It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

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Jonathan Loesberg
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#551 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » April 24th, 2019, 1:17 am

Yao C wrote:
April 23rd, 2019, 11:47 am
Otto Forsberg wrote:
April 23rd, 2019, 5:09 am
But that pixelated red fruit note.

Just what.
Yes I've been curious about that too. Sometimes it's been rendered as "pixilated"
"Pixelated" and "pixilated" are different words. The first means what it is used to mean in this thread, fruit appearance reproduced by pixels. Why this would be thought to be a positive quality is also a mystery to me. The second is a 19th and early 20th century Americanism meaning somewhat addled. The root is pixies, not pixels. For those of you with a taste for old movies, the word appears in the trial scene in Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town. I could sort of see why fruit that was metaphorically addled might be distinctive, at least, but I doubt that that's what the reviewers meant.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#552 Post by J.Vizuete » April 24th, 2019, 5:18 am

Mark Thompson wrote:
April 23rd, 2019, 5:33 am
Otto Forsberg wrote:
April 23rd, 2019, 5:09 am
But that pixelated red fruit note.

Just what.
D3F1CB80-5248-4DC0-B9F0-34C5901E1051.jpeg
Bwahahaha [rofl.gif]
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John Morris
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#553 Post by John Morris » April 24th, 2019, 8:27 am

Jonathan Loesberg wrote:
April 24th, 2019, 1:17 am
"Pixelated" and "pixilated" are different words. The first means what it is used to mean in this thread, fruit appearance reproduced by pixels. Why this would be thought to be a positive quality is also a mystery to me. The second is a 19th and early 20th century Americanism meaning somewhat addled. The root is pixies, not pixels. For those of you with a taste for old movies, the word appears in the trial scene in Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town. I could sort of see why fruit that was metaphorically addled might be distinctive, at least, but I doubt that that's what the reviewers meant.
What a wonderful bit of etymology! Thanks for that. I assumed "pixilated" was just a typo. I must find an opportunity to use that word.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#554 Post by Yao C » April 24th, 2019, 3:44 pm

John Morris wrote:
April 24th, 2019, 8:27 am
Jonathan Loesberg wrote:
April 24th, 2019, 1:17 am
"Pixelated" and "pixilated" are different words. The first means what it is used to mean in this thread, fruit appearance reproduced by pixels. Why this would be thought to be a positive quality is also a mystery to me. The second is a 19th and early 20th century Americanism meaning somewhat addled. The root is pixies, not pixels. For those of you with a taste for old movies, the word appears in the trial scene in Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town. I could sort of see why fruit that was metaphorically addled might be distinctive, at least, but I doubt that that's what the reviewers meant.
What a wonderful bit of etymology! Thanks for that. I assumed "pixilated" was just a typo. I must find an opportunity to use that word.
Yes thank you! I'd bet money none of the wine critics knew that about the word
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#555 Post by David Glasser » April 25th, 2019, 8:55 pm

I’d say use of "pixelated fruit" as a descriptor is evidence of critic pixilation.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#556 Post by RichardFlack » April 26th, 2019, 7:14 am

So what are the pixies supposed to have done to the fruit?

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#557 Post by John Kight » April 26th, 2019, 7:36 am

Haven't you ever sprinkled Pixie Stix (a candy powder that comes in a straw-like container) over your fruit before, making it "Pixie-lated" fruit?

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#558 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » April 26th, 2019, 9:32 am

I think "pixelated" is somehow meant to be an analogy for the fineness and precision of detail of the fruit, so like you are tasting each individual bit of fruit that makes up the whole, like pixels in a computer image. (Before you comment -- I didn't say it was a *good* analogy!)

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#559 Post by Otto Forsberg » April 26th, 2019, 11:16 am

Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
April 26th, 2019, 9:32 am
I think "pixelated" is somehow meant to be an analogy for the fineness and precision of detail of the fruit, so like you are tasting each individual bit of fruit that makes up the whole, like pixels in a computer image. (Before you comment -- I didn't say it was a *good* analogy!)
This really doesn't make sense, if it's supposed to be about fineness and precision. The more noticeable the pixels are, the lousier the resolution is. [wow.gif]

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#560 Post by David Glasser » April 26th, 2019, 2:59 pm

Otto Forsberg wrote:
April 26th, 2019, 11:16 am
Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
April 26th, 2019, 9:32 am
I think "pixelated" is somehow meant to be an analogy for the fineness and precision of detail of the fruit, so like you are tasting each individual bit of fruit that makes up the whole, like pixels in a computer image. (Before you comment -- I didn't say it was a *good* analogy!)
This really doesn't make sense, if it's supposed to be about fineness and precision. The more noticeable the pixels are, the lousier the resolution is. [wow.gif]
I agree with both of you.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#561 Post by John Morris » April 28th, 2019, 9:39 am

