It's critic bingo! ("vertical in feel")

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G. Newman
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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#351 Post by G. Newman » March 15th, 2018, 5:37 pm

John Morris wrote:It seems that Wine Spectator has beat the other critics in applying this technology, according to Tim Atkin MW:
The two words that come to mind when one thinks of the “Wine Spectator’s” lineup of wine critics — James Laube, Matt Kramer, Tim Fish, James Molesworth, Harvey Steiman et al.— is Artificial Intelligence. And, in fact, the entire publication is written by software developed by the entrepreneur Elon Muscadet. I suspect that the news that “Wine Spectator” is written by a machine will not come as a shock to anyone who reads it, but, nonetheless, it’s an astonishing achievement.

.... “Wine isn’t that complicated,” Hunter Poynts, “Wine Spectator’s” A.I. guru, tells me, “and assigning them numeric scores couldn’t be easier. I think it’s clear from the proliferation of imbeciles giving numbers to wine on the internet that, for the consumer, assigning meaning to scores is like believing someone’s weight on their Tinder profile."
Brilliant piece written by the only critic to obtain the title of HoseMaster of Wine in the world (Ron Washam).
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El que al mundo vino y no toma vino, ¿a qué ...vino?

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#352 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » March 31st, 2018, 6:30 am

Interesting comparision here. Two notes actually tell you about the wine, one note is utterly worthless, don't even know if it is a red or white, or what it even tastes like. Lots of internal contradictions too, on its face.

2013 Castello dei Rampolla "Sammarco" Toscana

98 points Vinous
The 2013 Sammarco is a stunning wine. Super-expressive aromatics make a strong opening statement in a wine endowed with myriad dimensions of nuance and complexity. The 2013 is deep and fleshy, with generous fruit, beautifully integrated tannins and exceptional finesse. Readers should not plan on opening a bottle of this any time soon, though, as it seems likely to age at a glacial pace. (AG) (1/2018)

95 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Wines from the Castello dei Rampolla property show an impressive and especially chiseled quality that gives them a very direct and immediate quality. These are frank and honest wines that stay true to the identity set forth years ago at this historic estate. They stay the course, so to speak. The 2013 Sammarco is Cabernet Sauvignon with Sangiovese and Merlot that tastes nothing like the many blended Bordeaux-inspired reds you find in this part of Italy. Instead, the wine is all-Tuscan in its appeal, with sun-drenched cherry, Mediterranean herb and a pretty balsam note that recalls the thick underbrush and woods of the Chianti Classico countryside. This vintage soars in intensity and beauty. (ML) (10/2017)

94 points James Suckling
A complex wine with cherries, strawberries, black currants and hot stones. So clean and precise. Full body, firm tannins, high acidity and a long and fresh finish. Tight. Still needs some time. Better in 2019. (10/2017)

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#353 Post by John Morris » March 31st, 2018, 6:58 am

Robert Alfert, Jr. wrote: The 2013 Sammarco is a stunning wine. Super-expressive aromatics make a strong opening statement in a wine endowed with myriad dimensions of nuance and complexity.
That is a stunningly vacuous statement, and complex and nuanced in its vacuousness.

Aromas that are an "opening statement." Well, duh! You smell before you taste. And "expressive" aromas. Expressive of what? "Myriad dimensions of nuance and complexity."

Translation: "Lots of sensory impressions I can't be bothered to articulate."
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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#354 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » March 31st, 2018, 7:01 am

But yet, don’t open it for an eon, cause none of you simpletons will pick any of this up.

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#355 Post by John Morris » April 4th, 2018, 9:17 am

I think Molesworth needs to stay clear of the fire. Everything is getting singed:
2015 JL Chave - Cotes du Rhone - Mon Coeur

"This unfurls a pure beam of crushed plum and black cherry fruit, inlaid gently with singed bay leaf, pepper and anise notes. A light smoky edge runs through the finish."-James Molesworth
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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#356 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » April 4th, 2018, 9:46 am

John Morris wrote:I think Molesworth needs to stay clear of the fire. Everything is getting singed:
2015 JL Chave - Cotes du Rhone - Mon Coeur

"This unfurls a pure beam of crushed plum and black cherry fruit, inlaid gently with singed bay leaf, pepper and anise notes. A light smoky edge runs through the finish."-James Molesworth
“Beams” as well!

