Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

Tasting notes, varietals, grapes - anything related to wine
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Drew Goin
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#251 Post by Drew Goin » February 22nd, 2019, 6:58 pm

Camuna Cellars is a small-scale operation that currently is releasing a new Contra Costa white blend, in addition to its other offerings. Besides the white wine, Camuna has made a Carignan from the "Del Barba Vineyard".


"Updates from the cellar & studio
Fermentation & Form


"notes from the cellar: Our 2018 Barbera Rosé and 2018 White Blend are bottled and almost ready to go. They're currently available for sale and will be shipping in late March/early April. These wines and our 2018 Mission should be ready to ship in time for Passover. We have less than 25 cases of our 2017 'High Vibes' Nebbiolo available, but if you're local it's it's also available at Bi-Rite and Douglas in SF and at Afikomen and Ordinaire in the East Bay. We have some magnums of our 2017 Carignan and 2017 Nebbiolo. Contact us if you're interested in purchasing any of these limited edition 1.5L bottles.

"As you may know we produce only small batches of wine each harvest, so the wine tends to sell out quick (we have learned). We are proud to say our 2017 Barbera Rosé and our 2017 Carignan sold out (!!) in only a couple of months. However after doing some early Spring cleaning we found a few extra cases of our 2017 Carignan that we put back on the site - get it before it's gone for good.

"...Our inaugural white wine is delish blend of 54% Malvasia Bianca and 46% Chardonnay from Contra Costa County, California. You've got amazing floral brightness from the Malvasia and the roundness from the Chardonnay. An interesting blend makes for interesting conversations around the dinner table. Fermented and aged in neutral barrels."

"Super High Vibes!"



2018+white+front.jpg
"2018 'High Vibes White'" - from Camuna Cellars website

• "2018 'High Vibes White' (54% Malvasia Bianca - 46% Chardonnay) $24.00, Contra Costa County, California"


carignan+with+peach+and+tomatoes.jpg
"2017 'Ancient Vine Carignan'" - from Camuna Cellars website

• "2017 'Ancient Vine Carignan' 36.00, Contra Costa County, California

"The grapes for our 2017 Carignan were grown in Contra Costa County at the historic 'Del Barba Vineyard' on ancient head-pruned vines over a century old. We crushed and destemmed the fruit into old neutral oak barrels where it fermented with only native yeasts. Minimal sulfur added at bottling. Only 25 cases produced.

"Medium bodied with notes of cherry and red fruit. This wine goes great with any meal from pasta to steak.

"It’s delicious and you should drink it!
Unfined and unfiltered."


Camuna Cellars website:
https://www.camunacellars.com

"About"


The Jewish News of Northern California
"New Kosher Winery Camuna Cellars Springs Forth in Berkeley"
by Joshua E. London
November 15, 2018

"...Camuna is a passion project from Eli Silins, cellar master at the famed kosher Covenant Winery, and his wife, Molly Nadav, an artist and also Covenant’s project director. A Chicago-area native, Silins chalks his involvement in wine up to 'hashgacha pratis' (God’s providence).

"...Camuna Cellars 2017 Ancient Vine Carignan
Contra Costa County ($36):


"Made from grapes grown in the historic, sandy 'Del Barba Vineyard' in Oakley. This 55-acre gem of a vineyard is populated by mostly 'ancient vines', planted in the early 1910s by the Del Barba family (which still farms it). Due to the sandy soil, the roots of the vineyard’s non-irrigated, gnarly looking, head pruned, century-old vines — they typically look like something out of an Edward Gorey illustration or a Tim Burton film — stretch way down to the water table for sustenance, which can be as far as 20 feet below the surface. Even though temps in Oakley sometimes hit triple digits in the summer, the acidity of the grapes is preserved by the cool evenings. The resulting fruit makes for distinctive wines.

"This red wine is a unique, beautiful and entirely delicious expression of California Carignan. Offering bright and juicy yet controlled notes of cherry, red plum and black currant fruits, with a touch of flint and earth. This smooth, lightly tannic, medium bodied wine exhibits beautiful balance between the fruit, acidity, tannins, earth and floral notes. Terrific now, but will reward some aging."

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Drew Goin
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#252 Post by Drew Goin » February 22nd, 2019, 10:04 pm

I received an email from Mr Ken Strelo about the current status of the efforts to protect old vineyards in Oakley, California:


"Mr Goin,

"On September 26, 2017, the ACVP program was accepted as completed after Phase 2. You will find copies of the item packet and minutes from that City Council meeting attached to this email. The City Council and Staff still work to encourage relocation of vineyards on properties that are designated for and apply for development. As for viticulture heritage, that is always in the forefront of the Council’s wishes. The most recent effort was negotiating with Department of Water Resources to preserve an old growth vineyard near the delta and mouth of Marsh Creek, which was originally planned to be removed during the Dutch Slough Tidal Wetland Restoration project. I hope you have a great day!

Sincerely,
Kenneth Strelo
Primary Planner
City of Oakley




Previous Posts addressing the City of Oakley Agricultural Conservation and Viticulture Program (ACVP)


Overview of ACVP goals - 2014 news article and Mr Strelo's response email

ACVP, Phase 1 City of Oakley Staff Report (05/13/2014), from Kenneth L Strelo

Greenbelt Alliance/San Francisco Foundation case "East Cypress Corridor" settlement

Greenbelt Alliance funds article

ACVP, Phase 2 City of Oakley Staff Report



Random information about SF Bay's agricultural conservation easements:

"...The Bay Area contained 5% of the cropland in California but included some of the agricultural land most accessible to urban dwellers. Only 7% of cropland in the Bay Area was protected through fee or conservation easement."

"...Nearly half (46%) of conservation easement areas were designated for agricultural land use, followed by very-low-density residential (36%) and low-density residential (11%)."

"...Land-use planning is central to regional efforts to provide open space and manage development. Conservation acquisitions are not necessarily incorporated into city and county general plans. We found that fee-simple lands were often designated open space in general plans, but that conservation easements were typically designated as agricultural or very-low-density residential areas. Because conservation easements mostly occur on private land and involve private and public institutions at multiple scales, they may be less likely to be integrated into land-use planning processes. This lack of integration of acquisition and regulation creates difficulties for regional conservation and development planning."

"The Conservation Contributions of Conservation Easements: Analysis of the San Francisco Bay Area Protected Lands Spatial Database", Ecology and Society 13(1):40 · June 2008 

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#253 Post by Drew Goin » February 23rd, 2019, 1:09 am

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Soil Types Map - from Marsh Creek Watershed NHI document

"The Past & Present Condition of the Marsh Creek Watershed", 4th Ed. (2007) *download*
by John R. Cain, James D. Robins, & Sarah S. Puckett
with contributions by Stephen Barbata, Richard P. Walkling, & Ellen Cheng

Prepared by the Natural Heritage Institute
and the Delta Science Center at Big Break

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Detail from Soil Types Map - from Marsh Creek Watershed NHI document

The Natural Heritage Institute
www.n-h-i.org



Take Pride in Your Community (Oakley area blog)
Marsh Creek Watershed: Big Break


Big_Break_Trail_2250w_32c.gif
Big Break Trail Map - from Sallie's Personal Website blog

Sallie's Personal Website (blog)
Tags for "California Delta"



SF Gate
"Big Break With Past: New Shoreline Park in Delta to Showcase History, Environment"
by Erin Hallissy
June 7, 2000

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"Human detritus and natural habitat coexist in the Big Break area, behind Steve Barbata, director of the Delta Science Center project" - photo by Mike Kepka

"Big Break is an eclectic area, a biologically rich part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta where threatened fish and birds thrive amid a graveyard of rusty, overgrown barges that provide an almost charming reminder of the wild days of early settlers.

"...The area is named Big Break because its levee collapsed about 80 years ago, letting the river reclaim farmland that had been surrounded by the dirt-and-rock fortifications built throughout the Sacramento- San Joaquin River Delta in the early days of California...."



Mercury News
"Delta science center taking shape at Big Break Regional Shoreline"
(Adapted from 'Quick & Healthy Recipes and Ideas, 3rd Edition,' by Brenda J. Ponichtera
Small Steps Press, 2008)
by Denis Cuff
June 20, 2011

"...the 5,500-square-foot, prefabricated building will feature tall windows overlooking a lake formed by a flooded island that gave 'Big Break' its name.

"Another milestone occurred last week. The park district opened a 30-by-50-foot outdoor model showing major waterways, islands and cities in the area at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers...."



The Press
"Tons of history at Oakley’s Big Break"
by Rick Lemyre
April 23, 2015



East Bay Parks events calendar: Big Break Regional Shoreline, Discovery Science Center

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Drew Goin
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#254 Post by Drew Goin » February 24th, 2019, 8:50 am

The Three Wine Company's "Field Blend" was featured in the most recent Wine Access email promotion:


2015 Three Wine Company "Field Blend", Contra Costa County (Carignan, Mataro, Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Alicante Bouschet)

"...Fields once covered Contra Costa County, an area today known better for San Francisco’s suburban sprawl. Between the high rises and strip malls, Matt Cline has been working tirelessly to maintain the vineyards that offer a window to the Contra Costa of yore.

"In these vineyards, there’s no dirt, no gravel, no galets roules. Everything is sand. There are no trellises, rosebushes, or mansion-like tasting rooms.

