It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

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Robert.A.Jr.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#701 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 8th, 2019, 10:48 am

Jayson Cohen wrote:
June 8th, 2019, 9:18 am

Meanwhile on the LawyerBerserkers.com lawyer’s bingo thread:

Bingo card includes—
- for the foregoing reasons
- notwithstanding
- respectfully asks that the Court
- aforementioned
Plus:

- Govern yourself accordingly
- Esquire
- Effectuate
- Same
- Whether or not (the former implying the latter, of course)
- Including but not limited
- For avoidance of doubt (as a preamble to restating something because your first sentence was not clear)
- Whereas

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#702 Post by GregT » June 8th, 2019, 11:58 am

- Including but not limited
- For avoidance of doubt
Man if you know how many times I've told people that "including" is not limited unless it's modified. In other words, "including A and B" does not exclude C unless you state that you are "including ONLY A and B."

And the avoidance of doubt phrase is one of the dumbest. I always know I'm in the presence of a blowhard when I read that. Just state the point clearly and there will be no doubt!

But back to the game.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#703 Post by John Morris » June 11th, 2019, 1:57 pm

Take this to Asylum, boys! It deserves its own thread.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#704 Post by John Morris » June 11th, 2019, 2:02 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 2:41 pm
As we all know, some wines speak to you. This one seems like a downright chatterbox:
The 2014 Barbera d'Alba is an intriguing wine in that it speaks more to the personality of the estate than to the year, or even to Barbera. The 2014 is a Cappellano wine, and that's pretty much all there is to it. Succulent, pliant and expressive, the 2014 has a lot to say. On the palate, the 2014 expresses the mid-weight style of the year. Dark chocolate, plum and spice meld into the super-expressive finish.
-- Antonio Galloni
Now for some wines that don't have a lot to say. What they do have in common with the Cappellano barbera is repetition:
2016 Peay Pinot Noir Scallop Shelf
Vinous 92
"The 2016 Pinot Noir Estate Scallop Shelf comes across as a bit shy in the way it speaks with a hushed voice. Inward and not especially expressive, the 2016 doesn't have either the depth of the Ama not the energy of the Pomarium. Instead, the Scallop Shelf lies somewhere in the middle, with a less clearly defined personality than the other Pinots in the range."-Antonio Galloni


2015 Peay Pinot Noir Estate Ama
Vinous 93+
"The 2015 Pinot Noir Estate Ama comes across as quite understated, especially within the context of the year. Bright red cherry, blood orange, mint and sweet spices give the wine its beguiling aromatics. Delicate and understated on the palate and also relative to other vintages the 2015 looks like it will drink well with minimal cellaring."-Antonio Galloni
"The Internet has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of instances in which humor must be explained." - me, 2019

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#705 Post by K John Joseph » June 11th, 2019, 2:16 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 2:02 pm
2016 Peay Pinot Noir Scallop Shelf
Vinous 92
"The 2016 Pinot Noir Estate Scallop Shelf comes across as a bit shy in the way it speaks with a hushed voice. Inward and not especially expressive, the 2016 doesn't have either the depth of the Ama not the energy of the Pomarium. Instead, the Scallop Shelf lies somewhere in the middle, with a less clearly defined personality than the other Pinots in the range."-Antonio Galloni


2015 Peay Pinot Noir Estate Ama
Vinous 93+
"The 2015 Pinot Noir Estate Ama comes across as quite understated, especially within the context of the year. Bright red cherry, blood orange, mint and sweet spices give the wine its beguiling aromatics. Delicate and understated on the palate and also relative to other vintages the 2015 looks like it will drink well with minimal cellaring."-Antonio Galloni
That Scallop Shelf note is why Galloni (and many other critics) drive me absolutely nuts. You cannot read that tasting note and have any idea what it tastes like. Let's play a game, Galloni. Taste this soup and describe the soup to my friend so he can feel like he's here and decide whether to order this soup when he comes to this restaurant. *slurp* "The soup is soupy, but not expressive, or not as expressive as other soups. Its flavors are not as flavorful as other flavors, and I have had other soups that had more flavorful soupy flavors. 92 pts."

He's like Lloyd Christmas from Dumb and Dumber some times. What's the soup dejour? "the soup of the day." Mmmm, that sounds good. I'll have that.

The next note has redundancies, but at least it makes sense and you can get a very good impression of what the damn thing actually tastes like.

