What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

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Colin Murphy
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#151 Post by Colin Murphy » August 8th, 2017, 10:02 am

I've got 3.5 acres of Mourvedre at the Casa Blanca Vineyard. It was grafted from Zaca Mesa cuttings about 15 years ago. Based on the larger berry size and later ripening it appears to be a Tablas clone. Zaca Mesa also has the 369 clone, but it is not in the section from which we sourced. I believe they have also recently grafted some Enz material.
The Mourvedre here is very different from the fruit I used to work with, years ago, at the Thompson Vineyard. Thompson Mourvedre had big marble like berries, took forever to crack 23 Brix, and the stems would lignify almost to the point of bark. I am unaware of the Thompson origins.
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#152 Post by Drew Goin » August 8th, 2017, 3:32 pm

Thanks for the details, Colin!

You know, you can promote your stuff here (Mourvedre-stuff, that is). ;)

Koehler Winery

http://store.koehlerwinery.com/mobile/2 ... e-p82.aspx

BTW, I am curious to hear more from you Santa Ynez/SBC folks about how successfully Mourvedre grows out there. I was under the impression for quite some time that it was too cool of a climate for the grape to ripen.

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#153 Post by Colin Murphy » August 8th, 2017, 4:20 pm

Ah jeez, remind me to update those bottle shots. Ugh.
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Jonathan Grunzweig
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#154 Post by Jonathan Grunzweig » August 8th, 2017, 6:17 pm

Colin Murphy wrote:Ah jeez, remind me to update those bottle shots. Ugh.
I think what you should update is the score. Didn't this get 95 from Wine Enthusiast, oh modest one?

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#155 Post by Drew Goin » September 25th, 2017, 11:27 pm

Here's a Lodi Winegrape Commission article on Mourvedre from the Clements Hills AVA’s Belle Colline Vineyard (predominantly the bottlings from Bokisch)...

"Mourvèdre (in Gentle Lodi) is a Red Wine that Compels, Not Panders"

SEPT 26, 2016 | RANDY CAPAROSO

http://www.lodiwine.com/?method=blog.bl ... not-pander

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#156 Post by Drew Goin » November 9th, 2017, 9:04 pm

Last edited by Drew Goin on February 16th, 2018, 9:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#157 Post by jnbrown » November 10th, 2017, 7:52 pm

I really love Mourvedre.
I think I first had 100% at Curtis vineyard on Foxen Canyon that was taken over by Andrew Murray.
Since then I have had or have Mourvedre from the following wineries:

Koehler - It is really big and jammy but I do like it very much.
Harrison Clarke - Just picked up their first vintage, can't wait to try it.
Cass - From Paso, tasted it at the winery but have not cracked open a bottle yet.
Tercero - Had a bottle a while ago, it was great wish I bought more.

Would like to try something from Bandol soon.
Joel

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#158 Post by Drew Goin » November 11th, 2017, 11:40 am

jnbrown wrote:I really love Mourvedre.
I think I first had 100% at Curtis vineyard on Foxen Canyon that was taken over by Andrew Murray.
Since then I have had or have Mourvedre from the following wineries:

Koehler - It is really big and jammy but I do like it very much.

http://koehlerwinery.com

Harrison Clarke - Just picked up their first vintage, can't wait to try it.

http://www.harrisonclarkewine.com

Cass - From Paso, tasted it at the winery but have not cracked open a bottle yet.

http://www.casswines.com

Tercero - Had a bottle a while ago, it was great wish I bought more.

http://www.tercerowines.com

Would like to try something from Bandol soon.
Welcome to the wonderful world of Mourvedre, jnbrown!!!

I have a bottle of the Tercero 2011 SBC Mourvedre that I have not opened yet. I have not tried the other wines, however. I will definitely try to remedy that! :)

My favorite Mourvedre-based wines have been from older vineyards, generally speaking (Contra Costa County, Sonoma Valley, southern France). I would love to recommend a few Bandol reds to you, but my own experience is pretty limited.

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#159 Post by Drew Goin » November 15th, 2017, 7:38 pm

A bit of a change - an article on the history of Mourvedre in Australia!

"Mataro: A Dark Horse with Exceptional Pedigree"
Wine Australia website
April 11, 2017

https://www.wineaustralia.com/whats-hap ... 017/mataro

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#160 Post by Drew Goin » November 16th, 2017, 2:08 am

"How to Drink Wine From the World's Oldest Vines"
from the Food & Wine Magazine website
by Henry Jeffreys
May 24, 2017

http://www.foodandwine.com/blogs/how-dr ... dest-vines

"Hewitson 'Old Garden' Mourvedre:
I tried the 2012 of this recently. It certainly smelled powerful, as you might expect from this grape, with leather, dark fruit and licorice notes, but on the palate I was surprised by its delicacy."


Hewitson has been drawing fruit from the Koch family's 8-row "Old Garden" Vineyard in Barossa. The dry-farmed vines were planted in 1853! From these surviving plants, the "Baby Bush" Vineyard was propagated in 1996.
Dean-Hewitson-at-Hewitson-Baby-Bush-Vineyard-1-WM-panorama.jpg
Hewitson vineyard
Dean-Hewitson-at-Hewitson-Baby-Bush-Vineyard-1-WM-panorama.jpg (30.4 KiB) Viewed 1652 times
"Eight rows of this rare and unique planting remain at Rowland Flat and from these vines is where Dean makes his much lauded single varietal wine called Old Garden. Geologists have confirmed that the Old Garden sits on what was the bottom of an ancient lake, once part of the Para River. The secret to the vines longevity is their extremely long roots burrowing over 10 meters down into the prehistoric ground."

http://winetimeshk.blogspot.com/2013/05 ... f.html?m=1

From the Hewitson website:

"'One of the most valuable things I learnt is that the best wines in the world come from those optimal conditions where the grapes ripen just before the season closes,' comments Dean Hewitson. 'The 'Old Garden' grows in two metres of sand over limestone leaving the bunches dry and healthy. Mourvèdre is an extremely late ripening variety and these conditions allow harvesting at the end of the season with perfect maturity.'
- Dean Hewitson"


https://www.hewitson.com.au/about-us/

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#161 Post by Wes Barton » November 17th, 2017, 1:08 am

Wow. Haven't had a Hewitson Old Garden in a very long time, but recall it being fantastic. Have you tried one?
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#162 Post by Drew Goin » November 17th, 2017, 1:22 am

My last bottle was ~8 years ago (2006 vintage?). I enjoyed it very much, and knew I should have aged it.

