What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

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Rick Allen
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#501 Post by Rick Allen » May 2nd, 2020, 7:42 pm

I’ve now tasted through all of Marcus’s 2018 Chardonnay cuvees. My favorite right now is the Durant, followed by the WV. The others all need time (the Durant will benefit from bottle age as well), so I’m picking up another case of the 2017 Ribbon Ridge, which is drinking really nice right now. When we finish that we’ll look to the 2018s.

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#502 Post by Sean_S » May 2nd, 2020, 9:49 pm

Sounds great Brian. Glad I have a few of those left.
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#503 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 3rd, 2020, 10:01 am

Rick Allen wrote:
May 2nd, 2020, 7:42 pm
I’ve now tasted through all of Marcus’s 2018 Chardonnay cuvees. My favorite right now is the Durant, followed by the WV. The others all need time (the Durant will benefit from bottle age as well), so I’m picking up another case of the 2017 Ribbon Ridge, which is drinking really nice right now. When we finish that we’ll look to the 2018s.
How does the 2018 Durant compare to the 2017 Durant?
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Scott Tallman
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#504 Post by Scott Tallman » May 3rd, 2020, 10:27 am

As part of a blind online tasting last night (we exchanged mini bottles of wine in advance), had the 2015 Goodfellow Deux Vert Syrah Reserve. I’ve drank a fair amount of this in prior vintages, so was disappointed that it took me a few guesses to even get in the ballpark (my final guess was Biggio Hamina DV Syrah).

As with past vintages, this was a refreshing take on Syrah that leans more towards the N Rhone than towards WA/CA/AUS, but without the olive note. The Viognier was evident and gave it lift. Despite 2015 being a very hot year, this was in no way reflected in the wine. Always a treat to drink this and need to pick up a few of the 2015s as this is the end of the line. Drank alongside, among others, an very intriguing NV Sami-Odi Australian Syrah that had a very prominent olive note.
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Rick Allen
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#505 Post by Rick Allen » May 3rd, 2020, 10:44 am

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 3rd, 2020, 10:01 am
Rick Allen wrote:
May 2nd, 2020, 7:42 pm
I’ve now tasted through all of Marcus’s 2018 Chardonnay cuvees. My favorite right now is the Durant, followed by the WV. The others all need time (the Durant will benefit from bottle age as well), so I’m picking up another case of the 2017 Ribbon Ridge, which is drinking really nice right now. When we finish that we’ll look to the 2018s.
How does the 2018 Durant compare to the 2017 Durant?
They are similar, both a little richer than their siblings. Nice citrus/green apple, balanced acidity, slightly reductive, great mouthfeel.

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#506 Post by ABell » May 3rd, 2020, 5:41 pm

Opened a 17 Ribbon Ridge Pinot last night. Really nice wine in the making. wet forest funk, red fruits, some pepper, and crushed rocked. really nice acid backbone and fine tannins. I think it should really come together over the next couple years and drink really well through 2027

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#507 Post by Jason R. » May 3rd, 2020, 5:59 pm

Ok, I know it’s young...who cares?!? Cracked a 2017 Durant PN tonight with grilled flank steak. Such an explosive nose of ripe strawberries and fragrant flowers. Was it a little tight? Yes. Did it unfurl over an hour? Also yes. Delicious acidity and bright cranberries and red fruits with a suggestion of blue. But over all, such an intoxicating aroma!
R o b e r t s o n

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#508 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 4th, 2020, 3:48 pm

2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Chardonnay Willamette Valley

Consumed from a Grassl Cru glass. Underripe tropical fruit (pineapple, mango, passion fruit) mingle with citrus notes of lemon peel and lime zest, backed by a core of seashell/chalky minerality. Medium in body and concentration, refreshing acidity on the palate, with the fruit notes gliding to the back of the throat. The finish has nice saline and fresh cut herbal notes. An excellent chardonnay from Marcus that punches well above its weight as a "basic" appellation level wine.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#509 Post by Mike Evans » May 5th, 2020, 4:55 pm

2013 Goodfellow Family Cellars Pinot Noir Durant Vineyard - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley, Dundee Hills (5/5/2020)
Popped and poured in a Grassl Cru. The fairly light translucent garnet color but excellent intensity present a textbook example of the difference between concentration and extraction. It initially shows evergreen inflected dark cherry on the nose, while a layer of very fine tannin latches on to pure fruit on the palate like Velcro. It broadens out and takes on more savory notes with air. Excellent now and I look forward to seeing what more age will bring to the table. (93 pts.)

