from AG:

"A positively gorgeous, sumptuous wine, the 2019 Pontet-Canet is explosive right out of the glass. Layers of richness and pure textural intensity give the wine its statuesque build and a good deal of gravitas to match. Floral and savory accents appear later, adding layers of dimension that play off the natural radiance of the year."

"Layers of dimension": I'm almost certain he was trolling you.
Last edited by crickey on June 10th, 2020, 5:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
Chri$ Ri¢k€y

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#965 Post by John Morris » June 9th, 2020, 6:27 pm

Damn! I missed that one!

(So much huffing and puffing!)

If you don't have "explosive" and "gravitas" on your bingo card, you're really not in contention. "Has so much to say" and "expressive" are updates you should install to stay current.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

crickey
Posts: 516
Joined: August 3rd, 2009, 2:59 pm

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#966 Post by crickey » June 10th, 2020, 5:20 am

You would have had to been a subscriber. The note wasn't formally published; he put the note in a thread on his discussion board.
Chri$ Ri¢k€y

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#967 Post by John Morris » June 10th, 2020, 5:45 am

crickey wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 5:20 am
You would have had to been a subscriber. The note wasn't formally published; he put the note in a thread on his discussion board.
With the lure of gems like that, it’s almost tempting to subscribe.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#968 Post by John Morris » June 10th, 2020, 6:03 am

It's hard to know where to start with this note on the 2019 Cos d'Estournel, there are so many clunky and incongruent terms and phrases.

Recall LPB's preoccupation with Black Forest cake notes (see post #825) and cast iron pans (post #568).

Built like a skyscraper?!?

Grainy tannins and seamless freshness??

Juxtaposition between (it should be "of") heat and "hallelujah moments" of rain. Ouch.
. . . Medium to deep garnet-purple colored, the 2019 Cos d'Estournel soars out of the glass with vibrant black raspberries, Black Forest cake and crushed blackcurrants scents plus nuances of red roses, wild sage, dark chocolate and cast-iron pan with a waft of woodsmoke. The medium to full-bodied palate is taut, muscular and built like a skyscraper, with firm, grainy tannins and seamless freshness supporting the concentrated black fruit flavors, finishing with incredible length and depth. This wine so beautifully, clearly captures the juxtaposition between the periods of dry heat and those hallelujah moments of refreshing rain - the hallmarks of this great vintage. It's a vinous masterpiece in the making. -- 97-99+ points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, The Wine Advocate
Suckling, meanwhile, describes the wine as "a classic wine with historical grip and power. Real Bordeaux. Sophisticated and provocative."

"Historical grip and power" brings to mind Roman emperors and great kings.

It's also a bit hard to square LPB's Black Forest cake with Suckling's "sophisticated" "real Bordeaux."

Finally, what makes a wine provocative?
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

Jonathan Loesberg
Posts: 1851
Joined: April 27th, 2010, 5:59 am

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#969 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » June 10th, 2020, 8:38 am

John Morris wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 6:03 am
It's hard to know where to start with this note on the 2019 Cos d'Estournel, there are so many clunky and incongruent terms and phrases.

Recall LPB's preoccupation with Black Forest cake notes (see post #825) and cast iron pans (post #568).

Built like a skyscraper?!?

Grainy tannins and seamless freshness??

Juxtaposition between (it should be "of") heat and "hallelujah moments" of rain. Ouch.
. . . Medium to deep garnet-purple colored, the 2019 Cos d'Estournel soars out of the glass with vibrant black raspberries, Black Forest cake and crushed blackcurrants scents plus nuances of red roses, wild sage, dark chocolate and cast-iron pan with a waft of woodsmoke. The medium to full-bodied palate is taut, muscular and built like a skyscraper, with firm, grainy tannins and seamless freshness supporting the concentrated black fruit flavors, finishing with incredible length and depth. This wine so beautifully, clearly captures the juxtaposition between the periods of dry heat and those hallelujah moments of refreshing rain - the hallmarks of this great vintage. It's a vinous masterpiece in the making. -- 97-99+ points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, The Wine Advocate
Suckling, meanwhile, describes the wine as "a classic wine with historical grip and power. Real Bordeaux. Sophisticated and provocative."

