What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

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Drew Goin
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#1 Post by Drew Goin » December 25th, 2015, 7:44 pm

I know, bad acronym.

There's the Carignan Renaissance, ZAP, PS I Love You, and Grenache Symposium.

Aside from the Rhone Rangers, I cannot find a group dedicated to the Mourvedre grape and its wines.

Anyone know of one?

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#2 Post by Michael Martin » December 25th, 2015, 8:01 pm

Bandol. [snort.gif]

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#3 Post by larry schaffer » December 25th, 2015, 9:53 pm

Drew,

Just buy it and drink it - that's appreciation enough! :-)
Last edited by larry schaffer on December 26th, 2015, 8:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#4 Post by Drew Goin » December 25th, 2015, 10:27 pm

I'm doing it, *glug* I'm doing it!

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#5 Post by Drew Goin » December 25th, 2015, 10:29 pm

Tonight, actually, is night #1 of the Sixteen 600 Steel Plow Vineyard Grenache (needs a day of slow O2), and backup was the Massena Barossa Mataro 2010.

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#6 Post by Jon Hesford » December 26th, 2015, 2:24 am

I make and love Mourvedre. I've been a member of both Grenache Symposium and Carignan Renaissance but I've hunted for Mourvedre groups in vain. I asked loads of Bandol producers at Vinisud 2 years ago. There isn't one. A real shame because it's a variety with lots of terroir expression and one that can make very different and wonderful wines.
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#7 Post by Mike Evans » December 26th, 2015, 8:32 am

The Dirty and Rowdy mailing list?

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#8 Post by larry schaffer » December 26th, 2015, 8:35 am

I make a 100% Mourvedre Rose as well as 2-3 different Mourvèdres each vintage, all from Santa Barbara Court grapes.

In fact, I'll be leading a seminar on the variety at the upcoming Garagiste Festival in February.

Cheers.
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#9 Post by Jon Hesford » December 26th, 2015, 9:08 am

It would be great if you could share that seminar online Larry. For those of us too far away.
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#10 Post by Jim Cowan » December 26th, 2015, 9:27 am

Mike Evans wrote:The Dirty and Rowdy mailing list?
Word.
Best, Jim

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#11 Post by Doug Schulman » December 26th, 2015, 6:15 pm

I love Mourvedre. I don't drink it often enough. It's pretty much all Bandol for me. I love how they taste with about 10-15 years on them. Does anyone have any experience with aged New World Mourvedre?
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#12 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » December 26th, 2015, 6:36 pm

Doug Schulman wrote:I love Mourvedre. I don't drink it often enough. It's pretty much all Bandol for me. I love how they taste with about 10-15 years on them. Does anyone have any experience with aged New World Mourvedre?
The Ridge Mataro bottling so aged pretty well. Sadly they no longer make them.

I would love more Mourvèdre options.
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#13 Post by Doug Schulman » December 26th, 2015, 6:50 pm

Interesting, it looks like Ridge used to make a couple of bottlings. Too bad I never got to try those.
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#14 Post by Drew Goin » December 26th, 2015, 7:05 pm

I missed out on the Joseph Swan and Castelli Mourvedre wines

I am eventually going to get some of Mr Schaffer's wines...

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#15 Post by larry schaffer » December 26th, 2015, 7:27 pm

Doug,

Ridge still does - still calls theirs Mataro, the Spanish name of the group from a region near Barcelona.

In fact, if you look at the current CA Grape Crush report, the grape in CA US still referred to as Mataro, not Mourvèdre . . .

Cheers.
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#16 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » December 26th, 2015, 7:50 pm

I think the Ridge wines are only ATP releases.
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#17 Post by Doug Schulman » December 27th, 2015, 8:52 am

Great, I'll keep an eye out for Ridge Mataro. There's one listed on Winebid right now, but I'm thinking based on Cellartracker notes that it's over the hill. Plus I swore off buying older wines from them quite a while ago, but I did have really good luck with older domestic wines that weren't very expensive. If I can find a younger one at some point (or a few), I'll jump on it.
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#18 Post by Peter Kleban » December 27th, 2015, 9:00 am

Jade Mountain Evangelho Vineyard used to make a wonderful old vines Mourved--but they're out of business since ca 2005 (and the 2005 is starting to decline, tho I'd still recommend it if you can find any). Cline now makes an Old Vine Mourved from some of those vines, and it's very good, with IMO a long life ahead of it. I think Dirty and Rowdy may as well, but I haven't had theirs.
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#19 Post by Ian Sutton » December 27th, 2015, 9:51 am

I suppose it is quite surprising, because the grape has really good examples in many regions. I recall my 1st experience was the old rhone shaped bottle Penfolds Bin2 Shiraz / Mourvedre. A wonderful wine at a giveaway price. With the change to a standard bdx bottle and a doubling in price, also came a drop off in quality. Not a wine I'd recommend now, but in it's day one of the great bargains.