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#510 Post by Sean_S » May 6th, 2020, 10:13 am

2018 Whistling Ridge Chardonnay - All the usual descriptors. Nice reduction on PNP. Seems closer to the Richards then other vintages. Acid bright but softer than the super chisled 17's. Will write a more formal note after day 2. Its open for business though.
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1995 Williams Selyem Pinot Noir Summa Vineyard

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#511 Post by Ian H » May 6th, 2020, 3:19 pm

Just opened a 2018 Berserker Cuvee Chard. Oh my god it's delicious. Laser focused but intense.
@@S

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#512 Post by MitchTallan » May 10th, 2020, 7:40 am

I was going to open a '16 Blanc yesterday but because I have more of them, I opened a '17 WR Chard.
This is among the most sneaky, lithesome chards I have ever encountered,
Very pale color. Flint, campfire and gunpowder kept coming to mind, soft and floating. Maybe just the slightest hint of lime zest. Weightless and yet flavorful. No obvious or even noticeable oak and yet none of the green apple that I have always associated with inox style chards. Salinity seems to predominate the finish which goes on and on. The sneaky aspect of this wine is how the perception of power and intensity increases as time goes on. This is unlike any domestic chard I have ever tasted. Imagine a French sauv blanc from a cool vintage with no oak and no grassiness. Maybe i am nuts, but a very toned down Dagueneau Silex comes to mind. I think I have two cases of this.

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#513 Post by Richard T r i m p i » May 10th, 2020, 9:32 am

MitchTallan wrote:
May 10th, 2020, 7:40 am
....I opened a '17 WR Chard. This is among the most sneaky, lithesome chards I have ever encountered..... I think I have two cases of this.
2 cases! You went long. I've never purchased 2 cases of anything. High praise!

RT

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#514 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 10th, 2020, 9:51 am

Think I'll be cracking open a 2013 Heritage No. 2 Whistling Ridge Vineyard tonight and follow over the next couple days. Will post my notes later.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#515 Post by Richard T r i m p i » May 10th, 2020, 2:28 pm

2013 Goodfellow Whistling Ridge Richard's Cuvee Chardonnay
It smells like really good Chardonnay and it's tasty. Very.

RT

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#516 Post by James Lyon » May 10th, 2020, 3:03 pm

Richard T r i m p i wrote:
May 10th, 2020, 2:28 pm
2013 Goodfellow Whistling Ridge Richard's Cuvee Chardonnay
It smells like really good Chardonnay and it's tasty. Very.

RT
Yes, I opened a 2013 Richard's Cuvee a couple of weeks ago and a 2015 Richard's Cuvee last night. Very tasty and I'm looking forward to the second half of the 2015 tonight.

James

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#517 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 10th, 2020, 3:26 pm

James Lyon wrote:
May 10th, 2020, 3:03 pm
Richard T r i m p i wrote:
May 10th, 2020, 2:28 pm
2013 Goodfellow Whistling Ridge Richard's Cuvee Chardonnay
It smells like really good Chardonnay and it's tasty. Very.

RT
Yes, I opened a 2013 Richard's Cuvee a couple of weeks ago and a 2015 Richard's Cuvee last night. Very tasty and I'm looking forward to the second half of the 2015 tonight.

James
You’re in for a treat.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#518 Post by Scott Tallman » May 10th, 2020, 4:15 pm

Richard T r i m p i wrote:
May 10th, 2020, 2:28 pm
2013 Goodfellow Whistling Ridge Richard's Cuvee Chardonnay
It smells like really good Chardonnay and it's tasty. Very.

RT
Indeed. Drank this alongside the 2013 Durant Chard in November. Not only were they both delicious, for what I want in Chardonnay, they clearly have many years to run. Will hold final bottle of each until at least 2021, maybe later.
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#519 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 10th, 2020, 4:40 pm

  • 2013 Goodfellow Family Cellars Pinot Noir Heritage No. 2 Whistling Ridge Vineyard - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley, Ribbon Ridge (5/10/2020)
    Poured in a Grassl Cru glass and followed for several hours over the afternoon/evening.

    There is a perfumed nose of fresh bog cranberries, cherry, blood orange, cherry blossom, saddle leather, and sous bois. With another hour in the glass the savory notes on the nose start to recede and the fruit is nicely balanced by floral aromas of cherry blossom and potpourri.

    Mouthwatering acidity coupled with silky smooth tannins provide a foundation for the wine on the palate, which is lightweight and savory. Saddle leather, wet Autumn leaves, Asian spices, and a touch of cranberry and tart cherry caress the tongue and palate, and linger for a long finish.

    I suspect the higher acidity and slightly thin body are characteristic of the 2013 vintage in general. The wine is ready to go now but I think it'll last another 8-10 years at its current stage. (92 pts.)
    Image
Posted from CellarTracker
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#520 Post by Sean_S » May 10th, 2020, 5:49 pm

Stoked about your string of nice Goodfellow wines. Love your notes on all the recent Oregon discoveries.
Last edited by Sean_S on May 10th, 2020, 5:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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1995 Williams Selyem Pinot Noir Summa Vineyard

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#521 Post by Sean_S » May 10th, 2020, 5:51 pm

