It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1101 Post by Lee Barnard » June 23rd, 2020, 1:51 pm

Now we have some prancing Black Forest cake. And some cinnamon toast and preserves. Rolland wuz here.

98-100 Points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate: "The 2019 Figeac is composed of 30% Merlot, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 36% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 13th of September to the 7th of October. The alcohol this year is 14.1% and the pH is 3.7. Steal-your-heart scents of mulberries, black raspberries, Black Forest cake and cassis prance ever so gracefully out of the glass, followed by nuances of plum preserves, red roses, cinnamon toast and clove oil plus just a waft of lavender. Medium to full-bodied, the palate shimmers with electric energy, framed by a solid backbone of wonderfully ripe, grainy Cabernet-led tannins and bold freshness, finishing with fantastic persistence and with tons of emerging earth and floral layers. This is a simply stunning, seemingly effortless, beautifully harmonious expression of the vineyard and the vintage - bravo!" 6/20

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1102 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 23rd, 2020, 1:55 pm

We love prancing!


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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1103 Post by Charlie Carnes » June 23rd, 2020, 1:58 pm

Lee Barnard wrote:
June 23rd, 2020, 1:51 pm
Now we have some prancing Black Forest cake. And some cinnamon toast and preserves. Rolland wuz here.

98-100 Points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate: "The 2019 Figeac is composed of 30% Merlot, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 36% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 13th of September to the 7th of October. The alcohol this year is 14.1% and the pH is 3.7. Steal-your-heart scents of mulberries, black raspberries, Black Forest cake and cassis prance ever so gracefully out of the glass, followed by nuances of plum preserves, red roses, cinnamon toast and clove oil plus just a waft of lavender. Medium to full-bodied, the palate shimmers with electric energy, framed by a solid backbone of wonderfully ripe, grainy Cabernet-led tannins and bold freshness, finishing with fantastic persistence and with tons of emerging earth and floral layers. This is a simply stunning, seemingly effortless, beautifully harmonious expression of the vineyard and the vintage - bravo!" 6/20
6/20... I thought that was the rating! That is such a RMP note. That sentence reminds me of reading Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man!

Plus clove oil and lavender just sounds astringent.
So shines a good deed in a weary world!

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1104 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 23rd, 2020, 2:15 pm

Charlie Carnes wrote:
June 23rd, 2020, 1:58 pm
Lee Barnard wrote:
June 23rd, 2020, 1:51 pm
Now we have some prancing Black Forest cake. And some cinnamon toast and preserves. Rolland wuz here.

98-100 Points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate: "The 2019 Figeac is composed of 30% Merlot, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 36% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 13th of September to the 7th of October. The alcohol this year is 14.1% and the pH is 3.7. Steal-your-heart scents of mulberries, black raspberries, Black Forest cake and cassis prance ever so gracefully out of the glass, followed by nuances of plum preserves, red roses, cinnamon toast and clove oil plus just a waft of lavender. Medium to full-bodied, the palate shimmers with electric energy, framed by a solid backbone of wonderfully ripe, grainy Cabernet-led tannins and bold freshness, finishing with fantastic persistence and with tons of emerging earth and floral layers. This is a simply stunning, seemingly effortless, beautifully harmonious expression of the vineyard and the vintage - bravo!" 6/20
6/20... I thought that was the rating! That is such a RMP note. That sentence reminds me of reading Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man!

Plus clove oil and lavender just sounds astringent.
Charlie, I’m glad you don’t toe the line!

[snort.gif]

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1105 Post by Charlie Carnes » June 23rd, 2020, 2:48 pm

Not fair!
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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1106 Post by A Willi@mson » June 23rd, 2020, 3:08 pm

Richard Geoffroy doesn't count for this thread given he was a winemaker not critic but he had some classics. I was especially struck by his introduction of the 2009 Dom Perignon as "Really more like a Square than a Circle, as you can all clearly tell in the glass"

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1107 Post by John Morris » June 24th, 2020, 7:23 pm

Lee Barnard wrote:
June 23rd, 2020, 1:51 pm
Now we have some prancing Black Forest cake. And some cinnamon toast and preserves. Rolland wuz here.