"Huge, gnarled vines the size of small trees reach up from the sand craning skyward in shapes that defy modern viticulture, and would make most Napa vineyard managers cringe. Between what passes for rows, the vines are marked Spanish Mataró, Carignan, Zinfandel, and Malvasia Nero—planted not in blocks devoted to variety but helter-skelter in the traditional 'field blend' style pioneered by early farmers across Europe.

"Hauled down in buggies from the old Buena Vista Winery to Contra Costa 100-125 years ago, each vine was planted from a six-inch stick, called budwood, hand-twisted into Delhi sand by Portuguese and Italian immigrant families. The family names were Spinelli, Lucchesi, Evangelho, and Jacuzzi.

"It would be almost 100 years before a young Matt Cline, the grandson of Valeriano Jacuzzi, would walk us through the tree-like vines describing their lives, and how each still ekes out a few clusters each, the tiny berries packed with dense red-fruit concentration.

“'Contra Costa summers are hot, the best vineyards are those planted closest to the river,' Matt told us a while back over an all-you-can-eat ribeye lunch at Mac’s Old House. 'The best vintages come from the dry, mild years. 2012 and 2013 were superb. 2015 was a roller coaster, but the end results were just miraculous.'

"The early winter was rainy, replenishing hydric reserves, before drying out in a very warm January. By February, the rains were back at it, followed by cool spring temperatures that dropped yields severely in some places. July turned the burners on, putting ripening into hyperdrive and making for an early harvest that wrapped up by the last week of August and the first week of September. While the dust hasn’t yet settled, some have already called it the best of an incredible four-year run of brilliant vintages beginning with 2012."

Wine Access: Three Wine Company "Field Blend"


Three Wine Company website:
http://www.threewinecompany.com

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#255 Post by Drew Goin » February 25th, 2019, 9:18 pm

The CalWineCountry podcast is hosted by Dan Berger and Steve Jaxon. Cline Cellars' Fred Cline appeared as a guest on the show last year:


California Wine Country (Podcast)
"Fred Cline, Cline Cellars & Jacuzzi Wines"

April 25, 2018

"Fred Cline from Cline Cellars and Jacuzzi Wines is our guest today on California Wine Country with Steve Jaxon and Dan Berger.

"They started out in Contra Costa County in Oakley, now they are in Sonoma County. Jacuzzi was opened in 2007. The two wineries are across the street from each other on Arnold Drive (Hwy 121) in Sonoma Co.

"...Next they taste a Red blend also called 'Cashmere Black Magic', which is dark red from Alicante Bouchet grapes. Dan says it’s a real crowd pleaser, tasty to drink now because of the flavors in all the different varieties. The next wine is their Mourvedre, then a Carignane. Dan says it’s another pizza joint wine, pleasing and tasty with mid-palette fruit, but with tannins enough to stand up to a steak...."

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Cline CoCo Old Vine - Instagram image

Cline Cellars bottles vineyard-designated red wines from Contra Costa County as well as county-level varietals:

• "Big Break" Zinfandel:

"Big Break Vineyard was named after a levee that collapsed over 80 years ago, flooding the local farmland. This area typically produces pervasive and distinctive lots of Zinfandel. The combination of the extremely sandy, well-drained soils, dry-farmed century-old, head-trained vines, and the unique band of cooling air from the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers flavor Oakley's best vineyard sites. In fact, this block of land is situated between the San Joaquin River and a Eucalyptus grove. Both of these elements contribute to the wine, enhancing its taste by adding a minty character. The combination of the aforementioned creates a synergy of elements that are ideal for both ripening, as well as expressing the full character of the Zinfandel grapes."

• "Bridgehead" Zinfandel:

""Our Bridgehead vineyard is named after Bridgehead Road in Oakley, California, which runs adjacent to our treasured vineyard. This vineyard consistently produces one of our most individual and refined lots of Zinfandel. It was planted by Italian immigrants well before the turn of the century and is one of California’s most historic vineyards. The vines are head-trained and dry-farmed in sandy soils. The area also boasts a unique band of cooling air from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. These qualities create an incredible synergy of elements that express the unique characteristics of this site."

• "Live Oak" Zinfandel:

"Our single vineyard Live Oak Zinfandel is named for Live Oak Road in Oakley, California. The vineyard is adjacent to this road and consistently produces some of our most complex, concentrated and unique lots of Zinfandel. Cline Cellars has chosen to dry-farm the ancient, head-pruned vines, a practice employed by the Italian and Portuguese immigrants who planted this vineyard well before the turn of the century. The Oakley terroir is characterized by the hot sun, sandy soil, and a unique band of cooling air that flows from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, producing a stunning and concentrated Zinfandel."

• "Heritage" Zinfandel:

"The prized 100-year-old Big Break, Live Oak and Bridgehead vineyards in Oakley, planted in deep, sandy soil, dry-farmed and head-pruned, as they were 100 years ago."

• "Lucchesi" Petite Sirah:

"The 2016 Cline Petite Sirah is made from grapes grown on the 3 acre Lucchesi Vineyard. Planted in deep, sandy soil and dry farmed, we feel that this 40 year old vineyard provides us with an intensity and richness that yields our highest quality Petite Sirah grapes."

• "Big Break" Grenache:

"...We allow our Grenache grapes to reach full ripening, with Brix at 25.8 degrees at harvest. The results are expressive and complex grapes that make a delicious wine."

• "Small Berry" Mourvèdre:

"Our Small Berry Mourvèdre grows in a very special small block at Big Break Vineyard that consistently produces one of our most complex and concentrated Mourvèdres. The vineyard is bordered by Eucalyptus trees which gives the wine a signature minty note. The vines in this block are over 100 years old and planted on their own roots, making this one of California’s most historic vineyards. The vines have survived on their own roots because they grow in sand which keeps the phyloxera root louse in check. We dry farm these ancient, head-pruned vines, continuing a practice employed by the Italian and Portuguese immigrants who planted this vineyard before the turn of the last century."

• "Late Harvest" Mourvèdre:

"The Big Break vineyard was chosen for this Late Harvest Mourvèdre. It’s planted in deep sand-soil, which is dry-farmed and benefits from the drying winds that blow through Contra Costa County. The vineyard carried a light crop of grapes that ripened and dehydrated without rotting to a high sugar content. By the time the grapes arrived at the winery, the lot was 25% raisined."

• "Ancient Vines" Carignan:

"Our Ancient Vines Carignane draws from four separate vineyards located in the northwest area. These vines all share sandy soil and a cooling effect from the proximity to the San Joaquin River. The newest vineyard dates to 1940, while the oldest vineyards date back to the early 1900s."

• "Ancient Vines" Mourvèdre:

"The 2016 Ancient Vines Mourvèdre draws from some of our oldest, most historic and shyest-bearing vineyards. These blocks produces fruit of stunning concentration. We reach this concentration as a result of sensitive farming practices, the singular Oakley terroir, and a unique cooling band of air that flows in from the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers. By naturally restricting yields to only 2 to 3 tons per acre we are able to achieve a sublime expression of the Mourvèdre fruit. These grapes hold characteristics of dark, dusty berry fruit that makes our Ancient Vines Mourvèdre so lustrous."

• "Ancient Vines" Mourvèdre Rosé:

"Mourvèdre grapes for this rosé come from our Oakley vineyards in Contra Costa County. These vines grow in the deep sand-soil along the delta of the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers. Cool winds blow off the water and allow the grapes to hold their bright acidity. The combination of low average rainfall and fast-draining soil in the region limits the production of the vines, resulting in a scant but intensely flavored crop."

• "Ancient Vines" Zinfandel:

"Our 2017 Ancient Vines Zinfandel draws primarily from a wide selection of our oldest, most historic and shyest-bearing Zinfandel blocks in Contra Costa County. These ancient, dry-farmed vineyards consistently produce fruit of stunning concentration."

• Cashmere Series:

› Rosé (91% Zinfandel, 9% Primitivo)

› Red (58% Mourvedre, 29% Syrah, 13% Grenache)

› Black (Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, Mourvèdre, Carignane, Alicante Bouschet, Grenache, Syrah, Merlot)

› White (NOT from Contra Costa)


Tasting Pour
"Cline Cellars Ancient Vines: Vine In-Clined"

October, 2012

Cline-vineyard.jpg
Cline vineyard - Tasting Pour

The backstory of the Cline brothers' ascension to the forefront of Contra Costa's grape-growing during the 1980's is elaborated on in the following 2003 article:

SF Gate
"Where the Heck is Oakley?"

by David Darlington
May 22, 2003


Cline Cellars website:
https://clinecellars.com

Jacuzzi Family Vineyards website:
http://www.jacuzziwines.com/

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Drew Goin
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#256 Post by Drew Goin » February 27th, 2019, 6:21 pm

Here is a parcel owners' map of Contra Costa County from 1908:

Remember and Go: Your Gateway to Contra Costa History
"Official Map of Contra Costa County California: compiled from private surveys and official records"
by T. A. McMahon

Official_map_of_Contra_Costa_County_California__compiled_from_private_surveys_and_official_records_.jpg
1908 Contra Costa Map


On the website, one can zoom-in on specific areas of the map. Unfortunately, the quality of the downloadable version of this map is lower-resolution, regardless of the image size selected.

