It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
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crickey
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#901 Post by crickey » January 17th, 2020, 11:07 am

John Morris wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 7:56 am
One hopes a wine is vinous.

What's with the "scented yet silky"? What's the inconsistency between scented and silky?

And minerality has now become a structural element (a spine), as opposed to an aroma or flavor?
2012 Col D'Orcia Brunello di Montalcino
"Very pure nose offers raspberry, pomegranate, and licorice. Fresh and vinous, with scented yet silky flavors of redcurrant, raspberry, flowers and spices perked up by firm acidity and a solid mineral spine. The finish is penetrating and long.... This is a lovely example of the typical 2012 high acid, perfumed Brunellos, but those weaned on high pH, fleshier wnes may fnd it to be a littler lean." --Antonio Galloni, Vinous, 91 points
Since "minerality" somewhat oddly is a synonym for acidity, I thought AG was finally using it is the accepted sense, where spine and structural element (acidity) makes sense.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#902 Post by crickey » January 17th, 2020, 11:13 am

The one I thought you would flag is the review for the 2018 Wayfarer The Traveler:

"The 2018 Pinot Noir The Traveler is made from a blend of suitcase clones. It is also the most understated of the Pinots in this range. Sweet floral notes, spice, mint, earthiness, anise and blood orange all run through this super-expressive Pinot."

It's both understated and super-expressive.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#903 Post by Charlie Carnes » January 17th, 2020, 2:18 pm

Chris, these two scenes come to mind instantly...




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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#904 Post by John Morris » January 17th, 2020, 4:32 pm

crickey wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 11:07 am
John Morris wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 7:56 am
One hopes a wine is vinous.

What's with the "scented yet silky"? What's the inconsistency between scented and silky?

And minerality has now become a structural element (a spine), as opposed to an aroma or flavor?
2012 Col D'Orcia Brunello di Montalcino
"Very pure nose offers raspberry, pomegranate, and licorice. Fresh and vinous, with scented yet silky flavors of redcurrant, raspberry, flowers and spices perked up by firm acidity and a solid mineral spine. The finish is penetrating and long.... This is a lovely example of the typical 2012 high acid, perfumed Brunellos, but those weaned on high pH, fleshier wnes may fnd it to be a littler lean." --Antonio Galloni, Vinous, 91 points

Since "minerality" somewhat oddly is a synonym for acidity, I thought AG was finally using it is the accepted sense, where spine and structural element (acidity) makes sense.
But, since he just said it has "firm acid," what does it mean to add "and a solid mineral spine." It's either redundant or has some unclear meaning.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#905 Post by John Morris » January 17th, 2020, 4:38 pm

crickey wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 11:13 am
The one I thought you would flag is the review for the 2018 Wayfarer The Traveler:

"The 2018 Pinot Noir The Traveler is made from a blend of suitcase clones. It is also the most understated of the Pinots in this range. Sweet floral notes, spice, mint, earthiness, anise and blood orange all run through this super-expressive Pinot."

It's both understated and super-expressive.
Yes, a lot his reviews now have such paradoxical qualities -- their both "explosive" and "painfully stubborn":
2016 Felsina Chianti Classico Riserva Rancia
"The 2016 Chianti Classico Riserva Rancia is powerful, rich and explosive, with tremendous drive. Even so, several bottles have been quite closed. That is probably a very good sign for the long-term, but readers should not plan on touching a bottle anytime soon. A wine of vertical drive and aromatic nuance, the 2016 Rancia is super-complexed. Only with a few hours of air does it show the nuances and layers that were so evident from barrel. The 2016 is a painfully stubborn wine in the early going, but it will offer superb drinking pleasure for those who can wait." -Antonio Galloni, Vinous 96
[scratch.gif]

(And "super-complexed"?)
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?

#906 Post by RichardFlack » January 17th, 2020, 4:58 pm

My def of a stubborn wine is when the cork is really tight.