98-100 Points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate: "The 2019 Figeac is composed of 30% Merlot, 34% Cabernet Sauvignon and 36% Cabernet Franc, harvested from the 13th of September to the 7th of October. The alcohol this year is 14.1% and the pH is 3.7. Steal-your-heart scents of mulberries, black raspberries, Black Forest cake and cassis prance ever so gracefully out of the glass, followed by nuances of plum preserves, red roses, cinnamon toast and clove oil plus just a waft of lavender. Medium to full-bodied, the palate shimmers with electric energy, framed by a solid backbone of wonderfully ripe, grainy Cabernet-led tannins and bold freshness, finishing with fantastic persistence and with tons of emerging earth and floral layers. This is a simply stunning, seemingly effortless, beautifully harmonious expression of the vineyard and the vintage - bravo!" 6/20
Beat you to it, in post #996 a week ago.

(I was sure I had posted that note, but it didn't turn up searching for "prance." Grrr. Finally found it searching for "Figeac.")
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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1108 Post by Hans-Peter Eisele » June 26th, 2020, 9:15 am

Ah, gracefully prancing Black Forest cake is fine. Once had Black Forest cake stumbling out of the glass clumsily. That wasn't pretty, that wasn't pretty at all.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1109 Post by Otto Forsberg » June 26th, 2020, 2:33 pm

Hans-Peter Eisele wrote:
June 26th, 2020, 9:15 am
Ah, gracefully prancing Black Forest cake is fine. Once had Black Forest cake stumbling out of the glass clumsily. That wasn't pretty, that wasn't pretty at all.
Now there's a memorable first post if there ever was one!

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1110 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 29th, 2020, 7:09 am

Otto Forsberg wrote:
June 26th, 2020, 2:33 pm
Hans-Peter Eisele wrote:
June 26th, 2020, 9:15 am
Ah, gracefully prancing Black Forest cake is fine. Once had Black Forest cake stumbling out of the glass clumsily. That wasn't pretty, that wasn't pretty at all.
Now there's a memorable first post if there ever was one!
I wonder if Sir Hans-Peter was referring to himself, as we never saw him again! Stumbling BFC is a dangerous thing. Prancing is bad, but stumbling, really bad [wow.gif]


And hey, we have a new way of expressing how things waft from the glass . . . .
The 2016 Proprietary Red Wine is blended of 89% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Merlot, 3% Cabernet Franc, 1% Petit Verdot and 1% Carménère, with all fruit coming from the Quintessa estate, and it aged for 20 months in 73% new French oak. Very deep purple-black in color, it comes bounding out of the glass like a pedigree pup with exuberant notions of crème de cassis, warm blueberries and black cherries with hints of redcurrants, kirsch, candied violets, crushed rocks, cigar box and fallen leaves plus a waft of truffles. Full, rich and beautifully laced with layers of floral notes and fragrant earth, the profound black and blue fruits build slowly in the mouth, achieving great energy and depth with a beautiful velvety frame, finishing long and perfumed.

97+ points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate (Issue # Interim - Dec 2018)

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1111 Post by John Morris » June 29th, 2020, 8:38 am

Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 7:09 am
.... And hey, we have a new way of expressing how things waft from the glass . . . .
The 2016 Proprietary Red Wine is blended of 89% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Merlot, 3% Cabernet Franc, 1% Petit Verdot and 1% Carménère, with all fruit coming from the Quintessa estate, and it aged for 20 months in 73% new French oak. Very deep purple-black in color, it comes bounding out of the glass like a pedigree pup with exuberant notions of crème de cassis, warm blueberries and black cherries with hints of redcurrants, kirsch, candied violets, crushed rocks, cigar box and fallen leaves plus a waft of truffles. Full, rich and beautifully laced with layers of floral notes and fragrant earth, the profound black and blue fruits build slowly in the mouth, achieving great energy and depth with a beautiful velvety frame, finishing long and perfumed.