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Drew Goin
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#257 Post by Drew Goin » February 27th, 2019, 9:05 pm

Here are three older articles that tell of an unusual criminal escapade committed against the owners of the "Planchon Vineyard" back in 2012:


Mercury News
"Vineyard Thieves Plunder Half-Ton of Valuable Zinfandel Grapes in Oakley"

by Sean Maher
August 22, 2012

"OAKLEY — Vineyard owner Stan Planchon saw flashlights bobbing in the dark among rows of his zinfandel vines early Monday and knew right away that a grape heist was under way.

"His property, six acres of old vines planted near the intersection of Empire Avenue and Laurel Road, was being pillaged. Before police arrived, thieves made off with more than 1,200 pounds of prime grapes grown for California zinfandel giant Rosenblum Cellars, he said.

"...'That particular vineyard is about 180 years old*,' Planchon said, and wines made from its grapes have been featured in Wine Spectator magazine. They’re mostly zinfandel grapes, he said, with a field blending that includes the French varietals Alicante Bouschet, which adds rich color to the wine, and Mourvedre, which adds spicy flavor.

"Eighty-one plants had been stripped of their grapes, he said. At about 15 pounds of fruit per plant, which sell for $1.25 per pound, he lost roughly $1,500 worth of old-vine, specially tailored grapes.

"...Quoted on the Rosenblum website, winemaker John Kane said, 'To me, the Planchon vineyard is very historical. It’s a really nice wine from the old head prune vineyards, showing great signs of smoked bacon. I’m glad we were able to save it from the development out in Contra Costa County.'..."


Press Democrat
"1,200 Pounds of Grapes Stolen from East Bay vineyard"

August 22, 2012

oakley_vineyard_082312.jpg
90-year-old Stan Planchon tours his vineyard in Oakley after thieves stole 1,200 pounds of wine grapes on August 20, 2012. (CBS)

CBS San Francisco
"1,200 Pounds Of Wine Grapes Stolen From Oakley Vineyard"

August 23, 2013


* Each article states that the vines on the Planchon family's property is 180-years-old. In truth, the actual age would have been closer to 100-years-old in 2012; the majority of the site dates back to around 1902.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#258 Post by Drew Goin » March 3rd, 2019, 9:40 pm

A new vineyard mystery in Contra Costa County:

Nottingham Cellars / Vasco Urbano has a 2016 "Trembath Vineyard" Contra Carignan, its inaugural release. The question of the wine's source is a little bit of a mystery. According to the website, the fruit came from a +130-year-old own-rooted, dry-farmed spot in Antioch, California. Instagram posts from the winery and its winemaker make it apparent that there are going to be at least a couple of vintages of this bottling.


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Instagram post by Vasco Urbano


So, where/what is the "Trembath Vineyard"?

› Antioch has both a Trembath Lane and a Trembath Basin. Each are located in the sandiest part of the region, along the banks of the Carquinez Strait. There is a small plot of land containing (what appear to be) grapevines at the corner of Trembath Lane and E. 18th Street.

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Vines on "Trembath Lane" - CoCo Assessor map, Antioch, CA

› Producers occasionally sign NDA's with their fruit suppliers. In turn, proprietary names are assigned to vineyards that may be popularly known by a different moniker. Could the "Trembath Vineyard" simply be the "Evangelho Vineyard"? The "Evangelho Vineyard" is located close to Trembath Lane, and its mailing address is on E. 18th St.

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"Trembatch (sic) Vineyard" - Instagram post from Vasco Urbano
Instagram post by Vasco Urbano: link


Vasco Urbano website
https://nottinghamcellars.com

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#259 Post by Drew Goin » March 5th, 2019, 5:42 pm

eect0830concordave02.jpg
"Construction takes place in August 2008 on Segment 3 of the Highway 4 Bypass at the intersection of Balfour Road and Concord Avenue in Brentwood." - photo by Eddie Ledesma

East Bay Times
"Opinion: Don’t let Brentwood’s Urban Limit Line be Moved"

by Kathy Griffin
February 24, 2019

"Despite growing traffic, underfunded fire and emergency services and overcrowded schools, local development company Blackhawk Nunn Partners is proposing to expand the city of Brentwood to build more housing on top of current county agricultural land.

"The company is initiating a ballot measure for as early as November 2019 that will yet again try to move Brentwood’s Urban Limit Line (ULL) west of Shadow Lakes and north of Balfour Road to build about 2,400 single-family homes over 800 acres. Our ULL is a boundary beyond which urban development is not allowed; it is meant to discourage urban sprawl and contain development within our city.

"...Brentwood can protect this area as a dry-farmed, oil-rich parcel by upholding the Memo of Understanding (MOU) between Brentwood and Antioch that acknowledges the establishment of an open space buffer to separate and distinguish the two communities. By maintaining our existing ULL and reaffirming the in-force MOU, we can ensure that Antioch and Brentwood remain separate entities. This acreage is and should be upheld as our community separator.

"...I am leading the Alliance for a Better Brentwood, a coalition of residents and local organizations to actively and vehemently oppose any ULL ballot measure. For information, visit our website at AllianceForABetterBrentwood.org, e-mail AllianceForABetterBrentwood@gmail.com or call 925-325-8439."


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County Urbanization Ranks - from "California Farmland Conversion Report (2008 – 2010)"

The "California Farmland Conversion Report (2008 – 2010)" shows that Contra Costa County is among the top counties is the state experiencing a large amount of urbanization. The above opinion piece explains that some of the residential development is not in-pace with the needs of the communities affected. With regard to the theme of this thread, old vineyards and new risk increased threats of being paved over when communities' established laws are circumvented to accommodate certain development companies' interests.


Bay Area Greenbelt Alliance website:
https://www.greenbelt.org

"We work for a Bay Area where natural and agricultural lands are protected and where everyone can live in a thriving neighborhood that they are proud to call home."

Plan Bay Area 2040

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#260 Post by Drew Goin » March 5th, 2019, 9:31 pm

a11a-4.jpg
Delta NHA map - from Romick in Oakley blog

Romick in Oakley Blog
"US Senate Approves the Proposed Delta National Heritage Area"

by Kevin Romick
February 21, 2019


"...the Senate passed S. 47, the Natural Resources Management Act, a large public lands bill that includes the establishment of the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta National Heritage Area (NHA). The Commission would be the local coordinating entity for the Delta NHA.

"NHAs are a grassroots, community-driven approach to heritage conservation and economic development. Through public-private partnerships, NHA entities support historic preservation, natural resource conservation, recreation, heritage tourism, and educational projects. NHAs have no effect on water rights, property rights, or hunting and fishing rights within the designated area. If the Delta NHA passes the House and is signed by the President, the Commission would have three years to prepare a management plan...."


Link for more information: here

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#261 Post by Drew Goin » March 8th, 2019, 12:01 am

Mr Joel Peterson's Once & Future Wine Company is offering it's 2017 vintage of SEVEN different red wines until Friday, March 22, 2019.

once-and-future-leaf.png
Once & Future logo - from winery website

"Once & Future 'Oakley Road Vineyard':

"The soils at 'Oakley Road' vineyard are so sandy that early growers in this region were disparaged as 'sandlappers'. Little did those wags know that the delta sands, with their Phylloxera inhibiting properties, would be the key to the survival of some amazing 100-plus-year-old, own-rooted, unirrigated vines. The micro climate of Oakley allows grapes to ripen early. It is not so much that it is hot during the growing months—the average temperature is about 74 degrees with the nights in the mid 50s and the days in the 90s during the month of July and August—but that the sandy soils warm earlier in the year than most other areas in California, and vine growth starts sooner. As the season progresses, the grapes continue to ripen consistently in spite of the cooling maritime winds from the Carquinez straits, due to the reflected sun from the Antioch sandy soils.

"The resulting wines can be, in a word, graceful. The combination of own roots, old vines, deep sandy soils, and cooling afternoon breezes seems to encourage gentle, suave wines. Some winemakers like to make big, powerful, dark wines from these grapes, though I believe the wines are much more enjoyable, interesting, complex, and finer when picked earlier.

"These Oakley Road vines may not be around much longer. This part of Contra Costa (CoCo for short) is changing rapidly. It has been an industrial backwater for a long time. High tension electrical lines, a PG&E power plant, and motels that rent by the hour stand in contrast to an inordinate number of churches and an increasing reality of fast food restaurants that populate a disjointed human landscape. There is increasing urbanization as roads are widened and BART pushes east. Many of these vineyards are for sale with inflated land prices, having been designated as commercial land—the result being land costs that are more compatible with strip malls than farming. For now, the vines remain in the ground, producing viticultural treasure. And for now, we continue to make lovely wine and cherish our moment."

oakley-zin-3.jpg
Oakley Road Vineyard Zin - from the winery website

2017 Contra Costa Mataro, 'Oakley Road Vineyard':

"Tasting Notes - Mourvedre, the famous grape of Bandol, is known by the name Mataro in California. The Mataro grape has been planted in California since the 1870s, mostly as an adjunct in blends that were Zinfandel dominated. Though scarce, Mataro is an exceptional standalone grape in a few places. One of those is Oakley. In the eastern rain shadow of Mount Diablo near the San Joaquin River, vines on their own roots planted in sand dune-like soils in the late 1800s and early 1900s continue to produce some of the most interesting and highly regarded Mataro in California. The climate conditions are perfect for slow ripening grapes like Mataro. The 2017 shows bright vanilla-laced red fruit with hints of earth and spice. Round, full finish."