I guess wines with vertical drive should not be laid down?

I keep coming back to the question are notes like impressionist paintings or to be taken literally? The ideal note succinctly gives a clear impression of the wine, and any salient facts that are not obvious, and should be read just once, not parsed to a fare-thee-well.

Even as impressionist sketches these examples are overblown , and indeed contradictory in places.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#907 Post by RichardFlack » January 17th, 2020, 5:03 pm

John Morris wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 4:32 pm
crickey wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 11:07 am
John Morris wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 7:56 am
One hopes a wine is vinous.

What's with the "scented yet silky"? What's the inconsistency between scented and silky?

And minerality has now become a structural element (a spine), as opposed to an aroma or flavor?
Are minerals acidic or basic? I only did one year of chemistry at school before focusing on Maths.

In the spirit of overanalysing, I tend to take minerality as a style indicator , rather than a flavour descriptor.


Since "minerality" somewhat oddly is a synonym for acidity, I thought AG was finally using it is the accepted sense, where spine and structural element (acidity) makes sense.
But, since he just said it has "firm acid," what does it mean to add "and a solid mineral spine." It's either redundant or has some unclear meaning.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?

#908 Post by John Morris » January 17th, 2020, 6:07 pm

RichardFlack wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 4:58 pm
I guess wines with vertical drive should not be laid down?
You can lay them down, but they have a tendency to stand themselves upright.
RichardFlack wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 4:58 pm
I keep coming back to the question are notes like impressionist paintings or to be taken literally? The ideal note succinctly gives a clear impression of the wine, and any salient facts that are not obvious, and should be read just once, not parsed to a fare-thee-well.

Even as impressionist sketches these examples are overblown , and indeed contradictory in places.
Exactly. I'm all for good, communicative metaphors -- impressionist descriptions that actually convey something. But so many of these are just blather, a mix of generic metaphors that don't convey anything, plus unresolved contradictory descriptions. As I've said earlier in the thread, it makes me long for Parker. When I read one of his notes, I usually got a sense of the nature of the wine.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#909 Post by RichardFlack » January 17th, 2020, 6:30 pm

(Apologies if this has been said by others, I’ve only dipped into this thread. )

Isn’t part of the problem that many writers (most of the trade press) are in some fashion promoting wine. And so they want to be positive, even when damning with faint praise.

They also they want Their notes to be different. “This is a decent wine for near term drinking” does not earn many trips to Europe.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#910 Post by RichardFlack » January 17th, 2020, 6:32 pm

Parker - yes, I like his notes far more than most of “his” wines.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?

#911 Post by David Strange » January 17th, 2020, 8:25 pm

RichardFlack wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 4:58 pm
I guess wines with vertical drive should not be laid down?
You cannot age wines with vertical drive. You are tumescent with lust for them that makes you keep carrying bottles up out of the cellar, upstairs to the bedroom where you drink them up and they lift your spirits.
I keep coming back to the question are notes like impressionist paintings or to be taken literally? The ideal note succinctly gives a clear impression of the wine, and any salient facts that are not obvious, and should be read just once, not parsed to a fare-thee-well.

Even as impressionist sketches these examples are overblown , and indeed contradictory in places.

Depends what you want from a note. At one end of the spectrum there is the WSET structured note; a terse, technical description of each property of a wine's nose and palate in as non-florid terms as possible.

These have their place, but since I view fine wine is an art form I am much more of a one for the impressionistic sketch. Certainly they should be consistent and internally non-contradictory, but if a wine is a grand edifice, surely a note can be at least somewhat colourful to reflect this?

Furthermore, the appreciation of wine is a quite subjective game that can conjure up different feelings and emotions depending on when and where it is consumed. If one describes these, one's reader might know how the wine will affect them and in what circumstances they might best enjoy a bottle.

Finally, if one is asking someone to read one's description of a wine experience, it is best to make it fun for them and (hopefully occasionally) make it funny with a couple of jokes in it.

