It's critic bingo! (Dept. of Neologisms)

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Nick Ellis
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#851 Post by Nick Ellis » November 5th, 2019, 3:41 am

David Strange wrote:
November 3rd, 2019, 3:44 pm
Finally, Christmas cake is a very specific kind of cake. You have to age them for months in a cool, dark place for months before you can put marzipan and icing on them. I do not know anything else about them because I think they have the texture and composition of what vegan poo might be like.
Davy, as always, brilliant prose. I’m going to plagiarize this next time I taste a brett-infused natural wine.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#852 Post by David Strange » November 5th, 2019, 4:17 am

Nick Ellis wrote:
November 5th, 2019, 3:41 am
David Strange wrote:
November 3rd, 2019, 3:44 pm
Finally, Christmas cake is a very specific kind of cake. You have to age them for months in a cool, dark place for months before you can put marzipan and icing on them. I do not know anything else about them because I think they have the texture and composition of what vegan poo might be like.
Davy, as always, brilliant prose. I’m going to plagiarize this next time I taste a brett-infused natural wine.
Thank you, Nick! I had a really Brett-y Cornas last night - the whole flat is suffused with the foul aroma of faeces. Horse faeces id6 wager. I'm deciding whether to be incredibly rude about it on my website or deal with the other shit I've got to do.

Cheers,
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#853 Post by John Morris » November 5th, 2019, 10:01 am

GregT wrote:
November 3rd, 2019, 3:32 pm
And is Christmas cake another Brit thing that refers to a very specific delicacy, or is it an all-encompassing category. And BTW, are we going to start seeing notes of vegan dishes in TNs? That will render them further useless.
I think they are English in origin (you soak them in rum) but I had a fully American housemate at Berkeley who used to make them, starting in early November.

You’ve never heard people joke about them? Usually the joke involves the fact that they last forever but no one eats them.

A lot of commercial ones are pretty pointless, but homemade ones can be very good.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#854 Post by GregT » November 5th, 2019, 8:05 pm

So is Christmas cake what we call fruitcake? A bit like a cousin to your plum pudding, made sans plums? But some savory bits, some suet, brandy, dried fruits, nuts, allspice, nutmeg, etc? We call people fruitcakes too, but they're usually the types with silly hairstyles. Who just might make things like nut-roast.

Every time I look out the window the world seems to have become weirder. Maybe there are people who would be happy to have nut-roast in their wine and cake made out of pips and skins!
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#855 Post by John Morris » November 14th, 2019, 10:52 am

I'd say the words are holding their own:
2015 Spottswoode Cabernet Sauvignon
WA 100
"The 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon is deep garnet-purple colored with a mind-blowingly gorgeous nose that defies words: warm cassis, red roses, sandalwood, Indian spices, crushed rocks, menthol and iron ore with waft of lilacs and truffles. Medium to full-bodied with a rock-solid frame of super-ripe, grainy tannins and tons of freshness, it finishes incredibly long and remains incredibly provocative."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown, MW
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#856 Post by Mikko R » November 15th, 2019, 8:03 am

Not from a professional wine critic, but I came across this interesting TN:
As good as you would expect/hope for in an outstanding year. Fairly ripe sour cherries on the nose, and quite intense. There was something almost oak-like at one point, though it sees no small oak. A quinine scent emerged later that I liked. Pretty concentrated in the mouth, with red fruits and an appealing sweet thread. I got that quinine note in the mouth, too -- both flavor and bitterness. Long, somewhat tannic (as one would expect) but balanced finish. Though the price has risen in recent years, this is still the real thing and a great value.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#857 Post by John Morris » November 15th, 2019, 8:14 am

Don't tell Otto. Someone is hallucinating about quinine.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#858 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » November 15th, 2019, 12:27 pm