"Once & Future 2017 Contra Costa Zinfandel, 'Oakley Road Vineyard':

"Tasting Notes - 'Oakley Road' Zinfandel is planted on the same sandy slopes as the 'Oakley Road' Mataro. These vines, planted around 1900, are on their own roots. Coming out of the sand with multiple arms like hydra, they are truly bush vines. Unlike most other California Zinfandel vineyards, the fruit is carried relatively low to the ground. The proximity to ground acts as shelter from the wind, which can be moderately intense in the afternoon in Oakley, while reflecting radiated light and heat back on the grapes from the sandy soils. The vineyard has about 10 percent Carignane and Mataro interplanted with the Zinfandel. The sandy soils and the own-rooted vines tend to produce unique, suave, textural characteristics in the wines. The wines have bright, ripe flavors, and are very spicy, with fresh acidity and smooth fine tannins in the finish. The 2017 shows full, rich red and black fruit flavors. Big without being heavy. Very refined astringency."



Once & Future Wine Company website:
https://www.onceandfuturewine.com
[/quote]

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#262 Post by Drew Goin » March 9th, 2019, 6:45 pm

Petite Sirah specialist Mountain Tides is currently offering three Contra Costa bottlings in the Spring Release:

mountaintides_2017_contracostabottle.jpg
Mountain Tides "Contra Costa" PS - from winery website

Mountain Tides 2017 Petite Sirah (red wine) Contra Costa

"Grown in the sandy soils of the Sacramento Delta in Contra Costa County, this wine showcases a ruby red color which immediately announces that it will not be your standard dessert-like Petite Sirah. Carrying pretty aromas of blueberry, raspberry, cinnamon and dried rose petals, it feels more elegant than aggressive. More blueberry greets your palate alongside a blood orange bitterness that truly rewards being accompanied by a meal. It is a study in the tension between softness and strength and suggests that maybe there is no difference in the two after all.

"Tech Info:
Harvest Brix Level: 23.5
TA: 4.73
pH: 3.84"


Mountain Tides 2018 Petite Sirah (rosé wine) Contra Costa

"One of my favorite aspects of wine made from grapes grown in Contra Costa County is that due to all of the sand in the soil, the wines tend to have strikingly rich and complex aromatics. Long story short, they smell great! This rosé is no different with gorgeous layers of peach, honeysuckle, and sweet pea flowers. While the Clements Hills rosé showcases the energy and acidity that comes from the clay soil there, this Contra Costa Rosé truly shows how expressive wines grown in sand can be. The aromas are sweet, rich, and enticing while it tastes just as lovely as the nose would suggest. This certainly has acidity and freshness, but it is much more delicately woven into the fabric of the wine. The aromatic complexity, juicy flavor, silky texture, and bright acidity all come together in a beautiful harmony. This wine will pair with food beautifully, but it does not require it. You are just as likely to open a bottle and enjoy it by itself, in all of it’s glory.

"Tech Info:
Harvest Brix Level: 21.5
TA: 6.0 g/L
pH: 3.5"


Mountain Tides 2018 Partial Carbonic Petite Sirah (red wine) Contra Costa

"Sometimes a mistake can be a stroke of luck, an act of fate, or an act of God depending on where your spiritual inclinations lie. In honest winemaking, the goal is always to make delicious wines that represent the time and place from which they come which I think makes it easier for us to adapt in these situations because we are not trying to force or sculpt the wine into being a predetermined thing. Here we have one such fateful error where the grapes came in much lower in sugar than we were expecting so we experimented with adding over 65% of the clusters in whole without separating the berries from the stems. The resulting wine smells like heaven; a heaven filled with juicy black cherries, sweet spices, and dusty earth. That juicy fruit quality extends to the palate where one would more likely think it is Beaujolais Cru than Petite Sirah. The whole clusters went through carbonic maceration which yields these beautiful fruit flavors, but the addition of the woody stems also gives the wine a strong backbone of tannic structure that is supportive without being overpowering. It is a harmonious and heartfelt wine that we are so pleased to have available, albeit in very limited quantities. At our house, we like to drink it with a little bit of a chill on the bottle so don’t be afraid to throw it in the fridge for an hour or so before opening.

"Tech Info:
Harvest Brix Level: 21.0
TA: 5.6 g/L
pH: 3.51"


"...For those of you who have ordered previously, the process is the same, but the password is new*. For those of you who are newer to the mailing list, the instructions for ordering are below. You can now also set up an account on the site which should make viewing/tracking your orders much easier. It is very quick and easy to create, and as always, your information is never shared with anyone.

"As with previous releases, these wines are very limited so we are asking that you limit your purchase to 12 bottles of each wine so that everyone has a shot at purchasing. We do still have a small amount of our 2017 reds available as well, so you can purchase those too.

"Thank you again to all of you for being a part of this journey. Our hearts are full.


"Cheers!
Allison & Scott"
scott@mountaintideswine.com
Mountain Tides Wine
https://www.mountaintideswine.com

* Password: carbonic



The Wine Write blog
"Be Moved by Mountain Tides Wine"

January, 2019

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#263 Post by Drew Goin » March 9th, 2019, 7:19 pm

Fine Disregard will be releasing a Contra Costa Mataro (Mourvèdre) next week!

From the save-the-date email:


"Friends,

"We're excited to announce that our 2019 Spring Release opens next week on Tuesday, March 12. You'll receive an email with a personalized login and other important details, so please check your spam folder if you don't see one.

"This Release will focus on our 2017 Napa Valley Semillon as well as two new additions to our portfolio, a Mataro (a.k.a. Mourvèdre) from the 'Pato Vineyard' in Contra Costa County, and a new Grenache from the 'Sceales Vineyard' in Alexander Valley. Check out our notes below for a preview of what's to come.

"A huge thank you to everyone for your continued support!! We're really looking forward to sharing our latest wines with you.

"All the best,
Mike, Kara & Lucy"
mike@finedisregardwine.com
kara@finedisregardwine.com
707-681-5984


"...Mataro is something we’ve wanted to make for a long time. We drink a lot of it, especially from Contra Costa, and were giddy as schoolboys (or schoolgirls) when we had the opportunity to work with the 'Pato Vineyard' and its century old vines. Not only is the vineyard farmed so conscientiously, it's where California icons like Ridge, Rosenblum, and most recently Bedrock, have all made wine. It's a privilege to be a part of that history...."


Fine Disregard Wine Company website:
https://www.finedisregardwine.com



* Update *

From the Release email:


"...2017 PATO VINEYARD MATARO - Contra Costa County

"From dry farmed, own rooted vines planted around the turn of the 20th Century in the renowned Delhi Blow Sands of Contra Costa County and immaculately farmed by our good friend Morgan Twain-Peterson. This is a bit of an outlier for 'CoCo' Mataro. There are the expected supple tannins from the region’s beach like soils. But the vineyard is also a bit more inland from the cooling reach of the California Delta. As such, there’s a higher tone to the aromatics, with a top note of spice overlaying a core of tangy fruit.

"bing cherry, pomegranate, rose petal, allspice

"13.7% Alc."

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#264 Post by seanr » May 1st, 2019, 9:58 pm

I recently tried a wine from Dylan's Ghost (made by Aaron Pott) sourced from the Del Barba vineyard. It was really nice (TNs below) but I was surprised to see Cabernet Franc mentioned in the varietal list. I was unaware CF was planted in Del Barba.

From the site: https://www.dylansghostwinery.com/
Dylan's Ghost 21 Barrel Selection
Red Wine Blend Del Barba Vineyard 2015
Twenty One Reserve Barrels produced of this Single Vineyard Field Blend, Heirloom Cabernet Franc, Zinfandel and Syrah.

Anyone know more about the varietals planted in Del Barba?


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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#265 Post by Drew Goin » May 22nd, 2019, 3:03 pm

From an email from Al Turner, Secretary of the Contra Costa Wine Group:


"May 2019 Contra Costa Wine Group Newsletter

"I have just returned from Traverse City, Michigan where I attended the WineMaker Magazine Annual Conference. On Saturday night, it was announced that the Contra Costa Wine Group had won the 'Club of the Year' honors for the fifth year in a row! That is a huge accomplishment and we should all be proud.

"CCWG member, Mike Orton, owner of the Valley Vintner was also awarded 'Retailer of the Year' honors. That’s a first for Mike so congratulations are definitely in order...."



Contra Costa Wine Group website:
http://www.ccwinegroup.com/

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#266 Post by Drew Goin » May 22nd, 2019, 3:19 pm

seanr wrote:
May 1st, 2019, 9:58 pm
I recently tried a wine from Dylan's Ghost (made by Aaron Pott) sourced from the Del Barba vineyard. It was really nice (TNs below) but I was surprised to see Cabernet Franc mentioned in the varietal list. I was unaware CF was planted in Del Barba.

From the site: https://www.dylansghostwinery.com/
Dylan's Ghost 21 Barrel Selection
Red Wine Blend Del Barba Vineyard 2015
Twenty One Reserve Barrels produced of this Single Vineyard Field Blend, Heirloom Cabernet Franc, Zinfandel and Syrah.

Anyone know more about the varietals planted in Del Barba?

Sean, I knew that the vineyard included newer plantings (at least on the corner of O'Hara & Laurel Rd), but I don't know what varieties are specifically situated there.




The Dylan's Ghost winery also offers a "Del Barba Vineyard" "Heirloom" Red Blend Cask Selection bottling, from Cinsault, Syrah, & Zinfandel, but I imagine that the Syrah is newer vine material (just a guess).