I hate the WSET structured tasting note format, I find them soulless. My guess is that you would hate my tasting notes.

On a different note, Mr Parker's seemed an extreme form of the former style. I don't have much experience with them as I cancelled my subscription to his periodical after two issues (someone gave me a book as well, but I only really read the introduction). I did this partly because I found his scores and scoring system detestable, but mostly because I disliked his notes.

I recall there were often long lists of vaguely different fruits, or other aromas/flavours, but with little or no comment on how these made him feel - frequently even omitting whether he even liked any of them or not.

"This wine smells of this, this, this, this and this. It also smells alcoholic.", is only limitedly edifying. Sticking to a smaller set of descriptors with modifiers that communicate the nature of these characteristics, how they make the taster feel and whether (or not) and to what degree they create a pleasing whole blush seems more compelling, to me at least.

Then again, as I said I have limited experience of Mr Parker's notes and if anyone tells me he did often communicate the kind of wild passion one should be eager to explore when tasting fine wine, then I'm quite prepared to believe you!

Anon,
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#912 Post by John Morris » February 9th, 2020, 2:27 pm

What is this guy smoking?

Two years ago, I collected tasting notes here of James Molesworth's which referred to "singed alder" in a wide range of wines include grenache blends, a mourvedre, a South African Bordeaux blend and a Sherry. Comes now this Napa cab:
2016 Groth Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve
"This delivers a very tightly focused, almost piercing beam of cassis, raspberry coulis and bitter cherry fruit, scored with singed alder and iron notes. Incense and tobacco details chime in on the finish. Long and refined, with the fruit leaving a sweet and mouthwatering echo.”-James Molesworth
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#913 Post by Alan Rath » February 9th, 2020, 2:59 pm

Actually, I could see using "singed wood" as a descriptor. When I used to do some woodworking, I would sometimes make a mistake and singe a piece, which gives off a distinctive smell - which can be unique to the type of wood. I think I could still identify "singed maple" do this day :)
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#914 Post by John Morris » February 9th, 2020, 3:38 pm

Yes, many pages back, Greg dal Piaz said that the woods he uses when he smokes foods have distinct aromas. He said he'd never used alder, though.

But why always alder in the tasting note? I wonder how many readers have any idea what that's like. It seems like a bit of an affectation.
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#915 Post by Alan Rath » February 9th, 2020, 4:08 pm

John Morris wrote:
February 9th, 2020, 3:38 pm
But why always alder in the tasting note? I wonder how many readers have any idea what that's like. It seems like a bit of an affectation.
No idea. Once you open the door to "singed woods", seems like you've got a panoply of different types of wood to choose from. You could pick a different wood for a bunch of wines before you have to cycle back through [snort.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#916 Post by GregT » February 9th, 2020, 4:51 pm

John - they absolutely do have different smoke qualities! When my neighbor's cherry tree got blown apart by a storm, I used cherry chips for smoking. Quite delicious smoke they made too. We've used apple recently and that's also nice. There are some woods that produce a very light smoke and for me, those are the ones to use. Supposedly peach is one of them although I've never used it but since I have a dead peach tree in the yard, that's on the list with the dead plum tree. Alder is related to birch and both of those are on the mild side.

Hickory is very distinctive and can be kind of strong but it's good. A neighbor of my mother used oak, which can also be strong.

Mesquite is so strong it's overpowering - a little goes a long long way and it's really easy to make your food inedible if you're not careful.

I've never used a citrus wood but that seems like a pretty good idea.

My guess is that he's done some smoking or was around someone who did and in either case, they used alder so he always refers to it. I hope so anyway, because it would be very strange to be so specific if he really had no idea how alder differed from mesquite!