97+ points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate (Issue # Interim - Dec 2018)
[cray.gif]

Please no more forced verbs for aromas! [beg.gif]

(Note that "waft" managed to sneak in there, though all this prancing and bounding originated as an alternative to that word.)
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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1112 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 29th, 2020, 8:45 am

I distinctly remember my two pedigree pups, in their Exuberance, showcasing more wet slobbery cute puppy breath with a milky note. I wonder what mutts emit?

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1113 Post by Hans-Peter Eisele » June 29th, 2020, 1:13 pm

Otto, glad you thought my first post, ah, took, ah, the cake. *nerdgiggle* (I'll show myself out.)
Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 7:09 am
I wonder if Sir Hans-Peter was referring to himself, as we never saw him again! Stumbling BFC is a dangerous thing. Prancing is bad, but stumbling, really bad
No, Sire, I'm fine, thank you. The stumbling BFC was liquored-up so hard that it wasn't in shape to pick a fight when I approached it, so no danger at all. Just the random bursts-from-the-glass "Vhere is mine frishe? Vhere is mine verdammten frishe?", followed by the introspective mumbling "Gewasted, Ich bin so gewasted...", was rather unpleasant to bear the entire lunch. But luckily this kind of BFC happens only with wines that have so much alcohol even the wine is drunk.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1114 Post by John Morris » June 29th, 2020, 3:04 pm

Hans-Peter Eisele wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 1:13 pm
Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 7:09 am
I wonder if Sir Hans-Peter was referring to himself, as we never saw him again! Stumbling BFC is a dangerous thing. Prancing is bad, but stumbling, really bad
No, Sire, I'm fine, thank you. The stumbling BFC was liquored-up so hard that it wasn't in shape to pick a fight when I approached it, so no danger at all. Just the random bursts-from-the-glass "Vhere is mine frishe? Vhere is mine verdammten frishe?", followed by the introspective mumbling "Gewasted, Ich bin so gewasted...", was rather unpleasant to bear the entire lunch. But luckily this kind of BFC happens only with wines that have so much alcohol even the wine is drunk.
If "gewasted" is really an import from English to Deutsch, I think we anglophones should all be proud.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1115 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 29th, 2020, 3:19 pm

John Morris wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 3:04 pm
Hans-Peter Eisele wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 1:13 pm
Robert.A.Jr. wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 7:09 am
I wonder if Sir Hans-Peter was referring to himself, as we never saw him again! Stumbling BFC is a dangerous thing. Prancing is bad, but stumbling, really bad
No, Sire, I'm fine, thank you. The stumbling BFC was liquored-up so hard that it wasn't in shape to pick a fight when I approached it, so no danger at all. Just the random bursts-from-the-glass "Vhere is mine frishe? Vhere is mine verdammten frishe?", followed by the introspective mumbling "Gewasted, Ich bin so gewasted...", was rather unpleasant to bear the entire lunch. But luckily this kind of BFC happens only with wines that have so much alcohol even the wine is drunk.
If "gewasted" is really an import from English to Deutsch, I think we anglophones should all be proud.

Didn’t Parker already co-opt the phrase?

Pain grille.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1116 Post by John Morris » June 29th, 2020, 6:54 pm

Here's a note I love, from our own David Bueker here on WB. It's entirely metaphoric, but sums up a classic Chablis 1er cru vividly:
2010 François Raveneau Chablis Grand Cru Blanchot - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru (6/29/2020)
Take a very sharp knife. Slide a lemon with one quick cut. Add a dusting of fine salt. Infuse with mineral water than has been reduced to a concentrate. Shake. Chill. Serve the knife.
A critic couldn't write all notes like this, but once in a while this approach is the best.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1117 Post by Jonathan Loesberg » June 30th, 2020, 8:04 am

John Morris wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 6:54 pm
Here's a note I love, from our own David Bueker here on WB. It's entirely metaphoric, but sums up a classic Chablis 1er cru vividly:
2010 François Raveneau Chablis Grand Cru Blanchot - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru (6/29/2020)
Take a very sharp knife. Slide a lemon with one quick cut. Add a dusting of fine salt. Infuse with mineral water than has been reduced to a concentrate. Shake. Chill. Serve the knife.
A critic couldn't write all notes like this, but once in a while this approach is the best.