"Historical grip and power" brings to mind Roman emperors and great kings.

It's also a bit hard to square LPB's Black Forest cake with Suckling's "sophisticated" "real Bordeaux."

Finally, what makes a wine provocative?
It's got skimpily dressed acids and tannin straps hanging low off the shoulders.

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#970 Post by John Morris » June 10th, 2020, 8:49 am

So you got a Suckling decoder ring. Congrats! You and Alfert should compare notes.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Kight
Posts: 754
Joined: September 7th, 2009, 5:45 pm
Location: Dallas, Tx

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#971 Post by John Kight » June 10th, 2020, 11:44 am

I know that a certain wine "emerges from the glass", "springs from the glass", "leaps from the glass", or even "literally explodes from the glass". For example, according to the Wine Advocate, "The NV [Clouet] Grand Cru Cuvee 1911 emerges from the glass with the most haunting of perfumes", while according to Galloni, the Il Poggione 2007 Vigna Paganelli Riserva Brunello "literally explodes from the glass."

Presumably it is actually the nose/smell of the wine that does these things, unless the bottle has undergone secondary fermentation. But what else can a wine do from the glass? Can it "peek" or "peer" from the glass? Can it "luxuriate in the glass"? Does it imply less than 90 points if it simply "remains in the glass" (until it is poured into your mouth)?

User avatar
William Kelley
Posts: 2075
Joined: June 4th, 2014, 1:36 am
Location: London, Calistoga & Beaune

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#972 Post by William Kelley » June 10th, 2020, 12:22 pm

John Kight wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 11:44 am
I know that a certain wine "emerges from the glass", "springs from the glass", "leaps from the glass", or even "literally explodes from the glass". For example, according to the Wine Advocate, "The NV [Clouet] Grand Cru Cuvee 1911 emerges from the glass with the most haunting of perfumes", while according to Galloni, the Il Poggione 2007 Vigna Paganelli Riserva Brunello "literally explodes from the glass."

Presumably it is actually the nose/smell of the wine that does these things, unless the bottle has undergone secondary fermentation. But what else can a wine do from the glass? Can it "peek" or "peer" from the glass? Can it "luxuriate in the glass"? Does it imply less than 90 points if it simply "remains in the glass" (until it is poured into your mouth)?
I hear you; but equally, speaking as someone who does this for a living (and who has been know to write "wafts from the glass"), do have pity on the poor critic 700 wines into an 800-wine report, desperately searching for ways to say the same thing differently!
The Wine Advocate

Jonathan Loesberg
Posts: 1851
Joined: April 27th, 2010, 5:59 am

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#973 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » June 10th, 2020, 12:50 pm

If instead of "wine," the subject were "smell," or to maintain winespeak, "perfume," all that verbal hopping about would be just the kind of metaphorical verb use one advises in beginning journalism class rather than highly intriguing physics.

User avatar
Marcu$ Stanley
Posts: 1235
Joined: November 1st, 2010, 3:31 pm

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#974 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » June 10th, 2020, 1:34 pm

The 2019 Pavie is a blend of 50% Merlot, 32% Cabernet Franc and 18% Cabernet Sauvignon, harvested from the 30th of September to the 11th of October. The yields this year were 35 hectoliters per hectare, and the alcohol came in at 14.73%, while the pH was 3.55 (remarkably low!). Very deep garnet-purple in color, the nose opens with a beguiling array of intertwined earth and black fruit scents: baked plums, black cherry preserves, tilled soil, black truffles, mossy tree bark and mulberries with nuances of allspice, clove oil, espresso and cedar chest. Full-bodied, densely packed and with a rock-solid structure, the constrained flavor layers are just waiting to explode; it's framed by firm, exquisitely ripe, rounded tannins and this vineyard's signature freshness, finishing with epic length and depth. Quaking with latent power and shimmering with a kaleidoscope of electric flavors, this could only be Pavie.

Score: 97/100 Lisa Perrotti-Brown MW, RobertParker.com, June 2020
This wine is just sitting there quaking and waiting to explode, at which point it will shower the room with clods of earth, bark, mushrooms, and jam.