The 2012 [Barolo Pira Vecchie Viti] is dense and layered, with striking translucency that plays off the more overt elements. ... 96+ points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
Interactive translucency? [scratch.gif] [scratch.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#562 Post by Charlie Carnes » April 28th, 2019, 9:47 pm

RichardFlack wrote:
April 26th, 2019, 7:14 am
So what are the pixies supposed to have done to the fruit?
They are probably asking,"Where is my mind?", as they are trying to come up with new and fantastic ways to describe wine...
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#563 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » April 29th, 2019, 5:27 am

John Morris wrote:
April 28th, 2019, 9:39 am
The 2012 [Barolo Pira Vecchie Viti] is dense and layered, with striking translucency that plays off the more overt elements. ... 96+ points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
Interactive translucency? [scratch.gif] [scratch.gif]
You are so opaque!

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#564 Post by Jim Brennan » April 29th, 2019, 6:00 am

David Glasser wrote:
April 26th, 2019, 2:59 pm
Otto Forsberg wrote:
April 26th, 2019, 11:16 am
Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
April 26th, 2019, 9:32 am
I think "pixelated" is somehow meant to be an analogy for the fineness and precision of detail of the fruit, so like you are tasting each individual bit of fruit that makes up the whole, like pixels in a computer image. (Before you comment -- I didn't say it was a *good* analogy!)
This really doesn't make sense, if it's supposed to be about fineness and precision. The more noticeable the pixels are, the lousier the resolution is. [wow.gif]
I agree with both of you.
Great example of how critic bullshit buzzword bingo isn't helpful to consumers... We can't even understand what it is supposed to mean.

As for transparency vs translucency, since we've already established that Galloni uses words he doesn't understand, should we assume he mean the former but used the latter under the false assumption they mean the same thing?

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#565 Post by Yao C » April 29th, 2019, 10:51 am

Jim Brennan wrote:
April 29th, 2019, 6:00 am
As for transparency vs translucency, since we've already established that Galloni uses words he doesn't understand, should we assume he mean the former but used the latter under the false assumption they mean the same thing?
So if "transparency" is what he meant, I wonder how Mr. Galloni thinks it "play(s) off the more overt elements"?

Either he is secretly using a deep learning program to auto-generate wine reviews for him, or he's trained himself to write like one, but in either case there is very little actual information there. It's like the inverse of the Turing Test, where a human demonstrates they are indistinguishable from a machine
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Re: It's critic bingo! (Furballs?)

#566 Post by John Morris » April 29th, 2019, 2:48 pm

Winemakers everywhere are scrambling to get that cast iron skillet note in their wines now to produce that "wow" factor.
John Morris wrote:
April 3rd, 2019, 2:18 pm
1998 Clos de Sarpe, St-Emilion
94 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Medium to deep garnet-brick in color, the 1998 Clos de Sarpe gives a beautiful perfume of Chinese five spice, sandalwood and preserved plums with notions of dried mulberries, potpourri, black truffles, cast iron pan and a compelling waft of aniseed. Medium-bodied with wonderful elegance, incredible freshness and a scintillating satiny texture, the perfumed layers just go on and on. Wow—fantastic surprise! (LPB)
[scratch.gif]
"100 out of 100...Deep garnet colored, the 2009 Pontet-Canet is a little shut down to begin, but with coaxing this baby is soon firing on all cylinders with a full-throttle nose of chocolate-covered cherries, crème de cassis, boysenberries and spice cake plus tons of kirsch and cranberry sauce sparks and a beautiful undercurrent of emerging tertiary characters: cigar box, sandalwood, chargrill, truffles and cast iron pan. Full-bodied, rich, multilayered and completely seductive, the palate is charged with incredible energy, with a firm backbone of velvety tannins and seamless freshness providing solid grounding and promising a very long life ahead. It finishes with an incredible display of epically long-lasting flavor fireworks. Wow!" - Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#567 Post by Jim Brennan » April 29th, 2019, 6:35 pm

Yao C wrote:
April 29th, 2019, 10:51 am
Jim Brennan wrote:
April 29th, 2019, 6:00 am
As for transparency vs translucency, since we've already established that Galloni uses words he doesn't understand, should we assume he mean the former but used the latter under the false assumption they mean the same thing?
So if "transparency" is what he meant, I wonder how Mr. Galloni thinks it "play(s) off the more overt elements"?