  • 2015 Goodfellow Family Cellars Deux Vert - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley, Yamhill-Carlton (5/10/2020)
    OregonLoafer gets it right on the flavor profile and development. Fruit dominates on day 1, and the wine just gets better on Day 2 and 3. This wine is darker, extracted, and riper than the lean and mean 2013 Matello Deux Vert Syrah that I also love, but this is a very different wine. This wine is not big and flabby, though despite its ripeness and concentration. It shows the nature of vintage. I would say it also clearly indicates more syrah varietal character than 2013, The pepper comes through on this wine. Reminds me of restrained well made California Syrah. Great fruit on the nose, pepper, excellent fruit, spice, and acid on the palate. The acidity carries through into the medium finish. Lovely wine, Awesome QPR. Not sure why more folks aren't growing Syrah in Willamette Valley.
    Image

9/28/2019 - OREGONLOAFER LIKES THIS WINE:
Classic. While it’s denser than some other cool-climate Syrahs, nobody can call this too lean - but at the same time it bears no resemblance to Washington State Syrah or 90s-Style Aussie Shiraz. Basically if you like the northern Rhône you’ll probably like this.

This wine is built around a focused core of intense dark fruit so intense that on the first day just maybe flirts with the perception of sweetness. However, it avoids overripeness or jamminess, and the fruit is supported by a scaffolding of lovely secondary flavors like herbs and a nice savory meatiness, as well as a solid structure of acid with some tannins in play as well.

I definitely like this best on day three. The fruit is robust enough to still be the main player, but those secondary characteristics really come to the fore as well with air. I’d love to taste this in five years. Fun stuff but also “serious.”

And what a price point, holy cow. So excited by a lot of the sub-$25 Willamette Valley wines right now, and also by just about all of this producer’s bottling.
CT: Seanwsmithm3
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1995 Williams Selyem Pinot Noir Summa Vineyard

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#522 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 10th, 2020, 5:54 pm

Nice Sean. I'm pretty particular about syrah, partly because I think I'm pretty sensitive to the meaty/bacon notes. Might have to give this a try.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#523 Post by Sean_S » May 10th, 2020, 6:14 pm

This is not meaty or smoky like a northern rhone, IMO. I get the white pepper I expect with Syrah but this is an outlier. The 13 is even more so. I doubt I would ever guess the 2013 is Syrah. far closer to Pinot.

The 2017 WV Chardonnay I just opened is drinking well too. Nice flinty notes on PNP.

Sean
CT: Seanwsmithm3
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2020 WOTY Candidates
1994 Ravenswood Petite Sirah Sonoma County
1995 Williams Selyem Pinot Noir Summa Vineyard

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#524 Post by ABell » May 12th, 2020, 5:39 pm

opened a 2018 Dundee Hills Chard to start off my birthday evening. First Goodfellow chard and wow this is good. I'm mad at myself for being so late to the goodfellow party to be honest. Ton of various mineral notes up front and on the finish. citrus, yellow apple, white flowers, herbs and spices layer. serious chablis like acidity. not sure where is up from here at this price point

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#525 Post by JDavisRoby » May 12th, 2020, 5:57 pm

For those that have dove into the QPR/Cellar Defender wines. How would you compare/contrast these two:

Chardonnay: WV AVA vs Dundee Hills
Pinot Noir: WV AVA vs Ribbon Ridge
Joshu@

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#526 Post by Sean_S » May 12th, 2020, 7:34 pm

JDavisRoby wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 5:57 pm
For those that have dove into the QPR/Cellar Defender wines. How would you compare/contrast these two:

Chardonnay: WV AVA vs Dundee Hills
Pinot Noir: WV AVA vs Ribbon Ridge
For 2017:

Chardonnay:
2017 - WV AVA is awesome and ready to drink or cellar. Its a mix or Durant and WR Fruit. Typical Goodfellow. Pounded one Sunday. Great flinty notes... Love this wine.
2017 - Dundee Hills - I've called it "kinder and gentler". Cut through the chase. My least favorite Goodfellow wine. Its riper, rounder, creamier and not inline with the others they produced. Marcus indicated he got a late call on the fruit offer, and he took it because he wanted the block, but the 1st vintage was riper than he wished to. The 18 is much better IMO.

Pinot Noir: Those are both really good and very drinkable IMO. Are we picking a favorite? Which day of the week is it?

That said, I am a sucker for WR, so anything RR is de-classified WR fruit, so I give that the edge any day. Marcus' QPR wines are challenging for me. We buy many of them buy the case and drink them due to price, but these are serious wines that have aging potential. I try to reserve some and hope to be someday able to prove my theory that these QPR wines will age and develop complexity.

2018 is a new chapter, and I've hadn't tasted through them all yet, so I will reserve judgment, but the 18 Dundee Hills chard is rocking right out of the gate.

Sean
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1994 Ravenswood Petite Sirah Sonoma County
1995 Williams Selyem Pinot Noir Summa Vineyard

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#527 Post by JDavisRoby » May 12th, 2020, 8:10 pm

I loved the 2018 Dundee Hills Chardonnay! As you saw in my comment on the Quarantine offer/SIP thread. I don’t have any of the WV AVA Chardonnay and am going to buy some of the 2018 this week.