John Morris wrote:
November 14th, 2019, 10:52 am
I'd say the words are holding their own:
2015 Spottswoode Cabernet Sauvignon
WA 100
"The 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon is deep garnet-purple colored with a mind-blowingly gorgeous nose that defies words: warm cassis, red roses, sandalwood, Indian spices, crushed rocks, menthol and iron ore with waft of lilacs and truffles. Medium to full-bodied with a rock-solid frame of super-ripe, grainy tannins and tons of freshness, it finishes incredibly long and remains incredibly provocative."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown, MW
Wine critics are mostly just an embarrassment at this point. Spewing superlatives all over the place -- this note has like a half a dozen over the top adjectives ("mind-blowingly", "gorgeous", not one but two "incredibly", "tons", "super-ripe", "rock-solid", "defies words" blah blah blah), terrible cliched writing, adjectives picked randomly from some kind of perfume shop mad lib, no analysis or critical thought whatsoever. (Repeating the cepage and a few items of producer-supplied technical data is supposed to be "analysis").

Basically their job is to write shit that would be too over the top for the producer to write on their own back label, and too ridiculous for the clerk to say at the store with a straight face.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#859 Post by David Strange » November 15th, 2019, 12:35 pm

Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
November 15th, 2019, 12:27 pm
John Morris wrote:
November 14th, 2019, 10:52 am
I'd say the words are holding their own:
2015 Spottswoode Cabernet Sauvignon
WA 100
"The 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon is deep garnet-purple colored with a mind-blowingly gorgeous nose that defies words: warm cassis, red roses, sandalwood, Indian spices, crushed rocks, menthol and iron ore with waft of lilacs and truffles. Medium to full-bodied with a rock-solid frame of super-ripe, grainy tannins and tons of freshness, it finishes incredibly long and remains incredibly provocative."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown, MW
Wine critics are mostly just an embarrassment at this point. Spewing superlatives all over the place -- this note has like a half a dozen over the top adjectives ("mind-blowingly", "gorgeous", not one but two "incredibly", "tons", "super-ripe", "rock-solid", "defies words" blah blah blah), terrible cliched writing, adjectives picked randomly from some kind of perfume shop mad lib, no analysis or critical thought whatsoever. (Repeating the cepage and a few items of producer-supplied technical data is supposed to be "analysis").

Basically their job is to write shit that would be too over the top for the producer to write on their own back label, and too ridiculous for the clerk to say at the store with a straight face.
Marcu$, praise be for people like you! Voices of moderation and reasonableness when there are too many nut-jobs writing crap.

Cheers, and well said!
D.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#860 Post by Jayson Cohen » November 15th, 2019, 11:51 pm

David Strange wrote:
November 15th, 2019, 12:35 pm
Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
November 15th, 2019, 12:27 pm
John Morris wrote:
November 14th, 2019, 10:52 am
I'd say the words are holding their own:

Wine critics are mostly just an embarrassment at this point. Spewing superlatives all over the place -- this note has like a half a dozen over the top adjectives ("mind-blowingly", "gorgeous", not one but two "incredibly", "tons", "super-ripe", "rock-solid", "defies words" blah blah blah), terrible cliched writing, adjectives picked randomly from some kind of perfume shop mad lib, no analysis or critical thought whatsoever. (Repeating the cepage and a few items of producer-supplied technical data is supposed to be "analysis").

Basically their job is to write shit that would be too over the top for the producer to write on their own back label, and too ridiculous for the clerk to say at the store with a straight face.
Marcu$, praise be for people like you! Voices of moderation and reasonableness when there are too many nut-jobs writing crap.

Cheers, and well said!
D.
Yes. His post is an absolutely stunning and deep tour de force pumping out deep truths in all of its multiple depth dimensions and exuding a magical but unfathomable and word-defying depth. In a word: deep.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#861 Post by GregT » November 16th, 2019, 12:33 am

Yeah, Marcus captured the point of this whole thread! But it's still fun reading the nonsense that people spew.