Either he is secretly using a deep learning program to auto-generate wine reviews for him, or he's trained himself to write like one, but in either case there is very little actual information there. It's like the inverse of the Turing Test, where a human demonstrates they are indistinguishable from a machine
Agree... I made this very comment (that many of his notes read like they were generated by an AI) earlier in this thread.

And, yes, it still doesn't really make sense.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#568 Post by GregT » April 30th, 2019, 12:59 pm

Either he is secretly using a deep learning program to auto-generate wine reviews for him, or he's trained himself to write like one
This is funny. Particularly the second alternative. As LPB would say - "wow!"

So I did a search and here are some more cast iron pans for John:

2016 Hartford Court Far Coast Pinot Noir 96 POINTS
"Medium ruby-purple in color, the 2016 Hartford Court Pinot Noir Far Coast Vineyard reveals a beautifully fruity nose of warm raspberries, preserved cherries and mulberries with hints of red roses, underbrush, wild blueberries and cast iron pan with a touch of truffles. Medium-bodied with a solid frame of very fine-grained tannins, the palate delivers vibrant red and blue fruit layers and a long, perfumed finish."- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Robert Parker Wine Advocate, October 2018


And this:
2017 Chateau Ausone St. Emilion WA97-99Wine Advocate
Blended of 55% Cabernet Franc and 45% Merlot, the deep garnet-purple colored 2017 Ausone offers up slowly emerging notes of crushed black plums, blackberries and mulberries with nuances of anise, violets, new leather and unsmoked cigars plus suggestions of black olives and truffles and a touch of cast iron pan. Medium to full-bodied with firm, very finely grained, super ripe tannins and an uplifting backbone of freshness perfectly supporting the profoundly layered, tightly wound yet incredibly intense fruit, it finishes very long with mineral accents and compelling tension.


Here's a bonus just for John, who loves this:

"The 2017 Ausone is a total stunner. That's all there is to it. 95-98 points" Antonio Galloni

Château Margaux 2016
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2016 Château Margaux (blended of 94% Cabernet Sauvignon, 3% Cabernet Franc, 2% Merlot and 1% Petit Verdot) sashays out of the glass with glamorous red currants, candied violets, kirsch and crushed blackcurrants scents followed by notions of tilled black soil, forest floor, cast iron pan and cigar box with subtle wafts of lavender and oolong tea. Medium-bodied, mineral laced accents hover over the palate with an ethereal sensation of weightlessness, yet it is super intense with layers of red and black flavors supported by a firm texture of silt-fine tannins, finishing wonderfully fragrant and incredibly long." - Lisa Perotti-Brown, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate (11/30/2018, Interim Issue), Ratings: 99


Leoville Las Cases 2016 100 WA
Very deep purple-black colored, the 2016 Léoville Las Cases (composed of 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 14% Merlot and 11% Cabernet Franc) is quite closed to begin, yet with patient coaxing it unfurls beautifully to reveal suggestions of ripe blackcurrants, black raspberries, warm redcurrants and wild blueberries, followed by touches of unsmoked cigars, tilled red soil, cast iron pan, fallen leaves and lavender plus wonderfully fragrant wafts of lilacs and baking spices. Medium to full-bodied, the palate is packed with tightly knit, very subtle layers of minerals, floral notions and black and red berries, all framed by exquisitely ripe, silt-like tannins and fantastic freshness, finishing with epic length and depth. Simply captivating even in its youth, give it at least a decade in the cellar and then enjoy it over the next 50+ years. - Lisa Perotti-Brown, Wine Advocate


So apparently cast iron pan means something specific for LPB. I cook with them every few days and can't imagine what it is - I've never actually tried to eat the pan itself.
G . T a t a r

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#569 Post by John Morris » April 30th, 2019, 2:02 pm

OMG, where to start?!

That's an epic [sic] harvest, Greg.
GregT wrote:
April 30th, 2019, 12:59 pm
2016 Hartford Court Far Coast Pinot Noir 96 POINTS
"Medium ruby-purple in color, the 2016 Hartford Court Pinot Noir Far Coast Vineyard reveals a beautifully fruity nose of warm raspberries, preserved cherries and mulberries with hints of red roses, underbrush, wild blueberries and cast iron pan with a touch of truffles. Medium-bodied with a solid frame of very fine-grained tannins, the palate delivers vibrant red and blue fruit layers and a long, perfumed finish."- Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Robert Parker Wine Advocate, October 2018


And this:
2017 Chateau Ausone St. Emilion WA97-99Wine Advocate
Blended of 55% Cabernet Franc and 45% Merlot, the deep garnet-purple colored 2017 Ausone offers up slowly emerging notes of crushed black plums, blackberries and mulberries with nuances of anise, violets, new leather and unsmoked cigars plus suggestions of black olives and truffles and a touch of cast iron pan. Medium to full-bodied with firm, very finely grained, super ripe tannins and an uplifting backbone of freshness perfectly supporting the profoundly layered, tightly wound yet incredibly intense fruit, it finishes very long with mineral accents and compelling tension.