I like this wine, excellent QPR. Have not tried the 15 yet. At least this note communicates what the wine tastes like, unlike the other I cite above!

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#357 Post by Otto Forsberg » April 5th, 2018, 12:27 am

John Morris wrote:I think Molesworth needs to stay clear of the fire. Everything is getting singed:
2015 JL Chave - Cotes du Rhone - Mon Coeur

"This unfurls a pure beam of crushed plum and black cherry fruit, inlaid gently with singed bay leaf, pepper and anise notes. A light smoky edge runs through the finish."-James Molesworth
:D Oh dear.

What next? A subtle note of singed mineral water in a subtly oaked Chablis Grand Cru?

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#358 Post by RichardFlack » April 5th, 2018, 6:41 am

One can picture him in the backyard with a lighter and little piles of things to burn and make notes. Or perhaps just a terrible cook? :)

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#359 Post by Karl K » April 5th, 2018, 6:50 am

Beams of singed bay leaf and alder smoke? Once you get past the gobs and gobs of reduction and delicate nut skin aromas?
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#360 Post by John Morris » April 5th, 2018, 7:48 am

These notes by Allen Meadows look like they were dictated but not read. I lost track of the number of run-on sentences and dependent clauses (italicized).
2014 Domaine de Montille Beaune 1er Cru Perrieres
Burghound 88-90 Points: This is unusually woody for what is typical for a de Montille wine with its menthol and toast elements that frame the slightly riper aromas of plum, dark currant, earth and violet scents. Otherwise there is a beguiling texture to the lightly stony and well-detailed flavors that possess a mouth coating finish that displays a touch of rusticity. The supporting tannins are slightly riper as there is a touch of asperity but no dryness.
2014 Domaine de Montille Grand Cru Clos de Vougeot
Burghound 91-94 Points: A brooding, restrained and cool nose consists mostly of intensely floral and earthy red and dark berry fruit aromas. There is outstanding punch and solid concentration on the dry extract-rich broad-shouldered flavors that display plenty of power and muscle on the impressively persistent if almost aggressively austere finale. This firmly tannic but balanced effort will require every bit of 12-ish years to resolve the imposing structure.
2014 Domaine de Montille Pommard 1er Cru Rugiens
Burghound 88-91 Points: A discreet floral element sits atop the pretty and equally fresh nose of cool and layered red and dark currant aromas. There is a bit more volume present on the mineral-inflected and tautly muscular middle weight flavors that also terminate in a firm and ever-so-mildly drying finish that is present compact and a bit clipped. This will probably mature reasonably gracefully though again I have my doubts that it will ever completely harmonize.
What's with the dependent clauses?! And "dry extract-rich broad-shouldered flavors" made me chuckle it's so awkward. (Also, dry extract is something you can measure in a lab, so this is just pseudo-scientific jargon. I don't believe that dry extract is necessarily a reliable indicator of wines we will experience as extracted.)
2013 Michel Gaunoux Pommard 1er Cru Grands Epenots
Burghound 88 Points: This is also cool, pure and airy with a similar fruit profile though in this case there are more spice and earth nuances present. Once again there is a sleek mid-palate mouth feel to the dense, serious and powerful middle weight plus flavors that possess excellent volume though the dusty, palate coating and overtly austere finish is shaped by tannins that don't possess quite the same level of phenolic maturity. I like the delivery and concentration but the balance isn't ideal.
The bolded sentence (with multiple dependent clauses) reminds me of a Doonesbury cartoon from the 1980s about a Ted Kennedy news conference. Kennedy is rambling on incoherently until some wag reporter at the back of the room finally shouts out: "A period, Senator. We need a period."
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It's critic bingo! Molesworth gets burned again

