What are you willing to spend for a wine you will actually drink?

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Joe B
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What are you willing to spend for a wine you will actually drink?

#1 Post by Joe B » December 10th, 2014, 8:53 pm

I have seen some crazy prices for 750 ml wines but really wonder if people are buying them to drink or as an investment. For me, I am willing to spend about $250 for the Shafer Hillside Select with every intention of drinking it within a year or two of purchase. That is one bottle at this price point about once per year.

Anybody else want to share.
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#2 Post by Joe S. » December 10th, 2014, 9:00 pm

Joe B wrote:I have seen some crazy prices for 750 ml wines but really wonder if people are buying them to drink or as an investment. For me, I am willing to spend about $250 for the Shafer Hillside Select with every intention of drinking it within a year or two of purchase. That is one bottle at this price point about once per year.

Anybody else want to share.
I am also buying the Shafer HSS to drink. But not in 1-2 yrs! I would prefer to pop the first bottle in 5-7 yrs, and then see when to open the next...i am also holding a few decent Champagnes to drink 10-15 yrs from now.
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#3 Post by Anton D » December 10th, 2014, 9:09 pm

Buck fifty.

Arbitrary, I know.
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#4 Post by Daniel McIntosh » December 10th, 2014, 9:14 pm

$100. Tops.

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#5 Post by Robert Pavlovich » December 10th, 2014, 9:17 pm

Under $100 for drinking now.

$100 - $300 for various off-lines, or plans on arranging some serious tastings or special occasions down the line.

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#6 Post by Andrew L. » December 10th, 2014, 9:19 pm

~$1K is my limit.
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#7 Post by Craig G » December 10th, 2014, 9:22 pm

I don't buy anything I don't intend to drink, though it might be many years in the future. I think 2008 Rayas was $245 (up too much from 2007!). I bought one bottle. In Epernay I bought a bottle of Selosse Substance which was something like $275 and one of their Les Carelles for maybe $230. Those were exceptional as we had just stayed at their hotel and my wife was still under the spell. Other than those, I don't think I bought more than a handful of bottles this year over $100.
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#8 Post by Chris L. » December 10th, 2014, 9:32 pm

$150-$200; and I seriously question the declining marginal utility/enjoyment at or above that price point.
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#9 Post by Robert Oertel » December 10th, 2014, 9:34 pm

I only have a few bottles over $125 and I plan on drinking them. I don't think I could spend more at this point but only because I am young and still new to wine. It's difficult for me to find the nuances between a $75 and >$125. I haven't had hss next to other wines but if I do this may change my upper threshold.

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#10 Post by Rick.T » December 10th, 2014, 9:40 pm

I don't purchase any wines that I don't plan on drinking. A poll would have been better for this question if you want more answers.
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#11 Post by AAgrawal » December 10th, 2014, 9:45 pm

<$100 is comfortable, up to $150 I will do occasionally with good reason. Above that is pretty much just Yquem.

Of course, if I buy a wine for less than that and it appreciates, then it's fair game. Rational economics aside...
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#12 Post by Scott Brunson » December 11th, 2014, 3:15 am

Rick.T wrote:I don't purchase any wines that I don't plan on drinking. A poll would have been better for this question if you want more answers.
^
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#13 Post by Kirk.Grant » December 11th, 2014, 3:34 am

The most I've spent on a wine to-date is $350 + shipping. The BEST money I've ever spent on wine was $250 for a Magnum of 1970 DRC Grands Echezeaux in the summer of 2007 from a passive cellar in Maine. I flew it out to California and we had a fun little gathering in December that year. A great little party.
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#14 Post by michael ottesen » December 11th, 2014, 4:29 am

I am comfortable with 100$,and occasionally 150$ for something like Giacomo Conterno Cascina Francia.But with the price increase,for 2010 barolo,i guess i will have to backfill.And i intend to drink all the wine i buy.Have bought.