That last line is classic in that it truly breaks new ground in wine criticism, I'm not sure I've ever seen that exact descriptor in any wine note before, which is a real accomplishment!

User avatar
Brandon R
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1611
Joined: November 10th, 2015, 5:07 pm

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#975 Post by Brandon R » June 10th, 2020, 1:56 pm

Having very recently used my cast iron pan, I can certainly attest that it does have a distinct smell. It's a metallic smell, but with a smoking cooking oil scent intertwined as well. So, when the above-mentioned reviewer uses, "cast iron pan," I can certainly imagine smelling that in a wine.
B. Redman

Jayson Cohen
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2286
Joined: July 9th, 2016, 4:29 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#976 Post by Jayson Cohen » June 10th, 2020, 4:13 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 5:13 pm
John Morris wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 4:55 pm
2019 Leoville Poyferre
“A rich and highly charged (uber-ripe and toasty) Poyferré, with creamy damson (low avoid, over-ripe jammy plums) and vanilla pod (toasted, smoky oak) spice expanding through the mid palate. Hugely impressive, with velvety tannins and plenty of charcoal (burnt or toasted something), grilled sarments (more wood toast?) and slate impact. Higher tension through the core would take the score up even further (meaning, it’s low acid now?). 4% Cabernet Franc completes the blend.... " -- 96 Points Decanter (Jane Anson)
Alfert interpretation.
I got a 2019 EP offer a couple days ago where LP was cheaper than Beychevelle per bottle. Here we are 20+ years after (previously beloved) LP went spoofy, and I’d be interested to Know whether that has paid off in $$ terms overall for the chateau.

Jayson Cohen
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2286
Joined: July 9th, 2016, 4:29 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#977 Post by Jayson Cohen » June 10th, 2020, 4:20 pm

Jonathan Loesberg wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 12:50 pm
If instead of "wine," the subject were "smell," or to maintain winespeak, "perfume," all that verbal hopping about would be just the kind of metaphorical verb use one advises in beginning journalism class rather than highly intriguing physics.
You rang?

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#978 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 10th, 2020, 5:25 pm

Jayson Cohen wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 4:13 pm
Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 5:13 pm
John Morris wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 4:55 pm

Alfert interpretation.
I got a 2019 EP offer a couple days ago where LP was cheaper than Beychevelle per bottle. Here we are 20+ years after (previously beloved) LP went spoofy, and I’d be interested to Know whether that has paid off in $$ terms overall for the chateau.
Which, of course, is irrelevant to us. Beychevelle all day long.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

User avatar
Keith Levenberg
Posts: 5528
Joined: June 6th, 2009, 3:11 pm
Location: Washington, D.C.

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#979 Post by Keith Levenberg » June 12th, 2020, 3:40 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 6:03 am
It's hard to know where to start with this note on the 2019 Cos d'Estournel, there are so many clunky and incongruent terms and phrases.

Recall LPB's preoccupation with Black Forest cake notes (see post #825) and cast iron pans (post #568).

Built like a skyscraper?!?

Grainy tannins and seamless freshness??

Juxtaposition between (it should be "of") heat and "hallelujah moments" of rain. Ouch.
. . . Medium to deep garnet-purple colored, the 2019 Cos d'Estournel soars out of the glass with vibrant black raspberries, Black Forest cake and crushed blackcurrants scents plus nuances of red roses, wild sage, dark chocolate and cast-iron pan with a waft of woodsmoke. The medium to full-bodied palate is taut, muscular and built like a skyscraper, with firm, grainy tannins and seamless freshness supporting the concentrated black fruit flavors, finishing with incredible length and depth. This wine so beautifully, clearly captures the juxtaposition between the periods of dry heat and those hallelujah moments of refreshing rain - the hallmarks of this great vintage. It's a vinous masterpiece in the making. -- 97-99+ points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, The Wine Advocate
Suckling, meanwhile, describes the wine as "a classic wine with historical grip and power. Real Bordeaux. Sophisticated and provocative."

"Historical grip and power" brings to mind Roman emperors and great kings.