I did pop a "Baby Bush" Mourvedre more recently. Very different, but good for the price.

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#163 Post by Drew Goin » November 18th, 2017, 3:26 pm

Decanter Magazine article on Bandol from over 15 years ago. The piece provides a concise overview of:

• refinements made in 1985 to permitted yields, proportions of allowed varieties, and minimum vine age;
• generational changes from parents to children, etc;
• highlighted wineries'/personalities behind the differences in house styles/winemaking methods.

I wonder how much of the information is relevant today...?

"New Blood in Bandol"
by James Lawther, MW
February 1, 2002

"Bandol is still essentially a vin de vigneron which happily hasn’t changed with the new generation. If anything the role of Mourvèdre has been heightened, but with a search for flavour and ripeness."


http://www.decanter.com/features/new-bl ... ol-249027/

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#164 Post by Drew Goin » November 19th, 2017, 10:06 pm

Continuing with the Bandol theme, here I an interview with Eric de St-Victor from my favorite producer in the region, Chateau de Pibarnon:
P1020793-600x450.jpg
Pibarnon Estate
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http://sustainablewineblog.com/2017/05/ ... much-more/

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#165 Post by larry schaffer » November 20th, 2017, 9:11 am

Keep it going, my friend!
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#166 Post by Drew Goin » November 20th, 2017, 7:56 pm

"Wine can offer oxygen to the spirit, I thought…..and not incidentally opening a bottle Domaine Tempier Bandol because I had read a secret bible in France that said to drink red after dark to fight off the night in our souls.”

Goodness! That's poetry, right there. :o
Harrisonobit1-blog427.jpg
Jim Harrison and his beloved bottle of Tempier
Harrisonobit1-blog427.jpg (20.36 KiB) Viewed 1506 times
- from Bradbury Kuett's website "Une Vue de l'Esprit: The Wit of Cultured Travel and Good Taste"

"For the Writer Jim Harrison, a Bandol Red of the Domaine Tempier Was His Reverie, His Lyric"
La-Tourtine44-300x199.jpg
La Tourtine Vineyard at Domaine Tempier
La-Tourtine44-300x199.jpg (19.64 KiB) Viewed 1506 times
Please read this beautiful piece dedicated to a man, a winery, and time.

http://www.bradburykuett.com/2017/08/03 ... his-lyric/

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#167 Post by Drew Goin » November 21st, 2017, 10:34 am

Today I learned...

In Mr Robert Mayberry's Wines of the Rhône Valley (1987), Jacques Perrin, the late owner of Château de Beaucastel, increased the plantings of Mourvedre on the estate vineyards with cuttings from Domaine Tempier of Bandol.

At the time of the book's writing, approximately 20% of the 70-hectare Coudoulet property was dedicated to Mourvedre (50% to Grenache). The Cru du Coudoulet/Coudoulet de Beaucastel, just across the highway from Beaucastel, actually falls under the boundaries of Courthézon.

The Tablas Creek Clones imported into America from the vineyards of Beaucastel should therefore contain Mourvedre vine material originally from Bandol or, more specifically, Tempier!
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#168 Post by Drew Goin » December 8th, 2017, 8:11 pm

I have been sending emails to various wineries in the hope of gaining a better understanding of what the Mourvedre grape needs to succeed in the vineyard, the winery, and (most importantly) the bottle!

From Daniel at Bandol's Domaine Tempier:

• Question: What Mourvedre Clone/selection do you grow, and why you have chosen that particular one?​

Answer: "Massale selection coming from old vines here at Tempier and also others regions when we find something interesting. No clones"

• Question: What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Mourvedre a viable grape for your fruit source?

Answer: "Needs lot of sun (here in France because originally from south Spain) but also decent reserves of water to keep some balance​ so quite a good amount of clay."

• Question: What thoughts do you have regarding Mourvedre being so often blended with other grapes in the production of wine? Why do you believe so little 100% Mourvedre is bottled commercially?

Answer: "Tradition here in the South is to have blended vines and if the ancients were doing so they were having good reasons. Mostly to temperate the strength of mourvedre."

• Question: Why do you think so many winegrowers have had success growing Grenache and Syrah, whereas Mourvedre has proven more challenging in getting mature
fruit?

Answer: "History: Mourvedre did not have Chateauneuf du Pape or Hermitage to pull everything. Despite the fact that the wines from the region were leaving the place by boat to go the market places and essentially Bordeaux as Mourvedre was considered ​very useful for travelling."

"Best regards,
Daniel
DOMAINE TEMPIER
83330 LE PLAN DU CASTELLET
Tel : 0033.(0)4 94 98 70 21
Fax : 0033.(0)4 94 90 21 65
Mail : contact@domainetempier.com"

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#169 Post by Drew Goin » December 15th, 2017, 7:07 pm

I sent an email to Mr Bill Easton of Domaine de Terre Rouge and Easton Wines seeking information on the current status of Mourvedre at his winery. I had read in Mr Patrick Comiskey's American Rhône book that the DTR estate had cuttings from the Brandlin Vineyard.

"I used the Tempier template.

Brandlin (a Mt Veeder old-vine planting) was for another Terre Rouge Mourvedre site that doesn’t exist anymore."

Question: What Mourvedre Clone/selection do you grow, and why you have chosen that particular one?

Answer: "Massale selections coming from old vines in Antioch. No newer clones. These were the best available selections in 1992."

Question: What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Mourvedre a viable grape for your fruit source?

Answer: "Lots of summer sun; slope; cool location; late bud-break; granitic-clay soil; our last vineyard site to ripen makes a rare elegant wine."

Question: What thoughts do you have regarding Mourvedre being so often blended with other grapes in the production of wine? Why do you believe so little 100% Mourvedre is bottled commercially?

Answer: "It is blended with Grenache (a grape prone to oxidation if not handled properly) as it has anti-oxidative qualities. It is not sold much as a varietal as it is not as commercially-viable as some other varieties."

Question: Why do you think so many winegrowers have had success growing Grenache and Syrah, whereas Mourvedre has proven more challenging in getting mature fruit?

Answer: "I am not sure this is the case. It is a late ripener and needs to be planted in the correct location. Maybe people are planting it locations that are too cool. Mourvèdre had a gaminess and smokiness to it that many uninitiated drinkers don’t understand. It is a higher pH grape like Grenache. It is even higher pH if you ferment it on stems."