And BTW, faeces is great. I love seeing "ae" in a word.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#862 Post by Charlie Carnes » November 16th, 2019, 5:36 am

John Morris wrote:
November 14th, 2019, 10:52 am
I'd say the words are holding their own:
2015 Spottswoode Cabernet Sauvignon
WA 100
"The 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon is deep garnet-purple colored with a mind-blowingly gorgeous nose that defies words: warm cassis, red roses, sandalwood, Indian spices, crushed rocks, menthol and iron ore with waft of lilacs and truffles. Medium to full-bodied with a rock-solid frame of super-ripe, grainy tannins and tons of freshness, it finishes incredibly long and remains incredibly provocative."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown, MW
At least she mind blew gorgeous and didn't mind blow her nose. it's pretty funny that in the same sentence she describes a wine that defies words, she uses words for nine separate descriptors. I am a big fan or crushed rocks a description of a "mind's eye" perception. Iron ore is a little stretch, but again I could see someone using it sparingly as a "mind's eye" perception, but that is one hell of an evocation. Here it feels like it was chucked in as filler for the note.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#863 Post by GregT » November 16th, 2019, 10:50 am

And "tons of" to describe a large quantity is the language of a four year old.

Now freshness is measured by mass? Can you have a pound or two of freshness? If we have the mass, can we determine it's density? Can freshness have the density of lead?
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#864 Post by John Morris » November 17th, 2019, 8:36 pm

Jayson Cohen wrote:
November 15th, 2019, 11:51 pm
Yes. His post is an absolutely stunning and deep tour de force pumping out deep truths in all of its multiple depth dimensions and exuding a magical but unfathomable and word-defying depth. In a word: deep.
Also very vertical, with beams of buy-it-ness.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#865 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » November 18th, 2019, 5:19 am

GregT wrote:
November 16th, 2019, 10:50 am
If we have the mass, can we determine it's density?
If we have its position we cannot also know its velocity. Heisenberg Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#866 Post by John Morris » November 18th, 2019, 7:15 am

Now that we're into physics, we'll need to call on Tom Hill.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#867 Post by David Glasser » November 18th, 2019, 10:57 am

GregT wrote:
November 16th, 2019, 12:33 am
Yeah, Marcus captured the point of this whole thread! But it's still fun reading the nonsense that people spew.

And BTW, faeces is great. I love seeing "ae" in a word.
A paean to faeces.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (Black Forest cake and tapenade)

#868 Post by John Morris » January 4th, 2020, 9:47 am

I'm afraid I may be geometrically challenged, but I'm still struggling to understand the (recurring) concept that I've bolded:
2014 Pax Syrah Castelli-Knight Ranch
Inky dark fruit, tobacco, scorched earth, herbs and leather flesh out in the 2014 Syrah Castelli-Knight Ranch. One of the more voluptuous and overt wines in the range, the Castelli-Knight exudes breadth and volume in all of its dimensions. The 2014 was done with no whole clusters, which helps bring out the fruit character nicely.” Antonio Galloni, Vinous, 94
And can a wine that's vertical exude breadth in all dimensions, or only vertically? Inquiring wino readers want to know.
2015 Peay Syrah Les Titans
“The 2015 Syrah Estate Les Titans is layered with scents of inky dark fruit, game, smoke, incense, licorice and savory herbs. The Titans is usually quite gamy, but that part of its personality is not especially evident today. Vertical in feel and persistent, the Titans is terrific.”-Antonio Galloni, Vinous, 94
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#869 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » January 4th, 2020, 9:51 am

I wanna use the word “trapezoidal” on a wine note. Thinking.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#870 Post by Charlie Carnes » January 4th, 2020, 10:23 am

You're so obtuse Robert.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#871 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » January 4th, 2020, 10:33 am

Charlie Carnes wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 10:23 am
You're so obtuse Robert.


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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#872 Post by William Kelley » January 4th, 2020, 10:33 am

The "vertical" line is almost certainly borrowed from the French, and probably not the first instance of a French tasting term getting transliterated into English in a way that doesn't make intuitive sense to Anglophone readers (I am always thankful for the fact that Microsoft Word considers "minerality" a spelling mistake, something that helps to restrain me).

It is not too easy to translate, but generally the French use "vertical/e" for wines that have a bright spine of acidity that makes them penetrating and direct. In such circumstances I would reach for something like "incisive", or talk about a "spine of acidity" as above. However, it is also often used comparatively, and as such may not always be applied to especially acid driven wines by French tasters and winemakers. In such circumstances, it's effectively the antonym of "broad" or "expansive", but it is hard to translate into an English word—even though it's a useful concept. Cécile Tremblay, for example, describes her Chapelle-Chambertin as "vertical" in contrast to her richer, more expansive Echézeaux, but it is not all that obvious how to render that in English.