#361 Post by GregT » April 5th, 2018, 9:19 am

Just looking at this thread after a few days but that Suckling note actually made sense. I think it was more or less happenstance that he picked that note out of the bag to throw on that particular wine, and perhaps it wasn't written for that wine at all - one never knows. But at least it gives one an idea of the wine.
And it has the requisite 94 JS points.
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#362 Post by Matthew King » April 5th, 2018, 6:01 pm

John Morris wrote:
The bolded sentence (with multiple dependent clauses) reminds me of a Doonesbury cartoon from the 1980s about a Ted Kennedy news conference. Kennedy is rambling on incoherently until some wag reporter at the back of the room finally shouts out: "A period, Senator. We need a period."
It reminds me of a quote from Ernest Hemingway from his days at the Kansas City Star:

“The typesetting room has an endless supply of periods to terminate short, declarative sentences!”
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It's critic bingo! Molesworth's singed alder obsession

#363 Post by Jim Brennan » April 5th, 2018, 8:10 pm

Karl K wrote:delicate nut skin aromas?
I'm at a loss for words...

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#364 Post by John Morris » April 8th, 2018, 6:54 am

I have to say, it never occurred to me to include "rowan" or "heliotrope" on the bingo card, but it looks like we'll have to add those for David Schildknecht.

2x rowan! (Yes, I had to look it up. It's the berry fruit of the mountain ash tree. Who knew?)*
2x heliotrope! (Ditto. Plants in the borage family.)*
Piquant and piquancy in one wine!
2016 Markus Molitor- Riesling Graacher Himmelreich Auslese*** A.P. #1 green capsule
This "three-star" Auslese leads with intense scents of rowan and heliotrope along with ripe, pit-inflected white peach that anticipates the lusciously juicy and stimulatingly piquant impression on a buoyant, creamy, persistently perfumed palate. Hints of caramel and quince jelly on the superbly sustained finish point toward a discreet but noble botrytis component. Here is a memorable balance of subtle sweetness and piquancy as well as of textural richness and primary juiciness. 95 points

2016 Markus Molitor- Riesling Graacher Domprobst Spätlese white capsule
Here is another of those gorgeously heady, florally perfumed noses that seem to abound among Molitor 2016s. Lily, rowan and heliotrope garland ripe apple and pecan, themes perfectly suited to this wine’s subtly creamy, expansive yet alcoholically buoyant palate impression. And for all of that creamy, nutty richness, the billowingly sustained finish is a model of sheer refreshment as well as of transparency to crystalline and stony nuances. 94 points
I need to devise a special category for sentences like the last one.


* Now Tatar, whose botanical erudition knows no bounds, will make fun of my ignorance.
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#365 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » April 8th, 2018, 7:26 am

John Morris wrote:I have to say, it never occurred to me to include "rowan" or "heliotrope" on the bingo card, but it looks like we'll have to add those for David Schildknecht.

2x rowan! (Yes, I had to look it up. It's the berry fruit of the mountain ash tree. Who knew?)*
2x heliotrope! (Ditto. Plants in the borage family.)*
Piquant and piquancy in one wine!
2016 Markus Molitor- Riesling Graacher Himmelreich Auslese*** A.P. #1 green capsule
This "three-star" Auslese leads with intense scents of rowan and heliotrope along with ripe, pit-inflected white peach that anticipates the lusciously juicy and stimulatingly piquant impression on a buoyant, creamy, persistently perfumed palate. Hints of caramel and quince jelly on the superbly sustained finish point toward a discreet but noble botrytis component. Here is a memorable balance of subtle sweetness and piquancy as well as of textural richness and primary juiciness. 95 points

2016 Markus Molitor- Riesling Graacher Domprobst Spätlese white capsule
Here is another of those gorgeously heady, florally perfumed noses that seem to abound among Molitor 2016s. Lily, rowan and heliotrope garland ripe apple and pecan, themes perfectly suited to this wine’s subtly creamy, expansive yet alcoholically buoyant palate impression. And for all of that creamy, nutty richness, the billowingly sustained finish is a model of sheer refreshment as well as of transparency to crystalline and stony nuances. 94 points
I need to devise a special category for sentences like the last one.