FWIW I've currently also just got some Bandols plus a single bottle of 2011 Treloar Motus and a 2009 magnum of the same wine. I like Mourvedre/Mataro with age on it, but would be interested in your views on where they're at in their development Jon.

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#20 Post by GregT » December 27th, 2015, 9:57 am

Doug - as far as "new world" versions, I think you might be referring to style more than location. There's a lot made in Spain - more than anywhere else, and Spain is pretty old world but there are different styles. The traditional style tended to be bretty and stinky and I know a lot of people will pine for those wines, whether or not they've even had them. But the winemakers realized that the funk isn't necessarily a characteristic of the grape so much as the wine making.

I've had plenty of the Ridge Mataro with ten years and more on, as well as the bottlings from Jade, from Larry at Tercero, and elsewhere. In the Valencia region of Spain there are some pretty remarkable versions being made - Rafael Cambra for example, has almost led a renaissance. His versions tend to be fresher and when made in a clean style, Monastrell is the only grape I know of that has hints of blueberry. Chris Ringland pushes that to the limit with the Nido and Clio wines - those can be almost like blueberry syrup. But if you dial it back a bit, like Cambra does, you don't get the sweetness but you get the freshness and there's some underlying earthiness as well. Those are pretty good and at least at ten years in, they seem to develop really well. I'm interested in tasting them at 20 years. Ditto some of the Bandol producers.

And from Sonoma, don't forget Cline. They've done it for years.
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#21 Post by Drew Goin » December 27th, 2015, 10:00 am

Peter Kleban wrote:Jade Mountain Evangelho Vineyard used to make a wonderful old vines Mourved--but they're out of business since ca 2005 (and the 2005 is starting to decline, tho I'd still recommend it if you can find any). Cline now makes an Old Vine Mourved from some of those vines, and it's very good, with IMO a long life ahead of it. I think Dirty and Rowdy may as well, but I haven't had theirs.

Peter, are you still crying about the Jade Mountain?!!?

Have you emailed the Danielaks at Pont Neuf (also make Juicy Rebound Evangelho Mourvedre)? They will notify you and me when the Mourvedre wines come out.

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#22 Post by larry schaffer » December 27th, 2015, 10:13 am

Folks, there are many wimemakers who have been working with Mourvèdre for a long time. Guys like Kenneth Volk, Bill Easton, Randall Graham. The 'challenge' for this variety is not unlike Petite Sirah - it has historically been viewed as a blending variety, not a stand alone one, especially here in the US. (Same story as Grenache, but I'll save that for another post!)

Thanks to Tablas Creek, new cuttings were brought in to the US in the 90s, and starting about 15 years ago, have been used in both new plantings and replants throughout the US. These have proven to provide 'better', more 'characteristics' fruit than many previous clones that had been used.

I really dig the variety and feel it has a bright future ahead of it - as a variety for rose, a stand-alone one, and one perfect for blends as well.

Cheers.
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#23 Post by Brian G r a f s t r o m » December 27th, 2015, 10:15 am

larry schaffer wrote:Drew,

Just buy it and drink it - that's appreciation enough! :-)
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#24 Post by Drew Goin » December 27th, 2015, 10:23 am

larry schaffer wrote:Folks, there are many wimemakers who have been working with Mourvèdre for a long time. Guys like Kenneth Volk, Bill Easton, Randall Graham. The 'challenge' for this variety is not unlike Petite Sirah - it has historically been viewed as a blending variety, not a stand alone one, especially here in the US. (Same story as Grenache, but I'll save that for another post!)

Thanks to Tablas Creek, new cuttings were brought in to the US in the 90s, and starting about 15 years ago, have been used in both new plantings and replants throughout the US. These have proven to provide 'better', more 'characteristics' fruit than many previous clones that had been used.

I really dig the variety and feel it has a bright future ahead of it - as a variety for rose, a stand-alone one, and one perfect for blends as well.