Champagne notes across many critics are like his first note. "Fine bead, precise, with firm cut and a lingering, mouth watering finish." Yeah but what does the wine actually taste like? Yeasty, pure citrus, biscuit, ginger, graham cracker, hazelnut, white peach, apple, marzipan, truffle...make an effort. It's for a paying consumer, not an effort in mental masturbation.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#706 Post by Charlie Carnes » June 11th, 2019, 5:45 pm

John, you are being too nice. To me he seems to be saying that a crappy wine tastes good. It's like he sneezed, sharted, then gave it a 92. Please forgive me if that's too crass, ill take it down if it is.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#707 Post by John Morris » June 11th, 2019, 6:02 pm

Charlie Carnes wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 5:45 pm
John, you are being too nice. To me he seems to be saying that a crappy wine tastes good. It's like he sneezed, sharted, then gave it a 92. Please forgive me if that's too crass, ill take it down if it is.
No, you've enlarged my Anglo-Saxon vocabulary.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#708 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 11th, 2019, 6:06 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 6:02 pm
Charlie Carnes wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 5:45 pm
John, you are being too nice. To me he seems to be saying that a crappy wine tastes good. It's like he sneezed, sharted, then gave it a 92. Please forgive me if that's too crass, ill take it down if it is.
No, you've enlarged my Anglo-Saxon vocabulary.
Of course a blue-blood like you would not know that word!

And charlie, not too crass, you like Loire Cab Franc like me!

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#709 Post by GregT » June 12th, 2019, 2:09 am

Interesting. I didn't know it was an irregular verb. More roughage would seem to be the key.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#710 Post by John Morris » June 12th, 2019, 7:46 am

Another term for the LPB bingo card: "decadently fruited." I guess that's equivalent to Parker's favorite, "hedonistic."
2018 Durand-Laplagne Les Terres Rouges, Puisseguin-St.-Emilion
...scents of plum preserves, Black Forest cake and Chinese five spice with wafts of potpourri and fragrant earth. Full-bodied, rich and decadently fruited in the mouth, it has firm, plush tannins...

2018 Les Gravieres, St. Emilion
...deep garnet-purple and rocks up with gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...
I'm getting the sense she has dessert on her mind constantly (see post #638 above). But, from the descriptions of these wines, I guess they may satisfy that urge.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#711 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 12th, 2019, 7:50 am

John Morris wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 7:46 am
Another term for the LPB bingo card: "decadently fruited." I guess that's equivalent to Parker's favorite, "hedonistic."
2018 Durand-Laplagne Les Terres Rouges, Puisseguin-St.-Emilion
...scents of plum preserves, Black Forest cake and Chinese five spice with wafts of potpourri and fragrant earth. Full-bodied, rich and decadently fruited in the mouth, it has firm, plush tannins...

2018 Les Gravieres, St. Emilion
...deep garnet-purple and rocks up with gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...
I'm getting the sense she has dessert on her mind constantly (see post #638 above). But, from the descriptions of these wines, I guess they may satisfy that urge.
Have not had the 2018, but the 2009 Les Gravieres was horrid, like syrup. I mean really, who the hell wants to drink a chocolate mocha milkshake for wine?

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#712 Post by Charlie Carnes » June 12th, 2019, 9:26 am

GregT wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 2:09 am
Interesting. I didn't know it was an irregular verb. More roughage would seem to be the key.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#713 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » June 12th, 2019, 10:34 am

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 7:50 am
John Morris wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 7:46 am
Another term for the LPB bingo card: "decadently fruited." I guess that's equivalent to Parker's favorite, "hedonistic."
2018 Durand-Laplagne Les Terres Rouges, Puisseguin-St.-Emilion
...scents of plum preserves, Black Forest cake and Chinese five spice with wafts of potpourri and fragrant earth. Full-bodied, rich and decadently fruited in the mouth, it has firm, plush tannins...

2018 Les Gravieres, St. Emilion
...deep garnet-purple and rocks up with gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...
I'm getting the sense she has dessert on her mind constantly (see post #638 above). But, from the descriptions of these wines, I guess they may satisfy that urge.
Have not had the 2018, but the 2009 Les Gravieres was horrid, like syrup. I mean really, who the hell wants to drink a chocolate mocha milkshake for wine?
Wouldn't syrup be the very definition of the most decadent possible form of fruit? I guess "decadently fruited" sounds better than "syrupy".