It's also a bit hard to square LPB's Black Forest cake with Suckling's "sophisticated" "real Bordeaux."

Finally, what makes a wine provocative?
I'm just worried about getting hit in the head by that cast-iron pan soaring out of the glass. Sounds dangerous.

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#980 Post by John Morris » June 13th, 2020, 10:44 am

John Kight wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 11:44 am
I know that a certain wine "emerges from the glass", "springs from the glass", "leaps from the glass", or even "literally explodes from the glass". For example, according to the Wine Advocate, "The NV [Clouet] Grand Cru Cuvee 1911 emerges from the glass with the most haunting of perfumes", while according to Galloni, the Il Poggione 2007 Vigna Paganelli Riserva Brunello "literally explodes from the glass."

Presumably it is actually the nose/smell of the wine that does these things, unless the bottle has undergone secondary fermentation. But what else can a wine do from the glass? Can it "peek" or "peer" from the glass? Can it "luxuriate in the glass"? Does it imply less than 90 points if it simply "remains in the glass" (until it is poured into your mouth)?
How do you feel about it "going atomic":
2019 Chateau Haut Brion
97-99+ pts, WA
The 2019 Haut-Brion is a blend of 48.7% Merlot, 43.2% Cabernet Sauvignon and 8.1% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 10th of September to the 3rd of October. The estimated label alcohol degree is 14.5%. Displaying a deep garnet-purple color, it comes off incredibly shy and reticent to begin, needing considerable coaxing to reveal notes of dark chocolate-covered cherries, blackberry preserves, woodsmoke and sandalwood, before launching into a full-scale fireworks display of iron ore, cumin seed, redcurrant jelly, red roses, oolong tea and Sichuan pepper scents plus a waft of cardamom. The medium to full-bodied palate delivers the most exquisitely ripe, finely grained tannins with a lively backbone of freshness supporting the tightly wound, earth-laced black fruit layers, finishing very long and minerally. This is one of the most finely structured, tightly knit wines of the vintage. Given time, I wouldn't be at all surprised if it goes atomic and eventually takes top place for the vintage. -- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
Warning: It sounds like, if it does that, it will obliterate all other '19s.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#981 Post by John Morris » June 13th, 2020, 10:52 am

Bingo bonus points here, there are so many cliches. However, "provocatively graceful" is new, I think. Whatever that means.
2019 Chateau La Mission Haut Brion
The 2019 La Mission Haut-Brion is composed of 53% Merlot, 39.5% Cabernet Sauvignon and 7.5% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 11th of September to the 2nd of October. The estimated label alcohol degree is 14.5%. Very deep purple-black in color, it slowly unfurls in the glass to reveal a beguiling perfume of violets, Black Forest cake, wild blueberries and kirsch with nuances of star anise, cast-iron pan, pencil lead and crushed rocks plus a waft of wild sage. The full-bodied palate is densely laden with layers of black fruit, earth and floral-laced flavors, framed by exquisitely ripe, finely grained tannins and compelling freshness, finishing with great length and loads of mineral sparks. A wine of impeccable breeding, both decadently flamboyant and provocatively graceful, this is already a prodigious wine of indisputable beauty. -- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
  • Note the use of both "unfurl" as a verb and "waft" as a noun!
  • More Black Forest cake!
  • Another one of those cast-iron pans. Very popular utensil.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#982 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 13th, 2020, 10:53 am

John Morris wrote:
June 13th, 2020, 10:44 am
2019 Chateau Haut Brion
97-99+ pts, WA
The 2019 Haut-Brion is a blend of 48.7% Merlot, 43.2% Cabernet Sauvignon and 8.1% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 10th of September to the 3rd of October. The estimated label alcohol degree is 14.5%. Displaying a deep garnet-purple color, it comes off incredibly shy and reticent to begin, needing considerable coaxing to reveal notes of dark chocolate-covered cherries, blackberry preserves, woodsmoke and sandalwood, before launching into a full-scale fireworks display of iron ore, cumin seed, redcurrant jelly, red roses, oolong tea and Sichuan pepper scents plus a waft of cardamom. The medium to full-bodied palate delivers the most exquisitely ripe, finely grained tannins with a lively backbone of freshness supporting the tightly wound, earth-laced black fruit layers, finishing very long and minerally. This is one of the most finely structured, tightly knit wines of the vintage. Given time, I wouldn't be at all surprised if it goes atomic and eventually takes top place for the vintage. -- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
Warning: It sounds like, if it does that, it will obliterate all other '19s.
Shy, but fireworks. Tightly knit, but atomic. Fresh, but 14.5% and jammy. Toss in some chocolates. Sounds like a mess, but it is more likely her note. Stunned with all those superlatives and sweet notes, she did not use her coin-phrase, “black forrest cake”.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#983 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 13th, 2020, 10:54 am