Cheers.
I am also excited about the Washington state plantings. I have a couple of bottles of Mark Ryan and Gramercy waiting for whenever I can do my big Mourvedre tasting.

*Also, considering that the grape makes yummy, not merely drinkable juice, from Arizona to the Pacific Northwest, it does deserve a little more credit.

My point of soliciting the creation of such an organization is not for me to keep drinking the stuff, but (just as with Petite Sirah's PS, I Love You) to get other people to drink it.

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#25 Post by Henry Kiichli » December 27th, 2015, 12:13 pm

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#26 Post by Peter Kleban » December 27th, 2015, 2:30 pm

Drew Goin wrote:
Peter Kleban wrote:Jade Mountain Evangelho Vineyard used to make a wonderful old vines Mourved--but they're out of business since ca 2005 (and the 2005 is starting to decline, tho I'd still recommend it if you can find any). Cline now makes an Old Vine Mourved from some of those vines, and it's very good, with IMO a long life ahead of it. I think Dirty and Rowdy may as well, but I haven't had theirs.

Peter, are you still crying about the Jade Mountain?!!?
Well, it beats Jonesing over tomato "wine!" ;-)
Drew Goin wrote: Have you emailed the Danielaks at Pont Neuf (also make Juicy Rebound Evangelho Mourvedre)? They will notify you and me when the Mourvedre wines come out.
Hmm, sounds interesting. Is it good? Never heard of this (or them), thanks!
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#27 Post by Drew Goin » December 27th, 2015, 5:57 pm

Peter,

I bought the Juicy Rebound Cuvee Unique, which carries a RRV appellation, and is Syrah dominant, I think. The Juicy Rebound California appellate is Contra Costa Mourvedre, followed by Grenache and Syrah from somewhere else, I think. I am waiting for the straight Mourvedre CC bottling from Juicy Rebound. They also have a Rhone Blend under the Pont Neuf label.

Here's the email reply:
Hello Drew,

Thanks so much for purchasing our Juicy Rebound "Juicy Villages". Alas, the Mourvedre and Grenache source for that bottling has since been t-budded over to Pinot Noir and we no longer work with that grower. It is sad that these heritage varieties are succumbing to the economics of the wine business, with Cabernet, Pinot, and other mainstream varieties taking precedence for their higher price per ton. We will continue to hunt for well-farmed, old vine grapes for our Juicy Villages.

You have found some of the best Rhone producers, we especially enjoy the Bedrock wines.

We can add you to our mailing list so that you won't miss out on new releases. You can always contact us to obtain our wines. If you are in Canada, a great source for all of Douglas' Pioneer, Juicy Rebound and Pont Neuf wines is J. Webb Wine Merchant in Calgary.

If you are planning a visit to Napa, please include us in your visits as Douglas and I would love to taste with you. We taste our wines, by appointment only, at Boeschen Vineyards, just north of St. Helena.

Wishing you and yours a very Happy Holiday!
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#28 Post by dsGriswold » December 27th, 2015, 11:13 pm

I like a Mourvedre dominant blend, Rasa and their PB brand are quite nice from WA.
  • 2011 PB Wines (Rasa Vineyards) Mourvedre / Syrah / Grenache Walla Walla Valley - USA, Washington, Columbia Valley, Walla Walla Valley (12/15/2015)
    Dark ruby red with red currant and cherry nose. Dry with dusty tannins, medium fruit with a good acid component to keep the fruit in balance. Not austere, but a bit restrained clear fruit and drinking well on opening with just a touch of bitter tannins on the finish. Similarities to a Tuscan red food focused wine. With a little more time this will show even better. (89 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
Also I am going to order some more Dirty & Rowdy Familiar from Storyteller.
  • 2014 Dirty and Rowdy Mourvedre FAMILIAR - USA, California (10/26/2015)
    Medium garnet with nose of ripe strawberries. Usually I would not open a red this young, but here goes due to all the notes on how well this drinks young. Refreshing bright fruit of well ripened strawberries, bold acid to liven the fruit and enough tart tannins on the finish to carry it along for a good ride. Bold fruit, but not overly heavy by any means, balanced by the acid which is very nice. I can see the reference to an OR pinot. It would be interesting to see how this develops over several years, but I only have the single bottle at present. The low 12.7% Alc is very much appreciated and the acid should carry for a number of years, 89 pts on opening. Starting to get some white pepper after an hour or so. Another night, strong raspberry nose, tart raspberries, light chewy tannins, restrained fruit, medium body, fresh and zesty. Great for immediate drinking and improves a lot with more open time. Not an intellectual wine to ponder the meaning of life, some wines are meant to drink and enjoy, this being one. (91 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
This is another nice WA blend I am drinking:
  • 2010 Maison Bleue Gravière Upland Vineyard - USA, Washington, Columbia Valley, Yakima Valley Snipes Mountain (12/24/2015)
    More toward the fruit side with some mineral. Finally getting around to writing a formal note, the bottle having rested on the counter for a couple of days, and the time has been beneficial. Medium red ruby color with a red berry, cherry nose. The acid has shown itself, giving a tart berry defining the medium fruit and some nicely integrated chewy tannins. Getting blueberries with some earthy slatey mineral elements, pine and balsam, olive brine and some light tar. Drinking exceedingly well, so give some time. While on the high 80s on opening, it's now in the low 90s and rising. The last glass tonight was the best 3 days later. (92 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
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#29 Post by Jon Hesford » December 27th, 2015, 11:37 pm