Cheers,
Bill

Bill Easton
Winemaker & Winegrower
Terre Rouge & Easton Wines
P.O. Box 41
Fiddletown, CA 95629-0041
Voice: (209) 245-3117
Fax: (209) 245-5415
Twitter: @rhonist
http://www.terrerougewines.com"

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#170 Post by Drew Goin » December 19th, 2017, 1:57 pm

The series of email inquiries continues. This time it's Mr Denis Hoey from Odonata Wines...

"I think Mourvedre is great, however it can be a little challenging to grow, it is always behind the Grenache and syrah by like 3-4 weeks throughout the growing season and into harvest.

"At Machado [Creek Vineyard] some years we see it get to 24.5 others we are lucky to get it to 22.5 before the rains shut us down... however even in the 22.5 years it makes a delicate almost pinot like expression. It is grown next to Grenache, Sangiovese, and Petite Sirah all of which bear well and ripen well. Warm climate with cool nights, good shift between the two retaining acidity.

"I grafted Tablas Creek Clone "D" into the vineyard. we only have about 200 plants so a quarter of an acre, 1 ton maximum productivity and we ferment it 50% whole cluster 50% destemmed.

"Little active oak is employed as most of this wine is destined for blending. Please let me know if I can be of further assistance!

"We are currently sold out of Mourvedre, and I am forced to blend most of it for our GSM but from year to year I have pure representations of it.

"...Love your passion for this grape as it can be amazing.

Cheers,
Denis"


http://www.odonatawines.com
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#171 Post by Howard Cooper » December 19th, 2017, 3:59 pm

My favorite Mourvedres are from Bandol - esp. Chateau Pradeaux and Tempier.

Domestically, my favorite has been Ridge Mataro.
Howard

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#172 Post by Wes Barton » December 19th, 2017, 4:39 pm

Drew Goin wrote:The series of email inquiries continues. This time it's Mr Denis Hoey from Odonata Wines...

"I think Mourvedre is great, however it can be a little challenging to grow, it is always behind the Grenache and syrah by like 3-4 weeks throughout the growing season and into harvest.

"At Machado [Creek Vineyard] some years we see it get to 24.5 others we are lucky to get it to 22.5 before the rains shut us down... however even in the 22.5 years it makes a delicate almost pinot like expression. It is grown next to Grenache, Sangiovese, and Petite Sirah all of which bear well and ripen well. Warm climate with cool nights, good shift between the two retaining acidity.

"I grafted Tablas Creek Clone "D" into the vineyard. we only have about 200 plants so a quarter of an acre, 1 ton maximum productivity and we ferment it 50% whole cluster 50% destemmed.

"Little active oak is employed as most of this wine is destined for blending. Please let me know if I can be of further assistance!

"We are currently sold out of Mourvedre, and I am forced to blend most of it for our GSM but from year to year I have pure representations of it.

"...Love your passion for this grape as it can be amazing.

Cheers,
Denis"


http://www.odonatawines.com
Denis started his label while he was assistant winemaker at Santa Cruz Mountain Vineyards. His wines are always really good, with a purity and clarity about them, not heavy or tannic, nor wimpy or flabby. The first good Malbec I ever had was his, and his Durif is ready and enjoyable on release. So, definitely pick one up next release.
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#173 Post by Drew Goin » January 3rd, 2018, 9:50 am

Mr Mike Officer of Carlisle Winery responded to my email inquiry about his work with old-vine (and not-so-old-vine) Sonoma Mourvedre. Mr Officer's answers are in italics.

From my email:

Me: The fact that you have bottled Mourvedre from all over Sonoma County places you in a pretty unique position for understanding the differences between each site and respective qualities of the grapes. The "Drink Chart" of the Carlisle website indicates that you have worked with Mourvedre from the Two Acres Vineyard, Bedrock Vineyard, as well as Bennet Valley's Radiant Ridge Vineyard. I realize you have handled smaller mixed parcels that include Mourvedre, but I don't have enough of a grasp on the details to ask anything specific about these sites.

• What Mourvedre Clone/selection you have you worked with, and what observations can you share regarding older California heritage grape materials versus those of ENTAV/FPS?

"I’ve worked with selections planted in old-vine vineyards dating back to 1888 and 1910. I’ve also worked with ENTAV 369. They all produce nice wine. They’re difficult to compare to each other as site usually trumps selection and many of the pre-prohibition plantings are heavily virused."
2010_BVM.jpg
Carlisle Winery Bedrock Vineyard Mourvedre
2010_BVM.jpg (58.35 KiB) Viewed 1321 times
• What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Mourvedre a viable grape for your fruit source?

"Mourvèdre needs heat but doesn’t like it too hot. Like Grand Noir and Petite Sirah, clusters can turn to hard scrabble if it gets too stressed from heat. It also wants water but not too much and does not perform well in fertile soils. Clay based soils that retain some water but still have adequate drainage (i.e., a slope) seem to work best."

• What thoughts do you have regarding the relationship between Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedre; what makes these three so complementary?

"Mourvèdre is thought to have originated in eastern Spain. Grenache? There’s debate as to whether it originated in Spain or Sardegna but I think most lean to Aragòn in Spain. Syrah originated in Isère Department of France, near the Alps. There’s no known genetic relationship between the three varieties. In a few winegrowing regions (CdP and Barossa Valley for example), there’s a tradition of blending the three varieties together but in the scope of viticultural history, that tradition is relatively recent.

"As for the varieties being complementary, I don’t exactly agree. I think Mourvèdre is extremely complementary to Syrah and Grenache, enhancing both without detracting from their most positive attributes. Mourvèdre is also great as a standalone. But I find Syrah quickly overwhelms Grenache, even say at 10%. I suspect the success of blending these varieties is most likely a function of site. Perhaps if I was working with different sources, I would feel differently about Syrah’s ability to play nicely with Grenache. Or maybe I just don’t like seeing Grenache lose its best characteristics in a blend."

• Why do you think so many winegrowers have had success growing Grenache and Syrah, whereas Mourvedre has proven more challenging in getting mature fruit?

"I wasn’t aware winegrowers were having a hard time getting Mourvèdre mature. We grow it in an area surrounded by Pinot Noir and Chardonnay and have no problem getting it ripe. And frankly, at least on the North Coast, I would not necessarily say Grenache has been uniformly successful. It really comes down to the market and what consumers want to purchase. If the market demanded more Mourvèdre, a lot more would be planted."