John Morris wrote:
June 13th, 2020, 10:52 am
Bingo bonus points here, there are so many cliches. However, "provocatively graceful" is new, I think. Whatever that means.
2019 Chateau La Mission Haut Brion
The 2019 La Mission Haut-Brion is composed of 53% Merlot, 39.5% Cabernet Sauvignon and 7.5% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 11th of September to the 2nd of October. The estimated label alcohol degree is 14.5%. Very deep purple-black in color, it slowly unfurls in the glass to reveal a beguiling perfume of violets, Black Forest cake, wild blueberries and kirsch with nuances of star anise, cast-iron pan, pencil lead and crushed rocks plus a waft of wild sage. The full-bodied palate is densely laden with layers of black fruit, earth and floral-laced flavors, framed by exquisitely ripe, finely grained tannins and compelling freshness, finishing with great length and loads of mineral sparks. A wine of impeccable breeding, both decadently flamboyant and provocatively graceful, this is already a prodigious wine of indisputable beauty. -- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
  • Note the use of both "unfurl" as a verb and "waft" as a noun!
  • More Black Forest cake!
  • Another one of those cast-iron pans. Very popular utensil.

DING DING DING

[winner.gif] [winner.gif]

See above!

Next will be “Black Forest Pancake”.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#984 Post by John Morris » June 13th, 2020, 10:59 am

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 13th, 2020, 10:53 am
John Morris wrote:
June 13th, 2020, 10:44 am
2019 Chateau Haut Brion
97-99+ pts, WA
The 2019 Haut-Brion is a blend of 48.7% Merlot, 43.2% Cabernet Sauvignon and 8.1% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 10th of September to the 3rd of October. The estimated label alcohol degree is 14.5%. Displaying a deep garnet-purple color, it comes off incredibly shy and reticent to begin, needing considerable coaxing to reveal notes of dark chocolate-covered cherries, blackberry preserves, woodsmoke and sandalwood, before launching into a full-scale fireworks display of iron ore, cumin seed, redcurrant jelly, red roses, oolong tea and Sichuan pepper scents plus a waft of cardamom. The medium to full-bodied palate delivers the most exquisitely ripe, finely grained tannins with a lively backbone of freshness supporting the tightly wound, earth-laced black fruit layers, finishing very long and minerally. This is one of the most finely structured, tightly knit wines of the vintage. Given time, I wouldn't be at all surprised if it goes atomic and eventually takes top place for the vintage. -- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
Warning: It sounds like, if it does that, it will obliterate all other '19s.
Shy, but fireworks. Tightly knit, but atomic. Fresh, but 14.5% and jammy. Toss in some chocolates. Sounds like a mess, but it is more likely her note. Stunned with all those superlatives and sweet notes, she did not use her coin-phrase, “black forrest cake”.
She's just trying to make sure that this note wasn't the one that put someone over the edge to win at bingo. Got to keep some suspense in the contest.

"Fireworks" and "atomic" are substitutes for "explosive," I guess.
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
RichardFlack
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1620
Joined: June 4th, 2012, 10:41 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#985 Post by RichardFlack » June 13th, 2020, 6:23 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 4:47 pm
My apologies for falling behind in my posting. In isolation in the wilds, a backlog has accumulated from my favorite sources.