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#714 Post by Jayson Cohen » June 12th, 2019, 11:19 am

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 7:50 am
John Morris wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 7:46 am
Another term for the LPB bingo card: "decadently fruited." I guess that's equivalent to Parker's favorite, "hedonistic."
2018 Durand-Laplagne Les Terres Rouges, Puisseguin-St.-Emilion
...scents of plum preserves, Black Forest cake and Chinese five spice with wafts of potpourri and fragrant earth. Full-bodied, rich and decadently fruited in the mouth, it has firm, plush tannins...

2018 Les Gravieres, St. Emilion
...deep garnet-purple and rocks up with gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...
I'm getting the sense she has dessert on her mind constantly (see post #638 above). But, from the descriptions of these wines, I guess they may satisfy that urge.
Have not had the 2018, but the 2009 Les Gravieres was horrid, like syrup. I mean really, who the hell wants to drink a chocolate mocha milkshake for wine?
This type of description - like one is drinking dessert - is how Rovani used to write red Burgundy tasting notes in the WA.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#715 Post by Jim Brennan » June 12th, 2019, 11:29 am

John Morris wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 2:02 pm
John Morris wrote:
June 3rd, 2019, 2:41 pm
As we all know, some wines speak to you. This one seems like a downright chatterbox:
The 2014 Barbera d'Alba is an intriguing wine in that it speaks more to the personality of the estate than to the year, or even to Barbera. The 2014 is a Cappellano wine, and that's pretty much all there is to it. Succulent, pliant and expressive, the 2014 has a lot to say. On the palate, the 2014 expresses the mid-weight style of the year. Dark chocolate, plum and spice meld into the super-expressive finish.
-- Antonio Galloni
Now for some wines that don't have a lot to say. What they do have in common with the Cappellano barbera is repetition:
2016 Peay Pinot Noir Scallop Shelf
Vinous 92
"The 2016 Pinot Noir Estate Scallop Shelf comes across as a bit shy in the way it speaks with a hushed voice. Inward and not especially expressive, the 2016 doesn't have either the depth of the Ama not the energy of the Pomarium. Instead, the Scallop Shelf lies somewhere in the middle, with a less clearly defined personality than the other Pinots in the range."-Antonio Galloni


2015 Peay Pinot Noir Estate Ama
Vinous 93+
"The 2015 Pinot Noir Estate Ama comes across as quite understated, especially within the context of the year. Bright red cherry, blood orange, mint and sweet spices give the wine its beguiling aromatics. Delicate and understated on the palate and also relative to other vintages the 2015 looks like it will drink well with minimal cellaring."-Antonio Galloni
Sounds like that wine is a low talker.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#716 Post by crickey » June 12th, 2019, 12:12 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 7:46 am
Another term for the LPB bingo card: "decadently fruited." I guess that's equivalent to Parker's favorite, "hedonistic."
2018 Durand-Laplagne Les Terres Rouges, Puisseguin-St.-Emilion
...scents of plum preserves, Black Forest cake and Chinese five spice with wafts of potpourri and fragrant earth. Full-bodied, rich and decadently fruited in the mouth, it has firm, plush tannins...

2018 Les Gravieres, St. Emilion
...deep garnet-purple and rocks up with gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...
I'm getting the sense she has dessert on her mind constantly (see post #638 above). But, from the descriptions of these wines, I guess they may satisfy that urge.
"Decadently-fruited" is actually a very good descriptive term. The responses it has drawn on this thread essentially boil down to "I don't like decadently-fruited wine." If that's the case, she did a good job of indicating it is a wine you should avoid.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#717 Post by John Morris » June 12th, 2019, 1:15 pm

I agree the phrase tells you a lot about the wine, though "fruited" is a bit annoying. What's the matter with "fruity"?

The real problem is the repetition. Good writers are careful to avoid reusing very distinctive phrases like that too often (e.g., recycling it in another review of the same category of wines).
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#718 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 12th, 2019, 1:39 pm

I like that it is gregarious pie. My favorite pies and desserts are those that speak to me before I goggle them up.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#719 Post by crickey » June 12th, 2019, 2:06 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 1:15 pm
I agree the phrase tells you a lot about the wine, though "fruited" is a bit annoying. What's the matter with "fruity"?

The real problem is the repetition. Good writers are careful to avoid reusing very distinctive phrases like that too often (e.g., recycling it in another review of the same category of wines).
In a report with 1000s of TNs, how often is too many? Also, context matters. LPB generally describes the tannin quality; how many ways are there really to describe tannins? You will have to expect significant repetition in those descriptions. I did flag AG a few weeks ago for using "outrageously beautiful" in two different Arnot-Roberts notes.