I have both of the 2018 QPR PN’s which is my first year to buy these wines. I didn’t do a proper tasting of the RR. It was opened as the second bottle of the night (following a Napa Cabernet) only a week after delivery. Didn’t get the tasting treatment it probably should have for my first go with the wine. We greatly enjoyed the WV PN last night with grilled pork chops.

Trying to get a feel for how long I should sit on these wines.
Joshu@

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#528 Post by Bill Mauger » May 12th, 2020, 10:20 pm

Sean_S wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 7:34 pm
[
Pinot Noir: Those are both really good and very drinkable IMO. Are we picking a favorite? Which day of the week is it?

That said, I am a sucker for WR, so anything RR is de-classified WR fruit, so I give that the edge any day. Marcus' QPR wines are challenging for me. We buy many of them buy the case and drink them due to price, but these are serious wines that have aging potential. I try to reserve some and hope to be someday able to prove my theory that these QPR wines will age and develop complexity.

Sean
I agree with everything Sean said about the qpr wines - my wife actually likes the WV PN year to year better than the RR but i am also a sucker for the nuance in WR. We can buy the WV locally here in CO and also buy it by the case. Thank goodness!

I will report back on WV and aging - i have kept a few from each vintage going back to 2014 - count me as a believer that they can age.

Bill

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#529 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 13th, 2020, 6:28 am

Bill Mauger wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 10:20 pm
Sean_S wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 7:34 pm
[
Pinot Noir: Those are both really good and very drinkable IMO. Are we picking a favorite? Which day of the week is it?

That said, I am a sucker for WR, so anything RR is de-classified WR fruit, so I give that the edge any day. Marcus' QPR wines are challenging for me. We buy many of them buy the case and drink them due to price, but these are serious wines that have aging potential. I try to reserve some and hope to be someday able to prove my theory that these QPR wines will age and develop complexity.

Sean
I agree with everything Sean said about the qpr wines - my wife actually likes the WV PN year to year better than the RR but i am also a sucker for the nuance in WR. We can buy the WV locally here in CO and also buy it by the case. Thank goodness!

I will report back on WV and aging - i have kept a few from each vintage going back to 2014 - count me as a believer that they can age.

Bill
Wish I had the wine sense to start following WV wines earlier :)
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#530 Post by Doug Uno » May 13th, 2020, 10:20 am

JDavisRoby wrote:
May 12th, 2020, 5:57 pm
For those that have dove into the QPR/Cellar Defender wines. How would you compare/contrast these two:

Chardonnay: WV AVA vs Dundee Hills
Pinot Noir: WV AVA vs Ribbon Ridge
Having tasted all the 2017 Chardonnays, IMO for a few dollars more the Ribbon Ridge, declassified Whistling Ridge/Richards, is outstanding QPR! When I tasted the three wines side by side, the Ribbon Ridge had all the qualities I love in the Whistling Ridge/Richards. It may not have the depth and nuances of the SVD, but for the money it is definitely a cellar defender wine showing the pedigree of the vineyard. I actually have more of the Ribbon Ridge Chardonnay arriving today. 🙂

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#531 Post by Darin Kendrick » May 18th, 2020, 8:38 am

Saw a familiar label (and some insta names) from Liger Belair this morning.
Goodfellow Story Tag.jpg

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#532 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 24th, 2020, 4:00 pm

  • 2018 Goodfellow Family Cellars Pinot Noir Fir Crest - USA, Oregon, Willamette Valley, Yamhill-Carlton (5/24/2020)
    Poured in a Grassl Cru glass and followed over the course of the evening.

    The wine has tons of floral character, with dried roses, cherry blossom, potpourri, and lavender bursting out of the glass. Hiding beneath the floral bouquet are aromas of black cherry, wild red cherry, raspberry, and earthy notes including wet leaves, turned soil, and freshly foraged mushroom.

    On the palate the wine is brooding, powerful, and concentrated, with predominantly black cherry, blackberry, tobacco, and leather notes. The tannic structure is more rustic than the wines from Marcus’ other sites, but the fresh acidity bringing lift to the fruit notes on the palate, and carrying them on the finish, is very present.

    Of the few 2018 Goodfellow single vineyard pinot noirs I’ve tried so far, I find this one to be the most structured and tannic in its youth. It should give great drinking pleasure in 8-10 years, and then some. (93 pts.)
    Image
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2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#533 Post by Sh@n A » May 24th, 2020, 7:13 pm

Has anyone had either of the '18 Lewman Heritage or '18 Whistling Ridge Heritage? I just had one of each and they are both really good. I found the '18 to have sappy cool red fruits with higher acidity and the Lewman to be more more black cherry with medium acidity. The WR needed a few hours to come together, where the Lewman was more approachable. I am newbie to west coast pinots, but the '18 WR reminded me of a late 90s Arcadian Pisoni I recently had. If the Lewman had more sauavage, it would be a village burg slayer.
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#534 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 24th, 2020, 7:16 pm