In the "duh" department:
2018 Gilbert Picq - Chablis
"The 2018 Chablis is a gorgeous wine. Floral, bright and delineated with terrific precision, the 2018 is an absolutely village-level wine. Apricot, spice and floral notes are beautifully perfumed in this mid-weight, gracious Chablis. There is so much to like here.” -- Antonio Galloni
Well, yeah. It's, uh, a village Chablis.

(Apricot in a Chablis? Doesn't sound "absolutely" Chablis.)
At least it had precise flowers.
Bottom line this doesnt really sound like Chablis. FaFail for the wine or for the writer?

User avatar
RichardFlack
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1620
Joined: June 4th, 2012, 10:41 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#986 Post by RichardFlack » June 13th, 2020, 6:36 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 4:55 pm
And, in the expand-your-vocabulary category, there's this from Decanter's Jane Anson. I'm informed (for I certainly didn't know) that "sarments" is French for vine clippings. I guess this is used by people who prefer "pain grille" to "toast." I wonder if James Molesworth can distinguish sarments from his various "singed" woods. And are grilled sarments different from singed sarments? So many questions.
2019 Leoville Poyferre
“A rich and highly charged Poyferré, with creamy damson and vanilla pod spice expanding through the mid palate. Hugely impressive, with velvety tannins and plenty of charcoal, grilled sarments and slate impact. Higher tension through the core would take the score up even further. 4% Cabernet Franc completes the blend.... " -- 96 Points Decanter (Jane Anson)
Grilled sarments and slate. Wow.

User avatar
RichardFlack
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 1620
Joined: June 4th, 2012, 10:41 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#987 Post by RichardFlack » June 13th, 2020, 6:42 pm

D@vid Bu3ker wrote:
March 17th, 2020, 10:19 am
John Morris wrote:
March 17th, 2020, 7:47 am
This Molesworth guy needs to stand further back from the flames. Too much singeing.
2016 Groth Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve
WS 96 "This delivers a very tightly focused, almost piercing beam of cassis, raspberry coulis and bitter cherry fruit, scored with singed alder and iron notes. Incense and tobacco details."-James Molesworth
The Berserker crowd is getting into it as well. "Melted raisins" came up in a note the other day. Granted it was for a Port, but still. How does one melt a raisin?
Soak in brandy and light.
(Childhood Christmas memory)

Lee Barnard
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 167
Joined: January 11th, 2018, 11:26 am
Location: Chadds Ford, PA

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#988 Post by Lee Barnard » June 13th, 2020, 7:07 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 13th, 2020, 10:54 am
John Morris wrote:
June 13th, 2020, 10:52 am
Bingo bonus points here, there are so many cliches. However, "provocatively graceful" is new, I think. Whatever that means.
2019 Chateau La Mission Haut Brion
The 2019 La Mission Haut-Brion is composed of 53% Merlot, 39.5% Cabernet Sauvignon and 7.5% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 11th of September to the 2nd of October. The estimated label alcohol degree is 14.5%. Very deep purple-black in color, it slowly unfurls in the glass to reveal a beguiling perfume of violets, Black Forest cake, wild blueberries and kirsch with nuances of star anise, cast-iron pan, pencil lead and crushed rocks plus a waft of wild sage. The full-bodied palate is densely laden with layers of black fruit, earth and floral-laced flavors, framed by exquisitely ripe, finely grained tannins and compelling freshness, finishing with great length and loads of mineral sparks. A wine of impeccable breeding, both decadently flamboyant and provocatively graceful, this is already a prodigious wine of indisputable beauty. -- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
  • Note the use of both "unfurl" as a verb and "waft" as a noun!
  • More Black Forest cake!
  • Another one of those cast-iron pans. Very popular utensil.

DING DING DING

[winner.gif] [winner.gif]

See above!

Next will be “Black Forest Pancake”.
I think we already have it? When a Black Forest cake and a cast-iron pan really love each other, you get an impeccably bred Black Forest pancake?

Jürgen Steinke
Posts: 1223
Joined: September 30th, 2009, 6:28 am

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#989 Post by Jürgen Steinke » June 14th, 2020, 2:10 am

Way too often the notes sound more like a marketing text than a review of a critic.