Other than mesquite and hickory, which to me are the most distinctive, at the end of the day, smoke is smoke and I don't think many people could discern one from another. You want a mild smoke that doesn't ruin your meat and whether it's some variety of apple or some variety of alder probably doesn't matter that much.
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#917 Post by PeterH » February 9th, 2020, 5:34 pm

In the PNW, salmon is often cooked on alder planks. Done properly, the wood should not be burned, but it may be where Molesworth got exposed to the scent.
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#918 Post by Larry P » February 10th, 2020, 4:24 pm

It's typical to smoke salmon over alder - I use red alder and if I were to sample you two salmons, one smoked over alder and one over oak, you would unquestionably detect the difference. Molesworth, however, I'd wager could not.

BTW I decided to check up on this thread, after Tablas Creek announced that "...all 36 of our wines received 90+ points, with 24 receiving scores of 93 or higher." I thought, it's been a while since I read tasting notes, this should be a hoot! I was shocked by how many different varieties of wine could taste like "smoked minerals, spice cake, and floral pastille." The last of which I had to look up, and according to Google, it's mostly a wine tasting note descriptor.

The kicker was the use of "vivid magenta."
This is vivid magenta
Image

https://tablascreek.com/uploads/news/Vi ... eb2020.pdf
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#919 Post by PeterH » February 10th, 2020, 4:43 pm

Wine the color of potassium permanganate, how appetizing!
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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#920 Post by RichardFlack » February 10th, 2020, 5:14 pm

PeterH wrote:
February 10th, 2020, 4:43 pm
Wine the color of potassium permanganate, how appetizing!
If you like oxidised wine ....

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Re: It's critic bingo! More Molesworthian singed wood!

#921 Post by John Morris » February 13th, 2020, 8:54 pm

I thought Sunrise Ruby was a Benjamin Moore color.
2018 Pétrus
4/19/2019 - JEFF LEVE WROTE:99 Points
The color of the ancient and priceless Sunrise Ruby replete with ornate reflections of royal purple, this wine moves you. Its perfume begins with a lightning bolt of flowers, cocoa, truffle, licorice, black cherry and even blacker plums. On the palate, the wine is extraordinarily concentrated. The fruit tastes and feels darker than usual with more command, opulence, depth and length. The flavors are expansive, moving from plummy mid-palate to a spicy, licorice, dark chocolate, mint and kirschwasser finish that remains with you for well over 60 seconds! The wine reached 14.5% alcohol with a pH of 3.7. The harvest took place September 13-27 and the wine is aging in 50% new, French oak barrels. 98-100 Pts
Last edited by John Morris on February 20th, 2020, 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#922 Post by John Morris » February 20th, 2020, 8:34 pm

Seems like a lot of prancing going on there in the Medoc in 2016:
GregT wrote:
April 30th, 2019, 12:59 pm
Château Margaux 2016
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2016 Château Margaux (blended of 94% Cabernet Sauvignon, 3% Cabernet Franc, 2% Merlot and 1% Petit Verdot) sashays out of the glass with glamorous red currants, candied violets, kirsch and crushed blackcurrants scents followed by notions of tilled black soil, forest floor, cast iron panand cigar box with subtle wafts of lavender and oolong tea. Medium-bodied, mineral laced accents hover over the palate with an ethereal sensation of weightlessness, yet it is super intense with layers of red and black flavors supported by a firm texture of silt-fine tannins, finishing wonderfully fragrant and incredibly long." - Lisa Perotti-Brown, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate (11/30/2018, Interim Issue), Ratings: 99
2016 Chateau Lagrange St Julien
WA 95
“Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2016 Lagrange sashays out of the glass with notions of candied violets, cassis, underbrush and warm black plums with waves of Black Forest cake, cedar chest and yeast extract scents. Medium to full-bodied, the bags of perfumed black fruits are solidly structured with super ripe, grainy tannins, finishing long and layered."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown, MW

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Re: It's critic bingo! (A lightning bolt of flowers!)

#923 Post by David Strange » February 21st, 2020, 12:44 am

John,

I'm very far from being Mister Popular Culture, and that video makes it seem like that's a wise choice.