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#15 Post by Markus S » December 11th, 2014, 5:07 am

Don't we all intend to drink the wines we buy? If not, perhaps you ought to be reading the Wall Street Journal or some "money" magazine. I think there is a difference between 'willing' to buy and 'doing' so, as sometimes emotion takes up the buying experience. For instance, I always have a psychological reversion to prices above $100. but then, Allemand comes out with the 2011's, and the Chaillots is 100+ now, and makes Faurie Hermitage seem 'cheap' in comparison. Same with many 2010 Barolo: what used to be $110-120 now seems cheaper in comparison when measured against $150 for the 2010's. So the scale seems relative, but when your income is modest, you have to adjust. And then some things pass beyond the threshold, like Clos Rougeard now.
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#16 Post by Robert B. » December 11th, 2014, 5:12 am

I will spend $400 on a 750 ml bottle of wine that I will drink. Not often, mind you, but I will do it.
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#17 Post by J a y H a c k » December 11th, 2014, 5:24 am

I buy about 6-10 bottles per year over $150. I plan to drink them all. This thread reminds me that I buy them faster than I drink them. At my age - 63 - I need to fix that. I must say that the 09 Schrader that I opened two weeks ago, the last wine in that category, was delicious.
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#18 Post by Richard T r i m p i » December 11th, 2014, 6:07 am

Average bottle price - cellar inventory: $49
Average daily drinker price (not inventoried): approx $26 and wish it was lower!
Most expensive bottle in the cellar: $255 paid, current retail est: $500

I plan to drink everything. None of it is designated for investment or resale.

I think twice about buying over $75. Paying north of $100 - $125 pains me and those bottles make up less than 3% of my cellar. It seems that "great wines" (best of their genre) are now $150+. Despite the quality and thoroughly enjoying great wines, I'm not a big fan of chasing scarcity, popularity or prestige. $500 is probably my top limit for an extraordinary occasion and I haven't ever spent that much....yet. Jumping in to the high end game now, after missing the days when the "greats" were "cheap", is going to hurt...and hurt a lot.

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#19 Post by Dan Rosenheck » December 11th, 2014, 6:11 am

I max out around $400. I recently made an exception for a $500 bottle, but I'm not sure I would have bought it if I didn't think I could sell it for more if necessary. But I am happy to go way higher if I'm splitting with other people--I'd have no problem ordering a $1K bottle at a restaurant with 2-3 other people and each paying $250-$333, so long as I thought it was a good deal (e.g. at Bern's).

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#20 Post by Frank Drew » December 11th, 2014, 6:12 am

The most I've ever spent, and this was only once, was $250 for Huet's 1947 Le Haut Lieu (totally worth it); a few months ago I paid $150 for a 15+ y.o. Grand Cru red Burgundy, but that was well above my normal psychological limit of around $100, and that itself is a level I very rarely get to these days.

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#21 Post by Brian Tuite » December 11th, 2014, 6:13 am

Daniel McIntosh wrote:$100. Tops.
+1 and they are few and far between. Gotta keep it all in perspective.
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#22 Post by M Hoose » December 11th, 2014, 6:39 am

Started somewhere around the $50, then hit $100, and now tops is 165 but it's a rare treat for me. I've not purchased with the intent to invest or sell, but I would now definitely trade around my inventory to find something special.
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#23 Post by Jay T. » December 11th, 2014, 7:07 am

I've tried to hold the line at $150 for new releases, but I would have said $100 two years ago. I think of myself as a rational person, but even the limited self reflection I've allowed myself while reading this thread leads to think that I'm in part motivated by the idea that my favorite wines (especially barolo) will just keep going up in price much faster than inflation, so I should buy as much as I can now -- even though it's not clear when I'm actually prepared to get off the elevator.