The problem, for me, with Mourvèdre is that it requires a very narrow climatic range or terroir for it to make wine that is not too green and not too jammy. Most Spanish and all new world single varietals that I've tried have been too jammy. This difficult ripening issue is why it's often used as a blender. However, in certain places, like Bandol and Roussillon, you can get the balance that can make wines with ripe tannins and freshness of fruit that will develop slowly for a long time.

Any vineyard that can be converted successfully to Pinot noir sounds like it was not suited to Mourvèdre and vice versa.

Regarding my Motus, ian, They age slowly. People have been sending me tasting notes of the 2006 which still has plenty of life ahead of it. However, the 2012 and 2013 I made with less tannic structure as so many customers want to drink them soon after purchase. They still have the acidity to last though.
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#30 Post by dsGriswold » December 28th, 2015, 12:01 am

Jon Hesford wrote:
Regarding my Motus, ian, They age slowly. People have been sending me tasting notes of the 2006 which still has plenty of life ahead of it. However, the 2012 and 2013 I made with less tannic structure as so many customers want to drink them soon after purchase. They still have the acidity to last though.
I will give these a try. That is if I can find them.
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#31 Post by Wes Barton » December 28th, 2015, 12:31 am

Jon, I've had plenty of jammy Mourvedres from Spain, Washington and Australia, but very few from CA. Maybe it's because people who want to make jammy wines are playing to pop culture hype, so they choose an en vogue variety like Pinot or Cab, while the people who seek it out have a passion for, and understanding of, the grape.

As far as sites here being too cool for it goes - our weather tends to not shut down quickly, allowing for extended hang time in the cool late season, where sugar and acid progression slow to a crawl. I'd be more afraid the other way - if a site has a proven track record for excellent Moo, the Pinot going in will probably end up being a gooey mess.

It's true that some of the super old vines are in warm sites like the Contra Costa vineyards. I'm sure it's a great challenge, and some jammy ones do come about (for some, it's an individual vintage, here and there), for the most part there's a reason those 120-ish year old vines are treasured.

People have already noted some good producers above, and there are more. California is a big town, and there are excellent sites for Moo.
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#32 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » December 28th, 2015, 5:04 am

Moo?

Call it cow juice! Then people will think we are not drinking. ;)
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#33 Post by Drew Goin » December 28th, 2015, 6:29 am

I am in agreement with most of what Mr Brand says on WB, and his defense of CC Mourvedre/"Cow Juice"/"Mu"(that's for Hardy) is pretty spot-on.

Please do not hate on Contra Costa. If not for those vines, Americans (if not others) would not have gained insight into the variety we all love.

The Enz Lime Kiln plantings were determined to be Mourvedre/Mataro only after comparison with ampelographic samples from Oakley/Antioch.

Also, the understanding that the smaller berried bushes made the better juice was more of a CC thing. I don't know if that stems from morphological or external factors, however.

I have tasted Mourvedre from many places, and I respectfully disagree with Mr Hesford's statements about site suitability in California.

I love Bandol. Languedoc and Roussillon are doing some awesome, revolutionary stuff right now with old vine Mourvedre and Carignan.
I would be interested in tasting the Motus. What US importer do you use, Jon?