• What special considerations do you think are necessary to produce a 100% (or Mourvedre-dominant) wine from this grape in the winemaking process?

"Nothing other than a favorable site, appropriate rootstock and selection, and attentive farming."
twoacres02.jpg
Two Acres Vineyard RRV
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#174 Post by larry schaffer » January 3rd, 2018, 10:18 am

Love seeing this - and keep it up!

See if you can get ahold of the folks at Cline - they certainly have been working with the variety for awhile :-)

Cheers!
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#175 Post by Drew Goin » January 3rd, 2018, 1:39 pm

larry schaffer wrote:Love seeing this - and keep it up!

See if you can get ahold of the folks at Cline - they certainly have been working with the variety for awhile :-)

Cheers!
Oh, I have sent an email to them. I am fearful that the message was lost in the shuffle.
I will try again. :)

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#176 Post by Drew Goin » January 7th, 2018, 2:22 pm

I sent a new email to Mr Charlie Tsegeletos, the winemaker for Cline and Jacuzzi Cellars. I realized that my prior email, dated May 29, 2016, did not provide him with questions about Mourvedre. I was trying to get information on the specific vineyards of Contra Costa County that he has worked with over the years.

Mr Tsegeletos' reply?

"It is true that CC has lost many acres of its heritage vines lover the last two decades but it is difficult to convince a grower that he should walk away from the money associated with housing development. It's a shame but you can't blame the old farmers who finally see a way to get rich.

"Cline owns a couple hundred acres and we contract for grapes on a number of other pieces so we're doing our part to keep the old vines a viable economic choice for growers.

"The city replanted some old vines after needing to uproot them for a gas line* so they are seeing some value to them too.

"There might be a Contra Costa growers assoc that would provide a list of growers names but that is all I can think of. Asking a winery for a list of their growers is like asking someone for the location of their best fishing hole!"
:P :P :P

* Please see the other posts in the "Contra Costa Wine Heritage" thread on the City of Oakley's operation to transplant of an old parcel of Alicante Bouschet vines. As it succeeded, I wonder if the effort might be attempted again at some point, somewhere, in the future.

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#177 Post by Drew Goin » January 7th, 2018, 2:40 pm

Here is an article from The Chicago Tribune on Mourvedre, printed on January 24, 2014:

"The Jazzy Notes of Mourvedre"
Bill St. John, Special to Tribune Newspapers

"...By and large, outside of Spain mourvedre falls back into its usual role as a factor in a blend, especially in the neighborhood of grenache and syrah. (The blend is famed in Australia under the nickname GSM.)

"'Grenache,' [Christian] Tietje [winemaker at Cypher Winery] says, 'brings a bright fruity lift; syrah is warm and sexy, all back end. Together, those two can make a nice wine, but it's sort of G-rated.

"'What you get when you add mourvedre is its dark and moody character, but also maybe some extreme menthol, lots of minerals and slate. It's the twist in the story that makes the plot interesting."

"And so that's what winemakers, especially those in our country, go after when they bottle mourvedre alone, what Tietje calls 'the dirty Frenchman, mourvedre's dark brooding fruit but also its medicinal character, the high note of flowers, complexity.'

"Some tasters complain that, writ large, mourvedre's complexity is a bit too dirty, the dark brooding berry fruit marred by scents of blood, smoked meat, hung game, even an animal-like funk. Truth be told, a fair number of people like all that, too, and find it, when they do, in some reds from Bandol in southern Provence or as a marker in monastrell from old vines in Spain."


Wines featured in the article TN's:

• 2011 Salvador Poveda Monastrell Ossiam, Alicante, Spain
• 2010 Enrique Mendoza Monastrell, Alicante, Spain
• 2011 Senorio de Barahonda Sin-Madera Monastrell, Murcia, Spain
• 2010 Artadi Monastrell El Seque, Alicante, Spain
• 2011 Tablas Creek Mourvedre, Paso Robles, California
• 2010 Domaine de la Terre Rouge Mourvedre, Sierra Foothills, California
• 2010 Nabucco Monastrell/Syrah, Yecla, Spain
• 2010 Domaine de la Terre Rouge Tete-a-Tete, Sierra Foothills
• 2011 Thacher Controlled Chaos, Paso Robles
• 2010 Olivares Monastrell Dulce, Jumilla, Spain

http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/re ... story.html

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Drew Goin
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#178 Post by Drew Goin » January 13th, 2018, 4:06 pm

Mr Charlie Tsegeletos of Cline Cellars answered a series of questions about his work with Mourvedre.

• Question: What Mourvedre Clone/selection you have you worked with, and why have you chosen that particular one?

Answer: "Our MV is all planted in vineyards in the little town of Oakley about an hour South-East of our Sonoma winery in Contra Costa County. Most of it has been there a long time and I don’t what clone it is."


• Q: What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Mourvedre a viable grape for your fruit source?

A: "Extremely sandy soil has kept the phyloxera at bay since the vines are mostly own-rooted. The heat allows the grapes to full ripen and the cooling delta breezes allow us to maintain some acidity. These old vines are a treasure and there are not many of them remaining in CA. There are a total of around 1,000 acres in CA now but that number had dwindled down to 300 acres a few decades ago. I hear there was a time in the 1930s when there was over 8,000 acres planted in CA!!"


• Q: What thoughts do you have regarding the relationship between Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedre; what makes these three so complementary?

A: "Our Mourvedre has a nice cherry and chocolate character plus it get ripe so there is lots of body by virtue of the alcohol. It is also not overly tannic and it has great color so it goes well with the cherry, crisp, lite tannin character we get out of the Grenache and the boysenberry, crisp, tannic character we get out of the Syrah. I think the Mourvedre is a good blender with a lot of things that benefit from a big mouth feel, good color and nice fruit."


• Q: Why do you think so many winegrowers have had success growing Grenache and Syrah, whereas Mourvedre has proven more challenging in getting mature fruit?

A: "Ours ripens up without a problem but it may be that folks have it planted in an area that is too cool for it to ripen or else they are carrying too much crop. We happy with our 4 ton per acre or lower in many of our vineyards."


• Q: What special considerations do you think are necessary to produce a 100% (or Mourvedre-dominant) wine from this grape in the winemaking process?

A: "We don’t bring it in so ripe that the fermentation sticks but we also don’t bring it in underripe and green tasting. We’ll press early if it tastes like we are picking up too much tannin and it can handle oak pretty well but keep that in balance."