I've paid ~$300 for some well-aged wines and will probably spend up to around $500 going forward for special bottles. My wife was born in 1978, so I have a great excuse to spend money outside of our ordinary wine budget on 1978 barolo. Best money I've spent on wine I'd say was $250 last year for a 1978 Cavalotto Riserva Bricco Boschis Vigna San Giuseppe.
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#24 Post by ky1em!ttskus » December 11th, 2014, 7:26 am

At this point in my life, I won't spend more than $100 on a bottle. At a restaurant, in the right circumstances, it's probably $250, but those would have to be some really right circumstances.

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#25 Post by Jerry Hey » December 11th, 2014, 8:31 am

It depends on what the wine is, what the price is, and what it would sell for at retail. I bought a 2000 Leflaive Montrachet at a restaurant in France for 690 Euros ($1000 US) but it would sell for at least four times that IF you could find it. I'never even seen one bottle.

I also recently bought a 2005 Rousseau Chambertin off a list in Paris for 500 Euros ($750 US) that would sell for around $1500. It is way too young, but at that price I had to try it.

But I won't pay $150 for something that is available at a wine store for $30.

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#26 Post by rfelthoven » December 11th, 2014, 8:40 am

$75 at home

$125 at a restaurant
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#27 Post by George Chadwick » December 11th, 2014, 8:44 am

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#28 Post by Eric Ifune » December 11th, 2014, 8:47 am

New release, or something unavailable otherwise?
I have spent close to $1000 for a new release of a 19th C Madeira recently bottled from demijohn. Only a few dozen bottles available worldwide.

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#29 Post by Michael Martin » December 11th, 2014, 9:34 am

At home $100. Dinner/special occasion/vacation $150.

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#30 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » December 11th, 2014, 9:47 am

I've certainly spent some bills buying first growths retail, but candidly, I am much more comfortable with $150-$200 being my very top-end. I will spend that on fine Bordeaux, Rougeard and some other obscure things. Passed on Allemand at $125, which was a mistake. I have to say, however, the risk of disappointment at those price points can be high. I just popped a 2003 Haut Brion, say cost of $400, that was a decent wine but disappointing at that price. I'm much happier buying sure-shot winners in the under $75 camp. And there is a plethora of fantastic wine to be had at the price point, at least for the stuff I love. I drink everything I buy. I do not buy anything for investment or to sell.

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#31 Post by Jim Clary » December 11th, 2014, 10:29 am

I don't buy wine that I don't plan on drinking. I'm on most of the upper end California mailing lists, and actually drink the wines. For anything that doesn't require a mailing list, I tend to buy only in strong vintages and sit out the weaker ones.

I have also started to become very selective on my mailing list purchases, and have been culling wineries from the active list.
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#32 Post by Peter Hirsch » December 11th, 2014, 10:52 am

Jerry Hey wrote:It depends on what the wine is, what the price is, and what it would sell for at retail. I bought a 2000 Leflaive Montrachet at a restaurant in France for 690 Euros ($1000 US) but it would sell for at least four times that IF you could find it. I'never even seen one bottle.

I also recently bought a 2005 Rousseau Chambertin off a list in Paris for 500 Euros ($750 US) that would sell for around $1500. It is way too young, but at that price I had to try it.

But I won't pay $150 for something that is available at a wine store for $30.
+1, on the concept. Wish I'd seen a good vintage bottle of Leflaive 'Monty' on a wine list for $1k, that cork would pop. Never seen a bottle.

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#33 Post by Ian Sutton » December 11th, 2014, 11:12 am

I paid ~ £120 for a Penfolds 1991 Grange and will drink it.

Apart from that ~ £60 is the highest I've paid, though I'd happily pay ~ £70 for birth year port.
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#34 Post by C. Mc Cart » December 11th, 2014, 2:32 pm

Not sure I have a strict number - Probably graded along a floating curve along the lines of Jerry.
I have only a VERY few bottles in my cellar that since buying, have ascended in value that I would have to consider whether or not to drink, sell or trade.
My number is a lot higher at home or at a friend's, than at a resto. I loathe restaurant mark-ups.
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#35 Post by Phill.WC » December 11th, 2014, 3:02 pm

I think long and hard on any bottle above $250 even though I do buy above that price point. Above $250 very few drinking experiences justify the dollar value. I know this, but those are bottles I'm buying for special reasons (sentimental value, special vintages, collector bug, hoarder, investment, bragging rights)
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#36 Post by Jay Miller » December 11th, 2014, 3:13 pm

The most I have spent was app. $225 which was IMO a good deal on some 1999 Soldera Case Basse.