* Now Tatar, whose botanical erudition knows no bounds, will make fun of my ignorance.
These are great tongue-twisters! Say this three times as fast as you can:

stimulatingly piquant impression on a . . . persistently perfumed palate

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth gets burned again

#366 Post by Joseph MR » April 8th, 2018, 7:47 am

Robert Alfert, Jr. wrote:
John Morris wrote:I have to say, it never occurred to me to include "rowan" or "heliotrope" on the bingo card, but it looks like we'll have to add those for David Schildknecht.

2x rowan! (Yes, I had to look it up. It's the berry fruit of the mountain ash tree. Who knew?)*
2x heliotrope! (Ditto. Plants in the borage family.)*
Piquant and piquancy in one wine!
2016 Markus Molitor- Riesling Graacher Himmelreich Auslese*** A.P. #1 green capsule
This "three-star" Auslese leads with intense scents of rowan and heliotrope along with ripe, pit-inflected white peach that anticipates the lusciously juicy and stimulatingly piquant impression on a buoyant, creamy, persistently perfumed palate. Hints of caramel and quince jelly on the superbly sustained finish point toward a discreet but noble botrytis component. Here is a memorable balance of subtle sweetness and piquancy as well as of textural richness and primary juiciness. 95 points

2016 Markus Molitor- Riesling Graacher Domprobst Spätlese white capsule
Here is another of those gorgeously heady, florally perfumed noses that seem to abound among Molitor 2016s. Lily, rowan and heliotrope garland ripe apple and pecan, themes perfectly suited to this wine’s subtly creamy, expansive yet alcoholically buoyant palate impression. And for all of that creamy, nutty richness, the billowingly sustained finish is a model of sheer refreshment as well as of transparency to crystalline and stony nuances. 94 points
I need to devise a special category for sentences like the last one.


* Now Tatar, whose botanical erudition knows no bounds, will make fun of my ignorance.
These are great tongue-twisters! Say this three times as fast as you can:

stimulatingly piquant impression on a . . . persistently perfumed palate
Heliotrope was blooming at a local garden last week, I need to go back and smell it!
ra + * ter

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It's critic bingo! Molesworth gets burned again

#367 Post by Jayson Cohen » April 8th, 2018, 8:57 am

Piquant is a good descriptor. I don’t see the need for the beef or to criticize the repetition.

Rowan and heliotrope are only unique and perhaps esoteric until they become part of the lexicon. It has to start somewhere. That said, they are foreign to me as well, and don’t seem likely to help or orient the average reader.

On the sentence structure and densely packed concepts, and as someone who has been occasionally accused of the same, refining a writing style is a lifelong process. Something to work on always. Simplicity is often better. That last sentence would work potentially — as three sentences. What is it with wine reviewers and run-on or ridiculously constructed sentences?!

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#368 Post by Otto Forsberg » April 8th, 2018, 11:24 pm

I most likely use a lot of descriptors pretty alien to many readers, including lingonberries, rowanberries and bilberries, because they are pretty much an integral part of the Finnish cuisine. There are rowanberry-flavored marmalades (and even fortified berry wines) here, lingonberry jam is commonplace and bilberry is probably the most popular berry in Finland.

Of course my TNs might be more helpful for a larger audience if I used more commonly known descriptors, but if a wine has a distinctive rowan note (and believe me, some do!), I really see no point in trying to find an awkward way to go around it. After all, my TNs are, above all else, notes for myself to help me remember how wines tasted like.