Napa Wine Project
"Dylan's Ghost Winery"

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#267 Post by seanr » June 17th, 2019, 7:41 pm

Happened to see this on redfin. 9 acres of Zinfandel claimed to be planted in 1800s. Anyone know what Vineyard this is? It's right on Oakley Rd.

https://www.redfin.com/CA/Oakley/2371-O ... ntent=link

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#268 Post by AD Northup » June 17th, 2019, 8:01 pm

seanr wrote:
June 17th, 2019, 7:41 pm
Happened to see this on redfin. 9 acres of Zinfandel claimed to be planted in 1800s. Anyone know what Vineyard this is? It's right on Oakley Rd.

https://www.redfin.com/CA/Oakley/2371-O ... ntent=link
Think it was already discussed on page 3 of this thread
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#269 Post by Drew Goin » July 20th, 2019, 5:26 pm

Facebook posts from Mr Morgan Twain-Peterson of Bedrock Wine Company:

FB_IMG_1563668104342.jpg
Ode to Frank bottling - front label - Bedrock FB post
FB_IMG_1563668112307.jpg
Ode to Frank bottling - back label - Bedrock FB post

Mr Frank Evangelho's family owned the "Evangelho Vineyard" from the 1930's, until selling the ancient property (c.1880's) to Bedrock.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#270 Post by Drew Goin » July 24th, 2019, 1:36 am

From the most recent Bedrock Wine Company email's release notes:


Bedrock-Wine-Company-2018-Evangelho-Heritage-Red-product-image-325-large.jpg
Bedrock Wine Company "Evangelho Vineyard"


"...2018 Evangelho Heritage Red

"2018 was our second vintage with full control of farming at our nearly 130-year-old estate site (still gives me chills to say that), and we enjoyed a mild and even vintage leading to a relatively late harvest at this amazing Delta site.

"This is a classic Evangelho, showing the bright and composed fruit we expect along with the savory bite inflected by the Mataro and Carignan, and one that should provide plenty of pleasure throughout the years.



"...2017 Evangelho Vineyard 'Areio e Vento e Amor'

"From the first time Frank showed me Evangelho Vineyard in 2011, I was always smitten by the possibilities of a small, western facing block of vines located in the heart of the vineyard. Located at the intersection of the Zinfandel, Mataro and Carignan blocks, this small block seemed to potentially encapsulate the site more than any other on that ranch. Unfortunately, it was so small that it had always been picked into larger lots and blended away by whatever winery had been contracted for the fruit.

"In 2017, we decided to pick the one ton out separately and give it the stage we thought it deserved. We were rewarded mightily by a wine that I consider to be the essence of Evangelho—a Mataro-dominated field-blend that also features Zinfandel, Carignan, Palomino and Alicante Bouschet. After Frank passed away last year, we thought it only fitting that his beautiful image should adorn the label with the words 'Wind and Sand and Love' written in his beloved Azorean (Portuguese) spelled across the back...."


Bedrock Wine Company website: https://bedrockwineco.com/


FB_IMG_1563668136792.jpg
Evangelho Vineyard on the Right, Cover Crops

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#271 Post by Drew Goin » September 22nd, 2019, 5:27 pm

From the Desire Lines 2019 Release offering:

18EXSER2-5014.jpg
Desire Lines Experimental Series #2: 'Fred’s Home Block' Mourvèdre

"2018 Desire Lines Experimental Series #2: 'Fred’s Home Block' Mourvèdre

"'Fred’s Home Block' Mourvèdre is from a small parcel of magnificent Mourvèdre planted in the 1880s in Oakley. The vineyard was for many years a core piece of the Bonny Doon 'Cigare Volant', and for good reason, we’ve discovered: the wine is incredible. The vines are planted on the eastern edge of the Oakley Sands three miles east of 'Evangelho Vineyard'.

"The wine was fermented with 30% whole cluster for 30 days in tank (we typically drain and press our Evangelho Carignan around 18-21 days) and raised in a single neutral 600L barrel. The wine smells like our local Watmaugh strawberries baked in a cobbler, with orange citrus, a hint of Mourvèdre’s distinctive gaminess, and a plush mouthfeel. The wine is part of our new Experimental Series, an opportunity for us to experiment with wines we’re excited about that may not yet fit our single-vineyard model. Things like new vineyards, individual blocks, experimental fermentations, or single barrel selections."



"2018 Desire Lines 'Evangelho' Red Wine

"Our 2018 'Evangelho' Red Wine is a blend of roughly 90% Carignan and 10% Mourvèdre. Like the 2017, the wine was fermented with 30% whole cluster under a submerged cap and aged for ten months in neutral 400L barrels. We love the 400L barrel size for Carignan – it retains freshness and builds tension like all large format barrels, but with a less reductive tendency than the 500L and 600L barrels that I prefer for Syrah and Mourvèdre.

"The Carignan from 'Evangelho' gives a juicy wine that smells of flowers and red fruits, with a soft tannin profile and vibrant acidity. The inclusion of cluster adds spice to the nose, while the small portion of carbonic maceration and Mourvèdre add flesh to the palate. The winemaking style is inspired by our love for the great cru Beaujolais of France: wines that are a joy to drink while young and age gracefully as well."



Desire Lines website:
https://www.desirelineswines.com/

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#272 Post by Matt Wood » September 22nd, 2019, 7:58 pm

Some photos of a pick I did in Oakley today. 120 year old vines in the sand. Mostly Carignan, some Mataro, some Zin. Wonderful looking fruit. 23 brix after soaking all day, perfect for me, it made me so happy. Thanks to Drew for keeping the CC thread alive. On a less happy note it seems like more of these old vineyards are for sale every year out there. I hope folks keep making great wine from them to keep the vines in the ground.
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#273 Post by Drew Goin » September 22nd, 2019, 8:54 pm

Amazing photos, Matt!!

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#274 Post by brigcampbell » September 22nd, 2019, 9:01 pm

Excellent, Matt.
Matt Wood wrote:
September 22nd, 2019, 7:58 pm
Some photos of a pick I did in Oakley today. 120 year old vines in the sand. Mostly Carignan, some Mataro, some Zin. Wonderful looking fruit. 23 brix after soaking all day, perfect for me, it made so happy. Thanks to Drew for keeping the CC thread alive. On a less happy note it seems like more of these old vineyards are for sale every year out there. I hope folks keep making great wine from them to keep the vines in the ground.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#275 Post by Ken Zinns » September 23rd, 2019, 6:52 am

Matt Wood wrote:
September 22nd, 2019, 7:58 pm
Some photos of a pick I did in Oakley today. 120 year old vines in the sand. Mostly Carignan, some Mataro, some Zin. Wonderful looking fruit. 23 brix after soaking all day, perfect for me, it made me so happy. Thanks to Drew for keeping the CC thread alive. On a less happy note it seems like more of these old vineyards are for sale every year out there. I hope folks keep making great wine from them to keep the vines in the ground.
Nice, Matt! [cheers.gif]

Also, I don't think I've mentioned this Contra Costa vineyard and winery before - Perfusion Vineyard.
Perfusion Vineyard
It's on the other side of the East Bay hills from the vast majority of Contra Costa vineyards - it's on the west side, in the Wildcat Canyon area of Richmond, so it's much cooler climate and they grow Pinot Noir at the small vineyard there. The vines were planted in 2007. I was reminded of Perfusion since I helped sort fruit from the vineyard on Saturday in San Francisco, where the wine is made.

Photo of the vineyard from the Perfusion website:
Image
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#276 Post by Matt Wood » September 23rd, 2019, 10:13 am

Thanks Ken. That looks like an interesting vineyard. So different than the Antioch/Oakley/Brentwood part of the county! I'll have to check out one of their wines.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#277 Post by Al Osterheld » September 23rd, 2019, 8:52 pm

Hey, I think I helped with the 2012 Perfusion Pinot which may have been the first real vintage. Didn't realize they had gone commercial.

-Al

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#278 Post by Drew Goin » October 8th, 2019, 10:24 am

I found a new producer that offers white, rosé, and red from Contra Costa, Birdhorse Wines.


From the winery website:

"2018 Contra Costa Carignan

"Our grapes grow in the sandy soil of Contra Costa County on some gnarled 80+-year-old vines - it's hard to find older or more storied vines. 12.0% ABV."


The details on the Backroom Wines retail site state that the grapes come from the "Sandy Lane Vineyard" in Oakley.


"2018 Contra Costa Verdelho

"We sourced these grapes from Contra Costa County, where the sunny climate and sandy soil works magic on this fruit. Neutral barrel aging and 12.4% ABV."



"2018 California Rosé

"One-third Carignan and two-thirds Valdiguié, we're able to show off some of the best of the Suisun Valley and Contra Costa County in each bottle. This one clocks in at 12.6% ABV."



Birdhorse Wines website:
https://www.birdhorsewines.com/

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#279 Post by Ken Zinns » October 8th, 2019, 11:09 am

Drew, your mention of Verdelho rang a bell and I remembered a couple of wines from a brand-new producer that each have Contra Costa County fruit. The producer is Zumo - I tasted their two debut wines at this year's Brumaire tasting in Oakland. Their 2018 "Phew" is Verdelho from a vineyard in the Knightsen area, and their 2018 "Flower Face" is 75% Tempranillo from Matthew Rorick's vineyard in Calaveras County plus 25% Muscat from Contra Costa (guessing it may be the same vineyard as the Verdelho but I'm not sure). Not a lot of info on the winery website but I'm sure you could contact them for more info.