On "fruity" vs. "fruited," I have seen "red-fruited" more than a few times, and it doesn't bother me. "Decadently-fruited" is similar and strikes me as better than "decadently fruity," but I have a soft spot for adverbally-hyphenated compound adjectives.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#720 Post by John Morris » June 12th, 2019, 2:44 pm

If you have to say "fruity," or "fine-grained tannins" or "hard tannins" or "astringent" many times, so be it, even if it's repetitive. But it's a basic rule of good writing not to repeat too often phrases that call attention to themselves, as "decadently fruited" does.

"Red-fruited" bothers me less, perhaps because in that context "fruited" is not synonymous with "fruity" (you wouldn't normally describe a wine as "red fruity"), as it is in "decadently fruited." But if "red fruited" were used every time a critic meant "red fruits," it would stand out as a writing tick.

Another comparison: I'm OK with "plummy" but describing a wine as "plummed," "raspberried" or "apricoted" would seem odd.

My advice to these folks? Don't try to get poetic if you're devoid of literary talent.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#721 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » June 12th, 2019, 4:07 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 7:46 am
Another term for the LPB bingo card: "decadently fruited." I guess that's equivalent to Parker's favorite, "hedonistic."
2018 Durand-Laplagne Les Terres Rouges, Puisseguin-St.-Emilion
...scents of plum preserves, Black Forest cake and Chinese five spice with wafts of potpourri and fragrant earth. Full-bodied, rich and decadently fruited in the mouth, it has firm, plush tannins...

2018 Les Gravieres, St. Emilion
...deep garnet-purple and rocks up with gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...
I'm getting the sense she has dessert on her mind constantly (see post #638 above). But, from the descriptions of these wines, I guess they may satisfy that urge.
The thing about those "dessert bingo" tasting notes -- chocolate covered cherries! blueberry pie! fruit preserves! cake! ice cream! -- is that you are comparing a very expensive drink to some very cheap sweets. I mean, do you realize how many chocolate covered cherries you could buy for the price of one Grand Cru Burgundy? Several months worth, even for someone with a sweet tooth. If I want some chocolates and pie I'll just drop by the supermarket, I don't need to look to fine French wines for the experience.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#722 Post by Keith Levenberg » June 12th, 2019, 4:45 pm

Charlie Carnes wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 5:45 pm
John, you are being too nice. To me he seems to be saying that a crappy wine tastes good. It's like he sneezed, sharted, then gave it a 92. Please forgive me if that's too crass, ill take it down if it is.
Wait, this is actually useful information. Every wine is either a total shart or a striking beauty whose depth blossoms in every dimension and captivates all the senses. Now we know the dividing line between those things is the line between 92 and 93 points.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#723 Post by Jayson Cohen » June 12th, 2019, 5:08 pm

Keith Levenberg wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 4:45 pm
Charlie Carnes wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 5:45 pm
John, you are being too nice. To me he seems to be saying that a crappy wine tastes good. It's like he sneezed, sharted, then gave it a 92. Please forgive me if that's too crass, ill take it down if it is.
Wait, this is actually useful information. Every wine is either a total shart or a striking beauty whose depth blossoms in every dimension and captivates all the senses. Now we know the dividing line between those things is the line between 92 and 93 points.
Remarkably this is my binary scoring system as well. All of the wines I like are 93 points. All of the wines I don’t like are 92 points. No sharting though.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#724 Post by Yao C » June 12th, 2019, 5:16 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 1:39 pm
I like that it is gregarious pie. My favorite pies and desserts are those that speak to me before I goggle them up.
Haha what an amazing howler [rofl.gif]

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#725 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 12th, 2019, 6:48 pm

Look at my signature. I give extra points for wines that shart.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#726 Post by John Morris » June 12th, 2019, 8:52 pm

Looking back at that 2018 Les Gravieres note of LPB's, what's with that "rocks up," which she seems to employ as a verb phrase?

The other funny thing is the utter disconnect between her descriptors and Galloni's:
Perotti-Brown (94-96): "... gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...."

Galloni (91-94): "Freshly cut flowers, rose petal, mint and sweet red berry fruit are beautifully lifted in this very understated Saint-Émilion. Medium in body, refined and supremely gracious....
She gets all dark fruits and chocolate and mocha, while he tasted a floral, lifted, red-fruited [sic] wine. Hers was gregarious, big and full. His was understated, medium-bodied, refined and gracious.