Sh@n A wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 7:13 pm
Has anyone had either of the '18 Lewman Heritage or '18 Whistling Ridge Heritage? I just had one of each and they are both really good. I found the '18 to have sappy cool red fruits with higher acidity and the Lewman to be more more black cherry with medium acidity. The WR needed a few hours to come together, where the Lewman was more approachable. I am newbie to west coast pinots, but the '18 WR reminded me of a late 90s Arcadian Pisoni I recently had. If the Lewman had more sauavage, it would be a village burg slayer.
I had the 2018 Lewman Vineyard. Didn’t know there was a Heritage version of it.
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2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#535 Post by Doug Uno » May 24th, 2020, 8:57 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 7:16 pm
Sh@n A wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 7:13 pm
Has anyone had either of the '18 Lewman Heritage or '18 Whistling Ridge Heritage? I just had one of each and they are both really good. I found the '18 to have sappy cool red fruits with higher acidity and the Lewman to be more more black cherry with medium acidity. The WR needed a few hours to come together, where the Lewman was more approachable. I am newbie to west coast pinots, but the '18 WR reminded me of a late 90s Arcadian Pisoni I recently had. If the Lewman had more sauavage, it would be a village burg slayer.
I had the 2018 Lewman Vineyard. Didn’t know there was a Heritage version of it.
Lewman Vineyard is Heritage #14. You might have to get some.🙂

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#536 Post by Sh@n A » May 24th, 2020, 9:02 pm

Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 7:16 pm
I had the 2018 Lewman Vineyard. Didn’t know there was a Heritage version of it.
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=169593&p=2972359&hi ... e#p2972359
"the 2018 Lewman Pinot Noir might be my favorite wine we made in 2018. We also made a single block bottling from the original Pommard planting in 1993, and a Lewman Heritage(#14) as well. Both are superlative to me, although as noted, there is something incredibly compelling to me about the vineyard designate."
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#537 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 25th, 2020, 6:17 am

Doug Uno wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 8:57 pm
Brian S t o t t e r wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 7:16 pm
Sh@n A wrote:
May 24th, 2020, 7:13 pm
Has anyone had either of the '18 Lewman Heritage or '18 Whistling Ridge Heritage? I just had one of each and they are both really good. I found the '18 to have sappy cool red fruits with higher acidity and the Lewman to be more more black cherry with medium acidity. The WR needed a few hours to come together, where the Lewman was more approachable. I am newbie to west coast pinots, but the '18 WR reminded me of a late 90s Arcadian Pisoni I recently had. If the Lewman had more sauavage, it would be a village burg slayer.
I had the 2018 Lewman Vineyard. Didn’t know there was a Heritage version of it.
Lewman Vineyard is Heritage #14. You might have to get some.🙂
Noted :)
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#538 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 25th, 2020, 4:42 pm

Day 2 of the 2018 Fir Crest PN. The wine still has loads of perfume wafting from the glass, and the fruit has transformed to more tart red notes (tart cherry, cranberry, raspberry). The purity of the fruit really shines today. The tannins and acidity are better integrated, though there is still some rustic character of the wine on the palate. Delicious!
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#539 Post by Sean_S » May 25th, 2020, 9:25 pm

Sounds Delicous.
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#540 Post by Marcus Goodfellow » May 25th, 2020, 10:14 pm

I was asked what drives the decision to label a wine as a Heritage wine in an email and thought I might answer it here.

While Willamette Valley wines have become more and more established in the period of my career, our region is still in it’s infancy. And to be honest, a lot of the information about the Valley is opinion/story/wishful thinking as well as ideas that will stand the test of time. Not to be a curmudgeon, but a lot of what’s portrayed as fact is often opinion tinged with marketing and fashion. For me, the Heritage wines are my best arguments for the terroirs, farming, and cellar choices that I have come to believe in, and my best arguments for the belief that the Willamette Valley can produce wines with European acidity, structure, and complex nature. These are arguments meant to stand for long after I am gone(so really they’re a way for me to keep running my mouth and pushing my opinions/agenda even after I am retired or dead).

They also truly are post cards to my kids. A way for them to see that I chose an artistic/agricultural life and was pretty good at it. Given that they’ll think I am a doofus for another 20-25 years, these wines do need to age well.

That said, the nuts and bolts of what makes a Heritage wine, for example old vines or highest place on the hill, is a bit different for each of these wines.