[A period, Lisa -- we need a period! - JM]

Here's a bonus just for John, who loves this:

"The 2017 Ausone is a total stunner. That's all there is to it. 95-98 points" Antonio Galloni

[Excellent spotting, Greg. He must have exhausted his "It's as simple as that's." -- JM]


Château Margaux 2016
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2016 Château Margaux (blended of 94% Cabernet Sauvignon, 3% Cabernet Franc, 2% Merlot and 1% Petit Verdot) sashays out of the glass with glamorous red currants, candied violets, kirsch and crushed blackcurrants scents followed by notions of tilled black soil, forest floor, cast iron pan and cigar box with subtle wafts of lavender and oolong tea. Medium-bodied, mineral laced accents hover over the palate with an ethereal sensation of weightlessness, yet it is super intense with layers of red and black flavors supported by a firm texture of silt-fine tannins, finishing wonderfully fragrant and incredibly long." - Lisa Perotti-Brown, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate (11/30/2018, Interim Issue), Ratings: 99


Leoville Las Cases 2016 100 WA
Very deep purple-black colored, the 2016 Léoville Las Cases (composed of 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 14% Merlot and 11% Cabernet Franc) is quite closed to begin, yet with patient coaxing it unfurls beautifully to reveal suggestions of ripe blackcurrants, black raspberries, warm redcurrants and wild blueberries, followed by touches of unsmoked cigars, tilled red soil, cast iron pan, fallen leaves and lavender plus wonderfully fragrant wafts of lilacs and baking spices. Medium to full-bodied, the palate is packed with tightly knit, very subtle layers of minerals, floral notions and black and red berries, all framed by exquisitely ripe, silt-like tannins and fantastic freshness, finishing with epic length and depth. Simply captivating even in its youth, give it at least a decade in the cellar and then enjoy it over the next 50+ years. - Lisa Perotti-Brown, Wine Advocate

"Sashays out of the glass"? [rofl.gif]

What's with the warm raspberries and redcurrants? And how is a warm red currant different from a glamorous one?

"Silt-like tannin" doesn't sound very appealing.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#570 Post by John Morris » April 30th, 2019, 2:04 pm

"Wow" seems to be contagious:
2015 Guigal Cote Rotie Ch D'Ampuis
JD 96-98
(T)he 2015 Côte Rôtie Château D'Ampuis reveals a deep ruby/purple color as well as an extraordinary bouquet of smoked black fruits, caramelized blackcurrants, leady herbs, ground pepper, and earth. It's deep, rich, massively concentrated, and a powerhouse of a wine that’s going to need bottle age, but wow, what a wine!"-Jeb Dunnuck
"I'm a Frisbeetarian. We worship frisbees. We believe when you die your soul goes up on the roof and you can't get it down." – Jim Stafford

"The Internet has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of instances in which humor must be explained." - me, 2019

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#571 Post by Charlie Carnes » April 30th, 2019, 2:23 pm

GregT wrote:
April 30th, 2019, 12:59 pm
"The 2017 Ausone is a total stunner. That's all there is to it. 95-98 points" Antonio Galloni
...at a loss for words? This might honestly be his best note to date! He didn't wade too deep into the miry lexicon.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#572 Post by Tim Heaton » April 30th, 2019, 2:34 pm

Charlie Carnes wrote:
April 30th, 2019, 2:23 pm
GregT wrote:
April 30th, 2019, 12:59 pm
"The 2017 Ausone is a total stunner. That's all there is to it. 95-98 points" Antonio Galloni
...at a loss for words? This might honestly be his best note to date! He didn't wade too deep into the miry lexicon.
and, by covering 4 of the possible 12 points, he blanketed a lot of territory. But really, folks, isn't Ausone 95-98 every year? Who needs this clown?
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#573 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » May 4th, 2019, 5:27 pm

Just read a tasting note in the Spectator that used “durian” in the description.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#574 Post by Yao C » May 4th, 2019, 5:30 pm

I could see it; durians are distinctly sulfurous. At least there's a real thing that the taste can be compared to (unlike say 'beams of tannin')
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#575 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 11th, 2019, 11:10 am

I have to pick on my friend Leve for using two terms that I have never seen before in a note - caliginous and mellifluous!