Cline Cellars bottles varietal wines sourced from the old-vine vineyards in the Oakley area: "Ancient Vines" Mourvedre, the "Small Berry" Big Break Vineyard Mourvedre, as well as an "Ancient Vines" Mourvedre Rose.


http://clinecellars.com/#

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#179 Post by Cris Whetstone » January 14th, 2018, 12:19 pm

Fantastic thread. I've always hoped for more interesting Mourvedre wines and for Tempier to be cheaper.

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#180 Post by Matt Wood » January 14th, 2018, 6:20 pm

Hey Drew, I thought I would add this label pic for another data point for you in your Contra Costa Mouvedre/Mataro search. This was a couple years past its prime and I thought it might be completely dead for the first hour. Then it opened up and blew off its funk and became a nice drinking wine. I thought Tom had one of the better wineries in Livermore and I think I got this bottle 1 of the times I helped on his bottling line. If blind I would have guessed it was all Petite Sirah. I think there were a couple vineyards Tom worked with in Oakley so I can't call where its from, I guess whichever vineyard is 92 years old now. Thanks for the great thread.
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#181 Post by Drew Goin » January 14th, 2018, 9:25 pm

Matt Wood wrote:I thought Tom had one of the better wineries in Livermore...l I think there were a couple vineyards Tom worked with in Oakley so I can't call where its from, I guess whichever vineyard is 92 years old now. Thanks for the great thread.
Thanks for your contribution, Matt!

I have bad luck of discovering wines just as they are being discontinued, the winery shut down, or something along those lines. :(

Thomas Coyne was a name I was not familiar with until K&L began offering all sorts of stuff at very friendly prices ($10-15/btl). The wines ranged from a Contra Costa Mourvedre (2012 vintage), Merlot, Zin, "Confluence" Bdx-blend, Syrah, Early Burgundy (Abouriou), and Petite Sirah.

I happened to be a member of the Contra Costa Wine Group, and I believe that it was the organization's secretary - Mr Al Turner - who provided me with a few biographic details about Mr Thomas Coyne. He was pivotal in the early days of the CoCo Wine Group, a home-winemakers' club. Coyne also worked at Rosenblum years ago. At some point in time, I thought I had figured out where the fruit was coming from for Thomas Coyne's CoCo Mourvedre*, but I cannot put my finger on it at this moment. I will keep looking...

Ken Zinns wrote up a winery visit/review in '08 on the Thomas Coyne Winery for the Grape-Nutz site:

http://www.grape-nutz.com/kenz/08_AprPt1.html#thos

Anyway, I believe I still have two of four bottles of Thomas Coyne Mourvedre, as well as one "Early Burgundy". I wouldn't expect the Mourvedre to be a long-term ager, but who knows.

Please do continue to share your thoughts and experiences with Mourvedre!!!

* According to the now-defunct "Co-CoFermented" blog, the Thomas Coyne "Contra Costa" Mourvedre was sourced from Mr Dwight Meadows' vineyard, which also sells/sold fruit to Rosenblum Cellars, where Mr Coyne worked many years ago.

http://co-cofermented.blogspot.com/2010 ... n.html?m=1
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#182 Post by Drew Goin » January 17th, 2018, 4:10 am

I received a reply to my interview request from winemaker and forum contributor Mr Ian Brand of I. Brand & Family, La Marea, and Le P'tit Paysan!

• Question: What Mourvedre Clone/selection you have worked with, and why you have chosen that particular one?

• Answer: "I'm not entirely sure. I haven't planted any Mourvedre/Mataro myself. The three vineyards we've worked with were already in the ground, although we've grafted two other vineyards to feed our rose program. We've used cuttings from the Enz vineyard to graft those two. The Enz Mataro represents a distinct genetic line supposed brought over by a Frenchman who planted the first vineyard in the Lime Kiln Valley in the late 1850s. Totally uncorroborated, although there is some funny stuff growing back there. I believe the other vineyards have had Tablas clone and another 'Mataro' heritage clone, but I haven't thought to track that info down."

• Q: What special factors in geology, climate, etc, do you find help make Mourvedre a viable grape for your fruit source?

• A: "Most Mourvedre vineyards you look at are rose vineyards at best. Some don't carry enough acid to do even that. Mourvedre is super finicky. It really needs a fortuitous match of climate and soil. The best two I've seen are the Enz vineyard and the Antle/Rodnick Farm vineyard. Both have a calcareous element, both have a granitic element, both have warm to hot days with little cloud cover, and both have cool nights. We've gotten some good, but generally inconsistent vintages off the heavily calcareous gypsum soils on Spur Ranch, but the drought has really put the hurt on those vines and they're struggling to rose ripeness these days. Other vineyards we've seen that lack the calcareous element, the sun exposure, or the cool to cold nights have lacked the texture, ripeness, or acid/tannin balance to make a red wine. Another part is canopy management. Like Grenache, it needs a head trained or reasonable facsimile thereof so there's space around clusters, filtered sunlight, etc. I haven't seen it perform well on a classic, manicured VSP. As such, drier weather is helpful."

• Q: What thoughts do you have regarding the relationship between Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedre; what makes these three so complementary?

• A: "I think Mourvedre and Grenache, especially, are complimentary to a wide variety of grapes. There's wisdom in conventions of blending, and there's convention, too. Grenache and Pinot can be pretty complimentary, or Grenache and Tempranillo, or Grenache and Touriga Nacional... Depending on the Syrah, it can be pretty dominant no matter what you put it in. Certain Syrah vineyards are just not for blending."

• Q: Why do you think so many winegrowers have had success growing Grenache and Syrah, whereas Mourvedre has proven more challenging in getting mature fruit?

• A: "I think Mourvedre is very finicky in its siting. It's tough for me to put my finger on it in a wider context as I specialize in such a limited geographic area, and because the Mourvedre vineyards I've seen that work fall into a very individual niche. I can tell you places locally I think Mourvedre would work, but that's about the reach. Mourvedre grapes that aren't in that sweet spot can have such skin/juice and acid/tannin/ripeness imbalances as to be unworkable without diving deep into the toolbox in the winery, which means something in the winemaking plan is off base -- likely the plan itself.

"As far as Grenache and Syrah go, Grenache is very hearty/forgiving in the vineyard if difficult to get a compelling wine from in the winery, and Syrah has it's foibles in the vineyard (especially around its relationship to water) but it's about the easiest thing to pull an interesting wine from in the winery if decent grapes, sort of the three-chord truth of the grape world. Always a good place for young winemakers to start out".