The first Heritage wine, in 2012, was 2 puncheons of Whistling Ridge. From the block called Beloved Acre(really 1.25 acre). It’s has produced the Heritage wine from Whistling Ridge in all vintages except 2018. The block is ridge top, 2/3s of it dropping slightly to the southeast, and 1/3 facing slightly to the northwest. The two sections ripen quite differently, and the cropping on the northwest side is lower than the southeast. It is interplanted with two very, very different rootstocks, Riparia and 3309, and multiple scion clones. So uniform ripening is a joke...just a joke. But it was the first block that I got at Whistling Ridge in 2006 along with the Long Acres(1.75 acres). I started making wines from the vineyard in 2004, but the fruit came from all of the different blocks.
The Beloved acre is on the windward side of the vineyard and has some of the shallowest soils, 100% sedimentary on uplifted siltstone. Sedimentary soils in the Willamette Valley are typically poor for retaining moisture and these plants suffer until their root systems are fully established and find deeper resources. During establishment, the baby vines in Beloved had a significant mortality due to lack of water. (Most vineyards irrigate to establish, but the option wasn’t really available to the Alvords(the family that planted the vineyard). Patricia is old school and she also does her own grafting. She replaced the plants that died each year until she finally had the block planted out, which took over 8 years.
Modern vineyard management thinking would NEVER do this. You irrigate baby plants to minimize loss, feed them, and get them producing as soon as possible. But this bypasses any Darwinian process and ensures that all the plants survive. Weak plants were weeded out of this block, and the vine durability is remarkable. In 2015, our hottest vintage at the time, vines in the Beloved Acre carried a full crop load, with no sign of stress. Leaf surface is smaller, alcohols are in balance, and skins are thicker producing wines with remarkable dry extract, and the typical Whistling Ridge fruit profile, as well as acidity and tannin structure. The Whistling Ridge Heritage bottlings are generally very successful fermentations, with high levels of whole cluster(many are 100%), and an extended period in fermenter, and long elevage in 500L puncheon.

The Durant Heritage wines are different. The original Heritage wine from Durant was from their original planting in 1973, and represented some of the oldest vines I had worked with. Now it’s typically from a 2 acre East facing block that was planted in 1998. It’s farmed no-till, and after almost a decade of that, this block truly produces a unique expression from the Dundee Hills. The Durant Heritage wines are also typically high whole cluster, and the No. 9 and No. 11 are 100% whole cluster, with long ferments and 19-20 months of elevage in neutral 500L Allier forest puncheons. The deeper soils of the Dundee Hills hold moisture extremely well, and these plants had a tendency to run sugars up a bit in the early days. No till has done a great job of restraining vigor in the vines and lowering the amount and size of leaves. Over the past 4 years we have been getting amazing results with this fruit, and the quality of the Durant vineyard designate is improving dramatically. One of the biggest differences in the Heritage and the regular Durant is being 100% whole cluster and the neutral wood. We don’t use new wood on Durant fruit at all, but the vineyard designate is typically comprised of a significant amount of wine aged in a two year old 500 liter puncheons. Not new but not neutral. The neutral puncheon(puncheon evolve slower than barriques, the oxygen transference is slower by volume) adds little to the wine, making it less immediately attractive, but allowing the fruit/stem flavors to really illustrate the vineyard as the wines ages and tannins integrate.

In 2018 we also bottled a Heritage wine from Lewman. While this was the first year we worked with Dennis Lewman’s Pinot Noir, it was a perfect year for his fruit, and the resulting wines are all exceptional. We brought in fruit from 4 blocks of fruit from the Lewman vineyard: Pommard planted
When Dennis established the vineyard in the early 1990s, 115 also from the original planting, 777 from a planting around 2000, and 667 also from around 2000. Clones are not a focus for me, but it’s how the blocks were divided. In the cellar, this remarkable vineyard just blew us all away. The 777 was about 40% whole cluster and is 100% of the 2018 Lewman vineyard designate. The 115 shows depth that comes with older vines, and carries a bit more fruit density that I felt would stand the test of time.

Dennis Lewman passed away suddenly from cancer last spring. Ken and Erica at Walter Scott took on farming for the vintage, and both Goodfellow and Walter Scott took fruit from the vineyard. It’s a small planting, and the entire property is less than 30 acres. In the annals of Oregon wine history, it’s unlikely Dennis Lewman will get the credit he deserves. The vineyard is most reminiscent to me of the Bethel Heights Flat Block and West Block bottlings. The vineyard was organically farmed from the beginning and Dennis was a full time teacher while he farmed the vineyard. Nothing is perfect, but regardless of the vagaries of farming Lewman vineyard has produced remarkable wines for many years, and hopefully will long into the future.

I bottled three vineyard designate wines from the vineyard because the quality was there, and because the opportunity to capture a moment in a vineyard with the person whose vision and endless commitment brought that vineyard to life is far more limited than we might think. It’s important to me that my kids have to suffer through my stories about the growers we work with. It’s also important that they can see why these people, and what they grow, are special.
Last edited by Marcus Goodfellow on May 27th, 2020, 5:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#541 Post by Sean_S » May 26th, 2020, 8:08 am

I appreciate the background on this.....

Sean
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2020 WOTY Candidates
1994 Ravenswood Petite Sirah Sonoma County
1995 Williams Selyem Pinot Noir Summa Vineyard

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#542 Post by Jason R. » May 26th, 2020, 12:25 pm

Marcus, great history there. Can’t wait for fall release [cheers.gif] Your narration encapsulates so many reasons why I love this pursuit. Wine is an amazing craft, from soil to bottle. The artistry, the details, the traditions, the patience, the site, the people, the choices...all comes together in a singular expression that is truly alive. Thanks for sharing all that!
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#543 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 26th, 2020, 12:42 pm

Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 10:14 pm
I was asked what drives the decision to label a wine as a Heritage wine in an email and thought I might answer it here.