2018 Les Carmes Haut Brion – Caliginous in hue, the wine exudes tobacco, smoke, blackberry, pepper, flowers, and spearmint. On the palate, you’ll find density with lift, intensity with complexity, sweetness with verve. The fruit shows a sublime sense of purity, similar to picking grapes off the vine during harvest and eating them right there. The finish matches power with elegance and length. The deep, opulent, mellifluous, mineral accented fruits just don’t want to quit and they remain with you for at least 60 seconds. From a blend of 37% Cabernet Franc, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 29% Merlot and reaching 13.75% alcohol with a pH of 3.61, the wine was made using 55% whole bunches during fermentation. Currently aging in 75% new, French oak barrels, 15% in foudre and 10% in amphora for 18-24 months before bottling. The harvest took place September 13 to September 28. 98–100

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#576 Post by GregT » May 11th, 2019, 11:49 am

Caliginous in hue
Excellent work Robert!

Question - are there bonus points for finding new words like this? If so, Robert gets them. I've never seen it used in a TN before either.

Not quite sure I get it though - doesn't hue mean color or more specifically, the intensity or saturation of the color? And caliginous means murky or maybe even gloomy, so it's murky wine? Muddy? [scratch.gif]

Still, it's a nice find. Kind of like finding a delicious mushroom as you walk by the drainage ditch.
G . T a t a r

[i]"the incorrect overuse of apostrophes is staggering these days. I wonder if half the adults these days have any idea what they are for." Chris Seiber, 5/14/19[/i]

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#577 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 11th, 2019, 12:17 pm

I recall using the words “pellucid” and “mellifluous” in an appeal brief that I wrote for a senior partner when I was in my first year. I was trying to impress with my Editor in Chief bona fides, thinking I was hot sh*t. And the words actually worked well in the context. Then he sat me down and said, “Mr. Alfert, people around here just don’t speak like this.” We had more country folk on our benches back then . . . .

He didn’t like the words “clear” or “clearly,” either. Telling me, “Mr. Alfert, if it were so clear, they wouldn’t need us lawyers, would they?”

I stood corrected . . . .

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#578 Post by Charlie Carnes » May 11th, 2019, 1:49 pm

I love the word mellifluous. I had to look up caliginous: misty, dim, dark, obscure. It's a little glib for a wine reference, but, it's a cool word, and might work well if the author were waxing poetically, or some other form of "gushing", if you will. I'll give that one to Leve!
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#579 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 11th, 2019, 1:54 pm

Charlie Carnes wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 1:49 pm
I love the word mellifluous. I had to look up caliginous: misty, dim, dark, obscure. It's a little glib for a wine reference, but, it's a cool word, and might work well if the author were waxing poetically, or some other form of "gushing", if you will. I'll give that one to Leve!

Well, Jeffois has been known to wax off poetically with this “liquid sex” reference. I think once even smothered in chocolate. [wow.gif]

He is so Hollywood! flirtysmile

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#580 Post by Charlie Carnes » May 11th, 2019, 1:56 pm

Well then the new word will have to be caligulated!
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#581 Post by Charlie Carnes » May 11th, 2019, 2:02 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 1:54 pm
Well, Jeffois has been known to wax off poetically with this “liquid sex” reference. I think once even smothered in chocolate. [wow.gif]
[welldone.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#582 Post by Jeff Leve » May 11th, 2019, 3:26 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 11:10 am
I have to pick on my friend Leve for using two terms that I have never seen before in a note - caliginous and mellifluous!

2018 Les Carmes Haut Brion – Caliginous in hue, the wine exudes tobacco, smoke, blackberry, pepper, flowers, and spearmint. On the palate, you’ll find density with lift, intensity with complexity, sweetness with verve. The fruit shows a sublime sense of purity, similar to picking grapes off the vine during harvest and eating them right there. The finish matches power with elegance and length. The deep, opulent, mellifluous, mineral accented fruits just don’t want to quit and they remain with you for at least 60 seconds. From a blend of 37% Cabernet Franc, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 29% Merlot and reaching 13.75% alcohol with a pH of 3.61, the wine was made using 55% whole bunches during fermentation. Currently aging in 75% new, French oak barrels, 15% in foudre and 10% in amphora for 18-24 months before bottling. The harvest took place September 13 to September 28. 98–100
I’ve made the big time! My first note is ready for its beating. I can take it. John Morris, anytime you’re ready. FWIW, Caliginous is used as dark or black in this case.
Last edited by Jeff Leve on May 11th, 2019, 3:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#583 Post by John Morris » May 11th, 2019, 3:27 pm

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 12:17 pm
I recall using the words “pellucid” and “mellifluous” in an appeal brief that I wrote for a senior partner when I was in my first year. I was trying to impress with my Editor in Chief bona fides, thinking I was hot sh*t. And the words actually worked well in the context. Then he sat me down and said, “Mr. Alfert, people around here just don’t speak like this.” We had more country folk on our benches back then . . . .