--
Ian Brand
http://lppwines.com

Mr Brand's bottlings include the La Marea Spur Ranch Mourvedre San Benito County and I. Brand & Family "Old Vines" Enz Vineyard Mourvedre Lime Kiln AVA, as well as Le P'tit Paysan "Pierre's Pirouette" Rosé (Mourvedre, Grenache, Cinsault) Central Coast & Le P'tit Paysan "Le P'tit Pape" (Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre, Counoise) San Benito County.
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For more information:
http://www.coeurwineco.com/producer/i-brand-family/
http://www.coeurwineco.com/producer/la-marea/
http://www.coeurwineco.com/producer/le-ptit-paysan/

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#183 Post by M. Dildine » January 17th, 2018, 10:45 am

Ian does really nice work with Enz Vineyard!
Cheers,

Mike

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#184 Post by Drew Goin » January 23rd, 2018, 6:31 am

Mr Bill Frick of Frick Winery in the Dry Creek AVA sent me some information about his work growing and bottling Mourvedre:

"Frick Winery is located on the hillsides in the Dry Creek Valley Appellation of Northern Sonoma County, California. This is a warm growing area with coastal influence; tempered in summer by cool ocean fogs.

"The only source for Frick Mourvedre is Frick Estate Dry Creek Valley Owl Hill Vineyard.

"I use the variety for 100% varietal wine, rose’ and in blends.

"Owl Hill Vineyard soil is Dry Creek Conglomerate. Clay with abundance of gravel, sand, pebbles and some medium sized stones (about the size of a football). This is a soil that translates to low vine vigor, thus smaller canopy and smaller crop.

"I planted a Beaucastel clone selection here because it is a more contemporary importation with precise provenance.

"The grape is late to bud and late to ripen here in Dry Creek Valley. It needs a long growing season. Harvest is late and that requires patience from the winemaker. Syrah and Grenache ripen easily, early and quickly. Syrah and Grenache are 'no-brainers' when it comes to getting them ripe.

"I like growing Mourvedre because it maintains a noble upright/vertical growth in the vineyard.

"Canes grow straight up and offer just the right amount of shade for clusters. The fruit is elegantly classical in appearance.

"In the cellar, fresh juice is balanced with classic dark red fruit flavors. Fermentation is slow.

"The wine has interesting nuance of earth and fruit.

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Mourvèdre Hanging On the Vine
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In the Bottle with a Mourvèdre Cluster and Leaf
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Photos: Mourvèdre Hanging On the Vine - In the Bottle with a Mourvèdre Cluster and Leaf

"Cheers,
Bill Frick
FRICK WINERY
Since 1976"[/i]

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#185 Post by Sean Devaney » January 23rd, 2018, 9:56 am

Frick is another winery that flies well below the radar and produces wonderful wines at great prices. As a bonus they have one of the most picturesque locations in DCV especially late afternoon.

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#186 Post by Drew Goin » January 23rd, 2018, 10:59 am

Honestly, I was previously more interested in tasting the Carignan or the "C3" red blend (Carignan, Cinsault, & Counoise) than the Frick Mourvedre. Now, I don't know...

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#187 Post by Dave McCloskey » January 23rd, 2018, 12:41 pm

I love the Mourvedre varietal. Sans Liege out of SB County makes a 100% Mouvedre that I frequently enjoy.

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#188 Post by dcornutt » January 23rd, 2018, 12:48 pm

Hardy should be the kingpin of this delegation. He makes the best Cali Mouvedre to me. I don't drink alot of mouvedre but when I do it's Dirty and Rowdy.
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#189 Post by Dave McCloskey » January 23rd, 2018, 1:11 pm

Jon Hesford wrote:</script>sertions();" class="inputbox">
Al Osterheld wrote:FWIW, I'd guess you wouldn't think that someone who visited Bordeaux and Burgundy for a day really understood all there was to know about wine in France, especially if they said that wineries in France seemed "to be focused on making wines that they know rich people will pay big bucks for, rather than carving out their own style". Food for thought.

-Al
The thing that makes France great to me is that it has wine regions doing their own thing irrespective of the popularity or profitability.
Jon, California has wine regions just like France with boutique wine makers in each one. I know you're not trying to imply ALL California wine makers are creating product solely for the purposes of profit, but it does come across that way. For every "Butter" Chardonnay wine maker there's a Tercero, Nicora or plethora of other smaller producers who are in it for the passion of making great wine, regardless of current trends.

PS - You might want to change your profile picture, the ladies on this site might think you're a porn star! [wow.gif]

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#190 Post by Dave McCloskey » January 23rd, 2018, 1:43 pm

Ken Zinns wrote:
stewart lancaster wrote:Was in paso robles 2 weeks ago. Multiple wineries are making single varietals of Mourvedre. I tried them at Adelaida, Lone Madrone, and Cozlina. They were very good
In Paso, the place to go for Mourvèdre is Paix Sur Terre. Ryan Pease is doing a great job with that variety there, which is his specialty. Dirty & Rowdy is the only other California winery I can think of off the top of my head where Mourvèdre is such an important part of their wine line-up, though it's become something of a specialty for a few others such as La Clarine Farm and Tercero. I suppose you could throw Tablas Creek into that mix since their top-of-the-line reds are Mourvèdre-based blends. I'm sure I must be missing a couple of others. Of course many other California wineries produce a Mourvèdre-based blend or a varietal Mourvèdre - some of them excellent - but few make it such a key part of their overall line-up.
You can add Nicora to the list of Paso wineries that feature Mourvedre. Nick Elliott is a great guy too.

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#191 Post by Dave McCloskey » January 23rd, 2018, 3:54 pm

Drew Goin wrote:I am sharing this communique from Mr Herb Quady, who grows Mourvedre on the Quady North Estate "Mae's Vineyard" in the Applegate Valley, Oregon, from another thread:

"Mourvèdre is one of my favorite varieties as well. I especially love big Bandols like Chateau Pradeaux.

"We grow Mourvèdre on our Estate in the Applegate
[Mae's Vineyard] and also source it from the Folin Vineyard in the Upper Rogue. From our cooler Applegate site we use it as part of our GSM rosé, where it serves nicely to tame down the ester-y qualities of Grenache and Syrah. From the warmer upper Rogue, we do our best to make it into red wine. As you correctly surmised, the season here is not quite long enough for the fruit to develop fully ripe and concentrated qualities that we associate with Bandol. However, it is perfect for our red GSM. We ultimately blend about 15-25% Mourvèdre with the Grenache and Syrah and the wine is always better for it.