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#369 Post by GregT » April 9th, 2018, 12:31 am

John - nothing to do with either wine or botany, but there was a wonderful ragtime composer named Louis Chauvin. He wrote a rag called Heliotrope Bouquet, or rather he started it but he died and Scott Joplin finished it for him. It's one of the most beautiful rags ever written. Chauvin died without writing or recording most of his work.
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#370 Post by John Morris » April 27th, 2018, 7:59 am

2015 Denis Mortet Gevrey Chambertin Mes Cinqs Terroirs
"Bright, dark red. Superripe-verging-on-liqueur-like but with lovely perfumed lift to its cherry, red berry and dark chocolate aromas. Wonderfully dense, sappy, concentrated wine with serious medicinal reserve and surprising framing acidity to its deep core of dark fruit, mineral and spice flavors. As ripe as this is, it does not pass into surmaturité. Finishes with substantial ripe, dusty tannins and terrific length. A splendid village wine with the density and depth to age." Steve Tanzer, 92 points, Vinous
[scratch.gif]

So it's overripe in English but not in French?
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#371 Post by A. So » April 27th, 2018, 8:08 am

The same way it's en magnum
エaイdドrリiアaンn (93 pts.)

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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#372 Post by William Kelley » April 27th, 2018, 8:30 am

John Morris wrote:
2015 Denis Mortet Gevrey Chambertin Mes Cinqs Terroirs
"Bright, dark red. Superripe-verging-on-liqueur-like but with lovely perfumed lift to its cherry, red berry and dark chocolate aromas. Wonderfully dense, sappy, concentrated wine with serious medicinal reserve and surprising framing acidity to its deep core of dark fruit, mineral and spice flavors. As ripe as this is, it does not pass into surmaturité. Finishes with substantial ripe, dusty tannins and terrific length. A splendid village wine with the density and depth to age." Steve Tanzer, 92 points, Vinous
[scratch.gif]

So it's overripe in English but not in French?
I think Steve is just trying to capture the sweetness of the fruit and ends up over-emphasizing how ripe it is. Honestly, on the spectrum of 2015s, it isn't that ripe. It's just that the tannins are so silky the sweetness of the fruit is more evident.
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#373 Post by John Morris » April 27th, 2018, 8:33 am

Claude Kolm tells me the same thing about the wine -- that it's a '15 but not overripe. But "superripe-verging-on-liqueur-like" and "medicinal" sure would lead me to think the wine was overripe!
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#374 Post by Alan Rath » April 27th, 2018, 9:22 am

It all makes sense. Superman is not Overripeman.
I'm just one lost soul, swimming in a fish bowl, year after year

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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#375 Post by crickey » April 27th, 2018, 12:10 pm

We have a gentian and buddleia sighting again (with piquancy), courtesy of David Schildknecht:

Gentian, buddleia, thyme, smoky black tea, white peach and lime mingle on the nose, then reconvene on a fleshy, full-bodied yet compactly concentrated and brightly juicy palate. The formidable finish displays greater piquancy, underlying stoniness and sheer grip albeit not quite the same vibrancy as its Dellchen sibling.

I'm open to the suggestion he is deliberately trolling this thread.
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#376 Post by John Morris » April 27th, 2018, 2:37 pm

crickey wrote:I'm open to the suggestion he is deliberately trolling this thread.
[basic-smile.gif]

One has to suspect that every time he puts pen to paper.
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#377 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » April 27th, 2018, 3:21 pm

Was looking up on CT a wine I just opened (2015 Hartford Family Dina’s Vineyard Zinfandel) and again saw the tasting note of “copious amounts of pen ink.” Who is drinking that stuff?
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1987 Dunn Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon Howell Mountain
1990 Chateau Beaucastel Chateauneuf-du-Pape
1993 Edmunds St. John Zinfandel Amador County

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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#378 Post by John Morris » April 27th, 2018, 3:23 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:Was looking up on CT a wine I just opened (2015 Hartford Family Dina’s Vineyard Zinfandel) and again saw the tasting note of “copious amounts of pen ink.” Who is drinking that stuff?
That sounds like a review of a Schildknecht tasting note.
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#379 Post by Marc Frontario » April 27th, 2018, 7:24 pm

John Morris wrote:Pity the poor wine critic. So many wines, so few words.