Cheers,
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#924 Post by John Morris » February 21st, 2020, 8:01 am

champagne.gif
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#925 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » February 21st, 2020, 8:05 am

John Morris wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 8:34 pm
Seems like a lot of prancing going on there in the Medoc in 2016:
GregT wrote:
April 30th, 2019, 12:59 pm
Château Margaux 2016
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2016 Château Margaux (blended of 94% Cabernet Sauvignon, 3% Cabernet Franc, 2% Merlot and 1% Petit Verdot) sashays out of the glass with glamorous red currants, candied violets, kirsch and crushed blackcurrants scents followed by notions of tilled black soil, forest floor, cast iron panand cigar box with subtle wafts of lavender and oolong tea. Medium-bodied, mineral laced accents hover over the palate with an ethereal sensation of weightlessness, yet it is super intense with layers of red and black flavors supported by a firm texture of silt-fine tannins, finishing wonderfully fragrant and incredibly long." - Lisa Perotti-Brown, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate (11/30/2018, Interim Issue), Ratings: 99
2016 Chateau Lagrange St Julien
WA 95
“Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2016 Lagrange sashays out of the glass with notions of candied violets, cassis, underbrush and warm black plums with waves of Black Forest cake, cedar chest and yeast extract scents. Medium to full-bodied, the bags of perfumed black fruits are solidly structured with super ripe, grainy tannins, finishing long and layered."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown, MW


Rolland now makes Margaux and Lagrange?

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#926 Post by Rory K. » February 21st, 2020, 8:11 am

Maybe it's just this thread but I notice more and more 'amateurs' like ourselves on cellartracker dropping these gems trying to sound like a critic, two recent notes I've read mentioned "gobs of fruit".... [swearing.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#927 Post by David Strange » February 21st, 2020, 8:19 am

Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:11 am
... mentioned "gobs of fruit".... [swearing.gif]
That's surely distinctly repulsive?
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#928 Post by John Morris » February 21st, 2020, 8:33 am

Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:11 am
Maybe it's just this thread but I notice more and more 'amateurs' like ourselves on cellartracker dropping these gems trying to sound like a critic, two recent notes I've read mentioned "gobs of fruit"....
Yes, critic emulation is a plague among us.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#929 Post by Rory K. » February 21st, 2020, 9:04 am

David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:19 am
Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:11 am
... mentioned "gobs of fruit".... [swearing.gif]
That's surely distinctly repulsive?
Yes, it is right up there with moist for words that make me cringe... Mercifully moist doesnt come up much in tasting notes
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#930 Post by John Morris » February 21st, 2020, 9:11 am

David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:19 am
Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:11 am
... mentioned "gobs of fruit".... [swearing.gif]
That's surely distinctly repulsive?
In American slang, "gobs of" (plural with "of") just means "lots of" without any connotation of snot, though "gob" as a singular noun means snot. A third sense in which "gob" means "mouth" is pretty much unknown in North America.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#931 Post by David Strange » February 21st, 2020, 9:24 am

John Morris wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 8:34 pm
Seems like a lot of prancing going on there in the Medoc in 2016:
Whilst we're are on linguistics, I would spell those two words: "santé" and "sachet"

I live a long way away in the past...

D.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#932 Post by David Strange » February 21st, 2020, 9:27 am

Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:04 am
David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:19 am
Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:11 am
... mentioned "gobs of fruit".... [swearing.gif]
That's surely distinctly repulsive?
Yes, it is right up there with moist for words that make me cringe... Mercifully moist doesnt come up much in tasting notes
Rory,

I'll remind both my readers in my next note that the wine was "Excitingly moist", just for you!

D.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#933 Post by Monica Larner » February 21st, 2020, 12:15 pm

I am honored to be included in Critic Bingo, a thread that I have followed with a good many giggles.