"Perhaps over time as the vines become older and the harvests get warmer we can do more stand alone Mourvèdre. We did bottle it once as a stand alone, in 2013. It was nice enough and fun for me, but doesn't compare to the great bottlings out there. Unfortunately we sold out of that last year."
Drew, what a fantastic thread!!! I just bought a couple bottles of 2012 Chateau Pradeaux. [cheers.gif]

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#192 Post by Drew Goin » February 4th, 2018, 5:52 pm

Scott Shapley at Flywheel Wines sent me this via email recently:

"Flywheel Wines is really just my wife and I, and we started it in 2012 to focus on the Chalone AVA (my “day job” is also making wine for another, larger winery). Interestingly, we set out to make Pinot Noir and Chardonnay (which we still make), but we ended up coming out short on yields in our blocks at Brosseau Vyd that first year. Rather than do the smart thing and squirrel the unspent money away for later, when another winemaker offered us some Grenache from Boer Vyd that had come in with a heavier crop, we decided to go for it. Then, Richard Boer asked if anyone would be interested in some Mourvedre that he had available, and we jumped on that as well – all 2 rows of it…

"In 2012, we ended up with 1 barrel each of Grenache and Mourvedre, plus topping wine. I pretty much had assumed that we’d do a 50%/50% G/M blend when all was said and done, but whenever I tried that blend, the Mourvedre ended up overpowering the Grenache. The Grenache was medium-light-bodied that year, but it was very pretty and aromatic, and that kept getting lost at 50%/50%. We did really like a G/M at 67%G/33%M, though – it gave a little more weight to the foundation of the wine, but allowed for all of the lofty aromatics that we got from the Grenache.

"So doing the math, you probably see where this was heading… we had decided on a G/M blend that was about 1.5 barrels, leaving another 30ish gallons of Mourvedre hanging around. We decided to just go ahead and bottle it on its own, and we absolutely loved it. Deep fruit, sauvage, wild, earthy flavors, and great weight (without being an over-the-top brute of a wine). The 12 cases went pretty fast, and we only wished we’d had more.

"In 2013, we had some different yields and ended up with 2 barrels of Grenache and 1 barrels of Mourvedre. This seemed perfect given the blend we’d liked the year before, but we were also hesitant to give up any of that barrel of Mourvedre. In the end, we preferred the 2 varietals standing alone anyway, so we just bottled the Mourvedre on its own and the Grenache on its own. Same thing happened in 2014, but with different yields.

"In 2015, crops were VERY low, and we got no Grenache and only 46 gallons of Mourvedre! I don’t know that I’ve ever spent so much thought on such a small volume of wine! Ended up doing 100% whole cluster just to give some volume to the fermenter. It turned out to be very funky early on, with all of those wild elements partnered with some great stemmy perfume and herbal elements, but with a year plus in bottle now, it’s turning out to be very cool… Richard Boer has planted another 3 rows of Mourvedre for us since then, so we SHOULD be able to get at least a barrel each year, hopefully 2+…

"Depending on the year, we have picked the Grenache and Mourvedre on the same date, or as long as 10 days later, but it just depends on how the seeds are ripening, how the flavors are developing, and whether veraison is even enough between them.

"Richard originally grafted over from Cab Sauvignon to Pinot, Grenache, and Mourvedre when he bought a chunk of Chalone Vyd (he is also the Vineyard Manager for Chalone Vineyard and Winery), and I think he specifically did the Mourvedre because people kept telling him that it didn’t work well up there (they had pulled some out elsewhere, I believe). He’s a great grower, though, and the success of his Grenache and Mourvedre are do both to his finding just the right spot for them, and also his care and attention.

"Sorry to ramble on – I probably have more that I can add, but mainly I’ve really loved working with both Mourvedre and with fruit from the Chalone AVA in general. If you have any questions, I’d be happy to keep going – I’ll REALLY respond more quickly the next time around!


Scott Shapley

Flywheel Wines"

http://www.flywheelwines.com
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#193 Post by Drew Goin » February 8th, 2018, 3:38 pm

This is a very brief piece (more of an announcement) from the Sacramento Bee:

Sacramento Bee
"Mourvedre from the Sierra Foothills is All the Rage with Wine & Spirits Magazine"
by Chris Macias
February 5, 2017

"In the case of Skinner, Pettinger’s (sic) expression of the grape in its 2015 vintage highlights tart red fruit flavors, moderate tannins and a hint of gaminess for which the grape is known. Pair with roasted lamb, take a sip, and see what the fuss is all about."

http://www.sacbee.com/food-drink/appeti ... 51604.html

I believe I sent an interview email to Mr Chris Pittenger - the correct spelling of his last name - some time back, hoping to gain a deeper understanding of the Mourvedre scene in the Sierra Foothills. I will check again and see if he can share his experiences with us. :)

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#194 Post by Drew Goin » February 8th, 2018, 3:49 pm

Here is a Sac Bee article that I can be proud of posting (not a knock on the publication, only on my last post): an interview with Chris Pittenger of Skinner Vineyards!

Sacramento Bee
"Feast Q&A: El Dorado’s Skinner Vineyards"
by Chris Macias
February 21, 2015
DSC02281.jpg
Mr Chris Pittenger of Skinner Vineyards
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"Q: After working at the winery for a few years, what have you learned about the nuances of the land and vineyards in El Dorado County?

"A: Every year is a kind of new chapter in learning and figuring out what thrives, and also how these different varietals – especially grenache and mourvèdre – really represent themselves and show a true sense of place depending on where they grow. As a case in point, the mourvèdre at the estate in Fair Play on granite soils is completely different compared to (Skinner’s) property in Rescue or Gold Hill. All those soils are so different, and they show differently (as wines).

"We’re still learning so much about the microclimate and, from a (vineyard’s) block-to-block standpoint, what clones are best suited for which styles of soils and root stocks. We’re just trying to dial down and narrow things down so we can really analyze what is working. We’re just kind of scratching the surface.

"Q: Skinner has received a good share of accolades, especially for a fairly young winery. What do you attribute the successes to?