Well, except for the bit about reducing the mineral water to a concentrate. Water doesn't thicken, it just evaporates. I guess you could distill the minerals out, though.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1118 Post by John Morris » June 30th, 2020, 10:00 am

David didn't say the water thickened. But if you boil water with a lot of minerals, you get water with a more concentrated level of minerals.
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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1119 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » June 30th, 2020, 10:06 am

Jeff Leve wrote:
June 22nd, 2020, 9:31 am
Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
June 20th, 2020, 3:58 pm
Let's take this one step further, people. There is *no* chocolate in any Bordeaux wine! There is not a single Bordeaux producer who mixes cacao powder or any other product of the cacao bean or even any artificial chocolate flavoring into their must or their wine before bottling! Amazingly, "chocolate" is just a *metaphor*, that is a familiar but imperfect analogy used to attempt to communicate a subjective impression of a wine flavor to a reader.

By general agreement, the "chocolate" metaphor can be at least reasonably useful in describing vinous flavors, in no small part because the range of experiences of chocolate is so vast (from extremely bitter to extremely sweet, light to intense, fruity to earthy, etc.) that people can generally find some purchase for the metaphor in how they experience certain wines. It is my contention, however, that the "black forest cake" metaphor, which unambiguously describes an extremely sweet, thick, fudgey, and confected dessert is not useful in describing what should be Bordeaux flavors, and if someone thinks it is this makes me believe either that the wine is bad or I don't trust their palate.

Jeff, I hope this explanation helps you to better understand what you are doing when writing wine tasting notes.
In the old days, I would have written some sarcastic response to your post. But as I've aged. Like my wine, I have mellowed and want to thank you for your explanation about experiencing chocolate in wine.

Until now, I often wondered if they actually placed chunks of Valhrona into the vats. Now, I know they only add cherries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries and plums. And what about all those fresh flowers, herbs, forest floor and truffles I find in wine? Do they add those into the blend as well?

Of course, that leaves me wondering as to which Cuban Cigars they include, my favorite being Cohiba Behikes! And what about licorice, tobacco, smoke, vanilla, leather, soy, salt, rocks, stones etc? How do they find the time to source all those ingredients? This also explains why they have so many vats in their cellars these days! Clearly they are all on the conspiracy saying each vat was for specific parcels. Now, thanks to you, I know the truth!

Thank you for filling me in. You really should write a book... "There is no F'ing Chocolate in Your Wine!" However, until your book comes out, I will simply continue using chocolate as a descriptor when that is the sensation I find in the wine.

Yes, good thing I have mellowed with age :D
pretty sure this qualifies as a sarcastic response! neener

Without wishing to continue the Great Black Forest Cake war of 2020, my point was very simple, and relevant to this thread in general -- description of flavors in wine is a metaphorical / stylistic exercise, not an objective scientific identification, and IMO when someone chooses to favorably describe a Bordeaux by analogy to a very sweet, rich, chocolate dessert that indicates either that their palate does not match mine, or that the wine is extremely non-traditional to the point of being a dessert wine, or both. I think this is a valid viewpoint regardless of whether I have tasted en primeur.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1120 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » June 30th, 2020, 10:25 am

John Morris wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 6:54 pm
Here's a note I love, from our own David Bueker here on WB. It's entirely metaphoric, but sums up a classic Chablis 1er cru vividly:
2010 François Raveneau Chablis Grand Cru Blanchot - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru (6/29/2020)
Take a very sharp knife. Slide a lemon with one quick cut. Add a dusting of fine salt. Infuse with mineral water than has been reduced to a concentrate. Shake. Chill. Serve the knife.
A critic couldn't write all notes like this, but once in a while this approach is the best.