Wines | Zumo Wine
ITB, Harrington Wines & Eno Wines, and Grape-Nutz.com

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#280 Post by Matt Wood » October 8th, 2019, 3:16 pm

I think the Zumo Verdelho comes from Tom Morgans vineyard in Knightsen that has Verdelho, Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Gris and a small amount of Pinot Noir. I've gotten small amounts of fruit from him almost every year I've made wine, super nice guy. I really like the Verdelho from there. The SB and PG do well too.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#281 Post by Drew Goin » October 9th, 2019, 8:27 am

From the Birdhorse Wines website blog:

"...The fruit comes from Evina Vineyard in Knightsen, Contra Costa County, California...".

link

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#282 Post by Matt Wood » October 9th, 2019, 10:01 am

Thanks Drew, that’s the official name for Toms vineyard. There’s not many white grape vineyards in that area.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#283 Post by Drew Goin » December 16th, 2019, 5:45 pm

Here is an older post from Wine Anorak featuring Precedent's Zinfandel from the "Evangehlo Vineyard":


Wine Anorak
"PROPERLY OLD VINE ZINFANDEL: PRECEDENT EVANGELHO VINEYARD ZINFANDEL 2013"

by Jamie Goode
January 4, 2016

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#284 Post by Drew Goin » January 16th, 2020, 5:09 pm

Thereafter Wine Company escaped my attention until today. This producer offers 2 wines sourced from Contra Costa vineyards.



2018 "Evina Vineyard" Sauvignon Blanc:

"Subtle honeydow melon and guava with light notes of lime zest and flint.

"Fresh and yet soft on the palate. Understated richness from the oak fermentation.

"Farmed by Tom Morgan and his family in Knightsen, California.

"These 20+ year old vines are rooted in the sandy clay soils of Contra Costa County.

"Spontaneously fermented and aged in neutral French oak barrels for 10 months.

"Full malolactic fermentation. No bâtonnage.

"4 barrels produced."


IMG_3914.jpg
"Sandy Lane" Red Wine - Thereafter website

2018 "Sandy Lane" Red Wine:

"Red plum, blackberry bramble, cedar, and raspberry tea.

"Ethereal and quenching red berry themes shift and change with each sip.

"Selected from a Carignan and Mataro field blend of 70+ years-old vines.

"Planted without rootstock, the own-rooted vines find their own water in soil so sandy it looks like a beach.

"Farmed by Gary Gonzales and his crew, located in Oakley, California.

"Native yeast co-fermentation of the two varieties, 25% whole-cluster. Daily punchdowns.

"Aged in neutral French oak barrels for 10 months.

"3 barrels produced."


Thereafter Wine Company website: https://www.thereafterwine.com/

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#285 Post by Adam Frisch » January 16th, 2020, 10:18 pm

Drew Goin wrote:
October 22nd, 2018, 4:35 pm

Tamayo Family Vineyards
www.tamayowines.com
2155 Elkins Way
Brentwood, Ca 94513
925-513-8463
I take some fruit from Tamayo. He's an excellent grower and winemaker. Low-intervention, perfectly farmed. His vines are virtually dry farmed. Last year he watered them twice. Took my Tinta Cao from him 2 years in a row and this year Alicante Bouschet as well.
Sabelli-Frisch Wines

Owner, proprietor and winemaker (with a little help) at Sabelli-Frisch Wines. I make wine from low-impact vineyards, focus on rare, forgotten, under-appreciated or historic grape varietals. Mission grape is my main red focus. IG: sabellifrisch

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#286 Post by seanr » January 24th, 2020, 8:23 am

Noticed this wine yesterday at K&L. From the Lamorinda AVA of Contra Costa. I will grab a bottle will report back with tasting notes.

ST. ROMEDIUS WINE
2017 Red Wine
Buckeye Ranch, Lamorinda AVA, Contra Costa County

Our third vintage from the Buckeye Ranch Vineyard is ready for your holiday table. This field blend is composed of 52% Petite Sirah and 48% Syrah. In 2017 the deer and raccoons ate all the zinfandel, which gave us the opportunity to see what the blend is like with only Petite Sirah and Syrah. We're very please with the results.

Type: Blend of 52% Petite Sirah and 48% Syrah
% Alcohol: ​ 15.0%
Production: 3 barrels



https://stromedius.com/

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#287 Post by Drew Goin » February 13th, 2020, 4:08 pm

The reddit r/wine thread featured this thoughtful post on the "Evangehlo Vineyard" of Antioch, California:

"Is Evangelho CA's Greatest Vineyard? Looking for Grand Cru in the New World (Tasting Notes Inside)"



Responses from Mr Morgan Twain-Peterson of Bedrock Wine Company and Mr Hardy Wallace of Dirty & Rowdy Family Wines are included.


Tasting Notes in post:

- KEEP Evangelho Vineyard Carignan 2015

- Precedent Evangelho Vineyard Zinfandel 2016

- Bedrock Evangelho Heritage Red Blend 2016

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#288 Post by Drew Goin » February 18th, 2020, 11:52 am

Some time ago, I researched the old vineyards of eastern Contra Costa County, including famous producers who bottle-designated their fruit sources, as well as news articles related to the owners/locations of the properties.

The post "CoCo-Confusion (...Continued)" mentioned the "Salvador Vineyard" which, according to today's "Spring 2020 Release" email from Bedrock Wine Company, no longer exists:



"...We lost Salvador Vineyard a few months ago. When I say 'we' do not mean Bedrock Wine Co., Chris or me, or even maybe Turley (though they had taken the fruit for a quarter century— rather, wine and history lovers as a whole lost something precious. To the developers that bought the ranch for tract homes the vines were just another relic of a bygone age in Contra Costa County—I am sure they had no idea that Robert Parker gave the 2013 Salvador the second-highest score he ever gave for a Zinfandel. They were 98 points on the development potential though. Driving the streets of Oakley, it is easy to see that Salvador is just the most recent casualty of decades of suburban creep that will continue to cost the area many of its last remaining vinous jewels.


"...Over the last few decades, nearly 80% of agricultural land in Oakley, and even more in neighboring Antioch, has been converted to different human installations. With the continued eastward march of Bay Area Rapid Transit, “For Sale” signs rise out of the sands in front of old vineyards welcoming the twisted phoenix of sprawl. A flurry of arguments surrounding the use of 'eminent domain' occupies columns of print. The city of Oakley has plans for a large mall— Costco, Bass Pro Shop, Target, you know the type—on what is one of the last large expanses of old vines in the area. Currently there are 'for sale' signs on Live Oak Vineyard (the main source of Ode to Lulu Mataro) and Oakley Road Vineyard (Bedrock, Once & Future, and notable others’ source of Mataro, Zinfandel and Carignan). This is where some of California’s oldest and best vineyards are most threatened, and where the contrast between old-fashioned agriculture and the reality of human expansion is most stark. It is here where author Don DeLillo’s quip that 'The future belongs to the crowds' seems most prescient.


"The main problem is simply that farmers are a dying breed in Oakley. The current generation of families that own the few remaining vineyards are getting close to retirement, and the next wave does not relish the hard, and oftentimes minimally profitable, existence their parents endured. This, combined with the housing pressure created by the pulsing leviathan of Bay Area commerce, creates a situation where vineyard acreage is selling to developers for $200-250k an acre—a pretty good retirement for someone who has picked sand out of their eyelashes on the back of aging tractors for decades.


"Perhaps the greatest irony of this eastward expansion is that the vines of Oakley are finally getting some respect put on their name by the California winemaking community. In an area that was reliant for so long on enormous Central Valley operations to take their fruit for Central Valley pricing, people are now flocking to the sands, realizing what rare beasts the remaining vines are. 100+ year old, own-rooted vines planted in sand are extraordinarily rare no matter where you are in the world. The result is that fruit that as recently as a decade ago was selling for less than $1000 a ton (barely subsistence farming) now, if farmed well, will sell for $2500-$3500. In 2011 Frank Evangelho could not sell all of his fruit from his ranch even at those low prices. There is now a waiting list.


"...It is hard to know exactly what grape culture in Oakley will look like as we move through the next several decades. For those of us who work with these vines and love the wines grown from this uniquely American growing area, each visit requires some mental steeling as it is common to find yet another vineyard felled in the name of progress. However, when one sees the wines being made from the area and the healthy price points being asked for the wines from the likes of Sandlands, Dirty & Rowdy, Turley, Ridge (making Evangelho again), Neyers, Cruse, Fine Disregard, Precedent, Desire Lines, Calder, and so many more there are grounds for optimism that a groundswell of winemaking imagination has caught up with the historically untapped potential of the area. Grain by grain, more sand is being put onto the side of the scale weighted toward economic sustainability for grapes in the region—and this, fundamentally, is the greatest bulwark against these old vines eventual passing into the dusk. I have a feeling that if Frank were still with us, he would be celebrating this point, and perhaps remind us that in his tenure he has seen worse. I hope."


I share the hopes of Mr Twain-Peterson and others who prize the unique traits found among Contra Costa's ancient, sandy vines.


Edit: I now believe that the location of the "Salvador Vineyard" was 2371 Oakley Rd.