When one is caught up speaking French for weeks of tastings in Burgundy or wherever, it becomes especially hard to navigate between the two languages in cases like this, so I am inclined to be understanding.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#873 Post by Charlie Carnes » January 4th, 2020, 10:54 am

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 9:51 am
I wanna use the word “trapezoidal” on a wine note. Thinking.
My next note:

u(y) = G/2u (y) (h-y), (Q) = Gh3/12u
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#874 Post by John Morris » January 4th, 2020, 11:02 am

William Kelley wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 10:33 am
The "vertical" line is almost certainly borrowed from the French, and probably not the first instance of a French tasting term getting transliterated into English in a way that doesn't make intuitive sense to Anglophone readers (I am always thankful for the fact that Microsoft Word considers "minerality" a spelling mistake, something that helps to restrain me).

It is not too easy to translate, but generally the French use "vertical/e" for wines that have a bright spine of acidity that makes them penetrating and direct. In such circumstances I would reach for something like "incisive", or talk about a "spine of acidity" as above. However, it is also often used comparatively, and as such may not always be applied to especially acid driven wines by French tasters and winemakers. In such circumstances, it's effectively the antonym of "broad" or "expansive", but it is hard to translate into an English word—even though it's a useful concept. Cécile Tremblay, for example, describes her Chapelle-Chambertin as "vertical" in contrast to her richer, more expansive Echézeaux, but it is not all that obvious how to render that in English.

When one is caught up speaking French for weeks of tastings in Burgundy or wherever, it becomes especially hard to navigate between the two languages in cases like this, so I am inclined to be understanding.
Ah! Perhaps Galloni was speaking to the folks at Pax and Peay in French, then. Hadn't thought about that possibility.
neener
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#875 Post by John Morris » January 4th, 2020, 11:06 am

Another geometric quandary: How do you determine what's vertical or which of the many dimensions is which when a wine is spherical? Put another way, can a wine be both spherical and vertical and also show breadth in all dimensions?
2009 Tenuta di Biserno
Sweet grilled herbs, incense, pine, menthol and espresso are some of the many notes that burst from the glass in the 2009 Biserno. Wonderfully alive and opulent, the 2009 is totally spherical in its expression of black fruit. Layers of fruit continue to build in the glass as the wine flows through to a creamy, expressive finish.-Antonio Galloni, Vinous, 95
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#876 Post by GregT » January 4th, 2020, 11:38 am

Well, does a sphere flow? I guess if you get down to the molecular level, you could make the case. I was once involved in a company using cellular automata for modelling and that's an analogy we used. But when we have to go microscopic on a tasting note we're entering an unreal world. I prefer the larger view.

Last night we had a wine that only exuded breadth and volume in three or four of its dimensions. I knew something was missing, but couldn't quite figure out what it was . . .
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#877 Post by crickey » January 4th, 2020, 11:52 am

John Morris wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 11:06 am
Another geometric quandary: How do you determine what's vertical or which of the many dimensions is which when a wine is spherical? Put another way, can a wine be both spherical and vertical and also show breadth in all dimensions?
2009 Tenuta di Biserno
Sweet grilled herbs, incense, pine, menthol and espresso are some of the many notes that burst from the glass in the 2009 Biserno. Wonderfully alive and opulent, the 2009 is totally spherical in its expression of black fruit. Layers of fruit continue to build in the glass as the wine flows through to a creamy, expressive finish.-Antonio Galloni, Vinous, 95
If it exudes (evenly) in all dimensions, it would be a sphere. A spherical would mean balanced exuding.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#878 Post by crickey » January 4th, 2020, 11:54 am

William Kelley wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 10:33 am
The "vertical" line is almost certainly borrowed from the French, and probably not the first instance of a French tasting term getting transliterated into English in a way that doesn't make intuitive sense to Anglophone readers (I am always thankful for the fact that Microsoft Word considers "minerality" a spelling mistake, something that helps to restrain me).