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#34 Post by H Wallace Jr » December 28th, 2015, 6:46 am

Over the past few years, we've thrown around the idea of getting together with some producers and putting together a small "Mourvèdre-Con". (Which I personally envision as just an excuse for me to have a never-ending chalice of La Clarine's Cedarville Vineyard Mourvèdre).

Hopefully this Spring we'll get off our hump- even if it is just in our backyard or the park down the street.
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#35 Post by Drew Goin » December 28th, 2015, 8:07 am

Mike Evans wrote:The Dirty and Rowdy mailing list?
Looks like you were right!

Now we need some t-shirts à la "Semmageddon".

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#36 Post by Ian Sutton » December 28th, 2015, 9:02 am

Jon Hesford wrote: Regarding my Motus, ian, They age slowly. People have been sending me tasting notes of the 2006 which still has plenty of life ahead of it. However, the 2012 and 2013 I made with less tannic structure as so many customers want to drink them soon after purchase. They still have the acidity to last though.
Thanks Jon. I think I've only ever sent a TN to a winery once - a 2003 Ch. Fuisse we bought following a discussion with them how they didn't sell through because of the perception of the vintage. They reckoned they made a good wine, so I asked them to dig me a bottle out. That felt right to email them a note - fwiw I liked it.

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#37 Post by larry schaffer » December 28th, 2015, 9:12 am

H Wallace Jr wrote:Over the past few years, we've thrown around the idea of getting together with some producers and putting together a small "Mourvèdre-Con". (Which I personally envision as just an excuse for me to have a never-ending chalice of La Clarine's Cedarville Vineyard Mourvèdre).

Hopefully this Spring we'll get off our hump- even if it is just in our backyard or the park down the street.
Count me in, my friend!
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#38 Post by GregT » December 28th, 2015, 9:21 am

Hardy - let me know if you do that. Depending on other obligations, I may be able to help scrounge up some Spanish versions. Gotta have Bandol too, don't neglect the original home of the grape.
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#39 Post by larry schaffer » December 28th, 2015, 9:26 am

And folks, there is not a lot of new Mourvèdre plantings happening these days in CA. There are some - Stolpman is adding some to their vineyard along Ballard Canyon and I've heard of another vineyard adding some to their Sta. Rita Hills vineyard, but it remains very much an 'outsider ' variety, destined to be a 'blender' for most folks . . .

As far as 'riper'ones go here in CA, there are plenty of them being produced. Plenty of areas up in Paso that get plenty ripe enough to produce jammy, fruit forward examples. Not my favorite style, for I feel that the earthy, peppery, slightly funky characteristics of the grape make it what it is . . .

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#40 Post by Jon Hesford » December 28th, 2015, 10:23 am

I'm sure California does have sites that can grow perfect mourvedre for a varietal, or almost varietal, wine. What Larry says suggest he knows exactly where the balance lies. It's just that my experiences of Mataro (the Catalan name) from Australia and Monastrell (the Spanish name) from around Jumilla, have been too ripe to capture that great feral character combined with great fruit and lovely acidity.

I don't know if I'm correct in saying this because I've never really explored California (difficult from France) and I only visited Napa and Sonoma for a day, but too many of the "boutique" wineries seems to be focused on making wines that they know rich people will pay big bucks for, rather than carving out their own style. The example of top-grafting a Mourverde vineyard with Pinot noir is a prime example of that.

One thing I've found is that it (or mine) suits American oak better than French. I'd always assumed that Bandol would use French oak but I know a guy who did vintage at Domaine Tempier and he told me they actually use American, as well as other oaks. So that backed up my own thoughts.

I only have one US importer and she's in New York. Loubaton Imports. She hasn't bought the Motus (I can see why now!)
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#41 Post by Al Osterheld » December 28th, 2015, 9:01 pm

FWIW, I'd guess you wouldn't think that someone who visited Bordeaux and Burgundy for a day really understood all there was to know about wine in France, especially if they said that wineries in France seemed "to be focused on making wines that they know rich people will pay big bucks for, rather than carving out their own style". Food for thought.

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#42 Post by Ken Zinns » December 28th, 2015, 9:11 pm

H Wallace Jr wrote:Over the past few years, we've thrown around the idea of getting together with some producers and putting together a small "Mourvèdre-Con". (Which I personally envision as just an excuse for me to have a never-ending chalice of La Clarine's Cedarville Vineyard Mourvèdre).