While Willamette Valley wines have become more and more established in the period of my career, our region is still in it’s infancy. And to be honest, a lot of the information about the Valley is opinion/story/wishful thinking as well as ideas that will stand the test of time. Not to be a curmudgeon, but a lot of what’s portrayed as fact is often opinion tinged with marketing and fashion. For me, the Heritage wines are my best arguments for the terroirs, farming, and cellar choices that I have come to believe in, and my best arguments for the belief that the Willamette Valley can produce wines with European acidity, structure, and complex nature. These are arguments meant to stand for long after I am gone(so really they’re a way for me to keep running my mouth and pushing my opinions/agenda even after I am retired or dead).

They also truly are post cards to my kids. A way for them to see that I chose an artistic/agricultural life and was pretty good at it. Given that they’ll think I am a doofus for another 20-25 years, these wines do need to age well.

That said, the nuts and bolts of what makes a Heritage wine, for example old vines or highest place on the hill, is a bit different for each of these wines.

The first Heritage wine, in 2012, was 2 puncheons of Whistling Ridge. From the block called Beloved Acre(really 1.25 acre). It’s has produced the Heritage wine from Whistling Ridge in all vintages except 2018. The block is ridge top, 2/3s of it dropping slightly to the southeast, and 1/3 facing slightly to the northwest. The two sections ripen quite differently, and the cropping on the northwest side is lower than the southeast. It is interplanted with two very, very different rootstocks, Riparia and 3309, and multiple scion clones. So uniform ripening is a joke...just a joke. But it was the first block that I got at Whistling Ridge in 2006 along with the Long Acres(1.75 acres). I started making wines from the vineyard in 2004, but the fruit came from all of the different blocks.
The Beloved acre is on the windward side of the vineyard and has some of the shallowest soils, 100% sedimentary on uplifted siltstone. Sedimentary soils in the Willamette Valley are typically poor for retaining moisture and these plants suffer until their root systems are fully established and find deeper resources. During establishment, the baby vines in Beloved had a significant mortality due to lack of water. (Most vineyards irrigate to establish, but the option wasn’t really available to the Alvords(the family that planted the vineyard). Patricia is old school and she also does her own grafting. She replaced the plants that died each year until she finally had the block planted out, which took over 8 years.
Modern vineyard management thinking would NEVER do this. You irrigate baby plants to minimize loss, feed them, and get them producing as soon as possible. But this bypasses any Darwinian process and ensures that all the plants survive. Weak plants were weeded out of this block, and the vine durability is remarkable. In 2015, our hottest vintage at the time, vines in the Beloved Acre carried a full crop load, with no sign of stress. Leaf surface is smaller, alcohols are in balance, and skins are thicker producing wines with remarkable dry extract, and the typical Whistling Ridge fruit profile, as well as acidity and tannin structure. The Whistling Ridge Heritage bottlings are generally very successful fermentations, with high levels of whole cluster(many are 100%), and an extended period in fermenter, and long elevage in 500L puncheon.

The Durant Heritage wines are different. The original Heritage wine from Durant was from their original planting in 1973, and represented some of the oldest vines I had worked with. Now it’s typically from a 2 acre East facing block that was planted in 1998. It’s farmed no-till, and after almost a decade of that, this block truly produces a unique expression from the Dundee Hills. The Durant Heritage wines are also typically high whole cluster, and the No. 9 and No. 11 are 100% whole cluster, with long ferments and 19-20 months of elevage in neutral 500L Allier forest puncheons. The deeper soils of the Dundee Hills hold moisture extremely well, and these plants had a tendency to run sugars up a bit in the early days. No till has done a great job of restraining vigor in the vines and lowering the amount and size of leaves. Over the past 4 years we have been getting amazing results with this fruit, and the quality of the Durant vineyard designate is improving dramatically. One of the biggest differences in the Heritage and the regular Durant is being 100% whole cluster and the neutral wood. We don’t use new wood on Durant fruit at all, but the vineyard designate is typically comprised of a significant amount of wine aged in a two year old barrel. Not new but not neutral. The neutral puncheon(puncheon evolve slower than barriques, the oxygen transference is slower by volume) adds little to the wine, making it less immediately attractive, but allowing the fruit/stem flavors to really illustrate the vineyard as the wines ages and tannins integrate.

In 2018 we also bottled a Heritage wine from Lewman. While this was the first year we worked with Dennis Lewman’s Pinot Noir, it was a perfect year for his fruit, and the resulting wines are all exceptional. We brought in fruit from 4 blocks of fruit from the Lewman vineyard: Pommard planted
When Dennis established the vineyard in the early 1990s, 115 also from the original planting, 777 from a planting around 2000, and 667 also from around 2000. Clones are not a focus for me, but it’s how the blocks were divided. In the cellar, this remarkable vineyard just blew us all away. The 777 was about 40% whole cluster and is 100% of the 2018 Lewman vineyard designate. The 115 shows depth that comes with older vines, and carries a bit more fruit density that I felt would stand the test of time.