He didn’t like the words “clear” or “clearly,” either. Telling me, “Mr. Alfert, if it were so clear, they wouldn’t need us lawyers, would they?”
Reminds me of using "blunderbuss" in a draft of a brief only to be told by the partner to take it out because our judge would have to look it up.

Some years later, I finally got to employ it, referring to some discovery requests in securities fraud litigation with 20 consolidated cases and countless firms, all before a judge who was fully literate.

To my horror, when the other defendants' replies arrived in the mail a few days later, it turned out that one of them had also used "blunderbuss." I checked the signature on the brief and saw that it was an associate who was a friend of a friend of mine. We'd never met or spoken, but I called him up to complain. I explained that I'd been waiting years to use that word and he had no right to use it on the same day. He responded that he'd been waiting years to use it, too.

Thirty years later, we remain fast friends.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#584 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 11th, 2019, 3:35 pm

Charlie Carnes wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 1:56 pm
Well then the new word will have to be caligulated!
Jeff, you will become Urban Dictionary cult classic if you use this one!!!

Easily adds 2 points! And 2 inches.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#585 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » May 12th, 2019, 1:02 am

Surely caligulated means to be turned into a Caligula like person. Is this a good thing for a wine? Or for a person for that matter?

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#586 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » May 12th, 2019, 5:24 am

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 11:10 am
I have to pick on my friend Leve for using two terms that I have never seen before in a note - caliginous and mellifluous!

2018 Les Carmes Haut Brion – Caliginous in hue, the wine exudes tobacco, smoke, blackberry, pepper, flowers, and spearmint. On the palate, you’ll find density with lift, intensity with complexity, sweetness with verve. The fruit shows a sublime sense of purity, similar to picking grapes off the vine during harvest and eating them right there. The finish matches power with elegance and length. The deep, opulent, mellifluous, mineral accented fruits just don’t want to quit and they remain with you for at least 60 seconds. From a blend of 37% Cabernet Franc, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 29% Merlot and reaching 13.75% alcohol with a pH of 3.61, the wine was made using 55% whole bunches during fermentation. Currently aging in 75% new, French oak barrels, 15% in foudre and 10% in amphora for 18-24 months before bottling. The harvest took place September 13 to September 28. 98–100
Jeff’s critical metaphors are always helpful in motivating me to save money. For example, this review motivates me to just buy some fresh grapes and eat them rather than spending $150+ on Carmes Haut Brion. Other reviews have inspired me to just spend five bucks on chocolate covered cherries rather than $200 on high end Pomerol :-)

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#587 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 12th, 2019, 5:34 am

Jonathan Loesberg wrote:
May 12th, 2019, 1:02 am
Surely caligulated means to be turned into a Caligula like person. Is this a good thing for a wine? Or for a person for that matter?
Knowing Charlie, there was a sexual connotation here - two words merged, think about it - but with your interpretation, would be the same as me calling some of Rolland’s creatures, Frankenwines.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#588 Post by Charlie Carnes » May 12th, 2019, 6:12 am

Hey, Robert is right. I was just funnin' with words that were already in play. I mean, wax off, liquid sex, and smothered in chocolate... plus new word that rhymes... it was an easy segue. Plus notice my love for Leve in bold on my first quote. I do like the word caliginous.
Charlie Carnes wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 1:49 pm
I love the word mellifluous. I had to look up caliginous: misty, dim, dark, obscure. It's a little glib for a wine reference, but, it's a cool word, and might work well if the author were waxing poetically, or some other form of "gushing", if you will. I'll give that one to Leve!
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#589 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » May 12th, 2019, 10:39 am

I thought it was pretty clear I was playing around and not criticizing Charlie or anyone else. But given Caligula, I'm fine with all the connections with sex and chocolate.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#590 Post by John Morris » May 13th, 2019, 9:47 am