You don’t feel robbed?

We got knife, but not Black Forrest Cake!

A very very very expensive knife.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1121 Post by Marcu$ Stanley » June 30th, 2020, 11:05 am

John Morris wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 6:54 pm
Here's a note I love, from our own David Bueker here on WB. It's entirely metaphoric, but sums up a classic Chablis 1er cru vividly:
2010 François Raveneau Chablis Grand Cru Blanchot - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru (6/29/2020)
Take a very sharp knife. Slide a lemon with one quick cut. Add a dusting of fine salt. Infuse with mineral water than has been reduced to a concentrate. Shake. Chill. Serve the knife.
A critic couldn't write all notes like this, but once in a while this approach is the best.
This note really highlights the masochistic nature of the search for ever-greater acidity and "edge" in white wines. Personally, I want structure in Chardonnay but I'll take a pass on a mouthful of razor blades.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1122 Post by John Morris » July 2nd, 2020, 8:17 am

It seems that this MW is unclear on the concept of "own-rooted":

"Grapes come from own-rooted vines planted in 1982 on AXR rootstock...." [scratch.gif] [scratch.gif]

And we have a new verb for aromas leaving the glass -- confidently striding!
2016 Pride Mountain Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve
"The 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve is made up of 96% Cabernet Sauvignon and 4% Petit Verdot aged in roughly 50% new oak. Grapes come from own-rooted vines planted in 1982 on AXR rootstock—the roots are very deep and so not affected by phylloxera; 67% of the fruit came from Napa County and 33% from Sonoma County. Deep garnet-purple colored, it strides confidently out of the glass with classic cassis, fresh blackberries, warm plums and cedar chest notes followed by nuances of charcoal, pencil lead, camphor, chocolate box and black olives. Full-bodied, the palate is charged with fantastic energy, featuring bright, exuberant black berry and earthy flavors with a firm, ripe, finely grained frame, finishing long and lively."-Lisa Perrotti-Brown, MW
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Re: It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

#1123 Post by Keith Levenberg » July 2nd, 2020, 12:38 pm

How does one tell if a wine is confident in its cassis and blackberries, or if it's riddled with angst and self-doubt?

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Re: It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

#1124 Post by David Glasser » July 2nd, 2020, 12:42 pm

Keith Levenberg wrote:
July 2nd, 2020, 12:38 pm
How does one tell if a wine is confident in its cassis and blackberries, or if it's riddled with angst and self-doubt?
Is the nose jumping/prancing/dancing out of the glass? Confident!
Is it exploding or roaring? Angry!
Is it reserved or slithering? Angst and self-doubt!
Is it unclean? Lack of self-care could be signs of cognitive impairment or a more serious mental disorder.
Pay particular attention to the tone when it speaks to you.
If still uncertain, ask about its relationship with its mother.

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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1125 Post by William Kelley » July 2nd, 2020, 2:36 pm

Marcu$ Stanley wrote:
June 30th, 2020, 11:05 am
John Morris wrote:
June 29th, 2020, 6:54 pm
Here's a note I love, from our own David Bueker here on WB. It's entirely metaphoric, but sums up a classic Chablis 1er cru vividly:
2010 François Raveneau Chablis Grand Cru Blanchot - France, Burgundy, Chablis, Chablis Grand Cru (6/29/2020)
Take a very sharp knife. Slide a lemon with one quick cut. Add a dusting of fine salt. Infuse with mineral water than has been reduced to a concentrate. Shake. Chill. Serve the knife.
A critic couldn't write all notes like this, but once in a while this approach is the best.
This note really highlights the masochistic nature of the search for ever-greater acidity and "edge" in white wines. Personally, I want structure in Chardonnay but I'll take a pass on a mouthful of razor blades.
Raveneau's 2010s are incisive, sure, but they're not painful to drink. TAs are a gram or so below what they were in e.g. 1990.
The Wine Advocate