It is not too easy to translate, but generally the French use "vertical/e" for wines that have a bright spine of acidity that makes them penetrating and direct. In such circumstances I would reach for something like "incisive", or talk about a "spine of acidity" as above. However, it is also often used comparatively, and as such may not always be applied to especially acid driven wines by French tasters and winemakers. In such circumstances, it's effectively the antonym of "broad" or "expansive", but it is hard to translate into an English word—even though it's a useful concept. Cécile Tremblay, for example, describes her Chapelle-Chambertin as "vertical" in contrast to her richer, more expansive Echézeaux, but it is not all that obvious how to render that in English.

When one is caught up speaking French for weeks of tastings in Burgundy or wherever, it becomes especially hard to navigate between the two languages in cases like this, so I am inclined to be understanding.
Does "depth" have the same meaning? I associate "vertical" with "depth," but wouldn't ordinarily associate "depth" with acidic.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#879 Post by William Kelley » January 4th, 2020, 12:14 pm

crickey wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 11:54 am
Does "depth" have the same meaning? I associate "vertical" with "depth," but wouldn't ordinarily associate "depth" with acidic.
Not for me, nor as I have heard "vertical/e" used in French.

For me, depth is the antonym of superficial / ephemeral / fleeting. Whereas "vertical" is the antonym of broad / expansive, for which I haven't found a one-word equivalent in English.

The ambiguity illustrates why it might be a term to avoid. Indeed, all these different dimensions are beginning to get a little disorienting...
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#880 Post by Jayson Cohen » January 4th, 2020, 1:09 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 12:14 pm
crickey wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 11:54 am
Does "depth" have the same meaning? I associate "vertical" with "depth," but wouldn't ordinarily associate "depth" with acidic.
Not for me, nor as I have heard "vertical/e" used in French.

For me, depth is the antonym of superficial / ephemeral / fleeting. Whereas "vertical" is the antonym of broad / expansive, for which I haven't found a one-word equivalent in English.

The ambiguity illustrates why it might be a term to avoid. Indeed, all these different dimensions are beginning to get a little disorienting...
Your explanation of “vertical” suggests “linear” as the English wine equivalent. At least that’s how I’ve always heard linear used or used linear. But obviously use of both linear and spherical have been put under the microscope even though they make sense to me.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#881 Post by William Kelley » January 4th, 2020, 1:26 pm

Jayson Cohen wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 1:09 pm
Your explanation of “vertical” suggests “linear” as the English wine equivalent. At least that’s how I’ve always heard linear used or used linear. But obviously use of both linear and spherical have been put under the microscope even though they make sense to me.
That has occurred to me, but I find "linear" a bit too figurative for comfort—"vertical" being too figurate a fortiori.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#882 Post by John Morris » January 4th, 2020, 2:35 pm

crickey wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 11:52 am
If it exudes (evenly) in all dimensions, it would be a sphere. A spherical would mean balanced exuding.
Much obliged for that clarification.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#883 Post by John Morris » January 4th, 2020, 2:37 pm

Jayson Cohen wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 1:09 pm
Your explanation of “vertical” suggests “linear” as the English wine equivalent. At least that’s how I’ve always heard linear used or used linear. But obviously use of both linear and spherical have been put under the microscope even though they make sense to me.
I, too, think I get "linear" and "spherical," though they are far from self-explanatory, and "vertical" was not at all clear to me before William's helpful explanation of the French usage.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#884 Post by RichardFlack » January 4th, 2020, 2:42 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 1:26 pm
Jayson Cohen wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 1:09 pm
Your explanation of “vertical” suggests “linear” as the English wine equivalent. At least that’s how I’ve always heard linear used or used linear. But obviously use of both linear and spherical have been put under the microscope even though they make sense to me.
That has occurred to me, but I find "linear" a bit too figurative for comfort—"vertical" being too figurate a fortiori.
I’d be inclined to use precise or focused (versus broad or blousey).