"A: It goes back to the Skinners and their commitment to the region and quality. From Day One, they’ve provided me with all the tools I need to make the best wines possible. We’re definitely grateful for the attention we’re receiving. It just affirms their dedication to the region of putting quality as the main driving force. It’s showing what we felt for the region, that these Rhone varietals were well suited for the soils and climate. For me, it means we’re on the right path."


http://www.sacbee.com/food-drink/wine/a ... 02469.html

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#195 Post by Ken Zinns » February 8th, 2018, 7:14 pm

More Chris Pittenger / Skinner here:
Visit with Chris Pittenger at Skinner, 7/14
ITB, Harrington Wines & Eno Wines, and Grape-Nutz.com

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#196 Post by Drew Goin » February 8th, 2018, 11:08 pm

Thanks, Ken (again)!!!

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#197 Post by Drew Goin » February 9th, 2018, 10:19 pm

Crux Winery normally offers a GSM red wine but, for the 2014 vintage, they offered a varietally-bottled Mourvedre from the Russian River Valley. Here are some comments from Mr Brian Callahan:

"We've only made it as a varietal wine once, in 2014. We use it often for blending - in our GSM and Rose, and perhaps a splash in the Grenache and Syrah. Windsor Oaks and one of our estate vineyards (Crazy Run Ranch, which is about 1 mile west of Windsor Oaks) are our sources for that fruit. We are in the northern corner of the RRV AVA, where it is the warmest. Even then, we occasionally have trouble getting it ripe. The last few years have been very warm ('14 - '17) so it hasn't been a problem recently. I can understand why the Green Valley folks might be pulling it out (that or their hair).

"Our Mourvedre is always the last grape to be harvested. Although we've picked it as late as mid November, we can usually get it off the vine in October. It's pretty hardy, in that stands up to rain pretty well. We think our corner of the RRV is an ideal place for Rhone varietals. Our vineyards are surrounded by Pinot and Chardonnay vineyards. Those grapes get premium prices in this AVA. In our opinion, the coast and into green valley are better locations for those varietals... and that's before the ongoing effects of climate change.

Brian Callahan
Crux Winery"


http://cruxwinery.com
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Crux Winery 2014 RRV Mourvedre
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Drew Goin
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#198 Post by Drew Goin » February 10th, 2018, 12:09 am

I completely forgot about this response to an email from Skinner Vineyards' co-owner Carey Skinner. Her responses (from September 8, 2017) are embedded in blue in my poorly written original email...


Hello,

I am a resident of Louisiana and a big fan of Mourvedre, Carignan, Zinfandel, and Alicante Bouschet (really!). Fun fact. There is a Skinner Clone at UC Davis of Petite Boushchet- the only known clone that we can find. We’re counting on Chris to make something beautiful out of it and our other legacy varieties. I am the founder of the Facebook group "Mourvedre Appreciation Social Club" and I regularly participate in discussions on the Wine Berserkers forum. How fun! I am always interested in the stories and history behind the cultivation and sites of this under-appreciated variety. Our history dates back to 1861, Pioneer Gold Rush. If you have any vineyard pictures, cool anecdotes, or other things related to the cultivation and vinification of Mourvedre, I would be very interested in sharing it with fellow Mourvedre lovers! Chris?

Please let me know how you came to work with Mourvedre, more particularly the El Dorado area. Family discovery in 2006 that began with a dot on atlas map that read “Skinners”. Today it still comes up on google as Skinners, CA an unincorporated community. From that spot our son discovered an historical wine cellar from 1861 and a Pioneer Gold Rush historical cemetery across the street. Long story short. James and Jesse Skinner were buried there. Mike contacted the Pioneer Cemetery Commission and discovered that James was his great, great, great grandfather. We flew up with the intent to purchase land, grow the same varieties that James produced in 1861 (one of the nations largest wineries at the time). James produced more than 15,000 gallons a year. He was one of the founding father’s of CA wine and produced Rhone Varietals & Zinfandel in the soils of El Dorado County.The full story is on our website. Mike and I being passionate wine lovers took the “leap of faith” and set off to bring back the family legacy in August of 2006. Chris joined us in our spirit of adventure and left the coast to join our project in the granitic, volcanic and high elevation soils of El Dorado County. We relied on Chris’s hands on experience and knowledge when designing our state of the art winery in 2007. Chris’s passion for our soils peaked Hardy’s interest our vineyards and soils, so here we are today... Our team is committed to respecting our environment and letting the grape express itself in the bottle naturally. I loved the cover story on Mourvedre in Wine & Spirits magazine featuring Skinner and Dirty & Rowdy! We did too! We’re so proud of Chris and appreciative of the beautiful wines he’s creating in our winery. Do you have any specific thoughts on Mataro/Mourvedre/Monastrell as a grape you make into wine? All Chris here, we just enjoy it. I'd be very grateful for any background information on your winery's work with the grape (what clone, the soil features, and vinification methods adopted in crafting your Mourvedre). I hope you are doing well. Have a great day! You too, cheers!

Sincerely,
Drew Goin

I have sent the winery my standard Interview Questions in the hope that winemaker Chris Pittenger will have an opportunity to answer them.

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Drew Goin
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#199 Post by Drew Goin » February 15th, 2018, 7:09 am

Hardy Wallace of Dirty & Rowdy Family Wines took a trip to the homeland of Mourvedre in France:

https://www.wineberserkers.com/forum/vi ... 1&t=148866

It beats anything on this thread! :P

Perhaps the most enlightening statement made by Mr Wallace was this gem:
What we do with Mourvèdre so different from Bandol (and most places). These stops don't make me want to do things differently winemaking wise. In fact, they really motivate me to go more deeply down our own path. What I get from these visits (besides the opportunity to taste mind-blowing wine) is a chance to further my understanding of Mourvèdre via its most classic / benchmark form and to really see how it is a remarkable reflector of terroir.
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The truth is spread
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Drew Goin
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#200 Post by Drew Goin » February 15th, 2018, 2:05 pm

NY Times
"Your Next Lesson: Bandol"
by Eric Asimov
January 30, 2017

"Bandol is grown in small quantities in the limestone hills near the village of Bandol, east of Marseille and west of Toulon in France. The red wines must be at least 50 percent mourvèdre, with the remainder generally blended with grenache and cinsault, and occasionally syrah and carignan.

"The best producers will use considerably more mourvèdre than the minimum, and it is mourvèdre that can sometimes make the wine fiercely tannic when young, before it evolves into a thing of complex beauty."

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NY Times Bandol Selections
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