YouTube Video of property:
Sotheby's Golden Gate

Last edited by Drew Goin on March 10th, 2020, 8:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#289 Post by Adam Frisch » February 19th, 2020, 4:37 am

Thanks Drew. Although I take from Brentwood, just south of Oakley, you can see the suburban urbanization taking over. This year I was waiting for a picking crew to pick someone else's fruit before they got to mine, so took truck to get some breakfast. Less than a few miles away were all these new suburban tract homes with malls, fast food, stores etc. Won't be long before they've engulfed it all.
Sabelli-Frisch Wines

Owner, proprietor and winemaker (with a little help) at Sabelli-Frisch Wines. I make wine from low-impact vineyards, focus on rare, forgotten, under-appreciated or historic grape varietals. Mission grape is my main red focus. IG: sabellifrisch

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#290 Post by Ken Zinns » February 19th, 2020, 6:38 am

seanr wrote:
January 24th, 2020, 8:23 am
Noticed this wine yesterday at K&L. From the Lamorinda AVA of Contra Costa. I will grab a bottle will report back with tasting notes.

ST. ROMEDIUS WINE
2017 Red Wine
Buckeye Ranch, Lamorinda AVA, Contra Costa County

Our third vintage from the Buckeye Ranch Vineyard is ready for your holiday table. This field blend is composed of 52% Petite Sirah and 48% Syrah. In 2017 the deer and raccoons ate all the zinfandel, which gave us the opportunity to see what the blend is like with only Petite Sirah and Syrah. We're very please with the results.

Type: Blend of 52% Petite Sirah and 48% Syrah
% Alcohol: ​ 15.0%
Production: 3 barrels



https://stromedius.com/
I've tasted the St. Romedius red blends on three occasions at the Garagiste Wine Festival in Sonoma, most recently this past Saturday. I did taste the 2017 red blend on Saturday - the fruit is sourced from Buckeye Ranch near Briones Regional Park. A big, ripe wine as you might expect, I thought it was good in that style though not a standout. The Petite Sirah component of the wine was pretty dominant to me. On Saturday, they also poured their 2015/16 NV red blend and two whites - a 2019 Tocai Friulano from the Apple Hill area near Placerville, and a 2018 white blend (75% Grenache Blanc / 25% Muscat Canelli). The Muscat is from the Knightsen region of Contra Costa County, while the Grenache Blance is from El Dorado County.

Some notes on the two earlier times I tasted the St. Romedius wines:

From the 2018 Garagiste tasting:
St. Romedius Wines
Robert and Milli Pintacsi are the proprietors of St. Romedius, and they established the label in 2015. Robert makes the wine in Napa, and just one wine has produced by St. Romedius thus far, with fruit sourced from the recently-approved Lamorinda AVA just over the hills to the east of Oakland and Berkeley. Robert poured me their first release, a NV Red Wine that’s mostly from the 2015 vintage – it’s a field blend of Petite Sirah, Syrah, and Zinfandel, aged in one-year old and older barrels. This had aromas of darker berry fruit, chocolate, and vanilla/oak, with a fairly rich mouthfeel and finish. I also tasted a barrel sample of the 2016 Red Wine – another field blend from the same vineyard and same grape varieties as the first wine. This had a larger proportion of Syrah, was aged in 33% new French oak, and will be bottled about a month after the tasting. Interestingly, this wine had noticeably less oak influence, with brighter and more herbal notes on the nose – I preferred this one of the two.
From the 2019 Garagiste tasting:
St. Romedius Wines
Robert and Milli Pintacsi are the proprietors of St. Romedius, and they established the label in 2015. Robert makes the wine in Napa, where he works at Far Niente and Dolce. The winery particularly interested me in that the fruit for their red wines is sourced from the recently-approved Lamorinda AVA just over the hills to the east of Oakland and Berkeley. Robert poured two pre-release white wines, and my favorite of these was the 2018 Muscat Canelli, sourced the Knightsen region of Contra Costa County. This spent some time on the skins prior to pressing, which helped tone down the characteristic floral Muscat aromatics, giving it some intriguing earth and spice undertones as well as a pleasant, slightly chalky texture. The 2016 Red Wine – a field blend of Petite Sirah, Syrah, and Zinfandel – displayed dark berry fruit, spice, and savory herbal notes on the nose, with a lively mouthfeel and moderate tannins on the finish.
25 St. Romedius Wines.jpg
St. Romedius 2018 Dry Muscat Canelli
ITB, Harrington Wines & Eno Wines, and Grape-Nutz.com

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#291 Post by Drew Goin » February 19th, 2020, 9:34 am

Thanks for the tasting notes, Ken!

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#292 Post by Drew Goin » March 3rd, 2020, 1:57 pm

Civil Eats
"Can Dry Farming Help Save California’s Vineyards?"

by Lela Nargi
October 3, 2019


"California’s most recent drought lasted many long, parched years—eight in some regions—before ending in 2017 to the relief of everyone in and out of agriculture. For the state’s grape growers, it meant respite from parched vines putting out small berries and leaves and showing other signs of stress. 'It was hard to walk through some vineyards and see vines dying, and there was nothing you could do,' says Tegan Passalacqua, director of winemaking for Turley Wine Cellars. 'Some vineyards lost 300 vines in one year. Talk to the old timers, and they’ll tell you—they never remember that happening.'

"There was plenty of suffering to go around, but some vineyards fared less terribly than others—historic parcels east of San Francisco, in Contra Costa County, for example. Planted at the turn of the last century by Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish immigrants, they rely on a technique called dry farming rather than irrigation.

"While these vineyards did not go unscathed during the drought, they did manage to 'acclimatize,' says Charlie Tsegeletos, director of winemaking for Cline Cellars, which owns about 150 acres of heritage vineyards in the county and contracts from another 300 acres.

"All around them, Contra Costa is experiencing an explosion of development. The allure of living amid the old vineyards’ leafy, picturesque rows is, ironically, threatening their continued existence. Tsegeletos says offers of hundreds of thousands of dollars per acre are hard to pass up for vineyard heirs with little interest in continuing the family business. With development has come concern that if these vineyards disappear, the knowledge the county’s dry farms can offer other wine-growing systems in fast-drying regions may also fade away.

"...In Contra Costa County, efforts to preserve the old vineyards continue. Cline’s Tsegeletos says that the city of Oakley seems genuinely interested in trying to keep them around, offering some rent-free acres. But should development amp up throughout the county, Gliessman says there will be repercussions, and not just for the vineyards. Swimming pools and lawns use a lot of groundwater; pavement 'affects the capacity of systems to take in water, get it into the soil system, and help maintain groundwater—it all runs off instead.' Whoever’s left behind to use that water, they’ll have less of it...."



Additional Reading:

Civil Eats
"Farmland Conservation: The Important Lesson of Brentwood, California"

by Naomi Starkman
August 10, 2009

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#293 Post by Drew Goin » March 7th, 2020, 12:10 pm

Wonderwerk Wines is an interesting small-scale producer offering two wines from Contra Costa fruit:


"Woon Wine Dinner featuring Say When Wines & Wonderwerk • August 21"


"Wonderwerk is Issamu Kamide and Andrew Lardy, two high school friends seeking new directions in fermentation. They live in LA and make wines from all over California. They produce and bottle with their own hands and feet at Stirm Wine Co. in Watsonville, CA alongside an inspiring collective of young, talented winemakers. Their labels are designed by their talented friends Anton Goddard and Lana Shahmoradian."



Wonderwerk Co
Above & Below Red Blend 2018 (13.5%)

"Wonderwerk Co. Above & Below Red Blend 2018 is a red natural wine made from a blend of 33% Carignan, 33% Mataro, 33% Zinfandel grapes grown in California. In the winemaker's words: "Above the Sacramento River delta and below Mt. Diablo, there is a patchwork of muscular head-trained vines that have weathered over 100 years on their own roots in 40 feet of nearly pure sand. Above & Below is a classic California wine crafted with minimal intervention in honor of past generation of California pioneers."

a8a994df-1514-4c05-ae04-0d03f5a53719.jpg
Wonderwerk FYM - from cellartracker

Wonderwerk Co
Free Your Mind 2019 (12.5%)

"Wonderwerk Co. Free Your Mind is a natural wine made from 50% Carignan, 50% Riesling. Free Your Mind, in the words of the winemakers, is essentially a carbonic old-vine Carignan pressed into a skin-fermented Riesling. Spontaneously fermented and bottled without fining, filtration, or added sulfur. Incredible wine with a little fizz, strawberry and a ton of attitude - the right one."



Wonderwerk Company website:
https://www.wonderwerkla.com/

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#294 Post by Adam Frisch » March 7th, 2020, 2:15 pm

Drew Goin wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 1:57 pm
Civil Eats
"Can Dry Farming Help Save California’s Vineyards?"

by Lela Nargi
October 3, 2019


"California’s most recent drought lasted many long, parched years—eight in some regions—before ending in 2017 to the relief of everyone in and out of agriculture. For the state’s grape growers, it meant respite from parched vines putting out small berries and leaves and showing other signs of stress. 'It was hard to walk through some vineyards and see vines dying, and there was nothing you could do,' says Tegan Passalacqua, director of winemaking for Turley Wine Cellars. 'Some vineyards lost 300 vines in one year. Talk to the old timers, and they’ll tell you—they never remember that happening.'

"There was plenty of suffering to go around, but some vineyards fared less terribly than others—historic parcels east of San Francisco, in Contra Costa County, for example. Planted at the turn of the last century by Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish immigrants, they rely on a technique called dry farming rather than irrigation.