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#885 Post by RichardFlack » January 4th, 2020, 2:45 pm

John Morris wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 2:35 pm
crickey wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 11:52 am
If it exudes (evenly) in all dimensions, it would be a sphere. A spherical would mean balanced exuding.
Much obliged for that clarification.
Are we limited to just three dimensions?

I’ve always thought a TARDIS would be the ultimate wine accessory. (Would resolve the debate in another thread about 2016 Clos St Jean CdP. :)

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Re: It's critic bingo! Let's start with Vinous.

#886 Post by Carl I Steefel » January 4th, 2020, 2:59 pm

john stimson wrote:
April 13th, 2017, 12:32 pm

Actually, if you try to write a lot of tasting notes, it's incredibly hard not to use phrases over and over again. That's why I sometimes find I prefer Coates' minimalist notes. I'm also reminded of a thread a few years ago about 6 word, or 10 word (some small number in that range) tasting notes. It's an interesting exercise, and the notes communicate about the same amount of information as the much longer notes.
I would think any number of people would have trouble avoiding stock phrases if they tasted and reported on 150-200 wines a day, maybe even the estimable (and resurrected?) Bill Klapp.

But you are right, the trick is to convey the immediate sense of the wine, although sometimes the stock phrases also suggest the generic character of this or that wine (generic phrasing to go with generic wines). It does bother me though when I see these stock phrases emerge with what otherwise seems to be a truly original wine (at least as conveyed by enthusiasm of the critic or note taker).

Certain other phrases or words mentioned below seem fine to me (e.g., "lifted"), and again it could be hard to avoid their reuse (or overuse) if one writes 150 notes a day. I still don't really see the point of "vertical" or "verticale" as describing a "precise wine" (vertical implies a directionality, which makes no sense, while at least linear is a true geometric quality).

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#887 Post by William Kelley » January 4th, 2020, 3:16 pm

RichardFlack wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 2:42 pm

I’d be inclined to use precise or focused (versus broad or blousey).
I do use those terms, but I think that a broad and expansive wine can also be focussed. Echezeaux for example across producers tends to producer higher pH, broader wines, but a great Echezeaux can also be nicely focussed. Treating broad is synonymous with blowsy is a little limiting.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#888 Post by Rudi Finkler » January 7th, 2020, 10:19 am

Let me add another thought. The characteristic line of Gothic cathedrals as well as the characteristic line of skyscrapers nowadays is vertical to suggest striving upward. So, for me, “vertical in feel” simply means “striving upward”.
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#889 Post by John Morris » January 7th, 2020, 11:10 am

Rudi Finkler wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 10:19 am
Let me add another thought. The characteristic line of Gothic cathedrals as well as the characteristic line of skyscrapers nowadays is vertical to suggest striving upward. So, for me, “vertical in feel” simply means “striving upward”.
An interesting metaphor, but I have no idea what that would denote in a wine!
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Re: It's critic bingo! Let's start with Vinous.

#890 Post by Todd F r e n c h » January 7th, 2020, 11:13 am

John Morris wrote:
April 13th, 2017, 10:45 am
Pain grillé! A must!
This meme was my avatar for some time...
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#891 Post by John Morris » January 7th, 2020, 11:38 am

Bring it back!
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#892 Post by Alan Rath » January 7th, 2020, 1:16 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 9:51 am
I wanna use the word “trapezoidal” on a wine note. Thinking.
"I lay, curled in a trapezoidal ball, after finishing this wonderful wine full of breadth and volume in all its dimensions"
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#893 Post by Alan Rath » January 7th, 2020, 1:19 pm

William Kelley wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 10:33 am
it's effectively the antonym of "broad" or "expansive", but it is hard to translate into an English word
Narrow, or focused.
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Re: It's critic bingo! Let's start with Vinous.

#894 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » January 7th, 2020, 1:20 pm

Todd F r e n c h wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 11:13 am
John Morris wrote:
April 13th, 2017, 10:45 am
Pain grillé! A must!
This meme was my avatar for some time...

Imagine this Jam on that Pain Grille! A Rolland-inspired breakfast and wine!