It's hilarious that some merchants quote these side by side!
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#727 Post by Charlie Carnes » June 12th, 2019, 10:08 pm

Keith Levenberg wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 4:45 pm
Charlie Carnes wrote:
June 11th, 2019, 5:45 pm
John, you are being too nice. To me he seems to be saying that a crappy wine tastes good. It's like he sneezed, sharted, then gave it a 92. Please forgive me if that's too crass, ill take it down if it is.
Wait, this is actually useful information. Every wine is either a total shart or a striking beauty whose depth blossoms in every dimension and captivates all the senses. Now we know the dividing line between those things is the line between 92 and 93 points.
I'm just hoping the term will go down in the annals of wine berserker history.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#728 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 13th, 2019, 3:00 am

John Morris wrote:
June 12th, 2019, 8:52 pm
Looking back at that 2018 Les Gravieres note of LPB's, what's with that "rocks up," which she seems to employ as a verb phrase?

The other funny thing is the utter disconnect between her descriptors and Galloni's:
Perotti-Brown (94-96): "... gregarious blueberry pie, chocolate-covered cherries and plum preserves scents with nuances of violets, spice cake and mocha. Big, full and decadently fruited...."

Galloni (91-94): "Freshly cut flowers, rose petal, mint and sweet red berry fruit are beautifully lifted in this very understated Saint-Émilion. Medium in body, refined and supremely gracious....
She gets all dark fruits and chocolate and mocha, while he tasted a floral, lifted, red-fruited [sic] wine. Hers was gregarious, big and full. His was understated, medium-bodied, refined and gracious.

It's hilarious that some merchants quote these side by side!
I like that both anthropomorphize the wine, and if you merge the notes, it is both gregarious and gracious. Sounds like a wine to make my friend. Over a big slab of cake from Cheesecake Factory.

Having tried other vintages of this wine, LPB is more likely close to correct.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#729 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » June 13th, 2019, 7:05 am

I wouldn't let the use of decadent off so easily. I suppose it points to something like surmaturité (I'm using the French to remain neutral about the quality and avoid the negative meaning built in to overripe). But, just as hedonistic incorrectly turns a word that describes the attitude of some people into the quality of an object (objects give pleasure and hedonists either philosophically approve of such things or just enjoy them and are thus hedonistic) this use of decadent turns a word that always has at least the connotation of dissolution (saying a dessert is decadent says, not merely that it is delicious, but that its deliciousness is over the top, perhaps purchased at unjustified cost or at some cost of health) and turns it into a bland adjective of praise. It gives information, just as hedonistic does, only once one has entered the corrupt world of wine notes.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#730 Post by crickey » June 13th, 2019, 1:04 pm

To use another example I cited above for why I cut writers slack about repetition, it was mildly entertaining to see how many modifiers Josh Raynolds could come up with to qualify "red" as the color descriptor for Oregon pinots: translucent, glimmering, brilliant, bright, vivid, deep brilliant, limpid, shimmering, lurid, etc. Needless to say, there were frequent repeats, but so what? There are only so many ways to describe the quality of a color, and hundreds of wines to so describe.
Chri$ Ri¢k€y

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#731 Post by John Morris » June 13th, 2019, 1:45 pm

This wine is not only rich; it exudes richness. I'm guessing it's sumptuous in all dimensions, too.
94-97 points Vinous
The 2018 L'Évangile is shaping up to be exceptional. Rich and sumptuous in the glass, the 2018 exudes richness in all of its dimensions. Opulent and dense in the glass, with soft curves and silky, polished tannins, the 2018 is hugely promising. All the elements just fall into place. Dark raspberry jam, cloves, menthol and new leather are some of the many notes that build in a sumptuous, racy Évangile loaded with class and personality. I can't wait to taste it from bottle. (AG) (4/2019)
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#732 Post by Jayson Cohen » June 13th, 2019, 6:32 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 13th, 2019, 1:45 pm
This wine is not only rich; it exudes richness. I'm guessing it's sumptuous in all dimensions, too.
94-97 points Vinous
The 2018 L'Évangile is shaping up to be exceptional. Rich and sumptuous in the glass, the 2018 exudes richness in all of its dimensions. Opulent and dense in the glass, with soft curves and silky, polished tannins, the 2018 is hugely promising. All the elements just fall into place. Dark raspberry jam, cloves, menthol and new leather are some of the many notes that build in a sumptuous, racy Évangile loaded with class and personality. I can't wait to taste it from bottle. (AG) (4/2019)
Does richness have dimensions, or does a wine have dimensions that can all exude richness? Does it matter?

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