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Re: It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

#1126 Post by John Morris » July 2nd, 2020, 6:13 pm

David Glasser wrote:
July 2nd, 2020, 12:42 pm
Keith Levenberg wrote:
July 2nd, 2020, 12:38 pm
How does one tell if a wine is confident in its cassis and blackberries, or if it's riddled with angst and self-doubt?
Is the nose jumping/prancing/dancing out of the glass? Confident!
Is it exploding or roaring? Angry!
Is it reserved or slithering? Angst and self-doubt!
Is it unclean? Lack of self-care could be signs of cognitive impairment or a more serious mental disorder.
Pay particular attention to the tone when it speaks to you.
If still uncertain, ask about its relationship with its mother.
champagne.gif
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Re: It's critic bingo! ('19 Haut Brion threatens to "go atomic")

#1127 Post by Jan Janas » July 2nd, 2020, 7:10 pm

The 2016 Proprietary Red Wine is blended of 89% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Merlot, 3% Cabernet Franc, 1% Petit Verdot and 1% Carménère, with all fruit coming from the Quintessa estate, and it aged for 20 months in 73% new French oak. Very deep purple-black in color, it comes bounding out of the glass like a pedigree pup with exuberant notions of crème de cassis, warm blueberries and black cherries with hints of redcurrants, kirsch, candied violets, crushed rocks, cigar box and fallen leaves plus a waft of truffles. Full, rich and beautifully laced with layers of floral notes and fragrant earth, the profound black and blue fruits build slowly in the mouth, achieving great energy and depth with a beautiful velvety frame, finishing long and perfumed.

97+ points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Wine Advocate (Issue # Interim - Dec 2018)
Raised-eyebrow

I don't know if I feel like I'm missing something by reading wine reviews and discovering such gems organically, or if I feel reassured that I'm not missing anything.

From someone that came into wine recently: have reviews always sounded like that or is it just a reflection of the ever riper and bolder style in winemaking?

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Brian S t o t t e r
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Re: It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

#1128 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » July 2nd, 2020, 8:28 pm

Read through the MFW Issue 52 today and “Conference pear” and “Williams pear” came up as descriptors for a couple wines. For the pear enthusiasts, what is the difference?
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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StevenB
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Re: It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

#1129 Post by StevenB » July 2nd, 2020, 11:41 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
July 2nd, 2020, 8:28 pm
Read through the MFW Issue 52 today and “Conference pear” and “Williams pear” came up as descriptors for a couple wines. For the pear enthusiasts, what is the difference?
The Williams Christ pear is well known for the spirit made out of it. Conférence is very slightly spicy (middle eastern spices, the Williams Christ has a very slight nutmeg note), a tiny bit less sweet than Williams Christ and Williams Christ is a tiny bit more intense in flavour. In the end, it all depends on when the pears are harvested as the ripeness is - in my view - the main factor in how the pears taste. And another big difference is the texture, but that is impossible to transport via grapes into the wine except with a lot of imagination.
S. Bauer

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John Ammons
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Re: It's critic bingo! (striding confidently when not prancing)

#1130 Post by John Ammons » July 2nd, 2020, 11:55 pm

David Glasser wrote:
July 2nd, 2020, 12:42 pm
Keith Levenberg wrote:
July 2nd, 2020, 12:38 pm
How does one tell if a wine is confident in its cassis and blackberries, or if it's riddled with angst and self-doubt?
Is the nose jumping/prancing/dancing out of the glass? Confident!
Is it exploding or roaring? Angry!
Is it reserved or slithering? Angst and self-doubt!
Is it unclean? Lack of self-care could be signs of cognitive impairment or a more serious mental disorder.
Pay particular attention to the tone when it speaks to you.
If still uncertain, ask about its relationship with its mother.
Rarely is a 20+ page thread so beautifully encapsulated in a single post.

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