All class, but slightly repetitive.
The 2016 Prieuré-Lichine is all class. Floral, silky and nuanced to the core, the 2016 is a wine of pure and total seduction. Freshly cut flowers, vibrant red fruit and creamy tannins all add to the wine's undeniable allure. In 2016, Prieuré-Lichine is all class, not to mention one of the sleepers of the vintage. Don't miss it! Tasted two times. - Galloni, 96 points
"Nuanced to the core." :-o
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#591 Post by John Morris » May 13th, 2019, 10:00 am

Note the "Don't miss it!" there, too. That's become almost reflexive:
The 2015 Chianti Colli Fiorentini is a gorgeous wine and an absolutely screaming value. Plump, juicy and yet very classic in its mid-weight structure, the 2015 is terrific. Hints of tobacco, leather and spice round out this pliant, super-delicious Chianti from the Colli Fiorentini district. Don't miss it. The 2015 was fermented and aged in concrete. 90 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)

2015 Ch La Conseillante Pomerol
Newly-arrived Technical Director Marielle Cazaux turned out a jewel of a wine at La Conseillante in 2015, her debut vintage. A polished and super-sophisticated Pomerol, La Conseillante is all class. Precise, lifted aromatics make a strong first impression, but it is the wine's overall feel and sense of harmony that truly dazzle. Over the last two years, the 2015 seems to have gained in freshness, precision and nuance. What a wine! The blend is 81% Merlot, 19% Cabernet Franc. Don't miss it. -Antonio Galloni

The 2015 Ducru-Beaucaillou is phenomenally great. Inky, powerful and explosive, the 2015 pulses with energy in all of its dimensions. Creme de cassis, blackberry jam, graphite, smoke, leather and incense, along with the wine's muscular tannins, convey an impression of brooding intensity. The 2015 has been nothing short of sensational on the two occasions I have tasted it so far. Readers should be prepared to be patient. Don't miss it! -Antonio Galloni
"Pulses with energy in all of its dimensions." [wow.gif]
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#592 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » May 13th, 2019, 10:06 am

That’s funny, I was reading a note of his on a retailer email, I think for 2018 futures, and it also said, “Don’t miss it!”

I’ll track it down.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#593 Post by John Morris » May 14th, 2019, 10:11 am

If someone can tell me what "built on texture, power and resonance" or "vertical in feel" mean, I'll ... tell them they're full of BS.
Moccagatta Barbaresco Bric Balin 2016
"The 2016 Barbaresco Bric Balin is a prototypical Moccagatta wine built on texture, power and resonance. Black cherry and plum fruit show the interplay of ripeness and bright acids that is such a signature of the vintage. Vertical in feel and yet also incredibly persistent, the Bric Balin is a wonderfully complete wine. This rich, super-concentrated Barbaresco is going to need time to shed some of its baby fat, but it is super impressive, even in the early going." 95 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
And why the "yet"? How is "vertical in feel" in contrast or opposition to "persistence"?
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#594 Post by crickey » May 14th, 2019, 12:02 pm

John Morris wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 10:11 am
If someone can tell me what "built on texture, power and resonance" or "vertical in feel" mean, I'll ... tell them they're full of BS.
Moccagatta Barbaresco Bric Balin 2016
"The 2016 Barbaresco Bric Balin is a prototypical Moccagatta wine built on texture, power and resonance. Black cherry and plum fruit show the interplay of ripeness and bright acids that is such a signature of the vintage. Vertical in feel and yet also incredibly persistent, the Bric Balin is a wonderfully complete wine. This rich, super-concentrated Barbaresco is going to need time to shed some of its baby fat, but it is super impressive, even in the early going." 95 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
And why the "yet"? How is "vertical in feel" in contrast or opposition to "persistence"?
I'm guessing "resonance" is meant to be a synonym for length or persistence (it can mean a powerful, lasting effect).

As for the other, persistence is a time-related word, and I think of time horizontally (i.e., stretching out). So the "yet" of time horizon opposed to vertical is a reasonable connector.