The problem was brought home by this blurb in one of those e-mails:
"The 2012 Barolo Castiglione is a gorgeous, radiant wine. Sweet red cherry, pomegranate, wild flowers and spices all meld together in a sensual, radiant wine endowed with striking presence and intensity. In 2012, the Castiglione is especially lifted, radiant and expressive, with striking purity and nuance. With time in the glass, the wine freshens up considerably, so aeration is a good idea for readers who want to open the 2012 early. This is a striking, seriously delicious Barolo from Vietti."-Antonio Galloni
Me thinks he needs an editor, or at least a thesaurus.

A little searching of my e-mails has turned up a list of overused words in Vinous, including: pedigree, class (often used together), luminescent, translucent, radiant, expressive, nuance/nuanced (“Scents of iron, smoke, herbs and licorice add the closing shades of nuances” [italics added; huh?]), polished and striking/strikingly.

Keith Levenberg suggested a bingo card, so here's my first stab:
Galloni bingo card.pdf
I'm sure we could make up one for Parker (I claim "hedonistic" for my center square). The guys at Zachy's are a little too fond of "patriarch" in their own pitches, so we could put that on their bingo card.

It’s hard not to sympathize when Galloni confesses that he’s run out of words:

* "The 2014 Montrose … is a much deeper wine than just a bunch of descriptors can conjure.”
* " Krug's 1988 Vintage … a Champagne of nearly indescribable finesse.”
* "Azelia's 2010 Barolo Bricco Fiasco is incredibly polished in this vintage. Dried roses, crushed berries, tobacco, mint and spices are woven together in a fabric of nearly indescribable class and elegance.”

Still, other times I wished he'd tried harder to express himself.

I'm still scratching my head trying to figure out how a wine "exudes resonance" and I'm not sure how a vintage can have a pedigree ("Two thousand thirteen is shaping up to be an epic vintage of classic proportions and superb pedigree”).

Over to you.... Want to suggest a Parker bingo card? An alternative Galloni card? Other favorite critics' malapropisms?

[Edited periodically to update subject heading.]

U missed a 'striking!'
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#380 Post by GregT » April 27th, 2018, 10:06 pm

"superripe-verging-on-liqueur-like" and "medicinal" sure would lead me to think the wine was overripe!
That's a description of Michael-David wine from Lodi.

Appropriately named Freakshow.

Goes for under $20. Good to know that you can pay exponentially more and get a similar product.
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#381 Post by John Morris » April 28th, 2018, 7:43 am

Marc Frontario wrote:U missed a 'striking!'
OMG! blush
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#382 Post by John Morris » May 23rd, 2018, 9:09 am

Easy-peasy pinot! Checked the "effortlessly fall into place" box.
2015 Anthill Farms Pinot Noir Abbey Harris
Vinous 94
"One of the many highlights in this lineup, the 2015 Pinot Noir Abbey Harris Vineyard is also voluptuous, silky and super-expressive, especially within the context of the year. All the elements fall into place in an effortless, supple Pinot endowed with real class and elegance. In 2015, the Abbey Harris is all finesse. This is a superb showing from Anthill Farms."-Antonio Galloni

2015 Melville Pinot Noir Sandy's
Vinous 92
"The 2015 Pinot Noir Estate Sandy's is exquisite. Lifted and precise, with lovely overall balance, the Sandy's is wonderfully complete in 2015. All the elements seem to fall into place effortlessly. The 50% whole clusters add nuance without overpowering the wine."-Antonio Galloni
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#383 Post by John Morris » May 23rd, 2018, 4:07 pm

It's a good day for bingo!

This from Lyle Fass's latest pitch for a wine that is unique in the world, will move mountains, provoke orgasms, etc. It's the 2008 Calafe Taurasi Riserva: "a Maelstrom of Licorice, Blackberry and Plum!"

[scratch.gif]

Maelstrom as in "a situation or state of confused movement or violent turmoil"?