R. Somerville
Posts: 278
Joined: December 28th, 2011, 8:12 am

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#990 Post by R. Somerville » June 14th, 2020, 3:43 am

Criticality
Critical mass - if you're going nuclear! cheesehead

Andrew M
Posts: 166
Joined: July 4th, 2019, 8:14 pm
Location: Richmond, VA

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#991 Post by Andrew M » June 14th, 2020, 8:06 am

I made a point to smell my cast iron pan this morning while doing dishes. It was definitely unique, but nothing I’ve ever picked up in a wine before, even with all the Barolo that are rightfully described as having a ferrous quality. Must be a 2019 thing.
M @ k $ ! m ø v ! ç

Jayson Cohen
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 2286
Joined: July 9th, 2016, 4:29 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#992 Post by Jayson Cohen » June 14th, 2020, 8:17 am

John Morris wrote:
June 13th, 2020, 10:52 am
Bingo bonus points here, there are so many cliches. However, "provocatively graceful" is new, I think. Whatever that means.
2019 Chateau La Mission Haut Brion
The 2019 La Mission Haut-Brion is composed of 53% Merlot, 39.5% Cabernet Sauvignon and 7.5% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 11th of September to the 2nd of October. The estimated label alcohol degree is 14.5%. Very deep purple-black in color, it slowly unfurls in the glass to reveal a beguiling perfume of violets, Black Forest cake, wild blueberries and kirsch with nuances of star anise, cast-iron pan, pencil lead and crushed rocks plus a waft of wild sage. The full-bodied palate is densely laden with layers of black fruit, earth and floral-laced flavors, framed by exquisitely ripe, finely grained tannins and compelling freshness, finishing with great length and loads of mineral sparks. A wine of impeccable breeding, both decadently flamboyant and provocatively graceful, this is already a prodigious wine of indisputable beauty. -- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
  • Note the use of both "unfurl" as a verb and "waft" as a noun!
  • More Black Forest cake!
  • Another one of those cast-iron pans. Very popular utensil.
John, I’m not defending this note generally.but what is wrong with “unfurl” as a verb?

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#993 Post by John Morris » June 14th, 2020, 8:32 am

I have no objection to it at all. That was a reference to the exchange above at posts 971 and 972 between John Kight and William Kelley about verbs that attribute an action on the part of a wine's aroma. Clearly, she's trying to avoid repetition of "waft."
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#994 Post by John Morris » June 14th, 2020, 8:33 am

Jürgen Steinke wrote:
June 14th, 2020, 2:10 am
Way too often the notes sound more like a marketing text than a review of a critic.
Indeed!
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
David Strange
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 956
Joined: January 20th, 2010, 4:52 am
Location: Winchester, England

Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#995 Post by David Strange » June 15th, 2020, 5:08 am

Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 7:12 pm
David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:27 am
Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:04 am


Yes, it is right up there with moist for words that make me cringe... Mercifully moist doesnt come up much in tasting notes
Rory,

I'll remind both my readers in my next note that the wine was "Excitingly moist", just for you!

D.
And snot-loads of fruit, please
Not exactly in the tasting notes, but I have used moist and snot in an article:

http://elitistreview.com/2020/06/15/from-heavento-hell/

D.
Elitistreview.com - Demented despatches on lubricious libations and felicific foods.

User avatar
John Morris
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 17777
Joined: June 21st, 2009, 2:09 pm
Location: Gotham

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#996 Post by John Morris » June 15th, 2020, 8:16 am

John Kight wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 11:44 am
I know that a certain wine "emerges from the glass", "springs from the glass", "leaps from the glass", or even "literally explodes from the glass". For example, according to the Wine Advocate, "The NV [Clouet] Grand Cru Cuvee 1911 emerges from the glass with the most haunting of perfumes", while according to Galloni, the Il Poggione 2007 Vigna Paganelli Riserva Brunello "literally explodes from the glass."

