The environmental argument: corks vs. screwcaps

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Eric LeVine
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Re: The environmental argument: corks vs. screwcaps

Post #101  Postby Eric LeVine » August 16th 2010, 5:07pm

Thanks Bob.
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Rick Gregory
 
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Re: The environmental argument: corks vs. screwcaps

Post #102  Postby Rick Gregory » August 16th 2010, 5:46pm

eric,

You might find this interesting: http://www.wine-economics.org/workingpa ... E_WP09.pdf

From footnote 5, page 10:
The relative environmental impact of corks versus screwcaps is minimal since both materials are extremely light weight. Because of this we use de minimis exclusion to disregard the relatively negligible impact of bottle closures. The cork industry is generally environmentally sustainable because it maintains large areas of forested land which could be otherwise used for development or environmentally less favorable forms of agriculture that may require high levels of agrichemicals and water.
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Eric LeVine
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Re: The environmental argument: corks vs. screwcaps

Post #103  Postby Eric LeVine » August 16th 2010, 6:04pm

Thanks Rick.
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JamieM.
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Re: The environmental argument: corks vs. screwcaps

Post #104  Postby JamieM. » August 31st 2010, 11:58am

Eric LeVine wrote:is there any data discussing the carbon footprint of the GLASS BOTTLE (and the heavy juice shipped around inside) itself and how it relates to the footprint for the enclosure?

If transportation and overall carbon costs of the enclosure are say 1% of the overall Carbon cost of a bottle of wine, who really gives a crap? So what is the percentage?


Apropos this discussion, a NYT article on efforts in Champagne to reduce bottle weight: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/01/busin ... ne.html?hp

"Packaging accounts for nearly a third of Champagne’s carbon emissions, with the hefty bottle the biggest offender."
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