This is the licorice and the plum pummeling each other in a moment of violent turmoil: [pillow-fight.gif]
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#384 Post by GregT » June 6th, 2018, 7:41 am

This review of a few critics is too good to let pass, even though it's not entirely on point. It doesn't go to the prose so much as to the manner of reviewing.

https://www.lapassionduvin.com/forum/a- ... ?start=420
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It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#385 Post by Brian Tuite » June 6th, 2018, 7:55 am

Overripeness is subjective.
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#386 Post by John Morris » September 21st, 2018, 8:25 pm

Hat's off to Neal Martin for "chirpy":
2015 Domaine Lamarche Bourgogne Rouge
"The 2015 Bourgogne Rouge comes from five parcels: Les Champs d'Argent, Lutenière, two in Les Piquiers and one in Poirier d'Aout. It has a pretty, floral bouquet that is bashful at first, but appeared to open in the glass with red cherries and crushed strawberry aplenty. The palate is smooth and caressing in the mouth, well balanced and quite chirpy towards the finish with a judicious twist of bitter cherry to lend this edginess."-Neal Martin
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#387 Post by John Morris » October 21st, 2018, 3:42 pm

My palate ceased to align with Parker's a long time ago, but I generally found his tasting notes gave me a pretty good sense of the wine. He was never an elegant writer, but he was usually pretty direct, and his notes were free from jargon.

This write-up, quoted in an e-mail pitch today, strayed a bit from that. It conveyed that this is a very big, fruity California cab. But what does "sucrosity of fruit" mean? Sugary? Sweet? Does this wine taste like sweet black fruits (quite likely)? If so, why not say that?

And "a terrific finish with real character and personality" tells me nothing. It sounds like a less fancy equivalent to "pedigree," Galloni's all-purpose, meaningless superlative.
2015 Perfect Season Cabernet Sauvignon
List price: $150
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"The 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon, which is still in barrel, ratchets up the level of intensity by a few points. It displays slightly blacker fruits, a tremendous purity and sucrosity of fruit, an unctuous texture, and a terrific finish with real character and personality. This should turn out to be a beauty and edge out its rival, the 2014. It should also drink well for at least 15-20 or more years. Both are great examples of viticulture in the up-an-coming Knights Valley."-Robert Parker
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#388 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » October 21st, 2018, 4:24 pm

He underscored it, too. Just in name, 100 point wine and 100 point vintage. Retail should be $399.99.

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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#389 Post by John Morris » October 21st, 2018, 4:40 pm

Sorry about the typo. It's actually "Perfect Score" Cabernet Sauvignon.
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#390 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » October 21st, 2018, 4:48 pm

Wow, that’s pretty cool. Didn’t know Suckling made wine. Nice of Parker to give him decent credit, reminding me of the old joke, “why don’t sharks eat lawyers?”

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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#391 Post by GregT » October 21st, 2018, 6:46 pm

Parker himself wrote that? Even in 2015, it's suspect. I wonder if it was supposed to be attributed to his Wine Advocate and somehow accidentally on purpose was attributed to him?
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#392 Post by John Morris » October 21st, 2018, 6:49 pm

The note says it was a barrel sample. Wasn't he still reviewing Californian wines in 2017?
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#393 Post by Jim Brennan » October 21st, 2018, 7:43 pm

GregT wrote:
June 6th, 2018, 7:41 am
This review of a few critics is too good to let pass, even though it's not entirely on point. It doesn't go to the prose so much as to the manner of reviewing.

https://www.lapassionduvin.com/forum/a- ... ?start=420
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#394 Post by Craig G » October 21st, 2018, 7:50 pm

John Morris wrote:
October 21st, 2018, 3:42 pm
And "a terrific finish with real character and personality" tells me nothing. It sounds like a less fancy equivalent to "pedigree," Galloni's all-purpose, meaningless superlative.
Nevertheless, for $150, I feel entitled to a finish with real character and personality.
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#395 Post by John Morris » October 21st, 2018, 9:35 pm

And pedigree is too much to ask for in a wine with little track record made from 13-year-old wines. http://www.perfectseasonwine.com/estate/
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#396 Post by John Morris » October 22nd, 2018, 9:55 am