Hopefully this Spring we'll get off our hump- even if it is just in our backyard or the park down the street.
Sounds cool - please keep me in the loop if you get something together! [cheers.gif]
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#43 Post by Jon Hesford » December 29th, 2015, 1:41 am

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Al Osterheld wrote:FWIW, I'd guess you wouldn't think that someone who visited Bordeaux and Burgundy for a day really understood all there was to know about wine in France, especially if they said that wineries in France seemed "to be focused on making wines that they know rich people will pay big bucks for, rather than carving out their own style". Food for thought.

-Al
It was a proviso, but I'm not completely ignorant about the Californian wine scene. In France, as I'm sure you realise Al, one cannot just plant and make the currently in vogue variety where one likes. The thing that makes France great to me is that it has wine regions doing their own thing irrespective of the popularity or profitability.

The idea that the same vineyard, or even region, could be suitable for both Mourvedre and Pinot noir would seem crazy to any French vigneron - or to any viticulturalist that I've ever met.

Anyway, back to Mourvedre. French tradition says that it needs to see the sea to be successful. Does that apply in the New World at all or do people view it as an old-wives tale?
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#44 Post by Drew Goin » December 29th, 2015, 6:09 am

The Contra Costa towns of Oakley and Antioch are sites of century old vineyards that are own-root planted in sand. Most people speak of the heat, but the cooling effect of the San Francisco Bay Delta, often with strong winds, definitely helps these dry farmed vines.

Down in Santa Barbara County, there are wind tunnels formed by the East-West orientation of ridges (same for Templeton Gap in Paso and part of Mendocino County). I will let the experts fill you in on that.

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#45 Post by Drew Goin » December 29th, 2015, 6:21 am

Evangelho Vineyard winds - MTP:


Another windy day for Oakley Mourvedre:


This is France http://gargantuanwine.com/2015/03/two-i ... h-terroir/


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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#46 Post by Al Osterheld » December 29th, 2015, 7:59 am

Jon, I agree that Mourvedre and Pinot Noir do best in different climates. I was reacting to your characterization of California based on a short visit. Some Napa Cab producers may have business plans marketing to "rich people" but that's no more representative of the California wine industry than First Growth Bordeaux is representative of the French wine industry.

It's true that France has more rigid rules for wines labeled with an appellation. Personally, I see both advantages and disadvantages. As you know, some producers have carved out their own style by moving outside the restrictions imposed by the appellation. But, in either France or California, ultimately you have to sell your wine to be successful. If the wine is not good you probably won't.

As far as Mourvedre needing to see the sea, in most of California a vineyard that can see the sea will be quite cool, sometimes challenging even for Pinot Noir let alone Mourvedre. But most of California has coastal mountain ranges that create inland valleys that can be warm during the day yet cool at night. The effects of the ocean and geography of California are such that areas that are not very far apart can have quite different climates.

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#47 Post by larry schaffer » December 29th, 2015, 8:27 am

I find that Mourvedre does great in sandy soils a la Bandol. I make my Rose from a relatively sandy soiled vineyard out in Happy Canyon, and my other Mourvedre sites are either entirely sand (Larner) or sandy loam.

As has been pointed out, many sites down here that 'you can see the sea from' are pretty darned cold - and Mourvedre needs lots of late harvest heat to ripen.

Just my $.02 . . .

Cheers!
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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#48 Post by Drew Goin » December 29th, 2015, 8:36 am

The Pacific is not the Med!

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#49 Post by Drew Goin » December 29th, 2015, 2:00 pm

I now see that my post was possiblly overly enthusiast

I merely meant to reinforce what Larry was saying about cool climates along the California coast.

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What, No Mourvedre Appreciation Delegation?

#50 Post by Jon Hesford » December 29th, 2015, 2:12 pm

larry schaffer wrote:I find that Mourvedre does great in sandy soils a la Bandol. I make my Rose from a relatively sandy soiled vineyard out in Happy Canyon, and my other Mourvedre sites are either entirely sand (Larner) or sandy loam.

As has been pointed out, many sites down here that 'you can see the sea from' are pretty darned cold - and Mourvedre needs lots of late harvest heat to ripen.

Just my $.02 . . .

Cheers!
A good 2c though. The Pacific is definitely not the Med. From the Med we get warm wet weather but it also means we face south or south-east.

I have my mourvedre on quite deep, sandy-clay soils. The local powers-that-be don't rate that as "good" terroir but I would challenge anyone to a mourvedre contest.

However, something in me says that there is a terroir for the best rosé and a different one for the best red Mourvedre.
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