What "vertical in feel" means, I have no idea, but then I've never understood Parker's metaphor of a skyscraper either. Curiously, I think I understand depth in wine, which is the same spatial dimension, but height doesn't make sense to me. Whatever.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#595 Post by David Glasser » May 14th, 2019, 12:12 pm

John Morris wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 10:11 am
If someone can tell me what "built on texture, power and resonance" or "vertical in feel" mean, I'll ... tell them they're full of BS.
Moccagatta Barbaresco Bric Balin 2016
"The 2016 Barbaresco Bric Balin is a prototypical Moccagatta wine built on texture, power and resonance. Black cherry and plum fruit show the interplay of ripeness and bright acids that is such a signature of the vintage. Vertical in feel and yet also incredibly persistent, the Bric Balin is a wonderfully complete wine. This rich, super-concentrated Barbaresco is going to need time to shed some of its baby fat, but it is super impressive, even in the early going." 95 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
And why the "yet"? How is "vertical in feel" in contrast or opposition to "persistence"?
Who knows what any of these made-up, unique-to-the-writer terms mean? Maybe "vertical in feel" suggests falling off a cliff and "persistence" suggests hanging on? Not that that makes the meaning any clearer.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

#596 Post by PeterH » May 14th, 2019, 12:14 pm

Either he was drinking from a tall stem, or he was deep in the bottle.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#597 Post by John Morris » May 14th, 2019, 1:20 pm

crickey wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 12:02 pm
I'm guessing "resonance" is meant to be a synonym for length or persistence (it can mean a powerful, lasting effect).

As for the other, persistence is a time-related word, and I think of time horizontally (i.e., stretching out). So the "yet" of time horizon opposed to vertical is a reasonable connector.

What "vertical in feel" means, I have no idea, but then I've never understood Parker's metaphor of a skyscraper either. Curiously, I think I understand depth in wine, which is the same spatial dimension, but height doesn't make sense to me. Whatever.
You are a very generous person.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#598 Post by RichardFlack » May 14th, 2019, 1:48 pm

John Morris wrote:
May 13th, 2019, 9:47 am
All class, but slightly repetitive.
The 2016 Prieuré-Lichine is all class. Floral, silky and nuanced to the core, the 2016 is a wine of pure and total seduction. Freshly cut flowers, vibrant red fruit and creamy tannins all add to the wine's undeniable allure. In 2016, Prieuré-Lichine is all class, not to mention one of the sleepers of the vintage. Don't miss it! Tasted two times. - Galloni, 96 points
"Nuanced to the core." :-o
Impure seduction would get my attention more...

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#599 Post by GregT » May 14th, 2019, 3:10 pm

crickey wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 12:02 pm
John Morris wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 10:11 am
If someone can tell me what "built on texture, power and resonance" or "vertical in feel" mean, I'll ... tell them they're full of BS.
Moccagatta Barbaresco Bric Balin 2016
"The 2016 Barbaresco Bric Balin is a prototypical Moccagatta wine built on texture, power and resonance. Black cherry and plum fruit show the interplay of ripeness and bright acids that is such a signature of the vintage. Vertical in feel and yet also incredibly persistent, the Bric Balin is a wonderfully complete wine. This rich, super-concentrated Barbaresco is going to need time to shed some of its baby fat, but it is super impressive, even in the early going." 95 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
And why the "yet"? How is "vertical in feel" in contrast or opposition to "persistence"?
I'm guessing "resonance" is meant to be a synonym for length or persistence (it can mean a powerful, lasting effect).

As for the other, persistence is a time-related word, and I think of time horizontally (i.e., stretching out). So the "yet" of time horizon opposed to vertical is a reasonable connector.

What "vertical in feel" means, I have no idea, but then I've never understood Parker's metaphor of a skyscraper either. Curiously, I think I understand depth in wine, which is the same spatial dimension, but height doesn't make sense to me. Whatever.
But then the "yet" makes less sense. It would mean (leaving out a few of the other descriptors) - "Built on persistence yet incredibly persistent."

[wow.gif] !!

Only in wine writing can you say less with more words than you can with no words.

The day is quite hot, yet extremely warm.

The synapses worked intermittently, yet fired sporadically.
G . T a t a r

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Re: It's critic bingo! ("pixelated fruit")

#600 Post by S. Rash » May 14th, 2019, 3:45 pm

John Morris wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 10:11 am
If someone can tell me what "built on texture, power and resonance" or "vertical in feel" mean, I'll ... tell them they're full of BS.
Moccagatta Barbaresco Bric Balin 2016
"The 2016 Barbaresco Bric Balin is a prototypical Moccagatta wine built on texture, power and resonance. Black cherry and plum fruit show the interplay of ripeness and bright acids that is such a signature of the vintage. Vertical in feel and yet also incredibly persistent, the Bric Balin is a wonderfully complete wine. This rich, super-concentrated Barbaresco is going to need time to shed some of its baby fat, but it is super impressive, even in the early going." 95 points Antonio Galloni (Vinous Media)
And why the "yet"? How is "vertical in feel" in contrast or opposition to "persistence"?
A little Top Gun reference, “We’re going vertical Maceric!”
S t e p h e n

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