Here's a descriptor that I suspect will be lost on WA's American readers:
2015 Darioush Cabernet Sauvignon
WA 96-98
"Medium to deep garnet-purple colored, the 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon has a seriously plummy and spice box-inspired nose with underlying baked blackberries and kirsch notes plus hints of sandalwood, Bovril and potpourri. The medium to full-bodied palate delivers a riper, berry preserves expression of the valley, packed with exotic spices and floral undertones, finishing long and chewy. This was tasted as a barrel sample."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown
I confess I had to look up "bovril":
Click to see spoiler:
"Bovril is the trademarked name of a thick and salty meat extract paste similar to a yeast extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston. It is sold in a distinctive, bulbous jar.... The first part of the product's name comes from Latin bovīnus, meaning "ox". Johnston took the -vril suffix from Edward Bulwer-Lytton's then-popular novel, The Coming Race (1870), whose plot revolves around a superior race of people, the Vril-ya, who derive their powers from an electromagnetic substance named "Vril". Therefore, Bovril indicates great strength obtained from an ox." - Wikipedia
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#397 Post by Alan Rath » October 22nd, 2018, 7:40 pm

Here's one that I think fits John's criteria. I have no idea what "sparky ingredients" are. One of the more pitiful wine reviews I've seen:
Jancis Robinson
Rather subtle nose with lots of juice and sparky ingredients. Hint of cough medicine but lots besides. Should evolve into something quite special. 17+/20
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#398 Post by John Morris » October 22nd, 2018, 9:04 pm

Probably a Briticism. But 17+ is a pretty high score for her, as I recall. I'd expect more than a Clive Coates-like note.
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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#399 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » October 23rd, 2018, 4:10 am

John Morris wrote:
October 22nd, 2018, 9:55 am
Here's a descriptor that I suspect will be lost on WA's American readers:
2015 Darioush Cabernet Sauvignon
WA 96-98
"Medium to deep garnet-purple colored, the 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon has a seriously plummy and spice box-inspired nose with underlying baked blackberries and kirsch notes plus hints of sandalwood, Bovril and potpourri. The medium to full-bodied palate delivers a riper, berry preserves expression of the valley, packed with exotic spices and floral undertones, finishing long and chewy. This was tasted as a barrel sample."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown
I confess I had to look up "bovril":
Click to see spoiler:
"Bovril is the trademarked name of a thick and salty meat extract paste similar to a yeast extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston. It is sold in a distinctive, bulbous jar.... The first part of the product's name comes from Latin bovīnus, meaning "ox". Johnston took the -vril suffix from Edward Bulwer-Lytton's then-popular novel, The Coming Race (1870), whose plot revolves around a superior race of people, the Vril-ya, who derive their powers from an electromagnetic substance named "Vril". Therefore, Bovril indicates great strength obtained from an ox." - Wikipedia
Clearly Johnny Harvard, with his smoker's jacket and pipe, never sat around with this study hall and poetry gents, sipping sherry out of etched crystal Waterfords, while enjoying sliced Spam, a salted meat paste that does not include bovine, and aged blue-cheese with toasted walnuts.

Incidentally, Spam's website is pretty fun. Check out the FAQs:

https://www.spam.com/about

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! Overripeness lost in translation?

#400 Post by Jörgen Lindström Carlvik » October 23rd, 2018, 5:51 am

Alan Rath wrote:
October 22nd, 2018, 7:40 pm
Here's one that I think fits John's criteria. I have no idea what "sparky ingredients" are. One of the more pitiful wine reviews I've seen:
Jancis Robinson
Rather subtle nose with lots of juice and sparky ingredients. Hint of cough medicine but lots besides. Should evolve into something quite special. 17+/20
I think that in many ways, she is the worst writer. Short, bland and impossible to understand UNLESS you 1) Have tasted the wine yourself, 2) Have a clear vision of the label.

Reading the above TN makes it impossible to understand whether it's red or white. Or even wine...
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