Dennis Lewman passed away suddenly from cancer last spring. Ken and Erica at Walter Scott took on farming for the vintage, and both Goodfellow and Walter Scott took fruit from the vineyard. It’s a small planting, and the entire property is less than 30 acres. In the annals of Oregon wine history, it’s unlikely Dennis Lewman will get the credit he deserves. The vineyard is most reminiscent to me of the Bethel Heights Flat Block and West Block bottlings. The vineyard was organically farmed from the beginning and Dennis was a full time teacher while he farmed the vineyard. Nothing is perfect, but regardless of the vagaries of farming Lewman vineyard has produced remarkable wines for many years, and hopefully will long into the future.

I bottled three vineyard designate wines from the vineyard because the quality was there, and because the opportunity to capture a moment in a vineyard with the person whose vision and endless commitment brought that vineyard to life is far more limited than we might think. It’s important to me that my kids have to suffer through my stories about the growers we work with. It’s also important that they can see why these people, and what they grow, are special.
Thank you so much for sharing this with us Marcus. I love and appreciate when winemakers can make that connection from the finished product back to the soil, vines, and people where it began. Looks like the fall release may be expensive :D
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#544 Post by Sh@n A » May 26th, 2020, 12:45 pm

Marcus Goodfellow wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 10:14 pm
They also truly are post cards to my kids. A way for them to see that I chose an artistic/agricultural life and was pretty good at it. Given that they’ll think I am a doofus for another 20-25 years, these wines do need to age well.
Beautifully written, and a lot to unpack there! I am curious, what are you targeting for in terms of tasting profile 20-25 years out on these wines? Is it simply to make a balanced wine with structure to age, and let time take its course? Or is there particular profile you are gunning for?
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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#545 Post by Ian H » May 26th, 2020, 3:54 pm

On night 2 of the 2015 Richard's Chardonnay Whistling Ridge Vineyard.

Holy balls what a bottle of wine. I needed something to jolt me back to life after a few weeks of some fine bottles but nothing that really made me take notice.

For me, a bit of matchstick, a bit more floral and a lot of stone on the nose, with great intensity of citrus on the palate. Great weight. Excellent finish. Bravo.
@@S

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#546 Post by MitchTallan » May 26th, 2020, 5:22 pm

I would post a separate note but if my experience on wine boards has taught me anything, it is to not keep heaping unbridled praise on one winemaker/winery for fear of being dismissed. This note is about the '18 WR Blanc. Forget everything I have ever said about how frigging good past vintages of this wine are, this one is the best. It is electric in it's preserved lemon dominated spicy but bright personality. Right now it may be a bit wysiwyg or the wine equivalent of "GUI", but I will still take this thrilling version in it's present format over any of its predecessors. Time, as always with all things, might change my view. But damn, try this wine and tell me I am wrong. Please. Before I beg Megan for another case.

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#547 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 26th, 2020, 5:34 pm

MitchTallan wrote:
May 26th, 2020, 5:22 pm
I would post a separate note but if my experience on wine boards has taught me anything, it is to not keep heaping unbridled praise on one winemaker/winery for fear of being dismissed. This note is about the '18 WR Blanc. Forget everything I have ever said about how frigging good past vintages of this wine are, this one is the best. It is electric in it's preserved lemon dominated spicy but bright personality. Right now it may be a bit wysiwyg or the wine equivalent of "GUI", but I will still take this thrilling version in it's present format over any of its predecessors. Time, as always with all things, might change my view. But damn, try this wine and tell me I am wrong. Please. Before I beg Megan for another case.
Hah! Now I'm wishing I took the risk with my last quarantine offer purchase and had it shipped now rather than wait until the fall.
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#548 Post by MitchTallan » May 26th, 2020, 6:11 pm

Brian-you will be fine. St. Louis must be hot by now. I been there.

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#549 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 26th, 2020, 6:53 pm

MitchTallan wrote:
May 26th, 2020, 6:11 pm
Brian-you will be fine. St. Louis must be hot by now. I been there.
Mid-80's all week, no signs of cooling off in the least for awhile...
CT: InZinity

2020 contenders for WOTY:
2017 Goodfellow Family Cellars Durant Vineyard Chardonnay
2015 Laherte Frères Champagne Blanc des Blancs Extra Brut Les Grands Crayeres
2001 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese
2015 Josef Walter Hundsruck Spätburgunder "J"

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Re: What Goodfellow/Matello are you drinking?

#550 Post by jon leifer » May 26th, 2020, 7:27 pm

2017 Goodfellow Willamette Valley Chard..A very gulpable wine, notes of wild flowers, pear, lemon zest on the nose, refreshing acidity,salinity,minerality predominate on the mouthfeel/palate..easy drinker, went well with grilled chicken kabobs, quinoa salad, corn on the cob, followed by cantalope and watermelon chunks.
Jon

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