I almost bid much more than that on some Trimbach Hors Choix but had some unexpected expenses at the time and decided against it.
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#37 Post by PaulMills » December 11th, 2014, 4:37 pm

I only buy wine I plan to drink. My max so far is $150 for a 750ml and I don't think I will go over that unless it is a very special occasion. Bottles over $100 only make up 1% of my cellar and I am fine with that. I see a point of diminishing returns above that. All of the wines over $100 were bought from wineries we tasted at and a lot of it was about the experience. And all of the wineries were ones we had bought from before so it was not a situation of thinking it was better than it was because we were in the tasting room.

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#38 Post by Dave H. » December 11th, 2014, 5:01 pm

I don't spend more than $50 a bottle, and most of my purchases are well below that.
Couple of kids, tight budgets and all that.
That said, while I'm priced out of Burgundy and don't know the finer Bordeaux, Champagne, Barolo, Napa Cab, etc., I can still get the best of the Loire, Beaujolais, Oregon, Washington and top offerings from producers like Bedrock and Carlisle, etc etc.
I have way too much delicious wine despite sitting in the cheap seats and I'm totally comfortable not knowing what I don't know right now.
Only in my mid-30s, though. Catch me a decade from now when I'm squandering my retirement on Burgundy.
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#39 Post by D@vid Bu3ker » December 11th, 2014, 5:08 pm

Simple answer: way too much.
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#40 Post by Joel W » December 11th, 2014, 5:28 pm

1) I would never buy a bottle that I don't intend to drink

2) the answer is: "It depends"

A) for a normal bottle to store in my cellar, my ceiling has been $250. But this is extremely rare. Mostly I don't like to go over $150, and that is still at a dead max. Probably $150 for Cabs, $70 for Syrahs, I don't want to think about Pinots.
B) it's someone else mentioned, if I was to com across a tremendous deal I would definitely spend more. '82 first growth properly stored for $500? Sure, I'll pull the trigger on that. But this is really mostly a pipe dream.
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#41 Post by John Glas » December 11th, 2014, 6:08 pm

$200 with the intention it is an offline with others bringing something of equal value so I can try five more at that price point. I have no intentions of ever drinking $200 bottles by myself. Wish I could afford it.

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#42 Post by alan weinberg » December 11th, 2014, 6:32 pm

Jerry Hey wrote:It depends on what the wine is, what the price is, and what it would sell for at retail. I bought a 2000 Leflaive Montrachet at a restaurant in France for 690 Euros ($1000 US) but it would sell for at least four times that IF you could find it. I'never even seen one bottle.

I also recently bought a 2005 Rousseau Chambertin off a list in Paris for 500 Euros ($750 US) that would sell for around $1500. It is way too young, but at that price I had to try it.

But I won't pay $150 for something that is available at a wine store for $30.
aren't those cases of DRCs I have seen in your cellar? Gifts? ;)

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#43 Post by alan weinberg » December 11th, 2014, 6:37 pm

an interesting side question would be "what is the most expensive bottle of yours that you'd be willing to open?" Many of us have bottles that have quintupled (or more) in price--maybe we bought them cheap, but current value is different. I bought 90 La Tache for $233 and I'd open a $233 bottle. But it is worth $4000--a whole different comfort level and a different question.

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#44 Post by Matthew Harrington » December 11th, 2014, 7:40 pm

Six years or so into laying down bottles, my 750 limit is inching up over $150. And with all the praise of Allemand (who I've never tried), I've been thinking of picking up a bottle of '11 Reynard that I've seen locally for $160. But then I think, that's four ESJ Fenaughty Syrahs right there. Four Wind Gap SC Syrahs. So it's rare that I take the plunge - more often I successfully rationalize buying more bottles that I like that are priced lower.