4614EABC-D70F-4FDE-90B7-359E75DFF6B0.jpeg

I should use this as my avatar, but I like being royal.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#895 Post by Carl Steefel » January 7th, 2020, 6:21 pm

Rudi Finkler wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 10:19 am
Let me add another thought. The characteristic line of Gothic cathedrals as well as the characteristic line of skyscrapers nowadays is vertical to suggest striving upward. So, for me, “vertical in feel” simply means “striving upward”.
OK, I had not thought of this angle (pun intended). Although I would be tempted to go directly to your cathedral metaphor...

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#896 Post by John Morris » January 7th, 2020, 7:11 pm

Carl Steefel wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 6:21 pm
Rudi Finkler wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 10:19 am
Let me add another thought. The characteristic line of Gothic cathedrals as well as the characteristic line of skyscrapers nowadays is vertical to suggest striving upward. So, for me, “vertical in feel” simply means “striving upward”.
OK, I had not thought of this angle (pun intended). Although I would be tempted to go directly to your cathedral metaphor...
The perfect set-up for, "This wine really rings my chimes."
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#897 Post by RichardFlack » January 7th, 2020, 10:38 pm

Alan Rath wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 1:16 pm
Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
January 4th, 2020, 9:51 am
I wanna use the word “trapezoidal” on a wine note. Thinking.
"I lay, curled in a trapezoidal ball, after finishing this wonderful wine full of breadth and volume in all its dimensions"
Why stop there... move up to rhombic dodecahedron.

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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#898 Post by Rudi Finkler » January 8th, 2020, 1:56 am

Carl Steefel wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 6:21 pm
Rudi Finkler wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 10:19 am
Let me add another thought. The characteristic line of Gothic cathedrals as well as the characteristic line of skyscrapers nowadays is vertical to suggest striving upward. So, for me, “vertical in feel” simply means “striving upward”.
OK, I had not thought of this angle (pun intended). Although I would be tempted to go directly to your cathedral metaphor...
Yes, a Gothic cathedral seems to defy the laws of gravity and is a symbol of forces striving towards heaven, but it is nonetheless constructed from heavy stone. For medieval people a transcendent place where heaven’s presence could be felt. It is all about height, light, gravity, structure, elegance, balance, and deep feelings.
So, I would associate “vertical in feel” with a firm acid backbone that gives the wine structure, persistence, and energy and will help to provide a heavenly pleasure in years to come, but also with great purity and clarity of the fruit as well as great balance.

However, I do not know whether Galloni is thinking of Gothic cathedrals while he is writing his notes. :-)
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#899 Post by John Morris » January 17th, 2020, 7:50 am

We've had a lot of discussion here of the dimensionality of wine, and now it seems that the continuum is at least two-dimensional: in addition to ends, it has sides!
2010 Col D'Orcia Brunello di Montalcino Riserva Poggio al Vento
"Released seven years after the harvest, the 2010 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva Poggio al Vento is a stunning wine. It soars to the highest altitudes in terms of elegance and power. These opposite forces -- muscle versus grace -- are what distinguish this classic vintage. Col d'Orcia has effortlessly captured and immortalized both sides of the continuum. The bouquet produces a long succession of aromas including dried cherry fruit, licorice, cola, lavender flower, cured meat and black truffle. The velvety finish is supple and long in persistence. This is a gorgeous creation." -- Monica Larner, Wine Advocate, 97 points
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Re: It's critic bingo! (am I geometrically challenged?)

#900 Post by John Morris » January 17th, 2020, 7:56 am

One hopes a wine is vinous.

What's with the "scented yet silky"? What's the inconsistency between scented and silky?

And minerality has now become a structural element (a spine), as opposed to an aroma or flavor?
2012 Col D'Orcia Brunello di Montalcino
"Very pure nose offers raspberry, pomegranate, and licorice. Fresh and vinous, with scented yet silky flavors of redcurrant, raspberry, flowers and spices perked up by firm acidity and a solid mineral spine. The finish is penetrating and long.... This is a lovely example of the typical 2012 high acid, perfumed Brunellos, but those weaned on high pH, fleshier wnes may fnd it to be a littler lean." --Antonio Galloni, Vinous, 91 points
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