Best,
Monica


John Morris wrote:
January 17th, 2020, 7:50 am
We've had a lot of discussion here of the dimensionality of wine, and now it seems that the continuum is at least two-dimensional: in addition to ends, it has sides!
2010 Col D'Orcia Brunello di Montalcino Riserva Poggio al Vento
"Released seven years after the harvest, the 2010 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva Poggio al Vento is a stunning wine. It soars to the highest altitudes in terms of elegance and power. These opposite forces -- muscle versus grace -- are what distinguish this classic vintage. Col d'Orcia has effortlessly captured and immortalized both sides of the continuum. The bouquet produces a long succession of aromas including dried cherry fruit, licorice, cola, lavender flower, cured meat and black truffle. The velvety finish is supple and long in persistence. This is a gorgeous creation." -- Monica Larner, Wine Advocate, 97 points
Italian Reviewer with Robert Parker Wine Advocate

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Robert.A.Jr.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#934 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » February 21st, 2020, 12:27 pm

Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:04 am
David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:19 am
Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:11 am
... mentioned "gobs of fruit".... [swearing.gif]
That's surely distinctly repulsive?
Yes, it is right up there with moist for words that make me cringe... Mercifully moist doesnt come up much in tasting notes

Hmm . . . . I often use wet earth on some Pomerols.

neener

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#935 Post by crickey » February 21st, 2020, 1:02 pm

I don't pick on writers as much as some (John) do, but I do find weird Lisa's frequent verbal tic of using ambulatory terms (sashays, dances, waltzes, leaps, bounds, strolls, etc.) in her write-ups, almost as if she takes a little too literally the grammarian admonition to use active verbs.
Chri$ Ri¢k€y

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#936 Post by John Morris » February 21st, 2020, 2:05 pm

Monica Larner wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 12:15 pm
I am honored to be included in Critic Bingo, a thread that I have followed with a good many giggles.

Best,
Monica
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#937 Post by John Morris » February 21st, 2020, 2:07 pm

crickey wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 1:02 pm
I don't pick on writers as much as some (John) do, but I do find weird Lisa's frequent verbal tic of using ambulatory terms (sashays, dances, waltzes, leaps, bounds, strolls, etc.) in her write-ups, almost as if she takes a little too literally the grammarian admonition to use active verbs.
Maybe I should follow up on Rory's comments and start picking on amateur reviewers. :-o
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#938 Post by crickey » February 21st, 2020, 2:13 pm

John Morris wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 2:07 pm
crickey wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 1:02 pm
I don't pick on writers as much as some (John) do, but I do find weird Lisa's frequent verbal tic of using ambulatory terms (sashays, dances, waltzes, leaps, bounds, strolls, etc.) in her write-ups, almost as if she takes a little too literally the grammarian admonition to use active verbs.
Maybe I should follow up on Rory's comments and start picking on amateur reviewers. :-o
There was a whole thread on it recently. It made Sally, whoever she is, quite famous.
Chri$ Ri¢k€y

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#939 Post by John Morris » February 21st, 2020, 2:21 pm

Link please! (How did I miss this?)
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#940 Post by Rory K. » February 21st, 2020, 7:12 pm

David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:27 am
Rory K. wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 9:04 am
David Strange wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 8:19 am


That's surely distinctly repulsive?
Yes, it is right up there with moist for words that make me cringe... Mercifully moist doesnt come up much in tasting notes
Rory,

I'll remind both my readers in my next note that the wine was "Excitingly moist", just for you!

D.
And snot-loads of fruit, please
K i n n e a r

ITB

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#941 Post by John Morris » February 21st, 2020, 7:27 pm

This thread is becoming a wiki of wine criticism tips!
"English doesn't just borrow foreign words, it stalks languages down dark alleyways, knocks them over and then rifles their pockets for new words." -- @Another NPC on YouTube

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Shake your Medoc booty!)

#942 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » February 21st, 2020, 7:46 pm

John Morris wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 7:27 pm
This thread is becoming a wiki of wine criticism tips!
Wiki-Drinks

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

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