"While these vineyards did not go unscathed during the drought, they did manage to 'acclimatize,' says Charlie Tsegeletos, director of winemaking for Cline Cellars, which owns about 150 acres of heritage vineyards in the county and contracts from another 300 acres.

"All around them, Contra Costa is experiencing an explosion of development. The allure of living amid the old vineyards’ leafy, picturesque rows is, ironically, threatening their continued existence. Tsegeletos says offers of hundreds of thousands of dollars per acre are hard to pass up for vineyard heirs with little interest in continuing the family business. With development has come concern that if these vineyards disappear, the knowledge the county’s dry farms can offer other wine-growing systems in fast-drying regions may also fade away.

"...In Contra Costa County, efforts to preserve the old vineyards continue. Cline’s Tsegeletos says that the city of Oakley seems genuinely interested in trying to keep them around, offering some rent-free acres. But should development amp up throughout the county, Gliessman says there will be repercussions, and not just for the vineyards. Swimming pools and lawns use a lot of groundwater; pavement 'affects the capacity of systems to take in water, get it into the soil system, and help maintain groundwater—it all runs off instead.' Whoever’s left behind to use that water, they’ll have less of it...."



Additional Reading:

Civil Eats
"Farmland Conservation: The Important Lesson of Brentwood, California"

by Naomi Starkman
August 10, 2009
Wonderwerk is part of the new budding Los Angeles winemaker scene. Their Carignan/Riesling blend is a great wine and an absolute buy if anyone ever comes across it. Very rewarding little effervescent wonder.
Sabelli-Frisch Wines

Owner, proprietor and winemaker (with a little help) at Sabelli-Frisch Wines. I make wine from low-impact vineyards, focus on rare, forgotten, under-appreciated or historic grape varietals. Mission grape is my main red focus. IG: sabellifrisch

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#295 Post by Drew Goin » March 8th, 2020, 4:16 pm

The City of Antioch is home to the most famous of Contra Costa County's viticultural heritage sites, the Evangehlo Vineyard. The following website features a profile of the vineyard including photos and a short video.


Antioch on the Move
"Evangelho Vineyards: The Ancient Vines Of Antioch"

August 19, 2019


"...Evangelho Vineyard was planted over 130 years ago by Portuguese immigrants. Unlike other heritage vineyards, but very common to ancient styles of growing, Evangelho has a wide variety of grapes within the vineyard, including Zinfandel, Carignan, Mourvedre, Alicante Bouchet, Muscat, and Palomino. Before technology that allowed winemakers to blend and manipulate wines, diverse vineyards is what the expert growers practiced.

"...Perhaps of greatest importance is that Evangelho Vineyards is the last, and only vineyard in Antioch. There are other dry-farmed, ancient vineyards throughout the country. However, this remaining vineyard offers a special piece of Antioch history and feeds into the current wine-making industry in California...."




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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#296 Post by Drew Goin » March 8th, 2020, 8:24 pm

Although the Oakley ACVP program appears to have died on the vine, there continue to be efforts to save the endangered agricultural/viticultural lands of eastern Contra Costa County.


Danville San Ramon
"Contra Costa County agricultural preservation, economic update in the works"

February 5, 2020


"Though some specifics are still being debated, a burgeoning plan to update agricultural land use policy in Contra Costa County to make it easier for ag tourism, farm-to-table restaurants and other emerging commercial uses is getting support from farmers and others looking to do more than simply grow crops and graze cattle.

"On Tuesday, the county Board of Supervisors accepted a report from the county's Department of Conservation and Development with various recommendations for reforming and updating ag land use policies in Contra Costa County to allow more uses to 'improve both economic vitality and sustainability.'

"The report also recommends that the Board of Supervisors update Contra Costa's winery ordinance and other rules to allow large 'farm dinner' events, various new types of lodging accommodations, including bed-and-breakfast businesses, farm stays for up to 90 days and camping/yurts/little houses on wheels.

"...'This (report) isn't perfect, but it's going in a great direction,' said County Supervisor Diane Burgis of Oakley.

"Her East County district has most of the county's farmland, though significant acreage also exists west and south of Martinez.

"'It's very important that we protect the farmland, and also give our farmers an opportunity ... to take advantage of their unique place,' Burgis said.

"This plan, said John Kopchik, the county's director of conservation and development, represents another phase of that protection.

"While the 1990 establishment of an 'urban limit line' was key to keeping at least 65 percent of Contra Costa County as ag, parks or open space, Kopchick told the supervisors further steps are needed to help ensure the ongoing sustainability and economic vitality of those preserved lands beyond the basic corn, cattle and U-pick orchards.

"...John Viano, president of the Contra Costa County Farm Bureau and an owner of Viano Vineyards in Martinez, said the plan has come a long way in two years, but that issues like parcel size, structure placement on parcels to provide the best possible economics and avoiding actions 'that take away the rural effect' still need to be worked out.


"'With a little talking, I think we'll have something we can all appreciate,' Viano said."

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#297 Post by Drew Goin » March 10th, 2020, 10:04 am

Once & Future Wine, Mr Joel Peterson's current project, specializes in legendary single-vineyard red wines. The notes in today's release offer some details into the projected fate of the "Oakley Road Vineyard" in Oakley, California:



"Oakley Road Vineyard

"The soils at Oakley Road vineyard are so sandy that early growers in this region were disparaged as “sandlappers.” Little did those wags know that the delta sands, with their Phylloxera inhibiting properties, would be the key to the survival of some amazing 100-plus-year-old, own-rooted, unirrigated vines. The micro climate of Oakley allows grapes to ripen early. It is not so much that it is hot during the growing months—the average temperature is about 74 degrees with the nights in the mid 50s and the days in the 90s during the month of July and August—but that the sandy soils warm earlier in the year than most other areas in California, and vine growth starts sooner. As the season progresses, the grapes continue to ripen consistently in spite of the cooling maritime winds from the Carquinez straits, due to the reflected sun from the Antioch sandy soils.

"The resulting wines can be, in a word, graceful. The combination of own roots, old vines, deep sandy soils, and cooling afternoon breezes seems to encourage gentle, suave wines. Some winemakers like to make big, powerful, dark wines from these grapes, though I believe the wines are much more enjoyable, interesting, complex, and finer when picked earlier.

"These Oakley Road vines may not be around much longer. This part of Contra Costa (CoCo for short) is changing rapidly. It has been an industrial backwater for a long time. High tension electrical lines, a PG&E power plant, and motels that rent by the hour stand in contrast to an inordinate number of churches and an increasing reality of fast food restaurants that populate a disjointed human landscape. There is increasing urbanization as roads are widened and BART pushes east. Many of these vineyards are for sale with inflated land prices, having been designated as commercial land—the result being land costs that are more compatible with strip malls than farming. For now, the vines remain in the ground, producing viticultural treasure. And for now, we continue to make lovely wine and cherish our moment."


Once--Future-2018-Contra-Costa-Zinfandel-product-image-75-large.jpg
O&F Oakley Rd Zinfandel - from Once & Future website

"2018 Contra Costa Zinfandel - Oakley Road Vineyard

"Like the Mataro, these vines are ancient, low production, own-rooted bush vines planted in deep sandy soils near the town of Oakley. This Zin is co-fermented with a bit of Mataro and Carignane."


Once--Future-2018-Contra-Costa-Mataro-product-image-81-large.jpg
O&F Oakley Rd Mataro - from Once & Future website

"2018 Contra Costa Mataro - Oakley Road Vineyard

"Known in France as Mourvedre, these ancient vines are own-rooted, dry farmed bush vines planted in the sandy soils of Contra Costa. It is nearly 100% Mataro."


Once & Future Wine website:
https://www.onceandfuturewine.com/

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#298 Post by Drew Goin » March 10th, 2020, 11:57 pm

So...in addition to finding the probable property marketing/sales information on the "Salvador Vineyard (2371 Oakley Rd)", I have discovered another viticultural site in Oakley that might be on the chopping block...


LoopNet Listings
"487 Sandy Lane"


image.jpg
487 Sandy Lane - LoopNet Listing

Information from the Listing:

"• 487 Sandy Lane, Oakley
• Asking Price - $3,000,000
• One Parcel:
±14.65 Acres, APN 037-050-015-9
• Located on the corner of Main Street and
Neroly Road (One Block from Hwy 4)
• Current Zoning: General Commercial
• Site is currently being used as an income producing vineyard"


The Contra Costa assessors office lists one sale date from 2017. The above data is from after this time.
Last edited by Drew Goin on March 11th, 2020, 9:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#299 Post by Jason T » March 11th, 2020, 3:09 am

Drew, good to see you posting. It would be a damn shame to lose the Oakley Road vineyard - that is indeed some nice juice.
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Re: Contra Costa County Wine Heritage

#300 Post by Drew Goin » March 11th, 2020, 10:26 am

Jason T wrote:
March 11th, 2020, 3:09 am
Drew, good to see you posting. It would be a damn shame to lose the Oakley Road vineyard - that is indeed some nice juice.

Jason, I have searched for online information on the specific routes planned for the Bay Area Rapid Transit in eastern Contra Costa County.

The "eBART Next Segment Study 2014 (Bay Area Rapid Transit)" maps out four or five susceptible regions in Antioch, Oakley, and Brentwood. You might want to check it out.

I defer to those on the ground (the winemakers) to determine what is truly happening. I can only play around on the internet and make guesses.

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