.... But what else can a wine do from the glass? Can it "peek" or "peer" from the glass? Can it "luxuriate in the glass"? Does it imply less than 90 points if it simply "remains in the glass" (until it is poured into your mouth)?
How do you feel about graceful prancing? That's slightly short of provocatively graceful prancing, I guess.
The 2019 Figeac is composed of 30% Merlot, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 36% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 13th of September to the 7th of October. The alcohol this year is 14.1% and the pH is 3.7. Steal-your-heart scents of mulberries, black raspberries, Black Forest cake and cassis prance ever so gracefully out of the glass, followed by nuances of plum preserves, red roses, cinnamon toast and clove oil plus just a waft of lavender. Medium to full-bodied, the palate shimmers with electric energy, framed by a solid backbone of wonderfully ripe, grainy Cabernet-led tannins and bold freshness, finishing with fantastic persistence and with tons of emerging earth and floral layers. This is a simply stunning, seemingly effortless, beautifully harmonious expression of the vineyard and the vintage - bravo!
Perhaps someone can advise me how the Figeac, which "shimmers with electric energy," stacks up against the Pavie, "quaking with latent power and shimmering with a kaleidoscope of electric flavors." Is one 110V/60Hz while the other is 220V/50Hz?

(I'm beginning to buy into the suggestion that she's trolling us.)
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

User avatar
Howard Cooper
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 18867
Joined: May 30th, 2009, 8:37 am
Location: Rockville, MD

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#997 Post by Howard Cooper » June 15th, 2020, 8:29 am

I must admit that some of these notes make me never want to taste a bottle of Bordeaux again.
Howard

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! (those talkative Barolos!)

#998 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 15th, 2020, 8:34 am

John Morris wrote:
June 15th, 2020, 8:16 am
The 2019 Figeac is composed of 30% Merlot, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 36% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 13th of September to the 7th of October. The alcohol this year is 14.1% and the pH is 3.7. Steal-your-heart scents of mulberries, black raspberries, Black Forest cake and cassis prance ever so gracefully out of the glass, followed by nuances of plum preserves, red roses, cinnamon toast and clove oil plus just a waft of lavender. Medium to full-bodied, the palate shimmers with electric energy, framed by a solid backbone of wonderfully ripe, grainy Cabernet-led tannins and bold freshness, finishing with fantastic persistence and with tons of emerging earth and floral layers. This is a simply stunning, seemingly effortless, beautifully harmonious expression of the vineyard and the vintage - bravo!
Perhaps someone can advise me how the Figeac, which "shimmers with electric energy," stacks up against the Pavie, "quaking with latent power and shimmering with a kaleidoscope of electric flavors." Is one 110V/60Hz while the other is 220V/50Hz?

(I'm beginning to buy into the suggestion that she's trolling us.)
It's the Rolland formula. Make wine-cake. Get 99-100 points. Get a bump up the vaunted St Em Classification. Make money. Boom.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#999 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 15th, 2020, 8:38 am

Not to pick in my friend, Leve, but alas, I must.

This is no longer Figeac:
Beautifully dark, almost purple/garnet in color, the wine gets you going with its nose of flowers, blackberry, dark plums, spice, smoke, vanilla, cherries, licorice and tobacco leaf. As good as that is, when the wine hits your palate, the show starts with its majestic textures. Voluptuous, opulent and silky, the wine seeks attention, but it's not loud, it's discreet. Classic and yet, voluminous, the flamboyant palate-coating finish, with its multiple layers of fruit stays with you for close to 60 seconds. The wine was made from a classic blend of 36% Cabernet Franc, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 30% Merlot reaching 14.1% alcohol with a pH of 3.7 and is aging in 100% new, French oak barrels
Read more at:https://www.thewinecellarinsider.com/bo ... on/figeac/
He will say it is a much better wine than ever before. Certainly scores out that way among the critics. But, I ask you, does it sound like the once-classic Figeac or Rolland's work on the Ovid Hexameter?

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

User avatar
Robert.A.Jr.
GCC Member
GCC Member
Posts: 23441
Joined: January 28th, 2010, 5:03 am
Location: Orlando, Florida

Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1000 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 15th, 2020, 8:45 am

LOL, to link up my post to John's, I googled some TWA notes on the 2016 Ovid Hexameter, and we get Lisa's ubiquitous "Black Forest Cake" note.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

Post Reply

Return to “Wine Talk”