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#45 Post by Jim Clary » December 11th, 2014, 7:48 pm

alan weinberg wrote:an interesting side question would be "what is the most expensive bottle of yours that you'd be willing to open?" Many of us have bottles that have quintupled (or more) in price--maybe we bought them cheap, but current value is different. I bought 90 La Tache for $233 and I'd open a $233 bottle. But it is worth $4000--a whole different comfort level and a different question.
Alan: I'm in the financial services business, so I should have a different answer, but the reality is that if I bought it, I'm opening it. I'm on the Screagle list, and while you can debate the widsom or value of that, I open them to drink, even though they are worth a multiple of what I paid. I generally don't consider the market value of a wine when I decide to open it.

I'm happy to come over and encourage you to consider my point of view, using your LaTache as an example! champagne.gif
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#46 Post by PCLIN » December 11th, 2014, 7:49 pm

alan weinberg wrote:an interesting side question would be "what is the most expensive bottle of yours that you'd be willing to open?" Many of us have bottles that have quintupled (or more) in price--maybe we bought them cheap, but current value is different. I bought 90 La Tache for $233 and I'd open a $233 bottle. But it is worth $4000--a whole different comfort level and a different question.
I am still happy to open all my Rousseau Chambertin and Chambertin Clos de Beze because they are still stuck in my mind in original cost and not replacement cost, otherwise, impossible for me to open these old bottles. But I don't buy new vintages anymore, sadly.
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Robert.A.Jr.
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What are you willing to spend for a wine you will actually drink?

#47 Post by Robert.A.Jr. » December 11th, 2014, 7:50 pm

Jim Clary wrote:
alan weinberg wrote:an interesting side question would be "what is the most expensive bottle of yours that you'd be willing to open?" Many of us have bottles that have quintupled (or more) in price--maybe we bought them cheap, but current value is different. I bought 90 La Tache for $233 and I'd open a $233 bottle. But it is worth $4000--a whole different comfort level and a different question.
Alan: I'm in the financial services business, so I should have a different answer, but the reality is that if I bought it, I'm opening it. I'm on the Screagle list, and while you can debate the widsom or value of that, I open them to drink, even though they are worth a multiple of what I paid. I generally don't consider the market value of a wine when I decide to open it.

I'm happy to come over and encourage you to consider my point of view, using your LaTache as an example! champagne.gif
4k buys a ton of wine!

"@lf3rt was clearly raised in an outhouse in the Loire. . . ."

Kenny H (circa 2015)

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What are you willing to spend for a wine you will actually drink?

#48 Post by PCLIN » December 11th, 2014, 7:58 pm

Robert Alfert, Jr. wrote:
4k buys a ton of wine!

I will take 20 bottles of 2008 Clos Rougeard "Le Bourg" and be happy with.
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What are you willing to spend for a wine you will actually drink?

#49 Post by Richard T r i m p i » December 12th, 2014, 4:54 am

Robert Alfert, Jr. wrote:4k buys a ton of wine!
Not if you're shopping for Musigny off the list at Per Se or 11 Mad.

RT

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What are you willing to spend for a wine you will actually drink?

#50 Post by Alain M » December 12th, 2014, 5:52 am

Most I've spent so far is 180 EUR on Rayas I think. I rarely buy above 100 EUR, the 10-20 bottles I have above 100 are mostly Rayas, a little Chave and a few Bourgognes (Echezeaux, Batard Montrachet).

I may go up to 250-300 for something very specific, but would think twice.

I've only once bought some wine (3 misc, older domaine Leroy) with the intent to sell them, but ended up drinking them all. Once I've spent the money, I don't think about it anymore. So chosing between drinking Leroy that I don't know vs. getting some money I don't really need was pretty easy.

Alain
M ï c h € l

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